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Full text of "The class of 1895"




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PRESENTED 1 




Spider McNulty, of Soochow, China, traveled half zvay round the world 
to attend the 20th Reunion in 1915, and captured the D. Q. Brozvn Long 
Distance Cup. 



THE CLASS OF 1895 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 
25th Year Record 1895-1920 




Compiled by 
Andrew C. Imbrie, Class Secretary 

and 

John Hamilton Thacher 



VOL. VI 



PRINTED FOR THE CLASS 
1920 






Printed at 

Princeton University Press 

Princeton, N. J. 






To the Class of Ninety Five 

I suppose the Ideal Class History would be a cleverly written 
collection of cheerful autobiographies, in which each contributor 
omitted no fact of significance since the day he was born. 

Our Decennial Record, printed in 1905, was an attempt to at- 
tain this impossible ideal. Many of the letters were completely 
satisfying ; but many, also, having been obtained by the Class Sec- 
retary by duress, were composed of one part apology-for-delay, 
one part deprecation-of-personal-achievement, and one part hur- 
rah-for-old-Nassau. 

Now the biographical part of the present Work may lack in- 
spiration, but it does contain much information. The book reeks 
with statistics. A dozen of you — a bare jury-box-full — have 
sought to withhold the facts of your lives by a persistent policy 
of silence. Yet you are all here. For the Secretary has em- 
ployed, in the preparation of this volume, certain bloodhounds of 
the Class, who have even less mercy upon shy delinquents than 
has the Secretary himself. Which is saying much. And which 
accounts largely for the completeness of the data herein pre- 
sented. 

One man in ten refused to face the camera. How very coy ! 
I hope they will not feel slighted because blank spaces appear 
where we should all prefer to see them as they are to-day — in 
deadly parallel with their shining morning faces of a quarter cen- 
tury ago. A thousand begging letters must eventually, and did 
actually, wear out the recipients — except the Submerged Tenth. 
If anything in this world was ever obtained by organized, methodi- 
cal brow-beating, this Gallery of Portraits is It. 

The Class will be grateful to John Thacher for his vivid edit- 
ing of the War Record ; to John Garrett for the admirable ac- 
count of his "Five Years in Europe" ; and to Ted Norris for his 
sympathetic "Recollections of Johnny Poe." Without their contri- 
butions this book would be about as exciting as a volume of 
"Who's Who." 

I could not resist the temptation to reprint from the Prince- 
ton Alumni Weekly the tribute to the "Golden Nineties" by Booth 
Tarkington '93. 

New York, April 5, 1920. A. C. I. 



Class Organization 

President 
Christy Payne, — 424 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Secretary 
Andrew C. Imbrie,— 320 Broadway, New York City. 

Treasurer 

Dickson Q. Brown, — 11 Broadway, New York City. 

Chairman, 2$th Reunion Committee 
Henry M. Canby, — Equitable Building, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Chairman, Class Memorial Committee 
Harold F. McCormick, — 1000 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 111. 

Class Representative upon the Graduate Council 
Dickson Q. Brown, — 11 Broadway, New York City. 



Table of Contents 

PAGE 

The Class Roll 9 

Biographies and portraits of 226 living members 11 

Class group pictures from Freshman Year to the 20th 

Reunion 19 15 254 

The '95 Class Boy, Geoffrey C. Bunting 264 

War Record of the Class 267 

Edited by Major John H. Thacher '95 with a Post- 
script by the Class Secretary. 

The Battlefields of France 339 

Five Years in Europe 1914-1919 346 

By John W. Garrett '95, Minister to the Netherlands, 
1917-19- 
Biographies and portraits of 37 deceased members 362 

Some Recollections of Johnny Poe 399 

By Edwin M. Norris '95. 

The Golden Nineties 4 T 4 

By Booth Tarkington '93. 

Music and words of the Ninety Five March 422 

Music by L. F. Pease '95, zvords by H. E. White '95. 

Occupational Classification in 1920 424 

Geographical Distribution in 1920 427 

Vital Statistics 43* 



Class of 1895 
"AS WE TURN OUR MEMORIES BACK' 





1. — Eddie Munn, Joe Polcar and Chubby Lewis uphold the honor of '95 

in the Cane Spree. 
2. — Jesse James, Johnny Poe and Beef Wheeler emerge victorious from 

the snowball fight with '94. 
3. — Jim Stink appears publicly in Jack Frame's golf trousers. 
4. — Dave Fentress and Sunfish Walker abscond With the Bell Clapper of 
Nassau Hall. 



The Class Roll 



Rocksy Agens 
Kid Andrews 
Caddy Arnold 
John Auchincloss 
Doc Bailey 
Smiles Bailey 
Bill Baird 
Baron Barr 
Stubbles Barton 
Willie Belden 
Bev Beveridge 
Chappie Biddle 
Jimmy Blair 
Stiffy Bone 
Beau Borie 
John Bowman 
Brad Bradner 
Mother Brady 
Porky Brooks 
Dick Brown 
Buck Buckingham 
Babe Bunting 
Bobby Burns 
Ben Butler 
Henry Canby 
Charlie Candee 
Carp Carpenter 
Kid Carroll 
Ray Carter 
Jack Cat on 
John Chapman 
Howard Colby 
Charlie Condit 
Les Conrow 
Al Cook 
Billy Cooke 
Al Corwin 
Sam Craig 
Al Cramer 
Hardy Crawford 
Jimmy Crawford 



Fuzzy Crawford 
Kid Creeson 
Sammy Curtis 
Jimmy Dale 
Darb Darby 
Willie Davey 
John Davis 
Walter Davis 
Deck Dechant 
Jimmy Decker 
Ben Deford 
Def De Forest 
Runt Dexter 
Dutch Dilley 
Dick Dixon 
Rabbit Dray 
Trusten Drake 
Art Dunn 
Dick Edwards 
Willie Pants Egbert 
Mike Elmer 
Buck Ewing 
Sister Faris 
Mike Fisher 
Fiscus Fisk 
Flem Flemming 
Joe Flint 
Reddy Foster 
Jack Frame 
Bob Francis 
Pop Fry 
Dutch Fulper 
Furny Furnajieff 
Mike Furness 
John Garrett 
Willard Gibbs 
George Gould 
Hage Hager 
Bucky Hall 
Irish Hamilton 
Clare Hamilton 



Stoif Hardin 
John Harding 
"H" Harlow 
Bob Harris 
Ben Harrison 
Arzie Hartzler 
Bone Harvey 
Dick Hatch 
Poler Hayes 
Jimmy Hayes 
Selden Haynes 
Bill Hencken 
Charlie Hendrickson 
Gerard Herrick 
Baron Hirshfield 
Ralph Hoagland 
Big Hodge 
Runt Hodge 
Mary Holden 
Prof. Hoos 
Tommy Hudson 
Mike Hunt 
Teddy Huntington 
Judge Hurst 
Soc Huston 
Illy Illingworth 
Andy Imbrie 
Bobby Inch 
Buck Irvine 
Jesse James 
Janny Janvier 
Jessie Jessup 
Kelly Kellermann 
Elsie Kennedy 
Lea Kennedy 
Harney Koch 
Harvey Koehler 
Dick Kumler 
Laffy La Fetra 
Puritan Leeds 
Bill Leggate 



IO 



Class of 1895 



Tom Leidy 
Chubby Lewis 
Hooli Lewis 
Bill Libby 
Willie Logan 
Walter Lord 
Minnie Loughran 
Doc Love 
Bert Lukens 
Buck McCammon 
Mac MacColl 
Harold McCormick 
Stanley McCormick 
Frank McGee 
Andy McNitt 
Spider McNulty 
Egg Marsh 
Buck Master 
Soc Miller 
Minnie Minott 
Bill Mitchell 
Frank Morse 
Billy Morse 
Walter Moses 
Frank Murphy 
Billy Neill 
Curly Nelson 
Lady Nelson 
Cow Nevin 
John Newbold 
Nick Nixon 
Teddy Norris 
Freddy Norris 
Teddy Otheman 
Jake Otto 



Ollie Parker 
Bill Paterson 
Don Paxton 
Jay Paxton 
Chris Payne 
Pop Pease 
Gil Perkins 
Tom Pierson 
Dan Piatt 
Bob Pogue 
Joe Polcar 
Freddie Poole 
Squaw Post 
Frank Reynolds 
Dick Richards 
Harry Roberts 
Bobby Robertson 
Shad Roe 
Tommy Ross 
Poler Ross 
Rut Rutter 
Tom Sawyer 
Toad Schumacher 
Eddy Scovill 
Student Shaw 
Bottles Sherman 
Ike Sinnickson 
Tommy Slidell 
Billy Sloane 
Edgar Smead 
Smithy Smith 
Harry Snyder 
Dave Speer 
Fitz Speer 



Kid Stewart 
Dick Stockton 
Willie Stone 
Nan Sutton 
Knox Taylor 
Ducky Teal 
Johnny Thacher 
Doggie Trenchard 
Puppy Upson 
Bum Urban 
Leroy Valliant 
Van Van Sellar 
John Vaughn 
Wad Wadhams 
Charlie Waldo 
Sunfish Walker 
Dougal Ward 
Guy Warren 
Fod Weeks 
Johnny Weiss 
Cherub Wells 
"D. X." Wells 
Danny Westcott 
Deacon White 
Dan White 
Bert White 
Al Williams 
Doc Williams 
Windy Wilson 
King Wilson 
Big Wood 
Woody Woodruff 
Woman Wyman 
Zab Zabriskie 



Class of 1895 

Princeton University 

(a) Indicates address to which mail may be sent zvith probability 

that it will be forzvarded. 

(b) Indicates present residence address. 

(c) Indicates business address. 

SYLVESTER HALSEY MOORE AGENS 




a > ° — 73 l High Street, Newark, N. J. 
c — 219 Market Street, Newark, N. J. 

Born, November 5, 1872, Newark, N. J. Son of Colonel Fred- 
erick G. Agens, retired, and Emma Louis Moore Agens. 

Married, June 2, 1900, at East Orange, N. J., Elizabeth Wallis 
Taylor, daughter of David Whaley Taylor, banker. 

Children, Sylvester Taylor Agens, born October 21, 190 1 ; Mar- 



12 Class of 1895 

garet Agens, born May 29, 1906; David Taylor Agens, born 
May 13, 1911. 

Prepared for college at Newark Academy, Newark, N. J., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed 
at "R" University Hall, and 6 East Brown Hall. Member of Clio 
Hall and Triangle Club. 

Employed in the Crescent Shipyard, Elizabeth, N. J., 1896-97; secre- 
tary and treasurer of The Electric Motor and Equipment Company, 
Newark, N. J., 1899-1911; president, Agens and Hopper, dealers in 
electric goods, Newark, N. J., 1911-14; owner, Agens and Company, 
dealers in electric goods, Newark, N. J., 1914-19. 

Life member of Jovian Order (an electrical organization), member 
of Kane Lodge No. 55, Free and Accepted Masons; trustee of Newark 
Chapter, Sons of American Revolution. 

Son, Sylvester Taylor Agens, is preparing for Princeton and expects 
to enter in September, 1920. 

During the war served as a lieutenant in the Civilian Police, Newark, 
N. J., in 1917 and 1918. 



ALEXANDER SPEER ANDREWS 



A.B. 




1895 



1920 



a, c—44 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. 

b — 12 Locust Street, Flushing, Long Island, N. Y. 
Born, August 9, 1875, Washington, D. C. Son of Chase Andrews 
and Maria Coyle Speer Andrews. 

Entered Princeton September, 1891, graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 



Princeton University 



13 



Roomed at 4 North Reunion Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Uni- 
versity Glee Club. 

Student at Columbia Law School, 1895-98, receiving degree of LL.B. 

Since 1898 has practised law in New York. 

Member of the Princeton Club of New York. 

During the war served on the legal advisory board of the local Draft 
Board. 



CARRINGTON GINDRAT ARNOLD 



A.B. 




a, c— 45 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 7 Ash Street, Flushing, N. Y. 
Born, September 17, 1872, at Newport, R. I. Son of Richard J. 

Arnold and Minnie S. Clarke. 
Married, July 19, 1902, at Flushing, N. Y., Cassandra Lawrence 

Lee, daughter of Alexander Nisbet Lee, a graduate of West 

Point. 
Children, Jennie Clarke Arnold, born January 22, 1908 ; Carring- 

ton Gindrat Arnold, Jr., born October 11, 191 1 ; Cassandra Lee 

Arnold, II., born June 3, 1914. 

Prepared for college at Maupin University School, Ellicott City, 
Md., entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 
1895, A.B. Member of St. Paul Society, Philadelphian Society, Whig 
Hall, Colonial Club. 

Entered New York Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897, LL.B. 



14 



Class of 1895 



From 1897 to date has practised law in New York City. 

Member of University Club of New York, Down Town Association of 
New York, Bar Association, Oakland Golf Club, Tennis Club of Flush- 
ing, Niantic Club, Nassau Club of Princeton. 

JOHN AUCHINCLOSS 





1920 

a, c— 45 Park Place, New York, N. Y. 

b— 30 East 55th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, December 8, 1872, Orange, N. J. Son of Henry B. 

Auchincloss, merchant, and Mary Cabell Auchincloss. 
Married, December 21, 19 12, New York City, Grace Eginton, 

daughter of John Watson Eginton, importer. 
Children, Julia Eginton Auchincloss, born December 28, 1913 ; 

Mary Cabell Auchincloss, born October 30, 1918. 

Prepared for college at Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., entering Prince- 
ton September 1891, and leaving in 1893. Roomed at 47 University Place. 

From 1894 to 1900 ranching in California. Member of real estate 
firm of Dovall and Auchincloss, New York, 1902. Partner in Jester 
and Co., New York, Investment Securities, 1907. Secretary and Treasurer 
of American Railway and Lighting Company, 1910; Treasurer of Dread- 
naught Flooring Company, 1915 ; associated with Merck and Company, 
chemists, 1919. 



Princeton University 
RALPH WALDO BAILEY 



15 
B.S. 




a, c — Care of Messrs. Stillwell and Gladding, 95 Front Street, 
* New York, N. Y. 
b — 200 Murray Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Born, December 27, 1873, Elizabeth, N. J. Son of George Wash- 
ington Bailey, M.D., physician, and Emma Margaret Blackman 
Bailey. 

Married, May 14, 1908, at Roselle, N. J., Nellie King West, 
daughter of William Taylor West. 

Children, Charles Perkins Bailey, born November 4, 1909 ; Doris 
West Bailey, born June 19, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Pingry School, Elizabeth, N. J., entering Prince- 
ton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 20 Middle Dod 
Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. Won First Group 
Honors in Junior year. 

Since leaving college has been a chemist; associated with the Grasselli 
Chemical Company, Grasselli, N. J., 1895-96; with Stillwell and Gladding, 
New York, 1896-99 with Pediatrics Labratory, New York, 1899-1901 ; with 
the National Lead Company of Brooklyn, N. Y., 1901-03 ; since 1903 with 
Stillwell and Gladding of New York, and is at present Vice-President of 
that company. 

Member of the American Chemical Society and the Society of Chemical 
Industry. 



i6 



Class of 1895 
THEODORUS BAILEY 



B.S. 






1920 



a, b, c — 120 East 72nd Street, New York, N. Y. 

Born, December 30, 1874, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Son of Edmund 
Smith Bailey, stock broker, and Mary Beekman McKnight 
Bailey. 

Married, November 1, 1902, at New York, Alice Van Ben- 
schoten Foos, daughter of Lamar Foos, lawyer and manufac- 
turer, Urbana College B.A.,- Harvard Law School LL.B. 

Children, Helen Lamar Bailey, born January 7, 1904 and died 
January 12, 1907; Rosalie Fellows Bailey, born August 7, 1908; 
Dorothy Piatt Bailey, born December 4, 1909 ; Gertrude de 
Peyster Bailey and Florence Livingston Bailey, born July 24, 
191 1 ; Elsa Beekman Bailey, born May 10, 1913. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., entering 
Princeton in January, 1892, and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 
16 South West College. Member of Whig Hall. 

Student at College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 
1895-99, receiving degree of M. D. At the same time was prosector in 
Anatomy and Surgery in the college. 

Clinical assistant in Roosevelt, Hudson Street, and Presbyterian Hos- 
pital clinics; house physican and surgeon in Lincoln Hospital; Adjunct 
Attending Physician and later Assistant Consulting Physician at the 
Manhattan State Hospital (Gastro-intestinal Division Physician) ; As- 



Princeton University 17 

sistant Visiting Physician, Polyclinic Hospital; Visiting" Physician, Red 
Cross Hospital, New York Hospital (Private Patient Pavilion), West 
Side German Hospital; Nose and Throat Surgeon, St. Bartholomew's 
Clinic; Medical Examiner, Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company, 
Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company, Columbian National Life 
Insurance Company, etc. ; instructor, Division of the Stomach and 
Digestive System, New York Polyclinic Medical School, 1904-08 ; Pro- 
fessor of Gastro Intestinal Diseases, New York School of Clinical 
Medicine, 1907-14. 

Consulting physician St. Nicholas Society; Gentleman of the Council 
of the Society of Colonial Wars, Recorder of the Naval Legion; Gentle- 
man of the Council, Military Order of Foreign Wars; member of 
Crescent and Washington Lodges (Masonic). 

Member of Zeta Psi Fraternity; Naval Order, Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion, St. Nicholas Club, Sleepy Hollow Country Club, Ardsley 
Club, Saratoga Country Club, Society of the Cincinnati, Society of 
the Colonial Wars, Society of the War of 1812 and the Veteran Corps 
of Artillery, Society of Foreign Wars, Aztec Club of 1847, St. Nicholas 
Society, American Legion, Historical Society of the City of New York, 
New York State Historical Society, Medical Veterans of the World 
War, Association of Military Surgeons. Was member of Princeton 
Club, Columbia Yacht Club, St. Andrew's Society, Dutchess County So- 
ciety and South Side Field Club. 

Was a member of the New York Academy of Medicine, the Ameri- 
ican, N. Y. State and County Medical Societies, the Greater New York 
Medical Society, the Polyclinic and West Side Clinical Societies, the 
N. Y. County and State Medical Association and the Red Cross Clini- 
cal Society. 

Author of articles on Gastric Ulcer, Hypersthenic Gastritis, Hyperchlor- 
hydria, etc. 

His great, great grandfather, Charles McKnight, was member of 
Class of 1771. 

During the war was surgeon in Veteran Corps of Artillery, State 
of New York, to November 9, 1918. Commissioned, Captain, Medical 
Corps, U. S. Army, November 9, 1918; discharged September 4, 1919. 
Commissioned a Major, Medical section, Officers Reserve Corps, January 
27, 1920. 



WILLIAM JAMES BAIRD A.B. 

a, b, c — 812 Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, December 29, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Matthew 

Baird, manufacturer and president of Baldwin Locomotive 

Works, 1866-73, an d Anna Wright Baird. 
Married, October 16, 1895, at Mt. Holly, N. J., Maria Uytendale 



i8 



Class of 1895 




1920 



Hendrickson, daughter of Charles Elvin Hendrickson, Asso- 
ciate Justice of Court of Appeals and of the Supreme Court 
of New Jersey (A.B. Princeton, 1863). 
Children, Sarah Uytendale Baird, born July 25, 1896 (married 
Harrison K. Caner, Jr., November 14, 1916) ; William James 
Baird, Jr., born March 25, 1899; Charles Hendrickson Baird, 
born September 3, 1900. 

Prepared for college at De Lancey School, Philadelphia, Pa., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 35 University Place. Member of Philadelphian Society, Cot- 
tage Club, Glee Club, Triangle Club; founder of Right Wing Club; 
member of Class of '95 reception committee and '95 Class Day Committee. 

After leaving college traveled abroad during 1895-96; student in 
Law School of the University of Pennsylvania, 1896-98, until inter- 
rupted by outbreak of Spanish War; student of vocal music in Paris, 
1901-06; has engaged in no active profession or occupation except 
music. 

Member of Princeton Club of Philadelphia, Nassau Club of Prince- 
ton, Racquet Club of Philadelphia, Orpheus Club of Philadelphia. For- 
merly member of Sons of the Revolution, Princeton Club of New 
York, Art Club of Philadelphia, Union League Club of Philadelphia, 
Racquet Club of Philadelphia, Huntington Valley Club of Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Country Club, Lambs Club of New York. 

His brothers, Edgar Wright Baird, '93, and Matthew Baird, Jr., are 
alumni of Princeton; his sons, William James Baird, Jr., '20, and Charles 
Hendrickson Baird, '22, are undergraduates. 



Princeton University 



19 



During the war was refused for foreign service on account of medi- 
cal examination; served as volunteer registrar in both drafts; appointed 
solicitor for all "drives," Liberty Bonds, Y. M. C. A., War Chest, Red 
Cross, Salvation Army, etc. 

GEORGE WINFRED BARR 





1920 

a — Cynwyd, Pa. 

b — 310 Cynwyd Road, Cynwyd, Pa. 

c — Allentown, Pa. 
Born, August 26, 1873, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Son of George Wash- 
ington Barr, founder of the Crescent Steel Works, Pittsburgh, 

Pa., and Martha Elkins Kirby Barr. 
Married, December 14, 1898, at Merion, Pa., Ethel Harrison 

Stewart, daughter of William Shaw Stewart, A.B., M.D. 
Children, Ethel Stewart Barr, born December 9, 1899; George 

Bishop Barr, born April 27, 1902 ; Lawrence Allman Barr, born 

July 25, 1905. 

Prepared for college at Haverford School, Haverford, Pa., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in February, 1894. Roomed 
at 17 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, Press Club, 
Class of '95 Baseball Team. 

Entered the employ of the Herendeen Manufacturing Company of 
Geneva, N. Y., as salesman in their Philadelphia office, October 1, 1894; 
after two years was made manager of the Philadelphia office and re- 
mained with the company until December 31, 1898. From January 
1, 1899 to December 31, 1910, was manager of the Boiler Depart- 



20 



Class of 1895 



ment of Isaac A. Sheppard and Company, Philadelphia and Baltimore. 
Manager of the Philadelphia Branch of the United States Radiator 
Corporation, January 1, 191 1 to December 31, 1915. Eastern Sales Man- 
ager of the Federal Radiator Company, New Castle, Pa., January 1, 
1916 to December 31, 1917. Since discharge from army in 1919 has 
been with Hersh Brothers Co., Allentown, Pa., makers of "Lehigh" Fans. 

Elected to the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engi- 
neers, 1905 ; Director of the same, 1910; elected to the Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania Chapter of the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engi- 
neers, 1916; Secretary of the same 1916; President of the same in 
1917; Director of Engineers' Club, Philadelphia, 1917. 

Member of Princeton Club of Philadelphia, Nassau Club of Prince- 
ton, Merion Cricket Club of Haverford, Pa., Manufacturers' Club of 
Philadelphia. ; 

His sons are preparing for Princeton ; George Bishop Barr expects 
to enter in 1920, and Lawrence Allman Barr in 1923. 

During the war was commissioned Captain in the United States 
Army, Ordnance Department, on January 2, 1918; called to active duty 
on January 7 and assigned to the Field Branch of Personnel Section, 
Office of the Chief on Ordnance, Washington, D. C. On April 6, 1918, 
assigned as Personnel Officer of the Pittsburgh District. Was Personnel 
Officer of Commissioned Personnel, Commanding Officer of Enlisted 
Detachment, Pass Issuing Officer, Military Intelligence Officer, Personnel 
Manager of Civilian Personnel. 



GEORGE FISHER BARTON 



C.E. 




a, b— Montour Falls, N. Y. 

c — Seneca Engineering Co., Montour Falls, N. Y. 



Princeton University 



21 



Born, April 29, 1873, Jersey City, N. J. Son of George Hamil- 
ton Barton, teacher (A.B. Syracuse) and Sara Elizabeth Fisher 
Barton. 

Married, August 29, 1895, at Trenton, N. J., Mary Belle Titus, 
daughter of Livingston Titus. 

Prepared for college at Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, C. E. Roomed in Edwards 
Hall. 

Engineer on sewer work in Plainfield, N. J., from July, 1895 to 
November, 1895 ; Draughtsman and engineer for Elmira Bridge Com- 
pany, Elmira, N. Y., 1895-1901 ; Engineer and manager, Rochester Bridge 
and Construction Company, Rochester, N. Y., 1901-04; President and 
Manager, Seneca Engineering Company, Montour Falls, N. Y., con- 
tractors and engineers in steel and concrete construction, 1904 to the 
present time. Trustee of Cook Academy, Montour Falls, N. Y. 

Member of Rochester Engineering Society, University Club of 
Rochester, Chamber of Commerce of Rochester, Chamber of Commerce 
of Montour Falls, Princeton Engineering Society of New York. 



WILLIAM VAN DYKE BELDEN 



A.B. 






1895 



1920 



a, b — 1795 Albany Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
c — U. S. Sub-Treasury, New York, N. Y. 
Born, December 25, 1872, Salem, N. J. Son of Oliver S. Belden, 
physician (A.B. Princeton 1853) and Anna Wilhelmina Van 
Dyke Belden. 



22 



Class of 1895 



Married, December 17, 1908, at Jersey City, N. J., Agnes Kathryn 

Daly, daughter of John Daly, accountant. 
Children, Ruth Constant Belden, born October 22, 19 13. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory School (also privately 
tutored by Charles and William Mudge, '92, during 1890 and 1891), 
entering Princeton in the fall of 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 6 North Reunion Hall. Member of Clio Hall and 
Chess Team. 

Clerk in Fourth National Bank, New York, from June, 1895 to latter 
part of 1897; clerk in the United States Sub-Treasury (federal ap- 
pointment) from March, 1898 to date. 

Member of Flatlands Civic Association and Albemarle Tennis Club. 

Author of "a few patriotic articles relative to the late cataclysm, 
printed in New York and Brooklyn papers ; also one or two appreciative 
of our great contemporary, Theodore Roosevelt." 

Related to Edward Vandyck, '53 (uncle) ; Henry Vandyck, '58 (uncle) ; 
Calvin Wight, '92 (cousin). 



WILLIAM W. BEVERIDGE 



A.B. 




1895 



1920 



a, b, c — Asbury Park, N. J. 

Born, July 26, 1869, Amsterdam, N. Y. Son of John Beveridge, 
farmer, and Janet Servoss Beveridge. 

Married, January 20, 1909, at Asbury Park, N. J., Emma Law- 
rence Johnson, daughter of Samuel Johnson, physician. 

Children, Samuel Johnson Beveridge, born December 17, 191 1; 



Princeton University 23 

Janet Servoss Beveridge, born June 15, 1913; John Rockefeller 
Beveridge, born December 1, 1914; William W. Beveridge, Jr., 
born May 17, 1916; Donald James Beveridge, born May 14, 
1918. 

Prepared for college at Troy Conference Academy, Poultney, Vt., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 20 North East College. Member of Clio Hall and 
Class of '95 Football Team. Won First Prize, Clio Hall Freshman 
Essay contest. 

Entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1895, graduating in 
1898 with degree of M. D. Interne in Bellevue Hospital, 1898-1900. 
Engaged in the practice of medicine in Asbury Park, N. J. from 1900 
to date. 

Member of various medical societies. Author of articles published in 
medical journals. 

LYNFORD BIDDLE A.B. 




a, b — Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, 1871, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Alexander 
Biddle and Julia Williams Reish Biddle. 

Prepared for college at the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, Pa., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 7 North Dod Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society, Whig Hall 
and Ivy Club. 

Entered the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1895, 



24 Class of 1895 

graduating in 1S98, with degree of LL.B. Since leaving law school he has 
maintained an office in Philadelphia, but has not been in active practice. 

Member of University Club of New York and several Philadelphia 
clubs. 



JAMES BLAIR, JR. 



A.B. 




1920 



a, c — Peoples-Savings and Dime Bank, Scranton, Pa. 
b — 401 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 
Born, August 25, 1872, Scranton, Pa. Son of Austin Bartley 
Blair, banker (A.B. Princeton 1866) and Emma Gay Blair. 

Prepared for college at School of the Lackawanna, Scranton, Pa., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895 
A.B. Roomed in University Hall and at 8 South West Brown Hall. 
Member of Philadelphian Society, Freshman Baseball Team, University 
Baseball Team, Whig Hall, Ivy Club. President of Class in Junior 
year. 

In the fall of 1895 entered the employ of the Scranton Savings Bank, 
and successively occupied the positions of bookkeeper, receiving teller, 
paying teller, and assistant cashier, until June 5, 1913. On June 5, 
1913 became assistant cashier of the Scranton Savings and Dime Bank. 
Since 1917 connected with the Peoples-Savings and Dime Bank, Scran- 
ton, Pa. 

Member of the Scranton Club, Country Club of Scranton, Nassau 
Club of Princeton, Ivy Club of Princeton. 



Princeton University 
WILLIAM JOHN BONE 



25 
A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — Newtown, Pa. 
Born, May 20, 1865, Fort Washington, Pa. Son of George 

Bone, farmer, and Jean Black Bone. 
Married, August, 1898, at Princeton, N. J., Ella Smith Hunt, 

daughter of John Bruere Hunt. 
Children, Helen Jean Bone, born August 2, 1899; Catherine 

Lydia Bone, born March 18, 1901 (died February 3, 1909) ; 

George Hunt Bone, born July 8, 1903; Marjorie Elizabeth 

Bone, born August 22, 1905 ; John Clarke Bone, born January 

1, 1908; Donald Henry Bone, born November 26, 191 1 (died 

January 11, 1912). 

Prepared for college at York Collegiate Institute, York, Pa., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 1 North East College. Member of Philadelphian Society 
and Whig Hall. 

Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1895-98; pastor at Wenat- 
chee, Wash., 1 898-1 905 ; at Stockton, N. J., 1905-07; at Terra Alta, W. Va., 
1907-11 and at Newtown, Pa., 191 1 to date. 



26 



Class of 1895 
BEAUVEAU BORIE, JR. 




1920 



a, c — 511 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, September 25, 1874, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Beauveau 

Borie (B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania) and Patty Neill Borie. 
Married, April 29, 1896, at Philadelphia, Pa., Anna B. Newbold, 

daughter of John S. Newbold. 
Children, Patty Borie, born January 1, 1898. 

Prepared for college at William S. Blight's School, entering Prince- 
ton in 1891 and leaving in 1894. Roomed at 8 West Witherspoon Hall. 
Member of Whig Hall and St. Paul Society. 

For short time after leaving college was employed by Farmers and 
Mechanics National Bank of Philadelphia. In November 1895 with C. 
and H. Borie, Bankers, Philadelphia in which firm he was a partner 
at time of its dissolution in 1905. At present is an investment broker, 
member of firm of W. H. Newbold's Son and Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Member of Philadelphia Club. 

During the war worked in connection with the Red Cross. 



JOHN HALL BOWMAN 

b — 445 15th Avenue, Paterson, N. J. 



A.B. 



c — 54 William Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, September 18, 1873, Plainfield, N. J. Son of James Bow- 
man and Emma Jane Lodor Bowman. 



Princeton University 



27 




1920 



Married, May 10, 1910, at Richmond, Quebec, Canada, Agnes 
Sibyl Wilson, daughter of Thomas Wilson, farmer. 

Children, Daniel James Bowman, born June 28, 191 1 ; Robert 
Bowman, born October 7, 1912 ; Janet May Bowman, born 
April 11, 1914; Margaret Hall Bowman, born June 26, 1915; 
Marion Agnes Bowman, born November 8, 1916; Lavinia Ann 
Bowman, born May 6, 1919. 

Prepared for college at Leal's School, Plainfield, N. J., entering 
Princeton in the fall of 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. cum laude. 
Roomed at 1 South Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Clio Hall and 
the Philadelphian Society. 

Student at Princeton Electrical School, 1895-6; Harvard Graduate 
School, September to December, 1896. 

From 1897 to 1914 employed by Price, Waterhouse and Co., Account- 
ants, as junior accountant, senior accountant, manager; 1914 to date, part- 
ner in the firm of Price, Waterhouse and Co. 

Member of Princeton Club, New York. 



FREDERICK CLARK BRADNER 



A.B. 



a, b, c — 133 Engle Street, Englewood, N. J. 
Born, February 5, 1873, Warwick, Orange County, N. Y. Son 
of William Batchelor Bradner, physician and surgeon (Colum- 
bia, M.D., 1857) and Emma Gertrude McEwen Bradner. 



28 



Class of 1895 





1920 

Prepared for college at Warwick Institute, Warwick, Orange County, 
N. Y., entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 
1895, A.B. Roomed at 13 South Edwards Hall. Member of Clio Hall. 
Won second group honors in Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years, 
graduating cum laude. 

Student at College of Physicians aand Surgeons, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1895-99, receiving degree of M.D. 

Interne, Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled, New York, 1899-1900; 
interne, Gouverneur Hospital, New York, 1900-02; practising physician, 
Englewood, N. J., 1902 to date; in 1905 Medical Inspector of Public 
Schools, Englewood, N. J.; in 1906, City Physician of Englewood; At- 
tending Surgeon, Englewood, Hospital, 1905 to date. 

Member of Englewood Club and Englewood Field Club. 

Related to Benoni Bradner, Class of 1755; Ira S. Bradner '40; and 
Thomas S. Bradner '46. 



HENRY HERVEY BRADY, JR. B.S. 

a, c — Scranton Life Building, Scranton, Pa. 
b — 615 Monroe Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Born, April 7, 1872, Chesapeake City, Md. Son of Henry H. 
Brady of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company, and 
Rebecca S. Cooper Brady. 

Married, November 15, 1899, at Scranton, Pa., Clara Belle Simp- 
son, daughter of Clarence D. Simpson, coal operator. 



Princeton University 



29 




Children, Clarence Simpson Brady, born June 1, 1902 ; Margaret 
Brady, born May 2, 1904; Katharine Brady, born January 30, 
1909; Henry Hervey Brady, Jr., born January 30, 1909, and 
died March 11, 1910; William Maxwell Brady, born April 28, 
1914. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, New Jersey, entering 
Princeton in 1891 and graduating June, 1895, B.S. Roomed 4 West 
Middle Witherspoon Hall. Member of Freshman Glee Club and Ivy Club. 

Paymaster for John A. Roebling's Sons' Company, Trenton, N. J., 
manufacturers of wire and wire rope, 1895 ; Secretary of Cooke Pot- 
tery Company, Trenton, N. J., 1897; Treasurer and purchasing agent of 
Temple Iron Company, Scranton, Pa., coal operators, 1898 ; President 
of West End Coal Company, Scranton, Pa., 1901 ; President, Melville 
Coal Company, Scranton, Pa.; President, Shickshinney Store Company, 
Scranton, Pa. ; President, National Graphite Lubricator Company, 
Pa. ; President, American Universal Mill Company, Scranton, Pa. ; Presi- 
dent, Tower Coal Company, Scranton, Pa. 

Member of University and Princeton Clubs, New York; Nassau Club, 
Princeton ; Scranton Club and Scranton Country Club ; Waverly Coun- 
try Club, Waverly, Pa. ; Motor Club of Lackawanna County, Scranton. 

His son, Clarence Simpson Brady, is preparing for Princeton at St. 
Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and expects to enter in 1920. 

During the war was commissioned Major in the United States 
Army, October 26, 1918, serving in the Department of the Inspector 
General ; stationed at Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., as Assistant 
to the Port Inspector ; discharged March 17, 1919 



30 



Class of 1895 
JOHN HUBERT BROOKS 



B.S. 





1920 



a, b — 424 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 
c — Brooks Building, Scranton, Pa. 
Born, September 11, 1872, Scranton, Pa. Son of Reese G. 

Brooks, coal operator, and Mary Anne Morgan Brooks. 
Married, April 5, 1904, at Scranton, Pa., Augusta Archbald, 

daughter of James Archbald (C.E. Union College). 
Children, Ruth Brooks, born February 24, 1905 ; Mary Morgan 

Brooks, Born June 11, 1906; John H. Brooks, Jr., born May 13, 

1908; James Archbald Brooks, born October 23, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at School of the Lackawanna, Scranton, Pa., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. 
Roomed at 8 South West Brown Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Tiger 
Inn Club ; played on Hockey Team, Freshman Baseball team ; Captain 
of University Baseball team. 

Clerk in City Treasurer's Office, Scranton, Pa., 1896-98; powder and 
oil sales agent, 1898-1901 ; engaged in coal business, 1901-04; senior 
partner of Brooks and Company, investment bankers, 1904 to date. 
Trustee of First Presbyterian Church, Scranton, since 1907. President 
of Scranton Board of Trade, 1915 and 1916. Commissioner of Boy 
Scouts. 

Member of University Club, Bankers' Club, Scranton Club, Westmore- 
land Club. 



Princeton University 



3i 



His sons expect to enter Princeton, John H. Brooks, Jr. in 1926, James 
Archbald Brooks in 1929. 

During the war was active in all local war relief campaigns ; Director 
of Distribution of Liberty Loan in 32nd Pennsylvania District; Director 
for recruiting secretaries (for the Y. M. C. A.) for oversea work, 
New York, 1917. 



DICKSON QUEEN BROWN 



A.B. 




a, c — 11 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
b— Hotel Chatham, New York, N. Y. 

Born, April 2, 1873, Pleasantville, Pa. Son of Samuel Queen 
Brown, President of Tide Water Oil Company (A.M Honor- 
ary, Princeton, 1871) and Nancy Lamb Brown. 

Married, November 9, 191 8, at Rockville Centre, N. Y., Marion 
Browne, daughter of Howard R. Browne, dealer in cut granite. 

Prepared for college at Hamilton School, Philadelphia, and Phillips 
Exeter Academy, entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating 
in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 31 University Hall and 10 West Middle 
Witherspoon Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Klu Klux, Valhalla, Tiger 
Inn. President of Republican Club. 

Student at Cornell University in summer of 1895. Entered the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology in October, 1895, graduating in June, 
1898 with degree of B. S. Electrical Engineering. Student at the Royal 
Mechanical Technical Hochschule, Charlottenberg, Berlin, Germany, from 



32 Class of 1895 

September 1899 to June, 1900. Student at New York University Law- 
School, October 1900 to June, 1901. 

Has been associated with the Tide Water Oil Company and subsidiary 
companies since leaving college, (was messenger in summer time when 
in college). Assistant to Master Mechanic of the Tide Water Oil Com- 
pany Refinery at Bayonne, N. J. in 1898; General Superintendent of the 
Tide-water Pipe Company, Limited, transporters of petroleum; now Sec- 
retary and Treasurer of the same company. President of Tidal Oil Com- 
pany; President, Associated Producers Company (producing oil and 
operating in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois, Ten- 
nessee, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana and Mexico) ; Vice-president 
and Assistant Treasurer, Tide Water Oil Company ; Treasurer, Tide Water 
Oil Sales Corporation; Treasurer and Director, East Jersey Railroad and 
Terminal Company; Vice-president, Magnetic Iron Ore Company; holds 
various offices with Allegheny Pipe Line Company, American Oil Com- 
pany, Tide Water Oil Company of Massachusetts, etc. 

Member of American Society of Mechanical Engineers; American 
Institute of Mining Engineers ; Associate member of American Institute 
of Electrical Engineers; was Treasurer, then Vice-president, then Presi- 
dent of the Princeton Engineering Association. 

Treasurer of Class of '95 ; representative of Class of '95 on Graduate 
Council; served as chairman of the Finance Committee of the Graduate 
Council. 

Member of Nassau Club of Princeton, Princeton Golf Club, Univer- 
sity Club of New York, Engineers' Club of New York, Automobile 
Club of America, Princeton Club of New York, Princeton Club of 
Philadelphia, Apawamis Club, Engineers' Country Club, Cherry Valley 
Country Club, Camp Fire Club, Rocky Mountain Club, Technology 
Club of New York. 

During the war served as a member of the Committee on Labor and 
Mediation of the Council of National Defense. 



WALTER MILTON BUCKINGHAM B.S. 

a, b, c — Boulder, Colorado. 
Born, July 25, 1872, Longmont, Colo. Son of Walter Alva 

Buckingham and Mary Emerson Buckingham. 
Married, April 2, 1902, at Boulder, Colo., (Mrs.) Janie Bailey 

Greene Worden. 
Children, Rosemary Greene Buckingham, born May 29, 1905. 

Prepared for college by private tutors, entering Princeton in September, 
1891, and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed at 24 Mercer Street. 

From the fall of 1895 until the summer of 1902 he was agent and man- 
ager for C. G. Buckingham, who had various interests in the vicinity of 
Boulder, Col. A good part of the time he had charge of a ranch. From 



Princeton University 



33 




1902 until May, 1915 (and possibly later) he has been an officer of the 
National State Bank of Boulder. 

The Secretary has had no communication from him since February 8, 
1917, at which time he gave his occupation as "Garage"without further 
explanation. He has furnished no information since for the Class Record. 



JOSEPH SHALLCROSS BUNTING 



A.B. 




34 Class of 1895 

a, b — The New Weston, 49th Street and Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 
c— 15 Broad Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, March 13, 1874, Chester, Pa. Son of Josiah Bunting, 

dealer in dry goods, and Sarah Sellers Bunting. 
Married, November 2, 1895, at Ogontz, Pa., Katherine Cooke 

Barney, daughter of Charles D. Barney, banker. 
Children, Geoffrey Cooke Bunting, ("class boy") born October 
13, 1896; Sidney Serrill Bunting, born April 11, 1900. 

Prepared for college at the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, Pa., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 63 University Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society, Whig 
Hall, Colonial Club, Monday Night Club ; played on Freshman and Uni- 
versity Scrub football teams ; member of Board Nassau Literary Maga- 
zine ; member of Class Day Committee and Dance Committee. 

Employed by John Wanamaker, Philadelphia and New York, as Man- 
ager of Bicycle, Sporting Goods and Automobile Departments, 1895- 
1903 ; General Manager and Treasurer of Smith-Mabley Manufacturing 
Co., builders of Simplex automobiles and speed boats, 1904-07; associated 
with Charles D. Barney and Co., Philadelphia, Pa., stock brokers, 1907- 
1916; Floor broker and member of New York Stock Exchange, 1916 
to date. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Princeton Club of Phila- 
delphia, Colonial Club, University Club of New York, Union League 
Club of Philadelphia, Huntington Valley Country Club, N. Y. Stock Ex- 
change Luncheon Club, Down Town Club of Philadelphia. 

Brother of Aubrey R. Bunting, '09. His son Geoffrey C. Bunting, left 
the University at the end of his Freshman year, June, 1917, to enter 
the Army and is still in the service as a Lieutenant in the Coast 
Artillery. 



WILLIAM FOSTER BURNS A.B. 

a, b— 471 1 15th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
c — Judge Advocate General's Office, 

132 State War and Navy Building, Washington, D. C. 
Born, April 10, 1875, Warren, 111. Son of William Henry 

Burns, D.D., clergyman, and Anna Pamilla Foster Burns. 
Married, October 11, 1899, at New Lenox, 111., Mary Luella 

Francis, daughter of A. Allen Francis, farmer. 
Children, Mary Louise Burns, born May 29, 1903 ; Allen Francis 

Burns, born August 23, 1905. 

Prepared for college at West Division and Lake View High Schools, 



Princeton University 



35 




Chicago, 111.; student at Northwestern University, 1891-94; entering 
Princeton in September, 1894, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 4 North West College. Member of Whig Hall. Won 
Whig Senior Oratorical First Prize ; Third Prize Lynde Debate ; Yale 
debater. 

Entered Lake Forest University Law School in 1895, graduating 
in 1897 with degree of LL.B. Clerk in the office of Garson, Leach and 
Company, Bond Brokers, Chicago, 111., 1895-98; Deputy in charge of 
Inheritance Tax Collections, County Treasurer, 1896-98; clerk in law 
office of A. M. Jones, attorney, Chicago, 1898-1900; commercial paper 
broker, 1900-03 ; General Counsel for Hapgoods Corporation, Chicago, 
1903-07; maunfacturing chemist (Foster Burns and Company, Chicago), 
1907-12; House Attorney and connected with Fuller Company, Chicago, ad- 
vertising, 1912-17; Alderman of the city of Evanston, 111., 1913-17; 
in the U. S. Army from August 15, 1917 to date. 

Member of A. F. and A.M. (Masonic) Knights Templar; B. P. O. E., 
Knights of Pythias; University Club, Washington, D. C. 

During the war was commissioned Captain of Infantry, U. S. A., 
on August 15, 1917; arrived in France September, 1917; returned to the 
United States from France January 22, 1919 ; Judge Advocate, commanding 
Company, Battalion ; Battalion and Camp Commander ; detailed to 
Director General of Transportation in charge of distribution of labor at 
base ports; promoted to Major April 23, 1919; Judge advocate General 
member War Claims Board in Canada, May 29, 1919 to January, 1920; at 
the present time in Claims and Contracts Section, Judge Advocate Gen- 
eral's Office, Washington; member Clemency Board, Judge Advocate 
General's Department, February i, 1919 to May 29, 1919 



36 



Class of 1895 
WILLIS HOWARD BUTLER 



A.B. 




a, b, c — 854 Asylum Avenue, Hartford, Conn. 
Born, October 3, 1873, Bangor, Maine. Son of Henry Hersey 

Butler, druggist and chemist, and Inez Lunt Butler. 
Married, December 21, 1898 at Braintree, Mass., Mary Helen 

Wales, daughter of George Oliver Wales, dealer in iron and 

steel. 
Children, Barbara Louise Butler, born June 21, 1900; Virginia 

Wales Butler, born April 12, 1909. 

Prepared for college at Lyon Classical School, entering Princeton in 
September, 1891 and graduating June 1895, A.B., cum laude. Roomed 
at 1 South West Brown Hall. Member of Clio Hall, Cap and Gown 
Club, Monday Night Club; President, Philadelphian Society; Managing 
Editor, Daily Princetonian ; Washington's Birthday Debater, Junior Year; 
Junior Orator; Harvard Debater; Ivy Orator; won Baird Prize for 
Delivery, Senior Year. 

Student at Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1895-98, receiving 
degree of B.D. 

Minister, First Congregational Church, Williamstown, Mass., 1898- 
1903 ; Minister, Edwards Congregational Church, Northampton, Mass., 
1903-12; Associate Minister, Old South Church, Boston, Mass., 1912- 
19; at present, Minister, Asylum Hill Congregational Church, Hartford, 
Conn. 



Princeton University 
HENRY MATHEWS CANBY 



37 

B.S. 






& 


iff! 


K 


' 




rt 


► 






*"~ * 






k ' ' * ^1 


■\' : 


: ' ':■".. 






■ 





1920 

a, c — 600 Equitable Building, Wilmington, Del. 
b — Selborne Farms, R. F. D., Wilmington, Del. 
Born, June 17, 1874, Wilmington, Del. Son of William Marriott 

Canby, banker, and Edith Dillon Mathews Canby. 
Married, May 6, 1907, at Wilmington, Del., Marjorie Tatnall 

Bush, daughter of Walter D. Bush, engaged in transportation 

and wholesale coal business. 
Children, Ann Tatnall Canby, born March 8, 1908; Henry 

Mathews Canby, Jr., born November 25, 1910; David Bush 

Canby, born September 20, 1912; William Marriott Canby, 

born April 10, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Friends' School, Wilmington, Del., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed 
at 2 West Brown Hall and 8 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Whig 
Hall. Won First Group Honors Freshman, Sophomore and Junior 
years, School of Science. 

Civil Engineer for Wilmington Park Commission for four months 
to January I, 1896; employed by Harlan and Hollingsworth Company, 
first as clerk, then cashier, then superintendent of Lumber Department, 
and finally purchasing agent, January 1, 1896 to January 1, 1903. As- 
sociated with Lewis Thompson Company and Thompson and Canby 
Lumber Company, January 1, 1903 to February 1, 1905. Since 1905 in 
wholesale lumber business under own name. 



38 



Class of 1895 



Park Commissioner, City of Wilmington, 1910-15 ; reappointed 1915 
for term of five years. Director, Chairman of Finance Committee, 
Wilmington Y. M. C. A. Trustee, Westminister Presbyterian Church, 
Wilmington; Treasurer of same, 1907-17. School Commissioner, Christ- 
iana Hundred. Treasurer, Delaware Chapter, American Red Cross, 
from its founding in 1904; reelected for one year, November, 1919. Vice- 
President for Delaware of American Forestry Association, 1904-06. 
Elected President of Society of Natural History of Delaware, Novem- 
ber, 1919. 

Member of University Clubs of New York and Philadelphia; Prince- 
ton Clubs of New York and Philadelphia. 

During the war was treasurer of the Delaware Chapter of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross. 



CHARLES LUCIUS CANDEE 



A.B. 




1895 



1920 



a, b — 1003 Broome Street, Wilmington, Del. 
Born, January 16, 1874, Milwaukee, Wis. Son of William 

Sprague Candee, banker, merchant, insurance, and M. Cecelia 

Smith Candee. 
Married, May 18, 1899, at Philadelphia, Pa., Elizabeth Laura 

Browne, daughter of William Hardcastle Browne, LL.D., 

lawyer. 
Children, Alice Beaver Candee, born October 20, 1901 ; William 

Sprague Candee, born November 17, 1906. 

Prepared for college at Milhvaukee Academy, Milwaukee, Wis., en- 



Princeton University 



39 



tering Princeton in the fall of 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 14 Middle Reunion Hall and 7 South West College. President of 
Philadelphian Society. Member of Freshman and Varsity Glee Clubs, 
and Whig Hall. Won Whig Hall Second Prize Freshman speaking, 
and First Prize Extempore Speaking Junior year. 

Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1895-98. Post graduate 
degree M.A. Princeton, 1897; D.D., Dubuque, 1915. 

Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Riverton, N. J., 1900-07 ; Pastor, Amer- 
ican Chapel, Frankford-on-Main, Germany, 1907-08; Pastor, Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, Del., 1909 to date. Moderator of 
Presbytery of Monmouth and Presbytery of New Castle. Member of 
Board of Ministerial Relief and Sustentation of Presbyterian Church. 

Member of University Club of Philadelphia; Country Club of Wil- 
mington. 

Brother, Alexander M. Candee, '92, is an alumnus of Princeton. His 
son, William Sprague Candee is preparing for Princeton and expects 
to enter about 1925. 

During the war served at various times in Y. M. C. A. and National 
Service Commission as preacher and speaker in camps ; made numerous 
speeches in various Red Cross, Liberty Loan Drives, etc. 



HOWARD DOTY CARPENTER 



A.B. 




a, b, c — 10759 Prospect Avenue, Morgan Park, 111. 
Born, April 20, 1874, North Adams, Mass. Son of Hiram 

Augustus Carpenter and Elizabeth Gardner Doty Carpenter. 
Married, June 10, 1908 at Paris, Ky., Anna Franklin Marsh, 



40 Class of 1895 

daughter of James Nicholas Marsh, farmer, a graduate of Cen- 
tre College, Danville, Ky. 

Prepared for college at Mt. Whitney Institute, Stephentown, N. Y., 
entering Princeton September, 1891 and graduating June, 1895, A.B. 
cum laude. Roomed at 42 South Edwards Hall. Member of Clio Hall. 
Won special honors in mathematics, Sophomore year, First Group honors 
Junior year, Experimental Science Fellowship Senior year. Post-gradu- 
ate degree Princeton A.M., 1896. 

Teacher, Department of Physics, Park College, Parkville, Mo., 1897- 
98; student, 1st semester, 1899-1900, at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 
Tenn. ; 2nd semester, 1899-1900, at University of Chicago ; teacher, De- 
partment of Physics, Central University, Richmond, Ky., 1900-01 ; engi- 
neer with Stanley Electric Manufacturing Company, Pittsfield, Mass., 
1902-05 ; teacher, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of 
Maine, Orono, Me., 1905-1906; teacher, Department of Electrical En- 
gineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., 1906-10; engineer, 
Public Service Company of Northern Illinois, 1910-16; associated with 
Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, 1916-19. 

Elected to Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education, 1910; 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1913. 



CHARLES VAN BERGEN CARROLL 




1895 



1920 



a, b — 605 Williams Boulevard, Springfield. 

c — First National Bank Building, Springfield, 111. 
Born, October 18, 1872, Springfield, 111. Son of Charles Cecilius 



Princeton University 



4i 



Carroll, Vice-president, First National Bank, Springfield, 111., 

and Lizzie Van Bergen Carroll. 
Married, February 11, 1899, at Peoria, 111., Augusta Smith, 

daughter of De Witt Smith, Vice-president, Ridgeley National 

Bank, Springfield, 111. 
Children , Edith Carroll, born November 16, 1899. 

Prepared for college at St. Austin's School, Staten Island, N. Y., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891 and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed 
at 6 East Witherspoon Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society, University 
Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs, Triangle Club, University Cottage Club. 

Member of firm of Carroll and Powell Insurance Agency, 1895-96; 
engaged in cattle ranching with firm of C. C. Carroll and Son, New- 
man, New Mexico, February, 1899 to December, 1899; publisher, Peoria 
Journal, 1900-02; publisher, Peoria Star, 1904-06; engaged in real es- 
tate business in Springfield, III, 1909 to the present. 

Member of University Cottage Club of Princeton, Princeton Club of 
New York, Sangamo Club of Springfield, 111., Illini Country Club of 
Springfield, 111. 

Related to George B. Stericker, '17 and J. Frank McPherson '06. 

During the war was special agent in U. S. Department of Justice, 
Bureau of Investigation, July 11, 1918 to April 15, 1919. 



RAY HARRISON CARTER 



A.B. 




a, b — 13 1 5 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
c — 807 New Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



42 Class of 1895 

Born, July 19, 1870, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Woodward Carter, 
U. S. Navy, and Anna Barbara Jahrans Carter. 

Prepared for college at Hamilton School, Philadelphia, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
in South Edwards Hall, North East College and North Edwards Hall. 
Member of Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. Won Second Prize, Clio 
Hall, Freshman Speaking; Second Prize, Clio Hall, Sophomore Oration; 
Second Prize, Clio Hall, Sophomore Essays; Second Junior Orator 
Medal. Took degree of A.M. in 1897. 

Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1895-98. Assistant Pastor, 
Walnut Street Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, Pa., 1898-1903; Pastor, 
Falling Spring Presbyterian Church, Chambersburg, Pa., 1903-05. Mission- 
ary of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., stationed at the Punjab 
Mission, India, 1905-1918. Professor of English and History at Forman 
Christian College, Lahore, India, 1907-08. 

While home on furlough, since 1918, was Inspector for the Philadelphia 
Housing Association from August 1918 to March 1919. Since then has been 
Superintendent of the Beth Eden Community House, Philadelphia. 

Is a member of the Nassau Club, Princeton. 



JOHN COLLINGS CATON 




1895 



1920 



a, b — 527 Palisades Avenue, West Hoboken, N. J. 
Born, February 25, 1872, Portland, England. Son of Cuthbert 

Caton, carpenter and builder, and Harriet Collings Caton. 
Married, June 7, 1904, at Fonda, N. Y., Rachel Davis Boyd 



Princeton University 43 

(A.B. Vassar 1901), daughter of the Reverend John Campbell 
Boyd (A.B., A.M., Princeton 1855). 
Children, Cuthbert Boyd Caton, born July 9, 1905 ; Donald 
Boyd Caton, born October 26, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Mt. Hermon School, Massachusetts, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 17 South Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society; 
clerk of Clio Hall ; mile runner of Princeton Track Team ; Junior Orator. 

Entered Yale Theological Seminary, 1895, graduating in 1898 with 
degree of B.D Post graduate degree M.A. Princeton, 1904. 

Minister of the Reformed Church in America, at Lawyersville, N. Y., 
1898-1901; Fonda, N. Y., 1901-04; Twelfth Street Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
1004-16; Church of the Covenant, 1916-19; First Reformed Church, West 
Hoboken, N. J., from November 15, 1919 to date. Member of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Publication and Bible School 
Work of the Reformed Church in America. Member of the Committee 
of One Hundred in Brooklyn under Mayor Coler. Vice-president of the 
organization in Paterson, N. J., for the Relief of Armenia. 

His wife is related to Dr. James Boyd, '64 (uncle) ; Boyd Van Benthuy- 
sen, '94 (cousin) ; Hamilton Boyd, '98 (brother). His son, Cuthbert 
Boyd Caton, is preparing for Princeton and expects to enter in 1925. 

During the war served in the Paterson Home Guards, New Jersey 
State Militia Reserve, December, 1917 to June, 1918; Y. M. C. A. Secre- 
tary, 15, 1918 to May 22, 1919. With Fourth Division, as Field Secretary, 
serving with field hospitals at Fere en Tardenois when the division was 
engaged in throwing the enemy across the Vesle River. With the 
Division at St. Mihiel in support ; with the Division in the Meuse- 
Argonne offensive; went with the Division into Germany, acting as busi- 
ness secretary on the way up to the Rhine and then appointed religious 
work director for the Division, stationed first at Bad Bertrich on the 
Moselle ; later at Neider Breisig on the Rhine. 



JOHN ADAMS CHAPMAN 

a, c — Care of William A. Read & Co., 234 South La Salle 
Street, Chicago, 111. 
b — Lake Forest, 111. 
Born, ( ) l &73> Chicago, 111. Son of John E. Chapman 

and Mary Adams Chapman. 
Married, October 24, 1908 , at Baltimore, Md., Eleanor T. 

Stickney. 
Children, Eleanor Stickney Chapman, born March 12, 1910; 
Margaret Dudley Chapman, born October 29, 1912; Mary 



44 



Class of 1895 




189s 



1920 



Virginia Chapman, born April 18, 1914; Carolyn Stickney 
Chapman, born April 21, 1919. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1893. Roomed in University Hall. 

After leaving college was employed by the Chicago Telephone Co., was 
manager of the North Shore Exchange at Lake Forest, 111., in 1896. 
Real Estate business in Chicago in 1898. With McCormick Harvesting 
Machine Co., Chicago, 1900, afterwards the International Harvester Co. 
In 1909 again in the real estate business. At present with William 
A. Read and Co., Bankers, Chicago. 

Member of Chicago Club, University Club, Onwentsia Club, Casino 
Club and Shore Acres Club of Chicago. 

During the war assisted in the sale of Liberty Bonds. 



HOWARD AUGUSTUS COLBY 



B.S. 



a — University Club, New York, N. Y. 

Born, May 10, 1871, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of Charles Lewis 
Colby, president of Wisconsin Central R. R. (Brown Univer- 
sity) and Anna Sims Knowlton Colby. 

Married, November 16, 1907 at Plainfield, N. J., Ruth Tenney, 
daughter of John Tenney, fire insurance. 

Prepared for college at Berkeley School, New York, entering Prince- 
ton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 2 Middle Dod 
Hall. Member of Cottage Club. Vice-president of Class in Junior year. 



Princeton University 



45 




1895 



1920 



He writes : "Have had no regular occupation or profession since 
leaving college. The first ten years was devoted to golf, checkers, 
chess, billiards, pool, lawn tennis, court tennis, racquette and squash and 
traveling here and there and everywhere. During the last fifteen years 
I have been an enthusiastic student of the so-called New Thought revela- 
tion or the subject of mental and spiritual healing which I find more 
interesting and helpful than anything else I have ever tackled." 

Member of University Club of New York. 



CHARLES BEACH CONDIT 



A.B. 



a, b — 63 Taylor Street, Newark, N. J. 
c — 510 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 
Born, June 7, 1872, West Orange, N. J. Son of Elias Mulford 

Condit, civil engineer and real estate operator, and Sarah 

Louise Beach Condit. 
Married, June 15, 1904, at Orange, N. J., Mary Maude Kynor, 

daughter of George Warren Kynor, of Bailey, Everitt & Co., 

Orange, N. J. (retired). 
Children, Warren Kynor Condit, born September 10, 1907 ; Ken- 
neth Beach Condit, born July 4, 1910 and died December 25, 

1910. 

Prepared for college at the Newark Academy, N. J., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
in D West Brown Hall and 11 North Edwards Hall. Member of 



4 6 



Class of 1895 




1920 



Cliosophic and Philadelphian Societies. Won Clio Hall Essay Prize, 
Junior year, and George Potts Bible Prize at graduation. Post-graduate 
degree A.M., Princeton, 1897. Graduated Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary 1898. 

Licensed by Morris aand Orange Presbytery at Morristown, N. J., June, 
1897 ; ordained a Minister of the Gospel by Presbytery of Elizabeth 
at Liberty Corner, N. J., July 7, 1898. Pastor, Presbyterian Church, 
Liberty Corner, N. J., 1898-1907 ; Pastor, Trinity Reformed Church 
(Reformed Church of America) Newark, N. J., 1907-17; Assistant Mini- 
ster, North Reformed Church, Newark, N. J., 1917-18; Minister-in-charge, 
North Reformed Church, Newark, N. J., 1918-1919; Assistant Minister, 
North Reformed Church, Newark, from May 1, 1919 to date. 

Commissioner to General Assembly of Presbyterian Church at Buffalo, 
1904. Delegate to General Synod of Reformed Church of America, 
1909, 1913, 1917. Stated Clerk, Classis of Newark, 1910. Trustee, 
Classis of Newark, 1917. 

President, Raritan Ministerial Association, 1004; President, Somer- 
set County Christian Endeavor Union, 1906-07 ; member, State Christian 
Endeavor Executive Committee, 1904-07 ; Secretary, Newark Ministerial 
Association, 1908-12 ; Superintendant, Bible Study Essex County Chris- 
tian Endeavor Union, 1909-12; Counsellor, Bible Study Essex County 
Christian Endeavor Union, 1903-18; Secretary, Condit Family Associa- 
tion, 1905-12; Vice-president of the same 1912-13; President of the 
same, 1913-19. 

Member of Presbyterian Ministers' Association of New York and 
Vicinity; Reformed Church Ministers' Association of New York and 
vicinity; Princeton Club of Newark. 



Princeton University 



47 



Brother of Albert Kitchell Condit, '02; cousin of Rufus Freeman 
Harrison, '11; his son, Warren Kynor Condit, is preparing for Prince- 
ton and expects to enter in 1924. 



LESTER MORRIS CONROW 



A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — Greencastle, Pa. 

Born, December 31, 1872, Long Branch, N. J. Son of Luke 
Conrow and Lavinia Woolley Conrow. 

Married, September 28, 1904 at Newark, N. J., Annie Belle 
Dobbin, daughter of James C. Dobbin, Attorney and Coun- 
sellor of Law, Congressman. 

Children, Anna Woolley Conrow, born June 30, 1905. 

Prepared for college at High School of Long Branch, N. J., entering 
Princeton in September 1891 and graduating June 1895, A.B. Roomed at 
9 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig 
Hall. Student at Theological Seminary, Princeton, September, 1895 to 
May, 1898. 

Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Corning, Iowa, 1898-99; pastor, Presby- 
terian Church, Chestertown, N. Y., 1900-01 ; pastor, Presbyterian Church, 
Lamington, N. J., 1901-06; student at New College, Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, October, 1904 to April, 1905 ; pastor, First Presbyterian Church, 
New Bedford, Mass., 1906-16; pastor, Presbyterian Church, Greencastle, 
Pa., 1916 to date. 

Moderator, Presbytery of Boston, 1908-09; Convenor and Moderator, 
Presbytery of Providence, 1912-13; Moderator, Synod of New England, 
1913-14; Stated Clerk, Synod of New England, 1912-1916. 



4 8 



Class of 1895 



Author of several articles of religious nature. 

Related to Joseph W. Conrow, '98 (brother) ; Matthias W. Conrow, 
'01 (brother) ; Henry G. Gilland, '16 (stepson). 

During the war served on Legal Advisory Board and War Work 
Council of Greencastle, and as a "Four Minute Man." 



ALBERT SAMUEL COOK 



A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — Towson, Md. 

Born, January 12, 1873, Greencastle, Pa. Son of Samuel Has- 
sler Cook, farmer, and Nancy Fahrney Cook. 

Married, December 27, 1898, at Gettysburg, Pa., Helen Earn- 
shaw, daughter of George Albert Earnshaw, Captain of 
Volunteers in Federal Army during the Civil War. 

Children, Elmer Earnshaw Cook, born March 28, 1900; Cath- 
erine Norris Cook, born March 31, 1902. 

Prepared for college at High School, Greencastle, Pa., and Gettysburg 
College, entering Princeton in September, 1893, in Junior Class, and 
graduating in 1895, A.B. cum laude. Roomed at 13 South Edwards Hall. 
Member of Clio Hall. Won Second Group Honors, Junior year. Post 
Graduate degree of A.M., 1906. 

Student at summer sessions of Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907 and 1913. 

Principal, Bel Air, Md., Academy and Graded School, 1895-98; Princi- 
pal, Franklin High School, Reisterstown, Md., 1898-1900; Superintendent 



Princeton University 



49 



of Public Schools, and Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of 
Education of Baltimore County, Maryland, 1900 to date. 

Second Vice-President, Department of Superintendence, National Edu- 
cational Association, 1913-14; member Executive Committee, Confer- 
ence for Education in the South, 1914; Vice-president, National Edu- 
cation Association, 1918. 

Author of occasional contributions to professional journals; contribu- 
tor to Twelfth Year Book of The National Society for the Study of 
Education, Part II, "The Supervision of Rural Schools." 

Related to Elmer J. Cook, '92 (brother). His son, Elmer Earnshaw 
Cook '21, is now an undergraduate at Princeton. 

During the war was director of War Saving Stamp campaign for 
Baltimore County, Md. 



WILLIAM BROWN COOKE 



A.B. 






1920 



a, b, c — 4504 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, May 18, 1873, Havre de Grace, Md. Son of William 
Henry Cooke, Minister of the Gospel (D.D., Center College, 
Ky.) and Mary Malinda Hitchcock. 

Prepared for college at High School, Amherst, Mass., and Carey's 
School, Baltimore, Md., entering Princeton September 1891, and gradu- 
ating June, 1895, A.B. cum laude. Roomed at 12 North Middle Reunion 
Hall. Member of Whig Hall ; editor Princetonian ; won Whig Senior 
General Debating Prize. 

Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1895-1899; B.D. 1898. 



50 



Class of 1895 



Pastor First Presbyterian Church, Steelton, Pa., 1900; pastor First 
Presbyterian Church, Manila, P. I., 1910; Minister of Market Square 
and Olivet Presbyterian Churches, Harrisburg, Pa., 1914; Minister of 
Summit Presbyterian Church, Germantown, Pa., 1916; Minister of First 
Presbyterian Church, Lewistown, Pa., 1917; Pastor of Falls of Schuyl- 
kill Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, Pa., 1918 to the present. 



ALLEN WICKHAM CORWIN 



A.B. 





1895 



1920 



a, b — 169 Wisner Avenue, Middletown, N. Y. 
c — 75 North Street, Middletown, N. Y. 

Born, June 18, 1870, Anderson, Ind. Son of John Eli Corwin, 
banker, and Alvira Jane Makepeace Corwin. 

Married, June 3, 1907, at New York, N. Y., Gertrude B. 
Bradley, daughter of Edgar Brodhead, a graduate of Anna- 
polis, and Captain, U. S. Navy. 

Prepared for college at Wallkill Academy, Middletown, N. Y., enter- 
ing Princeton in September 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed in Brown Hall and in town. Member of Philadelphian Society 
and of Whig Hall. 

Student at Law School, Harvard University, 1895-98, receiving degree 
of LL. B. 

Practising Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 1899 to date. Director 
and Vice-president of The Denver Chemical Manufacturing Company, 
manufacturers of antiphlogistine, for the past seven years. Recorder of 
the City of Middletown, N. Y., 1905-09. Appointed by Governor Whit- 



Princeton University 



5i 



man of New York as a member of the Board of Managers of the 
Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital for a term of seven years. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, The Middletown Club, 
University Club of Middletown, Drug Club of New York. 

During the war was a menber of the Legal Service Committee of the 
Orange County Defense Committee. 



SAMUEL G. CRAIG 



A.B 




1895 



1920 



a, b, c — St. David's, Pa. 
Born, June 1, 1874, DeKalb County, 111. Son of Andrew Craig, 

farmer, and Elizabeth Moorhead Swan Craig. 
Married, December 1, 1909, at New York, N. Y., Carrie Hays, 

daughter of Charles Hays. 
Children, Charles Hays Craig, born January 15, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Tarkio College, Tarkio, Mo., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1894 and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 11 East Witherspoon Hall. Member of Whig Hall; mem- 
ber of Track Team ; played on Varsity Foot Ball team as a post- 
graduate. Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1896-1900, re- 
ceiving degree of B.D. Post Graduate degree Princeton A.M., 1900. 

Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Ebensburg, Pa., 1900-09 ; Student, Univer- 
sity of Berlin, 1910-11; Pastor, North Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., 1912-15 ; Joint editor "The Presbyterian," 1915-18. At present en- 
gaged in preaching and literary work. 



52 



Class of 1895 



Author of "Jesus as He Was and Is," published by George H. Doran Co. 
Member of St. David's Golf Club. 

During the war was Vice-director of the Department of Allied Bodies 
of the Committee of Public Safety of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 



ALFRED CRAMER, JR. 



A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — 211 North Fifth Street, Camden, N. J. 
Born, February 13, 1871, Camden, N. J. Son of Alfred Cramer, 

and Priscilla Middleton Anne Wright Cramer. 
Married, June 9, 1906, at Camden, N. J., Anna Browning Dough- 
ten, daughter of Isaac Doughten, Deputy State Comptroller of 
New Jersey. 
Children, Alfred Cramer, 3rd, born December 27, 1907; Maurice 
Browning Cramer, born April 24, 1910; Priscilla Cramer, born 
October 19, 191 1; Isaac Doughten Cramer, born March 27, 
I9I5- 

Prepared for college at Peddie Institute, Hightstown, N. J., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 1 South West College. Member of Clio Hall. 

Entered University of Pennsylvania Medical School in October, 1895, 
graduating in June, 1898, with degree of M.D. Student at Vienna Uni- 
versity for four months in 1900 and in Polyclinic Hospital, Philadelphia, 
in 1903 and 1904. Since 1898 has practised medicine in Camden, N. J., 
since 1903 specializing in ophthalmology. Ophthalmologist to Cooper 



Princeton University 



53 



Hospital, Camden, N. J., and to the Training School at Vineland, N. J. 

Member of the Pine Valley Golf Club, Riverton Country Club, Candem 
Motor Boat Club. 

His Son, Alfred Cramer, 3rd, is preparing for Princeton and expects 
to enter the Class of 1929. 

During the war served from the beginning to the end, first as a 
member of the Selective Service Board, later as a member of the Medical 
Advisory Board. 



HARDEN LAKE CRAWFORD 



B.S. 




1920 



a, c — 25 Broad Street, New York City. 

b — Winter, 41 West 57th Street, New York City. 
Summer, Rumson P. O., Seabright, N. J. 
Born, September 26, 1872, New York City. Son of Robert L. 

Crawford and Julia Gaines Lake Crawford. 
Married, October 17, 1900, Oakland, Cal., Annie Clay, daughter 

of Major Charles Clement Clay, merchant. 
Children, Harden Lake Crawford, Jr., born December 6, 1902 ; 

Julia Lake Crawford, born February 1, 1906; Clement Clay 

Crawford, born October 13, 1907; Ann Lewis Crawford, born 

July 21, 1910. 

Prepared for college at Cutler School, New York City, and Lawrence- 
ville School, New Jersey, entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating 
in 1895, B.S. Roomed 4 West Middle Witherspoon Hall. Member 



54 



Class of 1895 



of Philadelphian Society, Ivy Club, Triangle Club, Freshman Glee Club 
and University Glee Club. 

With N. W. Harris and Co., Bond Brokers, 1895-1899; member of firm 
of Thompson, Tenney and Crawford, bond brokers, 1899-1905 ; senior 
partner H. L. Crawford and Co., Bond Brokers, 1905 to date. Presi- 
dent, Century Bank, New York City, 1907 until consolidation with 
Chatham and Phoenix National Bank of New York in 1915. President, 
Defiance Gas and Electric Co., President Maumee Valley Electric Co., 
Ohio ; president, Swanton Light and Power Co., Ohio ; Vice-president, 
Strafford-York Gas Co., New Hampshire; Director, Chatham and Phoe- 
nix National Bank, New York City; Indiana and Michigan Electric 
Co., of Indiana. Member, Borough Council, Rumson, N. J., for three 
terms. 

Member of Princeton Club, New York; University Club, New York; 
Riding Club, New York ; Rumson Country Club, New Jersey ; Sea- 
bright Lawn Tennis Club, New Jersey. 

Brother of Everett L. Crawford, '01. His sons expect to enter Prince- 
ton, Harden L. Crawford, Jr., who is now at Pomfret School, in 1921, 
and Clement Clay Crawford a few years later. 

During the war was a member of the Committee on Mediation and 
Conciliation of the Council of National Defense. Captain, Company C, 
3rd Battalion, New Jersey State Militia (machine gun company). 



JAMES STONER CRAWFORD 



A.B. 




1895 



1920 



a, c — 1 7 12 Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
b — 125 Mifflin Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 



Princeton University 



55 



Born, May 24, 1872, Arch Spring, Blair County, Pa. Son of 
John A. Crawford, flour manufacturer (deceased), and Eliza- 
beth Stoner Crawford. 

Married, June 16, 1903, at Pittsburgh, Pa., Mae Wilson, daugh- 
ter of James A. Wilson, contractor and builder. 

Children, James Wilson Crawford, born April 16, 1905 ; Virginia 
Crawford, born March 31, 1907. 
Prepared for college at Blair Academy, Blairstown, N. J., entering 

Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, 

A.B. Roomed at 8 South Reunion Hall and 20 South East College. 

Member of Clio Hall and Freshman Banjo Club. 

Entered Pittsburgh Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897 with degree 

of LL.B. Has since practised law in Pittsburgh, first as a member of 

the firm of Patterson, Sterrett and Acheson; then as a member of the 

firm of Patterson, Crawford, Miller and Arensberg. 

Member of the Dtiquesne Club, Oakmont Golf Club, Edgewood Club 

of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Bar Association, Pennsylvania State 

Bar Association. 
His son, James Wilson Crawford, is preparing for Princeton and 

expects to enter in 1923. 

During the war served as a "Four Minute Man" of the Committee on 

Public Information. 



JOHN FORSYTH CRAWFORD 



A.B. 




a, b — 726 Milwaukee Road, Beloit, Wis. 
c — Beloit College, Beloit, Wis. 



56 Class of 1895 

Born, November 16, 1871, Damascus, Syria. Son of John Craw- 
ford, missionary of the United Presbyterian Church in Damas- 
cus, Syria (A.B. Union College, 1847; D-D. University of Bel- 
fast, 1882) and Mary Beattie Stewart Crawford. 

Married, June 25, 1901, at Centreville, Iowa, Bertha M. Adams, 
daughter of George Mathew Adams, minister of the Baptist 
Church. 

Children, John Adams Crawford, born July 5, 1903 ; Martha 
Havens Crawford, born August 28, 1905 ; Stewart Grenville 
Crawford, born January 12, 1909. 

Prepared for college at Glens Falls Academy, Glens Falls, N. Y., and 
Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., entering Princeton in September, 1893, 
and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 1895, magna cum laude. Member of 
Clio Hall. Won Dickinson Prize in Philosophy, McCosh Prize in 
Philosophy, Special Honors in Philosophy, and member of Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

Was a student at the University of Halle for six months 1895-6 
and at the University of Berlin for six months, 1896; returned to 
Princeton for post-graduate work 1896-7, receiving degree of A.M. ; 
student at the McCormick Theological Seminary 1897-1900, receiving 
the degree of B.D., from the Seminary in 1910. 

Pastor, First Baptist Church, Beaver Dam, Wis., 1900-1904; Professor 
of Philosophy and Education at Grand Island College, Grand Island, Neb., 
1904-7; Professor of Psychology and Education, University of Nebraska, 
summer sessions of 1906 and 1907; Professor of Philosophy and Educa- 
tion, Tabor College, Tabor, Iowa, 1907-11; student at the University of 
Chicago, 1911-13, taking degree of Ph.D. in 1913; Professor of Philosophy, 
University of Chicago, summer quarters, 1913, 1914 and 1915; Professor 
of Philosophy, Beloit College, Beloit, Wis., 1913 to date. 

Elected to membership in the American Psychological Association, 1897; 
American Philosophical Association, 1908; American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, 1912. 



CHARLES CLEMENT CRESSON A.B. 

a — 815 Grayson Street, San Antonio, Texas. 
b — 500 West End Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
c — Office of Department of Judge Advocate, Eastern Depart- 
ment, Governor's Island, New York, N. Y. 
Born, March 23, 1874, San Antonio, Texas. Son of Charles 
Clement Cresson, officer of the United States Army, and Adelia 
van Derlip Cresson. 



Princeton University 



57 




1895 



1920 



Married, July 30, 1919, at Brooklyn, N. Y., Mary Jordan, daugh- 
ter of Henry Jordan, steel mill operator. 

Prepared for college at San Antonio Academy, San Antonio, Texas, 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 11 West Brown Hall. Member of Clio Hall, University Gun 
Club Team, Chess Team. 

Entered New York Law School in September, 1895, graduating in June, 
1897, with degree of LL.B. 

Practised law in San Antonio, Texas, from September, 1897 to May, 
1917. President and General Counsel of Medina Valley Irrigation Com- 
pany. Assistant City Attorney, San Antonio, Texas, 1901-03. Assistant 
United States Attorney, Western District of Texas, in charge of San 
Antonio Office and Division, 1905-14. 

Member of San Antonio Lodge, B. P. O. Elks, Phi Kappa Psi Frater- 
nity, San Antonio Country Club, Officers' Club, Governor's Island, New 
York; Princeton Alumni Association of Texas, Order of the Alamo, San 
Antonio Cotillion Club. 

Commissioned Lieutenant, Civilian Training Camp, July, 1916; Captain 
of Infantry, August 15, 1917; Major, Judge Advocate, October 7, 1918; 
Lieutenant Colonel, Judge Advocate, October 7, 1918. Stationed at Leon 
Spring, Texas, May 8, 1917 to August 15, 1917; Camp Travis, Texas, 
August 25, 1917 to July, 1918; Camp Lewis, Washington, July 30, 1918, to 
March, 1919; Washington, D. C, April, 1919 to June 20, 1919; Governor's 
Island. New York, June 20, 1919, to date. 



58 



Class of 1895 
CARLETON CURTIS 



C.E. 




1920 



a — The University Club, 1 West 54th Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 49 West 55th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, January 4, 1872, Padua, Italy. Son of Jeremiah W. Curtis 
and Estelle Schooley Curtis. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed 
at 5 South West College. Member of Cottage Club. 

Since his graduation as a civil engineer he has spent a considerable part 
of his time in extensive travels in Europe, Asia, Africa and South 
America. He has made explorations in unfrequented portions of the 
Desert of Sahara extending over a period of nearly a year ; and has served 
as engineer upon the coast surveys for the Government of Netherlands 
India (Dutch East Indies) in the South China Seas. He has made a wide 
study of Oriental languages, acquiring proficiency in Malay, Hindustani, 
Arabic and two Chinese dialects. 

Member of University Club of New York, Princeton Club of New York, 
Racquet and Tennis Club of New York. 

His brother, Frank G. Curtis, is an alumnus of Princeton, A.B. 1897. 



JAMES FREDERICK DALE 

a, b — 441 Bellevue Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 
Born, April 13, 1873, Helensburgh, Scotland. 
Jeffery Dale and Mary H. Goodwin Dale. 



Son of James 



Princeton University 



59 




i»95 1920 

Prepared for college at the State Model School, Trenton, N. J., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1894. 

In 1895 was a reporter on the staff of the State Gazette of Trenton, 
N. J. During the Spanish war he enlisted as private in the Sixth United 
States Cavalry, May 11, 1898. Joined regiment at Tampa, Fla., May 14th, 
being assigned to Troop I ; was honorably discharged October 31, 1898. 
While in the South he was taken with typhoid and malarial fevers, 
necessitating a two months' stay in the field hospital at West Tampa, and 
in the United States General Hospital at Fort Monroe, Va. In 1899 was 
the City Editor of the State Gazette of Trenton ; in 1901, correspondent 
for New York, Philadelphia and New Jersey newspapers ; in 1903, secre- 
tary and correspondent for the New Jersey Department of Labor ; in 1907, 
correspondent for the New York Sun, New York Tribune, Newark 
(N. J.) Evening News, Jersey City, N. J. Evening Journal, Paterson, 
(N. J.) Guardian, etc. In 1910 (last report received) gave occupation as 
newspaper correspondent and clerk of New Jersey Department of Labor. 



WALTER RAINES DARBY, A.B. 

a, b — 131 South . Euclid Avenue, Westfield, N. J. 
c — State Capitol, Trenton, N. J. 
Born, July 14, 1874. Son of John L. Darby and Hannah E. 

Radley Darby. 
Married, June 21, 1904, at Westfield, N. J., Jennie Drake 

Fowler, daughter of Robert Allan Fowler, lumber merchant, 

retired. 



6o 



Class of 1895 




Children, Carolyn Fowler Darby, born February 14, 1905 ; 
Robert Fowler Darby, born August 21, 1906; Janet Fowler 
Darby, born March 13, 1908. 

Prepared for college at the Plainfield High School, Plainfield, N. J., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating cum laude in June, 
1895, A.B. Roomed at 3 South Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Phila- 
delphia Society and Clio Hall. 

After graduation returned to Princeton for two years in the Electrical 
Engineering School, receiving degree of E.E. in 1897. 

Employed by the General Electric Company, manufacturers of electric 
apparatus and machinery, in their Testing Department at Schenectady, 
N. Y., 1897-1900. New York City Salesman of the General Electric Com- 
pany, 1900-03 ; Assistant Manager of New York District office of the 
Pittsburgh Reduction Company (Aluminum Company of America), 
manufacturers of aluminum, 1903-10; Sales Manager, Blanchite Paint 
Co., New York 1910-11; Editor and Manager Standard Publishing Con- 
cern, Westfield, N. J., 1911-14; Engineer for the Eastern Metals Cor- 
poration and the Rubber Refining Co., New York 1914-16; with S. K. F. 
Ball Bearing Co., New York, 1916-17. Since 1917 has been Commissioner 
of Municipal Accounts of the State of New Jersey. 

From 1907 to 1918 he was Treasurer of the Town of Westfield, N. J. 

His son Robert Fowler Darby expects to enter Princeton in the Class 
of 1927. 



Princeton University 
WILLIAM NELSON DAVEY 



61 




a, c— 49 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. 

b— 650 Central Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 
Born, August 27, 1874, Jersey City, N. J. Son of John Ed- 
wards Davey, manufacturer, and Mary E. Ege Davey. 

Prepared for college at Hasbrouck Institute, Jersey City, N. J., enter- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1893. Roomed 
at 3 West Witherspoon Hall. 

Since shortly after leaving college has been associated with Johnson 
and Higgins, Average Adjusters and Insurance Brokers, New York; now 
a member of the firm. 

Member of Maritime Law Association; Association of Average Ad- 
justers of the United States. 

Member of the Princeton Club of New York, University Cottage Club 
of Princeton, Essex County Country Club of West Orange, N. J.; Orange 
Lawn Tennis Club of South Orange, N. J. ; Metropolitan Club of Wash- 
ington, Down Town Association of New York, India House of New York. 

During the war was one of the Advisory Board of three in the Marine 
and Seamen's Division, Bureau of War Risk Insurance. Was also one 
of the original members of the Insurance Committee of Three of the 
United States Shipping Board. Was also a member of the Committee 
of Three appointed by the United States Shipping Board to negotiate the 
settlement of the claims of the owners of the Dutch steamers requisitioned 
in the United States ports by the United States. 



62 Class of 1895 

JOHN THOMAS DAVIS 




1920 

a, b, c — Elkins, W. Va. 
Born, March 31, 1874, Piedmont, W. Va. Son of Henry Gass- 

away Davis, (railroads, coal mining and banking) and Kate 

Bantz Davis. 
Married, November 10, 1897, at Brooklyn, N. Y., Elizabeth 

Irwin Armstead, daughter of Henry Howell Armstead, mining 

engineer. 
Children, Hallie Elkins Davis (Percy), born July 27, 1898; 

Mary McPherson Davis, born October 5, 1900 (died July 28, 

1901) ; Henry Gassaway Davis, 3rd, born January 6, 1902. 

Prepared for college at Pennsylvania Military College, Chester, Pa., 
entering Princeton in the fall of 1892 and leaving at the midwinter ex- 
amination in 1895, on account of an attack of diphtheria. Roomed at 30 
University Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

General Manager, Junior Coal Company ; President, Roaring Creek and 
Belington Railroad Company; Vice-President, Coal and Coke Railway 
Company; Vice-President, Davis Colliery Company; President, Davis 
Colliery Company; Chairman of Board, Davis Trust Company; President, 
Elkins Power Company. Councilman, City of Elkins, W. Va. Member 
of West Virginia Legislature, 1911-12. 

Member of National Geographic Society ; American Geographic Society. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Chevy Chase Club of Chevy 
Chase, Md., Metropolitan Club of Washington, D. C. 



Princeton University 



63 



His son, Henry G. Davis, 3rd, is now preparing for Princeton at Hill 
School. 

During the war was chairman of United War Work activities in Bar- 
bour, Randolph, Tucker and Pendleton Counties, West Virginia, in 1918. 



WALTER DAVIS 




n 




1920 

a, b, c — 24 South Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Born, April 15, 1872, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Son of Reese Davis, 

Surgeon (A.M. Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y. ; M.D. 

Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, 1869) and 

Margaret E. Williams Davis. 
Married, July 6, 1898, at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Emilie E. Phillips, 

daughter of Edward P. Phillips, merchant. 
Children, Emilie Davis, born January 24, 1901 ; Harriet Davis, 

born February 4, 1903 ; Frances Davis, born April 6, 1905 ; 

Walter Davis, Jr., born November 16, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Harry Hillman Academy, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 
entering Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1893. Roomed at 3 North East 
College. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall; played on 
Freshman Base Ball Team. 

Entered the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1893, 
graduating in 1897 with degree of M.D. Since 1897 has been engaged 
in the practice of medicine in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. City Bacteriologist for 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 1898-1901 ; on staff of City Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, 



6 4 



Class of 1895 



1903-1907; on staff of White Haven Sanatorium, 1901-07; on staff of 
Wyoming Valley Society for Cure and Prevention of Tuberculosis, 1906- 
07; Surgeon, Wilkes-Barre City Hospital, 1914 to the present time; Sur- 
geon, Hudson Coal Company, 1916 to the present time. 

Member of various medical societies. 

His son, Walter Davis, Jr. is preparing for Princeton and expects to 
enter the Class of 1929. 

During the war, 1917-18, was a member of Draft Board No. 2 of 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



CHARLES ERNEST DECHANT 



A.B. 






1895 



1920 



a, c — 404 Realty Building, Charlotte, N. C. 

b — 112 College Place Apartments, Charlotte, N. C. 
Born, May 6, 1866, Scioto, Pa. Son of George B. Dechant, 

Minister of the Gospel, and Elizabeth C. Cross Dechant. 
Married, June 27, 1900, at Kansas City, Mo., Daisy Markel 

Bantz, daughter of William S. Bantz, coal merchant. 

Prepared for college by private study and one year at Mount Hermon, 
Mass., entering Princeton in September 1891, and graduating in 1895, 
A.B. cum laude. Member of the Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. 
Roomed at 6 Middle Dod Hall. 

Instructor in mathematics in the State Normal School, Trenton, N. J., 
1895-1900; Principal of Ursinus Academy, Collegeville, Pa., 1900-03; 
Assistant Secretary and Treasurer of the Casualty Company of America, 
New York, N. Y., 1903-05 ; Superintendent of Public Schools, Cape May, 



Princeton University 



65 



N. J., 1905-07; Superintendent of Public Schools, Haddonfield, N. J., 
1907-18. Local Sales Manager at Reading, Pa. of the Monroe Calculating 
Machine Company, 1918-19; District Sales Manager for North and South 
Carolina of the Monroe Calculating Machine Company, Feb. 15, 1919 to 
date. 

His brother, Harry G. Dechant, is a member of the Class of '01. 



JAMES WINDSOR DECKER 



B.S. 




a, c — 25 Broad Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 375 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Born, August 10, 1874, Scranton, Pa. Son of Austin Moore 

Decker and Catherine Stowers Decker. 
Married, July 15, 1905, at Luzerne, Switzerland, Lillian Andrews, 

daughter of Samuel Andrews, of the Standard Oil Company. 

Prepared for college at the School of the Lackawanna, Scranton, Pa., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in 1895, B.S. 
Roomed at 15 South Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall, the Freshman 
and Varsity Banjo Clubs, Ivy Club, Monday Night Club. 

After leaving college entered the New York Homeopathic Medical 
College, graduating in 1898 with the degree of M.D. Interne at Flower 
Hospital, New York City, 1898-99; practised medicine from 1898 to 1908; 
at the same time was Demonstrator in Anatomy and Pathology at the 
New York Homeopathic Medical College, and Lecturer on Fractional 
Dislocations at the Women's Medical College. Associated with H. L. 
Crawford and Company, bankers, of New York, 1908-17; officer of the 
United States Army, 1917-19. 



66 Class of 1895 

Member of the University Club of New York, Racquet and Tennis Club, 
New York Athletic Club, Princeton Club of New York, Automobile Club 
of America, Recess Club, City Midday Club, Nassau Country Club. 

His nephew, E. B. Jermyn, Jr., is an alumnus of Princeton. 

During the war was commissioned Captain, Medical Corps, U. S. Army, 
August 11, 1917; discharged July 31, 1919. 



HOWARD de FOREST 



B.S. 




& h - 




1895 



1920 



a, c — Hull Botanical Laboratories, University of Chicago, Chi- 
b — 6107 Woodlawn Ave., Chicago.. 
Born, November 2, 1872, New York, N. Y. Son of Albert Henry 

de Forest and Jane Amelia Douglas de Forest. 

Prepared for college at King's School for Boys, Stamford, Conn., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. 
Roomed at 17 East Middle Witherspoon Hall. 

For one year after leaving college studied medicine at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York, but left in 1896 on account of ill 
health. In 1897 was associated, for a time, with the firm of Boussod, 
Valadon and Company, dealers in paintings. New York. In 1909 was a 
student of Forestry at Yale. In 1910-12 was in the United States Forest 
Service, first as Field Assistant, then as Forest Assistant. In 1913 was 
Acting Assistant Professor of Forestry at the University of Missouri, 
Columbia, Mo. In 1919 and 1920 has been engaged in botanical research 
at the Hull Botanical Laboratories of the University of Chicago. Ex- 
pects to resume the teaching of botany in the fall of 1920. 



Princeton University 67 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DEFORD 

a, c — Calvert and Lombard Streets, Baltimore, Md. 
b — Riderwood, Md. 

Born, January 20, 1872, Baltimore, Md. Son of Thomas De- 
ford, merchant, and Sallie William Bell Deford. 

Married, February 9, 1898, at Richmond, Va., Ellen Swan 
Drewry, daughter of Dr. Samuel Davies Drewry. 

Children, Ellen Swan Deford, born August 2, 1899; Benjamin 
Franklin Deford, Jr., born April 17, 1902; Alice Macgill De- 
ford, born September 21, 1903; Samuel Davies Drewry Deford, 
born July 19, 1907. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1892. Since then he has been associated 
with The Deford Company of Baltimore, manufacturers of leather for 
machinery belting. For several years he has been President of the Com- 
pany. 

His son, Benjamin Franklin Deford, Jr., is preparing for Princeton and 
expects to enter the Class of 1925. 

DANIEL WEAVER DEXTER A.B. 




a, b— 874 North Academy Street, Galesburg, 111. 

c — 424 Bank of Galesburg Building, Galesburg, 111. 
Born, March 12, 1872, Elmira, N. Y. Son of Seymour Dexter, 
lawyer and banker, and Ellenor Weaver Dexter. 



68 



Class of 1895 



Married, August 5, 1903, at Elmira, N. Y., Nelle Edna Johnson, 

daughter of Lorenzo R. Johnson, tanner. 
Children, Dorothy Johnson Dexter, born June 4, 1904; Seymour 

Johnson Dexter, born December 29, 1905 ; Florence Elizabeth 

Dexter, born October 18, 1919. 

Prepared for college at High School, Elmira, N. Y., entering Princeton 
in September, 1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, A.B. Took 
post graduate degree of A.M. in 1898. Roomed at 10 South Reunion Hall. 
Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall. At graduation won 
High Honors in Philosophy. Won Class of 1869 Prize in Ethics. 

Student at Chicago Theological Seminary, 1897-98; Pastor of First 
Congregational Church, Port Washington, Wis., 1899; student in Ger- 
many at the University of Berlin and the University of Marburg, 1899- 
1900; Pastor of First Congregational Church, Norwich, N. Y., 1900-07; 
engaged in Horticulture and Land Development, at White Salmon, Wash., 
1908-15; Manager, Johnson Oil Refining Company, Galesburg, 111., 1916- 
18; various oil interests, from 1918 to date. 



RALPH SELTZER DILLEY 




a, b — 1528 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, December 13, 1872, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Franklin 

Peter Dilley, retired merchant, and Maria Alice Meek Dilley. 
Married, May 10, 1909, at Philadelphia, Pa., Isabel Margaret 

Collins, daughter of Ross Clark Collins. 



Princeton University 



69 



Children, Franklin Collins Dilley, born August 27, 1910; and 
Mary Alice Dilley, born April 25, 1913. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory School, Princeton, N. J., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891 and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed 
at 7 East Brown Hall. Member of the Philadelphian Society and played 
on the Freshman Baseball Team. 

From October 1, 1895 to July 1, 1919, was a member of the firm of 
F. P. Dilley and Company, importers of wines and liquors. 

Was a member of the Council of the Borough of Millbourne, Pa., for 
two years in 1912 and 1913. 



HUSTON DIXON 



A.B. 




1920 



a, c — First National Bank Building, Trenton, N. J. 
b — no West State Street, Trenton, N. J. 

Born, July 30, 1874, Providence, R. I. Son of John Dixon, 
clergyman (D.D., Lafayette College and Life Trustee of 
Princeton) and Jane Whiteman Huston Dixon. 

Married, April 14, 1904, at Trenton, N. J., Marguerite Alexan- 
der Lee, daughter of Benjamin F. Lee. 

Children, Annabel Lee Dixon, born April 7, 1905 ; Marion Ross 
Dixon, born July 14, 1906; Huston Dixon, Jr., born November 
20, 1910. 
Prepared for college at State Model School, Trenton, N. J., entering 



;o 



Class of 1895 



college in the fall of 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 10 
West Brown Hall. 

After leaving college read law with the Hon. William M. Lanning in 
Trenton, N. J., and was admitted to the New Jersey Bar in June, 1898. 
Since 1898 has practised law in Trenton, N. J. Was member of the City- 
Council of Trenton, N. J. for two terms. Counsel of the Board of Free- 
holders of Mercer County, 1907-10; Judge of the District Court of the 
City of Trenton, 1910-15. 

Member of Trenton Club, Sons of the Revolution, Republican Club of 
Trenton. 

During the war was Chairman for Mercer County of the United States 
Food Administration, from October, 1917 to April, 1918; Adviser of 
Adjutant General of New Jersey on Draft Law, September, 1918 to 
January, 1919. 

TRUSTEN POLK DRAKE 




a, b, c — Ocala, Fla. 

Born, October 6, 1873, St. Louis, Mo. Son of James E. Drake, 
lawyer, and Cornelia Bredell Polk Drake. 

Married, December 3, 1902, at Jacksonville, Fla., Alice Walton 
Hocker, daughter of William A. Hocker, Justice of Supreme 
Court of Florida (Hampden- Sydney College, Va., A.B; Uni- 
versity of Virginia, L.B.) 

Children, Trusten Polk Drake, Jr., born September 30, 1903; 
William Hocker Drake, born November 2, 1909. 



Princeton University 



7i 



Prepared for college at St. Luke's School, Bustleton, Pa., entering 
Princeton in 1892 and leaving in 1895. Roomed at 5 West Middle Wither- 
spoon Hall. Member of the Cottage Club. 

Since leaving college to the present time has been engaged in fruit 
growing in Florida. 

Related to Gaston Drake '94 and Bertrand Francis Drake, '98. 

During the war was chairman of the Yalaha, Fla., Branch of the Red 
Cross. 



GAIL AYERS DRAY 



B.S. 




1920 



a, c — 19 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. 
b — Windemere Hotel, Chicago, 111. 
Born, January 10, 1872, Havana, 111. Son of Walter S. Dray, 
real estate dealer, and Louise Shotwell Allen Dray. 

Prepared for college at Harvard School, Chicago, entering Princeton 
in September, 1891, and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 5 East 
Middle Witherspoon Hall. 

After leaving college, studied law at Northwestern University, Chicago. 

Admitted to the Bar in 1897, and has practiced law continuously in 
Chicago since then. 



7 2 



Class of 1895 
ARTHUR DUNN 



A.B 




1920 



a, c — 149 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

b — 29 Magnolia Avenue, Larchmont Manor, N. Y. 

Born, March 7, 1873, Elmira, N. Y. Son of Isaac B. Dunn, in 
United States Government service, and Georganna Francis 
Tatham Dunn. 

Married, December 21, 1897, at Scranton, Pa., Augusta Pratt 
Fordham, daughter of Jeremiah L. Fordham (A.B. Amherst). 

Children, Arthur Dunn, Jr., born October 18, 1899; John Ford- 
ham Dunn, born April 8, 1901 ; Adelaide Augusta Dunn, born 
January 21, 1906; Walter Bruce Dunn, born June 23, 1910; 
Virginia Francis Dunn, born October 10, 1913. 

Prepared for college at Towanda High School, Towanda, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 10 Nassau Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, Whig Hall, Uni- 
versity Glee Club. Editor, Nassau Herald. Won First Prize, Whig 
Hall Declamation contest ; Second Prize, Whig Hall Senior oratorical 
contest; the James Gordon Bennett New York Herald prize at Com- 
mencement. 

After leaving college he taught in the School of the Lackawanna, and 
at the same time studied law in the office of Hand & Hand, Scranton, Pa. 
In August 1897 admitted to the bar at Scranton and practiced law for 
several years in partnership with his brother, J. D. Dunn '92. Was Chair- 
man of Committee of Fifteen to finance playgrounds for Scranton. In 



Princeton University 



73 



1912 was Treasurer of Progressive Party of Lackawanna County, Pa., 
and delegate to the National Progressive Convention in Chicago. From 
1915 to 1918 was Vice President United Cereal Mills Co., Ltd., and Presi- 
dent of Fruited Cereal Co. of Quincy, 111. Since 1918, President Arthur 
Dunn & Co. Inc., New York, dealers in investment securities. 

Has been Director Peoples Bank of Scranton, Director Anthracite Trust 
Co., Director New River Banking & Trust Co., President Fidelity Mort- 
gage & Securities Co., Vice-President Cranberry Fuel Co., Director New 
River Co., Director Black Diamond Silk Co., Director New River Fuel 
Co., Chairman Citizens Committee of Fifty of Scranton, Pa. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York and Rotary Club of Quincy, 111. 

Author of "Scientific Selling and Advertising" and "The New World — 
the Story of Labor Unrest — Its Cause and Cure." 

During the war worked with the Rotary Club of Quincy, 111., on Red 
Cross, Y. M. C. A. and all Liberty Loan drives, raising money and selling 
bonds. 



GEORGE HAMILTON EDWARDS 




a, c — 250 West Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

b — 1707 Ditmas Avenue, Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York. 
Born, September 22, 1872, Lisle, N. Y. Son of Hamilton 

Edwards, lumber dealer, and Martha Hanford Edwards. 
Married, April 5, 1899, at Brooklyn, N. Y., Mary Florence 

Williams, daughter of Edward W. Williams. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory School, entering Prince- 



74 



Class of 1895 



ton in September, 1891, and leaving in April, 1893. Roomed in Edwards 
Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Freshman Football Team. 

Clerk in the employ of the Chase National Bank, New York, May, 1893 
to May, 1904; Secretary of The Centaur Company, Manufacturers of 
Castoria, from May, 1904, to date. 

Related to William H. Edwards, 1900 (brother) ; Pierpont E. Twitchell, 
'16 (nephew) ; T. Ff. McCauley, '12 (nephew) ; H. M. Twitchell, '20 
(nephew). 



VICTOR EDGAR EGBERT 



B.S. 




a, b — Maryland Avenue and Howe Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Born, October 4, 1873, Petroleum Centre, Venango County, Pa. 
Son of Milton Cooper Egbert and Emma Taft Egbert. 

Prepared for college at Mitchell School, Allegheny, Pa., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed at 9 
North East College. 

After leaving college he engaged in the oil business in Pittsburgh with 
his father ; and continued so up to the time of his last report to the 
Class Secretary in May, 191 1. Since then he has not replied to letters. 



MACOMB KEAN ELMER B.S. 

a, b, c — The Covington, 37th and Chestnut Streets, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Born, July 18, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Macomb K. 



Princeton University 



75 




Elmer, senior member of Elmer and Brinton, brokers (A.B. 
Princeton 1866) and Laura Malten Elmer. 

Prepared for college at West Jersey Academy, Bridgeton, N. J., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed 
at 4 North Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Freshman 
Banjo Club. 

Entered the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in September, 
1895, graduating in June, 1898, with degree of M.D. Resident Physician 
at St. Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, June, 1898-October, 1899, Assistant 
Surgeon United States Navy, July, 1900-March, 1904; practising phy- 
sician in Philadelphia from 1904 to date. 

Member of Princeton Club of Philadelphia, Overbrook Golf Club; 
Philadelphia County Medical Society; Medical Club of Philadelphia, 
Geographical Society of Philadelphia. 

Related to Dr. William Elmer, '32 (grandfather) Jonathan Elmer, 1804; 
(great-great-uncle) ; Dr. William Elmer, '61 (uncle) ; Dr. Henry W. 
Elmer, '66 (uncle) ; Macomb K. Elmer, '66 (father) ; Daniel Elmer 
(cousin) ; Col. William Elmer Potter, '63 (cousin) ; Dr. J. Barron Potter, 
'44 (cousin) ; Judge William G. Whiteley, '38 (cousin) ; Judge Benjamin 
Champney (cousin) ; Dr. Mathew K. Elmer, '62 (cousin) ; William Elmer, 
'91 (cousin) ; Dr. William G. Elmer, '94 (cousin) ; Arthur H. Elmer, '98 
(cousin) ; Robert P. Elmer, '99 (cousin) ; David Potter, '96 (cousin) ; 
J. Boyd Nixon, '67 (cousin) ; John Barron Roway Nixon (cousin) ; Boyd 
Nixon (cousin). The Rev. Jonathan Elmer (cousin) and Charles Ewing 
Elmer (great-uncle) were Trustees of Princeton but not alumni. 



7 6 



Class of 1895 
EDWARD HILTS EWING 



A.B. 




1895 



1920 



a — Stoughton, Mass. 

b — 40 Park Street, Stoughton, Mass. 

c — 15 Walnut Avenue, Stoughton, Mass. 

Born, September 1, 1872, New Alexandria, Westmoreland 
County, Pa. Son of Thompson R. Ewing, clergyman of the 
Presbyterian Church (A.B. Washington and Jefferson, 1864, 
D.D., 1884; graduate of Allegheny Theological Seminary) and 
Minerva Hilts Ewing. 

Married, June 20, 1899, at Philadelphia, Pa., Agnes Kelso 
Kennedy (died July 27, 1905) ; daughter of Hugh Kennedy, 
building contractor; February 14, 1907, at Fairfield, Conn., 
Margaret Bartlett Allen, daughter of Joshua Bartlett Allen, 
farmer. 

Children, Marjorie Ewing, born July 16, 1901 ; Helen Ewing, 
born April I, 1904; Alice Frances Ewing, born April 24, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Kiskiminetas Springs School and Princeton 
Preparatory School, entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 4 North West College. Member of Philadelphian So- 
ciety and Whig Hall. Won scholarship in Histology, Biological Laboratory, 
Woods Hole, Mass., summer of 1894. 

Entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md., in 
October, 1895, graduating in May, 1897, with degree of M.D. Resident 



Princeton University 



77 



physician at City Hospital, Baltimore, Md., 1897-98; in private practice 
at Stoughton, Mass., 1898 to the present time. Associate Medical Ex- 
aminer, Norfolk County, Mass., 1899 to the present time. 

Member of Chicataubut Club, Stoughton, Mass. Is a Mason. 

His brother, Boyd Ross Ewing, '94, is an alumnus of Princeton. 

During the war was commissioned First Lieutenant, U. S. Army, De- 
cember 7, 1917; served in Medical Corps in the United States; honorably 
discharged May 9, 1919. 



JOHN THOMSON FARIS 



A.B. 




1920 



a, c — 419 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
b — 4005 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, January 23, 1871, Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Son of 

William Wallace Faris, Clergyman (University of Chicago 

A.B. 1866) and Isabella Hardy Thomson Faris. 
Married, February 2, 1898, Elm Grove, West Virginia, Clara 

Lee Carter, daughter of Arthur Elmer Carter, farmer. 
Children, Bethann Beall Faris, born May 26, 1902 ; Clara Lee 

Faris, born August 10, 1914. 

Prepared for college at Union Academy, Anna, 111. ; student at Lake 
Forest College, 111., 1888-1890, entering Princeton February 1, 1893, and 
graduating June, 1895 A.B. Roomed at 3 South East College. Member 
of Clio Hall. Won Sophomore First Group Honors, Junior First Honor 
Prize, Class '70 Junior English Prize. 



78 Class of 1895 

Student at McCormick Theological Seminary, Chicago, 111., 1895-1898. 
Honorary degree, D.D., Jamestown, 1913. 

Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Mt. Carmel, 111., 1898-1903 ; Pastor, Mark- 
ham Memorial Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo., 1903-1907; Managing 
Editor, The Sunday School Times, Philadelphia, Pa., 1907-1908; Assistant 
Editor, Presbyterian Board of Publication, Philadelphia, 1908-1914; 
Editor, Presbyterian Board of Publication, Philadelphia, 1914 to date. 

Elected to membership in Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1916; 
to American Geographical Society, 1917. 

Author of "The Sunday School and the Pastor," "Pleasant Sunday 
Afternoons with the Children," "The Sunday School in the Country," 
"Winning their way," "Romance of the English Bible," "Making Good," 
"Winning the Oregon Country," "Life of Dr. J. R. Miller," "Men who 
Made Good," "The Alaskan Pathfinder," "The Book of God's Providence," 
"Seeking Success," "The Book of Answered Prayer," The Book of Faith 
in God," "Reapers of His Harvest," "The Book of Personal Work," "The 
Mother Heart," "The Christian According to Paul," "How it Was Done in 
Harmony," "Real Stories from our History," "The Book of Joy," "Old 
Roads out of Philadelphia," "Makers of our History," "The Virgin Is- 
lands" (co-author with Theodoor de Booy), "The Romance of Old Phila- 
delphia," "Historic Shrines of America," "The Victory Life," "Seeing 
Pennsylvania," "The Book of Courage," "On the Trail of the Pioneers," 
"Seeing the Far West." 

Relative of John T. Carter, M.D., Princeton '71. 

During the war was in charge of religious Newspaper Publicity of the 
Division of Cooperating Organizations of the United States Food Ad- 
ministration, Washington, D. C. 



GORDON FISHER A.B. 

a, c — 450 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
b — 4 Colonial Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Born, November 2, 1873, Swissvale, Pa. Son of Samuel Jack- 
son Fisher, minister (A.B., A.M., LL.D. Hamilton College; 
LL.D. University of Pittsburgh) and Annie Shreve Fisher. 

Married, June 6, 1901 at Swissvale, Pa. Matilda Carothers 
Milligan, daughter of John Wesley Milligan (A.B. Dart- 
mouth). 

Children, Gordon Fisher, Jr., born May 25, 1904; John Milligan 
Fisher, born January 3, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Shadyside Academy, Pittsburgh, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 11 North West College. Member of Philadelphian Society, Clio Hall, 
Tisrer Inn and Triangle Club. Editor of the Princeton Tiger. 



Princeton University 



79 




1920 



Entered the New York Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897 with 
degree of LL.B. Since 1897 has practised law in Pittsburgh, Pa. ; as- 
sociated with Dalzell, Scott and Gordon, 1898-1906; member of the firm 
of Dalzell, Fisher and Hawkins, 1 906-1918; member of the firm of Dalzell, 
Fisher and Dalzell, 1918 to date. Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 
in University of Pittsburgh. 



CHARLES LEON FISK 

a, b — 2910 Noble Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 
c — 801-805 Hippodrome Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 



A.B. 



Born, December 20, 1868, Meriden, Conn. Son of Wilbur 
Nathan Fisk, mechanic, and Agnes Monegan Fisk. 

Married, April 26, 1899, at Chester, Vt, Marion Ada Ballou, 
daughter of Luman A. Ballou, farmer. 

Children, Marion Agnes Fisk, born July 29, 1900; Chester 
Ballou Fisk, born December 16, 1905. 

Prepared for college at Mount Hermon School, Mount Hermon, Mass., 
entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 15 
South Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, Glee 
Club. Won First Prize, Clio Hall Freshman Speaking. 

Entered Chicago Theological Seminary in 1895, graduating in 1898 with 
degree of B.D. 

Minister of the Congregational Church in charge of churches in 
Chicago and Sabetha, Kas., 1897-1902: District Superintendent of Sunday 



8o 



Class of 1895 




1895 



1920 



School Work, Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky, 
1902-16; District Education Secretary in Ohio and the Southeast for 
the Congregational Education Society, 1916 to date. Called for special 
six months' work as District Secretary to raise $275,000 in Ohio and 
$200,000 in Michigan toward a $5,000,000 Annuity Fund for Old Age 
Pensions for Congregational Ministers, July, 1919 to February, 1920. 

Member of Cleveland Princeton Alumni Association; Western Reserve 
Congregational Club. 

Son, Chester Ballou Fisk, is preparing for Princeton. 

During the war took part in Victory Loan campaigns. 



RALSTON FLEMMING 



A.B. 



a — Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va., or Care of Adjutant 

General, U. S. A., Washington, D. C. 
b, c — Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 

Born, September, 11, 1874, Norristown, Pa. Son of Woodville 
Flemming, lawyer (B.A. North Carolina 1866, LL.B. 1867) 
and Ella Ralston Flemming. 

Married, June 30, 1897, at New York, Bertha Bryan (died De- 
cember 15, 1909) ; August 4, 1919, at Noroton, Conn., Jean 
Robinson, daughter of Edward Robinson, merchant. 

Children, Bryan Flemming, born November 7, 1898. 

Prepared for college at Rittenhouse Academy, Washington, D. C, enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, 



Princeton University 



81 




1920 



A.B. Roomed at 33 University Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society 
and Clio Hall. Won Clio Hall Freshman Second Essay Prize. 

Entered New York Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897 with degree 
of LL.B. 

Partner in the firm of Flemming and Flemming, lawyers, New York 
City, from 1895 to 1909; practicing lawyer, 1909-1917. 

Was commissioned Captain, Field Artillery, U. S. Army, November 26, 
1917. 

Son, Bryan Flemming, is an undergraduate at Princeton in the Class of 
1920. 



JOSEPH MARSHALL FLINT 

a, 6—320 Temple Street, New Haven, Conn. 
c — 321 Cedar Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Born, July 8, 1872, Chicago, 111. Son of Francis Flint, con- 
tractor, and Sarah Elizabeth Dancy Flint. 

Married, September 15, 1903, at Hacienda del Pozo de Verona, 
California, Anne Priscilla Apperson, daughter of Elbert C. 
Apperson. 

Prepared for college at Lake Forest Academy, Lake Forest, 111., enter- 
ing Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1893. Roomed 17 West Witherspoon 
Hall. Manager, Freshman Base Ball team ; editor Daily Princetonian ; 
member of Tiger Inn ; played on University Football team. 

Entered University of Chicago 1893, graduating 1895 B.S. ; entered Johns 
Hopkins Medical School 1896, graduating 1900 M.D. ; student at Univer- 



82 



Class of 1895 




sity of Leipzig, summer semester 1900; student at Universities of Vienna, 
Munich, Bonn, Leipzig, 1905-07. Honorary degrees, A.M. Princeton 1900; 
A.M. Yale, 1907. 

Assistant in Anatomy, University of Chicago, summer semester, 1897 ; 
Assistant, Johns Hopkins Medical Commission to the Philippines, 1898 ; 
Associate in Anatomy, University of Chicago, 1900-01 ; United States 
Marine Hospital Service, on special plague duty, in charge of the Plague 
Laboratory, San Francisco, 1901 ; Professor of Anatomy, University of 
California, 1901-07; Professor of Surgery, Yale University, 1907 to date 
(first full time Clinical Professor in America) ; Attending Surgeon, New 
Haven Hospital, 1907-1917 ; Chief Surgeon, New Haven Hospital, 1917 to 
date; Chief Surgeon, New Haven Dispensary, 1907 to date; Director, Sur- 
gical Laboratory, Yale University, 1907 to date ; Surgeon in Command, 
Sixth Surgical Division, Arsakeion Hospital, Athens, Second Balkan War, 
1913 ; Medecin Chef, Hopital 32 bis Chateau de Passy, France, 1915 ; 
editor, American Journal of Anatomy, 1903-1907. 

Elected to membership in Sigma Chi, 1901 ; Morphologische-Physiol- 
ogische Gesellschaft Vienna, 1906; American Surgical Association, 1915, 
Interurban Surgical Society, 1915 ; Fellow American College of Sur- 
geons, 1914; New England Surgical Society, 1914; Manila Medical So- 
ciety, 1900; American Association of Anatomists, 1900. 

Member of Princeton and University Clubs, New York; Graduates and 
Lawn Clubs, New Haven; Cercle Interallie, Paris, 1917-18; Cercle Volnay, 
Paris, 1917-18. 

Author of numerous articles and monographs on surgical and an- 
atomical subjects. 

During the war was member of the Medical Board of Council of Na- 



Princeton University 



83 



tional Defense, and chairman of the Medical Board of Connecticut Council 
of National Defense. Raised funds for and organized the Yale Mobile 
Hospital. Commissioned, July 12, 1917, Major, Medical Reserve Corps, 
United States Army. Mobilized as Commanding officer, Base Hospital 
No. 39 (Yale Mobile Hospital) August 9, 1917 and embarked for France 
August 23. Stationed at Limoges, at the Mas-Loubier Hospital, September 
17, 1917. Assigned for duty with Sixth French Army at Aisne offensive, 
October, 1917. Appointed Liaison Officer, Chief Surgeon's Office to 
Twelfth French Region. Surveyed and organized hospital centre of five 
thousand beds in Limoges. Appointed Liaison Officer, Chief Surgeon's 
Office American Expeditionary Force to French War Office for Mobile 
Sanitary Formations. Recommended the purchase of twenty mobile hos- 
pitals and twenty mobile operating units for French, which recommenda- 
tion was adopted. Ordered to front in command of First Mobile Hos- 
pital for the American Expeditionary Forces, April 12, 1918. Promoted 
to Lieutenant Colonel, M. C, June 6, 1918. Promoted to Colonel, Medical 
Section Reserve Corps, April 4, 1919. Discharged from active service 
January 28, 1919, as Commanding Officer, Mobile Hospital No. 39. 
Awarded decoration "Officier de l'lnstruction Publique" by French Govern- 
ment for services as Medecin Chef, Hopital 32 bis, February 17, 1919; 
Distinguished Service Medal, March 1, 1919 ; Citation by General Pershing 
for "exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services" April 19, 1919. 



CURTIS SMILEY FOSTER 



A.B. 




a, c — 308 Diamond Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
b — 715 North Negley Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



8 4 



Class of 1895 



Son of James Young 



Born, February 9, 1873, East Brady, Pa. 
Foster and Mary Wallace Foster. 

Prepared for college at Clarion Normal School, Clarion, Pa., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and graduating cum laude in 1895 A.B. Roomed at 
15 North Edwards Hall. Member of Whig Hall. Won High Honors in 
Natural Science at graduation. 

Entered Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1895, 
graduating in 1898 with degree of M.D. Since 1898 has been a practising 
physician and surgeon. Gynaecologist to Western Pennsylvania Hos- 
pital, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1909. 

Fellow of American College of Surgeons, 1913; Fellow of American 
Association of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists; Fellow of Pittsburgh 
Academy of Medicine. 

Member of Duquesne Club, University Club, Pittsburgh Athletic Club. 

During the war was a member of the Medical Advisory Board of 
Pittsburgh. 



JOHN SELBY FRAME 



A.B. 




1920 



a — Fargo, North Dakota. 

b — 362 Ninth Avenue, South, Fargo, North Dakota. 
c — 308-314 de Lendrecie Building, Fargo, North Dakota. 
Born, November 29, 1872, Champaign, 111. Son of John Selby 
Frame, clergyman, (A.B. Princeton, i860) and Clara Win- 
chester Dana Frame. 



Princeton University 85 

Married, April 26, 1905, at Superior, Wis., Elizabeth Rutter 
Gilbert, daughter of Henry Wilbur Gilbert, lawyer. 

Children, John Selby Frame, Jr., born March 8, 1907; Margery 
Frame, born July 7, 1910; Daniel Piatt Frame, born July 31, 
1911. 

Prepared for college at Troy High School, Troy, N. Y., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 2 South Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, 
Whig Hall and Triangle Club. Was Washington's Birthday Orator in 
Senior Year. 

Entered Princeton Theological Seminary in 1895, graduating in 1898; 
student at University of Marburg, Germany during the spring semester, 
1898; student at the University of Berlin during winter semester, 1898-99; 
student at the New York Law School, New York City, 1900-01, for one 
term. 

Since 1901 has engaged in the practice of law, at Fargo, N. D. ; as a 
member of the firm of Newman, Holt and Frame, 1904-06; of Engerud, 
Holt and Frame, of 1906-17; of Engerud, Diret, Holt and Frame, 1917 to 
date. 

Member of the Board of Education of Fargo, N. D., 1911-13 and 1914- 
20; Vice President of the same Board 1915-19; President of the same 
Board, May, 1919-20. 

Member of Fargo Commercial Club and Fargo Country Club. 

During the war was a member of the Fargo "Four Minute Men"; 
chairman of Cass County Board of Instruction for Selective Service Men ; 
solicitor in the Second Liberty Loan Drive ; "Captain" in the third, fourth 
and fifth Liberty Loan drives. 

Applied for Field Artillery Officers' Training Camp at Kentucky in Octo- 
ber, 1918, but the armistice was signed before application was acted upon. 



ROBIN WILLIAM CUMMINS FRANCIS A.B. 

a, c — Surgeon's Office, Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J. 
b — 300 Traphagen Street, West Hoboken, N. J. 

Born, January 10, 1871, Freeport, Pa. Son of John Junkin 
Francis, minister of the Presbyterian Church (A.B. West- 
minister College, Pa. 1866; D.D. Hanover College, Ind., 1888) 
and Louise Cummings Francis. 

Married, July 4, 1903, at Chicago, 111., May Edith Schillinger 
(died January 28, 1915) ; May 2, 1917, at Cincinnati, O., Laura 
Jane Wilson, daughter of William Wilson, Minister of the 
Methodist Church. 



86 



Class of 1895 




Children, Gwendolyn Francis, born March 20, 1907, and died 
July 17, 1913. 

Prepared for college at Woodward High School, Cincinnati, O., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 7 North West College, Member of Philadelphian Society and 
Freshman Baseball Team. 

Entered the Medical College of Ohio, Cincinnati, O., in September, 1895, 
graduating in May, 1898, with degree of M. D. 

Interne in the Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati, O., 1898-1899; in 
private practice, 1899-1917. Demonstrator of Comparative Anatomy in 
the Medical College of Ohio (Department of Medicine of the University of 
Cincinnati) 1900-09. Assistant Health Officer of Cincinnati, O., 1900-05. 

Elected to the Academy of Medicine, Cincinnati, O., 1899; Ohio State 
Medical Society, 1899; The American Medical Association, 1899. 

Member of University Club of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Automobile Club, 
Hyde Park Country Club, Terrace Park Country Club. 

Related to David Junkin Satterfield, D.D., Princeton, 1870. 

Commissioned First Lieutenant, Medical Reserve Corps, August 1, 1917; 
called to active duty at Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., December 
4, 1917; promoted to Captain, Medical Corps, May 1, 1918. 



JESSE HOWARD FRY B.S. 

a, b, c — Rochester, Pa. 
Born, December 24, 1872, Rochester, Pa. Son of H. C. Fry, 
glass manufacturer, and Emily Mathews Fry. 



Princeton University 



$7 




1095 1920 

Married, October 2, 1901, at Rochester, Pa., Florence Ellis. 
Children, Florence Ellis Fry, born May 16, 1905; Emily Eliza- 
beth Fry, born January 7, 1907 ; J. Howard Fry, born 1912 ; 
Eleanor Fry, born 1916. 

Prepared for college at Trinity Hall, Washington, Pa., entering Prince- 
ton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 1 South Reunion Hall. 

Since 1895 has been engaged in the business of manufacturing glass; 
at first Sales Manager for the H. C. Fry Glass Company and the Beaver 
Valley Glass Company ; later, President of the North Rochester Improve- 
ment Company; Vice-President of the H. C. Fry Glass Company. 

During the war was chairman of War Service Committee, Chemical 
Glass Division, of War Industries Board. 



WILLIAM HILL FULPER 

a, b, c — Flemington, N. J. 

Born, May 15, 1872, Flemington, N. J. Son of William Hill 
Fulper, merchant, and Mary Higgins Fulper. 

Married, May 14, 1906, at Elizabeth, N. J., Etta Pearce, daugh- 
ter of B. Pearce. 

Children, William H. Fulper, born April 6, 1909 ; Willette Mary 
Fulper, born May 1, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
1891, and leaving in 1894. Roomed at 6 East Brown Hall. Member of 
Freshman Football Team, Varsity Football Team, Track Team. 



88 



Class of 1895 




1920 



Manager of the Mercer Oil Company, Trenton, N. J., 1894-96; Manager 
of the American Oil and Supply Company, Newark, N. J., 1896-98; served 
in the Spanish-American War as Passed Assistant Paymaster (with rank 
of lieutenant) on U. S. S. "Resolute," and U. S. S. "Montauk," receiving 
Sampson medal for three naval engagements which included destruction 
of Cervera's fleet, 1898. From 1899 to date, Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Fulper Pottery Company, Flemington, N. J. 

Elected Master Craftsman by Boston Society of Arts and Crafts, 1916; 
active member of American Ceramic Society, 1919; awarded Medal of 
Honor, Panama Pacific Exposition, 1915, and nine other awards ; awarded 
the Mrs. J. Ogden Armour Prize, Art Institute of Chicago, 1915. 

Member of Boston Society of Arts and Crafts, American Federation of 
Arts, National Society of Craftsmen, Artists' Guild, of Chicago, Metro- 
politan Museum of Art, English Ceramic Society, Hunterdon Club of 
Flemington, Princeton Club of New York, Trenton Club, Trenton Country 
Club, American Ceramic Society, New Jersey Clay Workers' Association, 
Travel Club of New York. 

Son, William H. Fulper, Jr., is preparing for Princeton and expects to 
enter in Class of 1931. 

During the war was U. S. Fuel Administrator for Hunterdon County ; 
served on committees and as chairman of various "Drives" ; Second 
Lieutenant Supply Officer, 2nd Battalion, New Jersey State Militia. 



Princeton University 
DIMITER NICOLOFF FURNAJIEFF 



89 
A.B. 




a — Sofia, Bulgaria. 

b — Rue Solun, 16, Sofia, Bulgaria. 
Born, October 9, 1866, Bansko, Macedonia. Son of Nicola 

Atanasoff Furnajieff and Alexandra Nicolova Furnajieff. 
Married, September 15, 1898, at Princeton, N. J., Zoritza V. 

Karaivanova, daughter of Vasil P. Karaivanoff. 
Children, Nicolai D. Furnajieff, born September 10, 1899; 

Vasil D. Furnajieff, born October 16, 1900. 

Prepared for college at the State Normal School, Fredonia, N. Y., en- 
tering Princeton in the fall of 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 42 South Edwards Hall and 11 Nassau Hall. Member of the Philadel- 
phian Society and Whig Hall. Sang in the chapel choir. 

Entered Princeton Theological Seminary in 1895, graduating in 1898. 
Pastor of Protestant Church at Kustendil, Bulgaria, 1898-1906; Pastor of 
Protestant Church at Kaskovo, Bulgaria, 1906-07; Pastor of Protestant 
Church at Philippopolis, Bulgaria, 1907-11; Pastor of Protestant Church 
at Sofia, Bulgaria, 191 1 to date. Legal representative of all the Evan- 
gelical churches of Bulgaria and Macedonia, 1912; elected Moderator 
of Protestant General Assembly, 1913. President of the Bulgarian Evan- 
gelical Society, from 1915 to date. President of the Bulgarian National 
Alliance of Y. M. C. A.'s, 1914. 

In August and September, 1919, was a member of the Bulgarian delega- 
tion for peace at Paris, as was also Mrs. Furnajieff. He writes, "Paris 



90 



Class of 1895 



called us there and locked us up. Never gave us a chance to see the 
eyes of the Peace Conference ; never gave us an opportunity to say a word 
for ourselves; never heard anybody of our sympathizers (missionaries 
and others). The humane and just basis for peace announced by the 
great and noble President Woodrow Wilson was trampled under foot 
by the greedy and selfish European diplomats. America wanted to do 
justice and help; Europe refused it all. The Paris Peace is Piratical 
Peace."' 

Author of booklets, "Spiritual Awakening" and "Character." 
During the war was President of the Bulgarian National Alliance 
of Y. M. C. A.'s ; directed the Y. M. C. A. work on "Soldiers' Home"; 
was member of the staff of Y. M. C. A. War Prisoners' Aid in Bul- 
garia; conducted weekly services for the English war prisoners in the 
camp at Philippopolis ; has preached for their war and sanitary mis- 
sion in Sofia since November, 1918. 



THEODORE FASSITT FURNESS 



B.S. 




a, b — Front Street and Providence Road, Media, Pa. 

c — The Philadelphia Rubber Works Company, 1305 Land 
Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, January 14, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Frank 

Furness, architect, and Fannie Fassitt Furness. 
Married, October 7, 1913, at Westtown, Pa., Eudora Adele 
Sproat, daughter of Harris Elric Sproat. 



Princeton University 



9i 



Children, Fannie Fassitt Furness, born August 25, 1915; Theo- 
dore Fassitt Furness, Jr., born July 24, 1917. 
Prepared for college at the William Penn Charter School, entering 

Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 70 and 

71 University Hall. Member of Ivy Club. 
After leaving college was associated for a year with Stevens and 

Company, Philadelphia, manufacturers of architectural terra-cotta. In 

1917, with The New York Belting and Packing Company, New York. 

Since April 1, 1903, Research Laboratory Chemist of the Philadelphia 

Rubber Works Company, dealers in reclaimed rubber. 
Member of the Princeton Club of Philadelphia and the Rose Tree 

Fox Hunting Club of Media, Pa. 
Brother, Radclyffe Furness, '91, is an alumnus of Princeton. 



JOHN WORK GARRETT 



B.S. 





1920 

a, c — Garrett Building, Redwood and South Streets, Balti- 
more, Md. 
b — Evergreen, Govans, Baltimore, Md. 
Born, May 19, 1872, Baltimore, Md. Son of Thomas Harrison 
Garrett, banker (A.B. 1868, A.M. 1871, Princeton) and Alice 
Dickenson Whitridge Garrett. 
Married, December 24, 1908, at Washington, D. C., Alice 
Warder, daughter of Benjamin H. Warder. 

Prepared for college with private tutors, entering Princeton in 1891 



92 Class of 1895 

and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 3 Stockton Street. Member 
of Whig Hall, Tiger Inn, Freshman Glee Club, University Glee and 
Mandolin Clubs, Triangle Club, Sophomore Reception, Junior Prom, and 
Senior Dance Committees, editor of Bric-a-Brac, President of the South- 
ern Club, Vice-President of the Democratic Club. 

Member of the firm of Robert Garrett and Sons, Bankers, 1896; mem- 
ber of the Baltimore Stock Exchange, 1896; Director, Trustee, etc., 
of various Railroad, Banking, Mining and other companies and educa- 
tional institutions, 1896-1901. Secretary of the American Legation, The 
Hague, 1901 ; to the Netherlands aand Luxembourg, 1903, Second Secre- 
tary, American Embassy, Berlin, 1905 ; First Secretary, American 
Embassy, Rome, 1908; Awarded "Messina Earthquake Medal" from 
the Italian Government, 1009; Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary to Venezuela, 1910, receiving decoration of "Busto 
del Libertador," 2nd class ; Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary to Argentina, 191 1; Special Agent of the Department of State, 
August 6, 1914; Representative at Bordeaux of the American Embassy 
at Paris, September 2 to December 19, 1914; from then until relations with 
Germany were broken off charged with German and Austro-Hungarian 
interests in France at the American Embassy at Paris, especially matters 
relating to civilian prisoners of war ; in charge of visiting the camps 
of these prisoners; on behalf of the French Government inspected camps 
of French officers prisoners in Germany, 1916; Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary to the Netherlands and Luxembourg, 1917-1919; 
Chairman of Special Diplomatic Mission to negotiate a treaty with Ger- 
many regarding prisoners of war; jointly negotiated and signed the 
treaty for the Treatment, Exchange and Repatriation of Prisoners of 
War, Civilian Prisoners and Sanitary Personnel, November 11, 1918, 
at Berne. 

Member of American Society of International Law (1906), Archaeo- 
logical Institute of America (1910), American Forestry Association, Na- 
tional Geographic Society, (1906), New York Zoological Society (1897) 
American Museum of Natural History (1910), American Asiatic So- 
ciety, Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore Municipal Art Society, 
Geographical Society of Baltimore, The American Bison Society, Amer- 
ican Numismatic Society (1920), American Geographical Society (1917). 

Member of Maryland, Baltimore, University, Elkridge Kennels, Balti- 
more Country, Merchants, City, and Charcoal Clubs of Baltimore and 
Bachelors' Cotillon ; Metropolitan, Chevy Chase and Montgomery County 
Clubs of Washington; Princeton Club of Philadelphia; Nassau Club of 
Princeton ; University, Princeton, Gr'olier, and National Arts Clubs of 
New York; St. Cloud Golf Club of Paris. 

Related to T. Harrison Garrett, '68 (father) ; Robert Garrett, '67 
(uncle) ; Horatio W. Garrett, '95 (brother) ; Robert Garrett, '97 (brother). 



Princeton University 
CYRENUS WILLARD GIBBS 



93 





1920 



a, b — 1 127 DeVictor Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
c — 2130 Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Born, September 17, 1873, at Wellington, O. Son of Willard 
Melville Gibbs, paint manufacturer, and Ellen Melvina Rex- 
ford Gibbs. 

Married, October 21, 1904, at Pittsburgh, Pa., Anna Hamilton, 
daughter of John Patrick Hamilton. 

Children, Elinore Hamilton Gibbs, born January 30, 1906 ; Jane 
Hamilton Gibbs, born December 17, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Allegheny Preparatory School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
entering Princeton in October, 1891 and leaving in June, 1893. Roomed 
in University Hall. Member of American Whig Society. 

Civil Engineering until 190 1 ; Assistant Engineer, Pittsburgh Railways 
Company, 1901-06; Assistant to Vice-president, Pittsburgh Railways Com- 
pany, 1906-12; Chief Engineer, Duquesne Contracting Company (general 
contracting work), 1912-18; Manager, Gibbs Coal Company (coal strip- 
ping and mining), 1918-January 1, 1919; Manager, Equitable Coke Com- 
pany (coal mining), January I, 1919 to date. 

Member of Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh. 



94 



Class of 1895 
GEORGE TUTTLE GOULD 





1895 



1920 



a, c — 262 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 
b — Dedham, Mass. 
Porn, August 6, 1873, Far Rockaway, N. Y. Son of George 
Tuttle Gould, merchant, and Mary Richard Gardner Gould. 

Prepared for college at Newark Academy, Newark, N. J., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1894. Roomed in University Hall. 
Played on Freshman Baseball nine. Member of Cottage Club. 

After leaving college spent one year in banking with Old Colony Trust 
Company, Boston, Mass., and two years in business with J. Gould's Sons 
and Company, New York. Has since been connected with various com- 
panies in the automobile business. At present, Eastern Factory representa- 
tive at Boston for the Acme Motor Truck Company of Cadillac, Mich. 

During the was was connected with the Labor Adjustment Board. 



WILFRID MATCHIN HAGER A.B. 

a, b — 1308 North Cascade Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
c — 401 Mining Exchange Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Born, September 13, 1873, Scranton, Pa. Son of Willis D. 

Hager and Jane Matchin Hager. 
Married, November 11, 1903, at Ogontz, Pa., Clarissa Butler, 

daughter of John M. Butler. 
Children, Janet Hager, born September 30, 1904; W. Morris 

Hager, born May 28, 1908 ; Clarissa Hager, born June 3, 1919. 



Princeton University 



95 




Entered Princeton in 1891, graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 3 and 
4 University Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Colonial Club. 

For six years after graduation spent most of the time ranching in 
New Mexico. Since 1908 has been engaged in the banking business in 
Colorado Springs, Colo. In 1910 Vice-President of the Colorado Title 
and Trust Company. Now member officer of W. M. Hager and Com 
pany, bankers and brokers, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Member of Nassau Club of Princeton ; University, Princeton, Recess 
and Rocky Mountain Clubs of New York; Racquet, Huntington Valley 
and Princeton Clubs of Philadelphia ; Cheyenne Mountain Country Club, 
El Paso Club and Colorado Springs Golf Club, of Colorado Springs. 

During the war was treasurer and member of the Executive Committee 
of the local Red Cross Chapter. 



GUSTAVUS ABEEL HALL 

a, c — 95 Pearl Street, Boston, Mass. 

b — 9 Elmwood Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

Born, December 15, 1874, Trenton, N. J. Son of John Alex- 
ander Hall (Princeton, 1866), and Annie Abeel Hall. 

Married, October 30, 1901, at New Brunswick, N. J., Alice 
Haxall Carpender, daughter of Charles J. Carpender, retired. 

Children, John Alexander Hall, 2nd, born November 4, 1902 ; 
Charles Carpender Hall, born May 29, 1906; Abeel Neilson 
Hall, born July 23, 1907 (died April 30, 1909). 



96 



Class of 1895 




1920 



Prepared for college at New Jersey State Model School, entering Prince- 
ton in 1891 and leaving in 1892. Member of Philadelphian Society and 
Whig Hall. Class Historian in Freshman year. 

After leaving college was associated with John A. Roebling's Sons' Com- 
pany, manufacturers of wire and wire rope, being manager of the Cleve- 
land branch until January, 191 1. From January, 191 1 to date, Treasurer 
and General Manager of the Durable Wire Rope Company of Boston, 
Mass. 

Member of the Nassau Club of Princeton, Princeton Club of New York, 
City Club of Boston. 

His son, John A. Hall, 2nd, is preparing for Princeton at Mercersburg 
Academy, and expects to enter the Class of 1925. 



CHARLES LEE HAMILTON 



B.S. 



a, c — 815-817 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
b— Sewickley, Pa. 
Born, January 18, 1873, Pittsburgh, Pa. Son of Samuel 

Hamilton, dealer in pianos, and Frances Elizabeth Campbell 

Hamilton. 
Married, April 25, 1906, at Pittsburgh, Pa., Margaret Miller 

Marshall, daughter of George Vardy Marshall. 
Children, George Marshall Hamilton, born February 15, 1907; 

Nancy Hamilton, born July 27, 1908 ; Alexader Hamilton, born 

January 23, 191 1; Margaret Hamilton, born July 22, 1912. 



Princeton University 



97 




Prepared for college at Bordentown Military Institute, Bordentown, 
N. J., entering Princeton in September, 1891 and leaving in June, 1895. 
(Degree of B.S. conferred in 1905). Roomed in South West Brown Hall. 
Member of Philadelphian Society, Freshman Glee Club, Whig Hall and 
Cottage Club. 

Since graduation has been engaged in retail musical merchandise busi- 
ness, first as an employe of his father, Samuel Hamilton, and since 1904 
as secretary and treasurer of a corporation formed by his father, brother 
and himself known as the S. Hamilton Company. 

Treasurer and later President of the Princeton Alumni Association of 
Western Pennsylvania. 

Three brothers are alumni of Princeton, Samuel Hamilton, Jr., '01 ; 
Donald C. Hamilton, '05 ; Ferris F. Hamilton, '12. His nephew, Samuel 
Hamilton Williams, '22, is an undergraduate. 



CLARENCE MITCHELL HAMILTON 



A.B. 



a, b — Hewlett, Long Island, N. Y. 

c — 19 West 44th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, June 7, 1873, Montrose, N. J. Son of Albert Thompson 

Hamilton, woolen merchant, and Emma Ward Gould Hamilton. 
Married, October 18, 1904, at Croton-on-Hudson, Jane Lathrop 

Farrington, daughter of Harvey Palmer Farrington. 
Children, Florence Farrington Hamilton, born July 24, 1905 ; 

Janet Hamilton, born November 18, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Dearborn Morgan Academy, Orange, N. J., 



9§ 



Class of 1895 




entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 4 University Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Tennis Club, 
Colonial Club. 

Vice-president of Smith and Mabley, Inc., importers of motor cars, 
1899-1907; Vice-president of Isotta Import Company, importers of motor 
cars, 1908-09 ; Vice-president of Daimler Importing Company, importers 
of motor cars, 1910-13 ; General Manager of Healey and Company, im- 
porters of motor cars, 1913-15; Vice-president of Morton W. Smith 
Company, motor cars, from 1915 to date. 



EDWIN DODGE HARDIN 



A.B. 



a, b, c — 890 Washington Street, Bath, Maine. 
Born, February 22, 1874, Beirut, Syria. Son of Oscar J. 

Hardin, minister, foreign missionary of the Presbyterian Board 

(A.B., A.M. Lafayette) and Mary Stuart Dodge Hardin. 
Married, November 20, 1902, at Cuba, N. Y., Bertha Sherrill 

Wynkoop, daughter of John Quackenbos Wynkoop. 

Prepared for college at Sedgwick School, Great Barrington, Mass., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 20 North West College. Member of Whig Hall. 

Student at Auburn Theological School, Auburn, N. Y., from September, 
1895, to May, 1898. Minister of Pierce Avenue Presbyterian Church, 
Niagara Falls, N. Y., 1898-1903; First Presbyterian Church, Cuba, N. Y., 
1903-08; Second Congregational Church, Massena, N. Y., 1908-12; First 



Princeton University 



99 




1895 1920 

Congregational Church, Groton, N. Y., 1912-18; Winter Street Congrega- 
tional Church, Bath, Maine, 1918 to date. 

Member of Civic Club of Niagara Falls, N. Y., and Town and Gown 
Club of Ithaca, N. Y. 

Author of articles in "Homiletic Review," "Biblical World," "American 
Journal of Theology," etc. 



JOHN COWDEN HARDING 



A.B. 




ioo Class of 1895 

a, c — 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 
b — 2406 Pioneer Road, Evanston, 111. 

Born, December 4, 1873, Nebraska City, Neb. Son of Amos J. 
Harding, (manager of Western Department, Springfield Fire 
and Marine Insurance Company, of Springfield, Mass.,) and 
Eliza Cowden Harding. 

Married, May 23, 1901, at Evanston, 111., Elizabeth A. Pratt, 
daughter of Frederick W. Pratt, dealer in wholesale hardware. 

Children, Margaret Cowden Harding, born May 23, 1903 ; Eliza- 
beth Ogden Harding, born May 19, 1907. 

Prepared for college at West Division High School, Chicago, 111., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 7 South Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Faust Club, Uni- 
versity Glee Club, Triangle Club, Ivy Club, Right Wing Club, Class Day 
Committee. 

Since leaving college has been associated with the Springfield Fire and 
Marine Insurance Company, which is engaged in writing fire and other 
kindred lines of insurance and is one of the oldest and most reliable insti- 
tutions in the United States. In 1895 entered the Western Department of 
this company (established by his father in 1876 at Chicago, 111.) after 
several months' experience in the office, traveled for the company as an 
inspector, special agent and adjuster; in 1899 returned to the Chicago office 
as Superintendent of the Loss Department; several years later received 
promotion as Superintendent of Agencies; from 191 1 to date has been 
Assistant Manager. 

Member of University Club of Chicago, Union League Club of Chicago, 
Indian Hill Golf Club of Winnetka, 111. 

Brother, Dwight S. Harding, is an alumnus of Princeton, 1809. 

ELLWOOD HARLOW A.B. 

a. b, c— 325 West 86th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Born, May 8, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Dr. John M. 
Harlow, physician (M.D. University of the State of New York) 
and Sarah M. McNeill Harlow. 

Married, May 24, 1899, at New York, N. Y., Antoinette Whit- 
lock, daughter of Daniel B. Whitlock, cordage manufacturer. 

Children, Elisabeth Harlow, born October 11, 1900. 

Prepared for college at the Lyon School, New York, and spent freshman 
year at Columbia University in 1890. Entered Princeton in Sophomore 
year in Class '94, was away for a year because of illness, and entered the 
Class of '95 as a Junior in September, 1893, graduating in 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 13 North Dod Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society and Sym- 



Princeton University 



ioi 





1895 



1920 



phony Banjo Club. Was with the Varsity Banjo Club for several 
concerts. 

Entered the New York University and Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College in 1896, graduating in 1899 with degree of M.D. Since 1899 
has practised medicine in New York City; Assistant Surgeon, Knapp 
Memorial Eye Hospital, New York; Attending Ophthalmologist, Vander- 
bilt Clinic, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. Elected to 
membership in the New York Academy of Medicine, May 19, 1904. 

Member of the Church Club of New York; associate member of the 
Princeton Club of New York. 

His wife's nephews, Louis I. Whitlock '07 and Willard P. Whitlock, 
Jr., '10 are alumni of Princeton. 

During the war served on the Draft Board No. 159. 



NORMAN BALDWIN HARRISON 



A.B. 



a — University Station, Seattle, Wash. 
b — 5042 17th Avenue N.E., Seattle, Wash. 
c — University Presbyterian Church, East 47th Street and 15th 
Avenue, N.E., Seattle, Wash. 

Born, December 14, 1874, Caldwell, N. J. Son of Cyrus Free- 
man Harrison, farmer, and Abbie M. Baldwin Harrison. 

Married, June 8, 1899, at Caldwell, N. J., Emma Burgess Smith, 
daughter of Thomas Jefferson Smith, banker. 

Children, Marjorie Louise Harrison, born April 7, 1900; Everett 



102 



Class of 1895 




1920 



Falconer Harrison, born July 2, 1902 ; Emma Frances Harri- 
son, born May 11, 1904; Kathryn May Harrison, born May 10, 
1906; Gertrude Harrison, born January 30, 1910; Norman 
Baldwin Harrison, Jr., born November 30, 1913. 

Prepared for college at Montclair High School, Montclair, N. J., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 
1895, A.B. Roomed at D, West Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian 
Society, and Clio Hall. Won First Prize Clio Hall Sophomore Essay. 

Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1895-98. Minister in charge 
of Presbyterian Church, Sheldon, N. D., 1898-99; Presbyterian Church, 
Skagway, Alaska, 1899-1902; Presbyterian Church, Haines, Alaska, 1903- 
C4; Presbyterian Church, Skagway, Alaska, 1904-06; Central Presbyterian 
Chapel, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1906-08; South Side Presbyterian Church, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., 1908-11; University Presbyterian Church, Seattle, Wash., 1911 
to date. 



ROBERT PATTERSON HARRIS A.B. 

a, c — 401 Drhumor Building, Asheville, N. C. 
Born, December 11, 1873, Princeton, N. J. Son of the Reverend 

William Harris and Christina Butler Harris. 
Married, September 11, 1907, at Seattle, Wash., Florence Louise 

Sherrick. 
Children, Robert Patterson Harris, Jr., born October 19, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Forsythe School, Philadelphia, Pa., entering 



Princeton University 



103 




1895 

Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Mem- 
ber of Philadelphia Society and Clio Hall. Took honors in Classics at 
graduation. 

In July, 1895, was a private tutor at Deer Park, W. Va. ; in September, 
1895, a teacher in Princeton Preparatory School; in July, 1896, a private 
tutor at Seabright, N. J. ; in October, 1896, with A. G. Spalding and 
Brothers, dealers in sporting goods, New York; in September, 1897, with 
Dwight Smith and Lillie, New York, agents for the "Employers' Liability 
Assurance Corporation" ; in July, 1898, engaged in mining mica at 
Franklin, N. C. ; in October, 1899, member of firm of Herron, Harris and 
Company, miners of manganese, at Brevard, N. C. ; in August, 1901, con- 
ducting lumbering operations near Franklin, N. C, as General Manager 
of the "Nantahala Company" ; 1905 to 1918, engaged in lumbering and 
real estate business in the State of Washington, chiefly at Chelan and 
later at Spokane and Seattle (in 1909 was manager of the Wapato Irriga- 
tion Company at Chelan, Wash.) ; 1919 to date, Vice-President and 
Manager of the Black Locust Treenail Company, manufacturers of wood 
products, Asheville, N. C. 



ROLLIN ZELLER HARTZLER 



A.B. 



a, c — 707 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 
b — 385 Passaic Avenue, Nutley, N. J. 
Born, August 27, 1870, Carlisle, Pa. Son of Henry Burns 
Hartzler, D.D., editor, and Sarah Ann Zeller Hartzler. 



104 



Class of 1895 




Married, September 30, 1907, at York Village, Maine, Mary 

Abra Bragdon, daughter of Joseph W. Bragdon. 
Children, Henry Bragdon Hartzler, born August 27, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Mt. Hermon School, Mass., entering Princeton 
in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed 6 Middle Dod Hall. Mem- 
ber of Freshman Glee Club, Philadelphian Society, Clio Hall. 

Teacher in Albright College, Meyerstown, Pa., 1895-97; engaged in 
gold mining, Southern Oregon, 1897-98; Teacher in York Collegiate In- 
stitute, York, Pa., 1898-1910; General Manager, Pennsylvania Audit Com- 
pany, York, Pa., 1909; Secretary, Municipal League, York, Pa., 1909; 
Principal, High School, Grant's Pass, Ore., 1910-11; in fuel wood business, 
Grant's Pass, Ore., 1911-12; Merchandise Educational Department, John 
Wanamaker, Philadelphia, 1912-14, Service Department, Barron G. Col- 
lier, Inc., New York and New Jersey, 1914 to date. 

Member of Columbian Club, East Orange, N. J. 

His son, Henry Bragdon Hartzler, is preparing for Princeton, and 
expects to enter in 1925. 

During the war was chairman of Liberty Loan and other War Loan 
Committees. 



a, b- 



WALLACE PINKNEY HARVEY 

-570 Park Aveue, New York, N. Y. 



A.B. 



c — 120 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Born, November 29, 1874, Baltimore, Md. 



Son of William 



Princeton University 



105 






1895 



1920 



Pinkney Harvey, merchant (deceased) and Virginia Jordan 

Harvey. 
Married, November 16, 1904, at Baltimore, Md., Josephine Gil- 

mor, daughter of Robert Gilmor, Jr., Judge of the Supreme 

Bench, Baltimore, Md. (deceased). 
Children, William Pinkney Harvey, Jr., born November 28, 

1905 ; Robert Gilmor Harvey, born April 14, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Marston's University School, Baltimore, Md., 
entering Princeton, in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A. B. RoOmed at 
8 West Witherspoon Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Colonial Club. 

After leaving Princeton entered the Law School of the University 
of Maryland. 

With W. P. Harvey and Company, Wholesale Provisions, Baltimore, 
1895. Assistant Secretary Citizens Trust and Deposit Co., Baltimore, 1899. 
After graduating with degree of LL.B. from the Law School of the 
University of Maryland, became a member of law firm of Harvey and 
Harvey, in 1903. Counsel for the American Bonding Company of Balti- 
more, 1905-13; counsel for the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Mary- 
land, 1913 to date. (Since 1919 at the New York office of that company.) 



RICHARD DANIEL HATCH 



A.B. 



a — Brooklyn, Conn. 
b, c — Southport, Conn. 



io6 



Class of 1895 




Born, March 13, 1873, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of Daniel B. Hatch, 

banker, and Mary Elizabeth Ames Hatch. 
Married, April 19, 1920, at Bridgeport, Conn., Jessie Elizabeth 

Walters, daughter of James Daniel Walters. 

Prepared for college at Morris Academy, Morristown, N. J. and 
Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduat- 
ing in June, 1895, A.B. cum laude. Roomed 11 East Brown Hall. Mem- 
ber of Philadelphian Society, Whig Hall, Ivy Club. Monday Night Club. 
Treasurer of Philadelphian Society ; Manager "Princeton Tiger." Won 
Junior First Group honors. Valedictorian, Class of '95. 

Entered General Theological Seminary, New York, 1895, graduating 
1899, B.D. Post graduate degree A.M. Princeton 1898. Ordained Deacon 
in Protestant Episcopal Church, May 23, 1899 ; ordained Priest in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, May 23, 1900. 

Member, Associated Mission, Trenton, N. J., 1899-1900; rector, St. 
Mary's Church, Point Pleasant, N. J., June 1, 1900 to September 1, 1900; 
rector, Calvary Church, Stonington, Conn., 1900-03 ; rector, St. Paul's 
Church, Willimantic, Conn, and St. Paul's Church, Windham, Conn., 
1903-10; curate, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn., 1910-11; rector, 
Trinity Church, Southport, Conn., 191 1 to date. Provincial Secretary, 
Anglican and Orthodox Churches Union, 1913-15. Secretary, Serbian 
Relief Fund. 

Author of "Home Reunion — The New Movement" and "Orthodox 
Doctrine in the American Prayer Book." 



Princeton University 
ALFRED HAYES 



107 
A.B. 






1920 

a, c—14 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 829 Park Avenue., New York, N. Y. 
Born, October 15, 1873, Lewisburg, Pa. Son of Alfred Hayes, 

lawyer, (A.B. Bucknell, 1855) and Mary Miles Van Valzah 

Hayes. 
Married, June 15, 1905, at Kalamazoo, Mich., Christine Grace 

Robertson, daughter of Joseph Robertson, merchant. 
Children, Christine MacEwan Hayes, born June 30, 1906; 

Alfred Hayes, Jr., born July 4, 1910; Miles VanValzah Hayes, 

born November 20, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Lewisburg High School and Bucknell Academy, 
entering Princeton September, 1893 (junior year) and graduating magna 
cum laude m 1895, A.B. Roomed at 12 West Brown Hall. Member 
of Whig Hall. Lynde debater ; substitute Yale debater. Won honors 
in Jurisprudence and Political Science ; Second Prize in Baird Dispu- 
tation. Post graduate degree A.M., Princeton, 1898. 

Entered Law School, Columbia University, 1896, graduating in 1898 
with degree of LL.B. Practised law in New York City, in office of 
Edward G. Whitaker, 1898-99; Gould and Wilkie, 1899-1900; Coudert 
Brothers, 1900-01 ; independent practice, 1901-07 ; tutor and lecturer in 
law at Columbia University, 1902-07; professor of law, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1907-17; President and Director of William Hayes, Inc., (lumber 
securities) 1917 to date; Vice-president and Director, P. D. Robertson, 



io8 



Class of 1895 



Inc. (furs), 1916 to date; member of Board of Managers, New York 
Transfer Company (baggage), 1918 to date; member of Board of Mana- 
gers, American Railway Supply Company (baggage checks and railway 
supplies), 1918-19. 

Delegate to Progressive National Convention, 1912; Progressive candi- 
date, Justice of Supreme Court, Sixth District, New York, 1912; Pro- 
gressive and Democratic Candidate, Justice of Supreme Court, Sixth 
District, New York, 1913. 

Member of Phi Beta Kappa, American Society of International Law, 
American Political Science Association. 

Member of University Club of New York, Sons of the Revolution, 
American and New York State Bar Associations, Association of the 
Bar of the City of New York, New York County Lawyers' Association. 

Author of "What the Sherman Anti Trust Act Has Accomplished," 
"The Insufficiency of Arbitration," "Partial Unconstitutionality with Special 
Reference to the Income Tax," "The Federation of the World," and other 
articles. Edited legal articles for the New International Encyclopedia and 
Nelson's Encyclopedia. 

Related to William W. Van Valzah, 1873 (uncle), Matthew C. Hayes, 
1906 (brother). 

During the war was chairman of local Law Board, New York, 
No. 93 under Draft Act. 



JAMES EDWARD HAYES 



C.E. 




a, c — 160 Front Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 36 Gramercy Park, New York, N. Y. 



Princeton University 



109 



Born, October 28, 1872, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of James Edward 
Hayes, merchant and Anna Lincoln Hayes. 

Prepared for college at the Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
entering Princeton in 1891, graduating in 1895, C.E. ; in 1897, E.E. 
Roomed 3 East Middle Witherspoon Hall. Member of Whig Hall and 
University Cottage Club. 

Member of electrical contracting firm of Offutt, Remsen and Hayes, 
1897; with General Electric Company as engineer, 1900; General Superin- 
tendent in Europe for Western Electric Company, 1910; General Mana- 
ger New Jersey Zinc Company, 1910-11; Vice-President, New Jersey 
Zinc Company, 191 1 to date. 

Elected to membership in American Geographic Society, National 
Geographic Society, American Zinc Institute, American Institute Mining 
Engineers, American Institute Electrical Engineers, Metropolitan Museum 
of Art. 

Member of New York Yacht Club, American Yacht Club, Univer- 
sity Club, New York; University Club, Chicago; Princeton Club, New 
York; India House, New York, University Cottage Club, Princeton; 
Blue Ridge Country Club, Walkill Golf Club. 



SELDEN LONG HAYNES 



A.B. 




1920 



a, c — 511 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
b — 308 Beacom Lane, Merion, Pa. 
Born, January 1, 1874, Lexington, Mo. Son of Henry 



L. 



no 



Class of 1895 



Haynes, lawyer (A.B. Miami 1864) and Fanny Miller Long 

Haynes. 
Married, June 30, 1903, at Binghamton, N. Y., Jessie Lee 

Crocker, daughter of Hyde Crocker. 
Children, Frances Dora Haynes, born April 21, 1904. 

Prepared for college at Lewis Academy, Wichita, Kas., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 
1 West Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. 
Won First Prize Clio Hall Junior Extempore Speaking. Lynde Debater 
in senior year. 

Entered Princeton Theological Seminary in 1895, graduating in 1898 
with degree of B.D. Student at the University of Berlin, 1898-99. 
Pastor of Presbyterian Church, Hancock, N. Y., 1899-1904; Pastor of 
Presbyterian Church, Watkins, N. Y., 1904-09; Pastor of Presbyterian 
Church, Kingston, Pa., 1909-19; Field Secretary of the New Era Move- 
ment of the Presbyterian Church, 1919 to date. 

Member of Rotary Club, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



WILLIAM FREDERICK HENCKEN 



C.E. 




1895 1920 

a, c—80 Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. 
b — Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. 
Born, May 24, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of George Hencken, 

exporter, and Sophia Link Hencken. 
Married, April 20, 1908, at New York, N. Y., Georgia Gray, 

daughter of William S. Gray, dealer in chemicals. 



Princeton University 



hi 



Children, Georgia Hencken, born February 15, 1909; Harold 
Gray Hencken, born April 28, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Columbia Grammar School, New York City, 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, with the Class of '95 and graduating 
in 1896 with the degree of C.E. Roomed at University Hall and 6 North 
West College. Member of University Cottage Club and Triangle Club. 

Engaged in engineering with the New York Central R. R., 1896- 
97; Treasurer, Rambusch Decorating Company, 1898 to date; Treasurer, 
William S. Gray and Company, Chemicals, 1914 to date. 

Member of the Princeton Club of New York, Greenwich Country 
Club, Field Club of Greenwich. 

Related to A. C. Hencken, '93 (brother) ; William S. Gray, Jr., '19 
(brother-in-law). His son, Harold Gray Hencken, expects to enter the 
class of 1938. 



CHARLES ELVIN HENDRICKSON 



A.B. 




a, c — 75 Montgomery Street, Jersey City, N. J. 
b — -103 East Front Street, Red Bank, N. J. 

Born, December 21, 1872, Mt. Holly, N. J. Son of Charles 
Elvin Hendrickson, Justice of the Supreme Court of New 
Jersey (Princeton, A.B. 1863) and Sarah Wood Noxon 
Hendrickson. 

Married, November 7, 1900, at New York, N. Y., Janet Doug- 
las Estes, daughter of Zenus Newton Estes. 



112 



Class of 1895 



Children, Charles Elvin Hendrickson, Jr., born January 16, 
1905 ; Janet Douglas Estes Hendrickson, born August 3, 1907 ; 
Zenus Newton Estes Hendrickson, born September 2, 1910 and 
died September 5, 1910; Marguerite Simpson Hendrickson, 
born May 26, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Peekskill Military Academy, Peekskill, N. Y., 
and Mount Holly Academy, Mt. Holly, N. J., entering Princeton in 
September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 9 South 
Reunion Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. Cap- 
tain of Gymnastic Team. 

After leaving Princeton entered the Law School of the University 
of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1898 with degree of LL.B. 

Practicing lawyer in Jersey City, N. J. Assemblyman in the New 
Jersey Legislature, 1907 and 1908; member of the State Board of 
Assessors, 1908-15 and President of the Board, 1912-15. President of 
the Hudson County Bar Association. 

Member of Bergen Lodge No. 47, Free and Accepted Masons, Jersey 
City, N. J. ; Red Bank, N. J. Lodge No. 233, B. P. O. Elks ; Down Town 
Club, Jersey City, N. J. 

His brothers, George D. Hendrickson, 1900 and James A. Hendrickson, 
1907, are alumni of Princeton. His son, Charles E. Henrickson, Jr., 
expects to enter Princeton in Class of 1925. 



GERARDUS POST HERRICK 



A.B. 




1895 1920 

a, b — 51 East 91st Street, New York, N. Y. 
c — 1 178 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 



Princeton University 1:3 

Born, January 23, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Elias Jacob 
Herrick, flour merchant, (A.B. Princeton; LL.B. New York 
Law School) and Margaret Louise Post Herrick. 

Married, May 10, 19 19, at New York City, Lois Bolton Hall, 
daughter of Bolton Hall, attorney-at-law (A.B., A.M., Prince- 
ton; LL.B. Columbia University). 

Prepared for college at Berkeley School, New York, entering Prince- 
ton in the fall of 1891, and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 2 Middle 
Dod Hall. Member of University Glee Club and University Cottage Club ; 
secretary and treasurer of Intercollegiate Lawn Tennis Association ; 
President of the Princeton Lawn Tennis Association ; tennis champion, 
Freshman class ; Tennis Champion, University Doubles, 1893 and 1894. 
Won Second Prize in Whig Hall Freshman Debate. 

Entered New York Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897 with de- 
gree of LL.B. 

President of the Metallic Glazing Company, manufacturers of sky- 
lights, i89. c ;-q8; with Welles, Herrick and Hicks, bankers and brokers, 
1898-1902; original investigation in mechanical engineering, 1902-04; with 
Herrick, Hicks and Colby, bankers and brokers, 1904-06; now President 
of the Gerard Development Company, (engineering). 

Member of the University Club of New York. Formerly member of 
Princeton Club of New York, Squadron "A" Club, and Aero Club of 
America. 

Co-author of "Small Arms Instructors' Manual'' (E. P. Dutton and 
Co.) 1918. 

Related to William Post, A.B. '35, A.M. '38 (grandfather) ; E. Hicks 
Herrick, A.B. '88 (brother) ; W. P. Herrick, A.B. '91, A.M. '95 (brother). 

During the war was executive officer of Small Arms Instructors' Corps, 
1917-18; Commissioned Captain in U. S. Air Service, March 4, 1918; 
honorably discharged June 10, 1919. 



BENJAMIN LEWIS HIRSHFIELD A.B. 

a, b — 5819 Ferree Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
c — P. O. Box 915, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Born, January 23, 1873, Wheeling, W. Va. Son of Henry 

Hirshfield, merchant, and Lina Berg Hirshfield. 
Married, October 4, 1899, at Allegheny, Pa., Ida R. Ehrman 

(died November 29, 1914) ; January 14, 1919, at New York 

City, Stella Joseph, daughter of Meyer Joseph. 

Prepared for college at Steubenville, O., High School, entering Prince- 
ton in January, 1892, and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 7 South 
Edwards Hall. Member of Clio Hall. Won Maclean Prize, Junior year 



H4 



Class of 1895 




and Lynde Debate First Prize, Senior year. Washington's Birthday 
Debater, Senior year. 

Entered Law School of Western University of Pennsylvania in 1895, 
graduating in 1897 with degree of LL.B. In general law practice from 
1897 to 1909. From 1909 to date, General Counsel and Treasurer, 
Blaw-Knox Company, formerly Blaw Steel Construction Company. 

Member of Concordia Club, Westmoreland Country Club, and Big 
Brother Club of Pittsburgh. Non-resident member of Princeton Club 
of New York. 

During the war served as a "Four-minute Man." 



RALPH TOWNLEY HOAGLAND 

a, b — 1522 Hyde Park Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 
c — 332 South Michigan Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 
Born, October 29, 1874, Fort Wayne, Ind. Son of John Rush 
Hoagland (B.S. Gettysburg, 1867) and Elizabeth Johns Town- 
ley Hoagland. 

Prepared for college at the Chicago Manual Training School, enter- 
ing Princeton in February, 1893, and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed at 
13 South Dod Hall. Member of Tiger Inn Club. Played on Scrub 
Football Team and Hockey Team. 

Member of Chicago Board of Trade, 1896-1903; with The Fair, 
Chicago, 1903-05 ; with Frank F. Reed, Chicago, 1905 ; Fiat Auto Com- 
pany, Chicago, 1909-11; Superintendent of Employment and Welfare 
of Chalmers Auto Company, Chicago, 1911-15; Sales Manager of King 



Princeton University 



ii5 




Auto Sales Company, Detroit, Mich., 1915-16; Employment manage- 
ment, Wright Martin Air Craft Curtiss Airplane Company, 1917-18; 
Assistant Secretary, Box Board Manufacturers' Association, Chicago, 1918 
to date. 

During the war engaged in industrial work in airplane manufacturing, 
labor department, May, 1917-November 12, 1918. 



HUGH LENOX HODGE 

a, b, c — Silver City, New Mex. 
Born, May 11, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Hugh Lenox 

Hodge, physician and surgeon, and Harriet Roosevelt Wolsey 

Hodge. 
Married, November 6, 1901, at Denver, Colo., Mary Genevieve 

Gough, daughter of Thomas Gough. 

Prepared for college at Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed at 
12 University Hall. Member of Freshman Football team, Colonial Club. 

Engaged in cattle raising in New Mexico from 1896 to the present 
time. President of the Diamond Bar Cattle Company (organized 1917). 
Member of the Cattle Sanitary Board of New Mexico. Deputy U. S. 
Marshal. 

Member of Princeton Club of Philadelphia, Princeton Club of New 
York, Santa Barbara Club. 



u6 



Class of 1895 
STEPHEN ALEXANDER HODGE 




a — Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

b — 301 South Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

c — Hazard Manufacturing Company, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Born, December 11, 1871, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Son of Francis 

Blanchard Hodge, minister (A.B. Princeton '59, A.M. '62, 

D.D. '83, Trustee of Princeton 1887-1905) and Mary Elizabeth 

Alexander Hodge. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton 
in September, 1891 and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed at 10 South Dod 
Hall. Member of Tiger Inn. Played on Freshman Football Team. 

Employed in Fourth Street National Bank, Philadelphia, Pa., 1895- 
96; Purchasing Agent of the Hazard Manufacturing Company of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa., manufacturers of wire rope and rubber covered wire and 
cables, 1896 to date. 

Member of Westmoreland Club of Wilkes-Barre, Wyoming Valley 
Country Club, Princeton Club of New York. 

Related to Charles Hodge, '90 (brother) ; Hugh L. Hodge, '95 (cousin) ; 
Edward B. Hodge, '96 (cousin); Richard Stockton, 95 (cousin). 



EDGAR HOLDEN, JR. A.B. 

a, b, c — 617 Mt. Prospect Avenue, Newark, N. J. 
Born, March 21, 1874, Newark, N. J. Son of Edgar Holden 
(Princeton A.B. 1859, A.M. later; Columbia M.D., Ph.D. and 



Princeton University 



117 




for forty-five years President of the Medical Board of the 

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company) and Helen Stuart 

Burgess Holden. 
Married, October 20, 1903, at Plainfield, N. J., Clara Florence 

Moore, daughter of David M. Moore of E. R. Durkee & Co. 
Children, Edgar Holden, 3rd, born December 12, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Newark Academy and Lawrenceville, entering 
Princeton September 1891, and graduating June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 10 
South Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society. 

Student at College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 
1895-99. M.D. Columbia, 1899. Interne, Bellevue Hospital, New York 
City, 1899-1901. Medical Examiner, Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Com- 
pany, Aetna, Connecticut Mutual, Pennsylvania Mutual, Massachusetts 
Mutual, Phoenix, New England Mutual, United States, Reliance, Fidelty 
Mutual, Columbian, etc. Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon to Newark City 
Hospital, Home for Crippled Children, Newark Memorial Hospital 
and Newark Babies' Hospital. Consulting Orthopaedic Surgeon to 
Muhlenberg Hospital, Plainfield, N. J. Consultant at Juvenile Court 
Parental Home and Home for Incurables. 

Member of Newark Medical and Surgical Society, Essex County 
Medical Society, Academy of Medicine, New Jersey State Society, Amer- 
ican Medical Association. 

Related to Edgar Holden '59 (father) ; Henri S. Holden, '63, James 
B. Burnett, '94 (brother-in-law) ; John Holden, '05, (brother) ; Graham 



n8 



Class of 1895 



C. Hunter, '05 (brother-in-law). His son, Edgar Holden, 3rd, is pre- 
paring for Princeton and expects to enter about 1924. 

During the war was Orthopaedic member of Medical Advisory Board 
of Essex County from formation to end. 



EDWARD HENRY HOOS 



A.B. 




a, b — 965 Summit Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 
c — 273 Washington Street, Jersey City, N. J. 

Born, March 26, 1873, Jersey City, N. J. Son of Edward Hoos 
merchant and banker, (former Mayor of Jersey City) and 
Dora Wilkens Hoos. 

Married, December 1, 1897, at Park Ridge, N. J., Louise Fran- 
ces Kerner, daughter of Jacob Kerner. 

Children, Ronald Edward Gordon Hoos, born September 13, 
1898 (died, March 11, 1911) ; Carmen Mildred Hoos, and 
Mignon Ethel Hoos, born March 14, 1900; Elaine Claire Hoos, 
born July 4, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Jersey City High School, entering Princeton in 
September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 9 North 
Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Cliosophic Society. 
Won Sophomore Special Honors in modern languages, Second Group 
honors Junior year, C. O. Joline Prize in American History in Senior 
year. 

Law student in office of Dickinson, Thompson and McMaster, July, 1895 



Princeton University 



119 



to December, 1896; entered New York Law School in 1895, graduating 
in 1897 with degree of LL.B. Practising lawyer in Jersey City from 
1897 to date; private secretary to his father the Mayor of Jersey City, 
1897-1900; Judge, First Criminal Court, Jersey City, 1900-04. 

Member of the Masonic Order. 

During the war was associate member of Legal Advisory Board 
(questionnaire work) ; "Block Chairman" in Fourth Liberty Loan and 
Victory Loan drives. 



THOMAS HENRY HUDSON 



A.B. 




a — Blackstone Building, Uniontown, Pa. 

b — 43 Lincoln Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

c — Lock Box 241, Uniontown, Pa. 
Born, October 5, 1873, Kirby, Pa. Son of Samuel Hudson, 

farmer and stock dealer, and Harriet Louisa Mestrezat 

Hudson. 
Married, October 16, 1906, at Pittsburgh, Pa., Lucille Scott 

Robinson, daughter of Charles Converse Robinson. 
Children, Elizabeth Lucille Hudson, born and died September 

16, 1907; Thomas Henry Hudson, Jr., born April 27, 1909; 

Elizabeth Louise Hudson, born August 28, 191 1; Mary Hope 

Hudson, born March 13, 1917. 

Prepared for college at Waynesburg, Pa., entering Princeton in 1894 



120 



Class of 1895 



and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 5 Edwards Place. Member of 
Whig Hall. 

Admitted to the Bar to practise law in the courts of Fayette County, 
Pa., March 5, 1898; Assistant District Attorney of Fayette County, Pa., 
1902-04; District Attorney of Fayette County, 1905-07; County Solicitor of 
Fayette County, 1911-14. Member of Princeton Club of Western Penn- 
sylvania, Laurel Club of Uniontown, Pa., Uniontown Country Club. 

Brother, Dr. William M. Hudson, '93 is an alumnus of Princeton; son, 
Thomas Henry Hudson, Jr., is preparing for Princeton and expects to 
enter the Class of 1928. 



EDWARD MILLER HUNT 



A.B. 






189S 



1920 



a, c — Broad Street Bank Building", Trenton, N. J. 
b — 500 West State Street, Trenton, N. J. 
Born, August 9, 1874, Metuchen, N. J. Son of Ezra Mundy 

Hunt, physician (A.B. Princeton 1849; A.M. Princeton; M.D. 

Columbia; LL.D. Lafayette), and Emma Reeve Hunt. 
Married, October 23, 1912, at Trenton, N. J., Susan M. Katzen- 

bach, daughter of Frank S. Katzenbach, merchant (A.B. 

Princeton 1867). 

Prepared for college at Model School, Trenton, N. J. and West Jersey 
Academy, Bridgeton, N. J., entering Princeton in September, 1891 
and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 14 South East College. 

Entered New York Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897 with de- 
gree of LL.B. Practised law in Trenton, N. J., 1898-1003 ; entered the 



Princeton University 



121 



employ of the Erie Railroad Company in Legal Department in 1903; 
Land and Tax Agent of the Western Division of the Erie Railroad at 
Cleveland, O., 1904-06; Assistant General Land and Tax Agent of the 
Erie Railroad, New York City, 1906-07 ; engaged in traveling and farm- 
ing 1907-10; in private practise at Trenton, N. J., 191 1 to date; Secretary 
and Treasurer of Trenton and Mercer County Traction Corporation. 

Member of Trenton Club, Trenton Country Club, University Club of 
New York, Princeton Club of New York, Hermit Club of Cleveland, 
Nassau Club, Princeton. 

Great great uncle (Holloway W. Hunt) graduated from Princeton 
in 1794; grandfather (David P. Hunt) in 1818; father (Ezra M. Hunt) 
in 1849; uncle, (Theodore W. Hunt), in 1865, uncle (David B. Hunt) in 
1866; brother, (Alonzo C. Hunt), 1878; another brother (Ellsworth E. 
Hunt), in 1875; cousin, (Henry D. Thompson) 1885; nephew, (Theodore 
B. Hunt), 1917. 

During the war served in the American Red Cross in France from 
October 26, 1918 to June 10, 1919. Commissioned as Second Lieutenant 
and promoted to Captain. 



THEODORE SOLLACE HUNTINGTON 



A.B. 






1895 



1920 



a, c — Huntington National Bank, Columbus, Ohio. 

b — 291 South Columbia Avenue, Bexley, Columbus, Ohio. 

Born, September 2, 1873, Columbus, O. Son of Pelatiah Web- 
ster Huntington, banker, and Frances Sollace Huntington. 

Married, January 29, 1902 at Columbus, O., Grace Livingston 



122 



Class of 1895 



Lee (died July 21, 1908) ; August 4, 1914, at Columbus, O., 
Mary Edith Bugh. 
Children, Theodore Lee Huntington, born March 28, 1904; (a 
son) born July 18, 1908 and died July 19, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 11 North 
Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Cap and Gown Club, Monday Night 
Club. Treasurer in Sophomore and Junior years of Class of '95 ; 
Treasurer and President of Track Athletic Association; Treasurer and 
President of Cap and Gown Club; Editor of "Princetonian" ; Editor of 
"Bric-a-Brac." 

Associated with P. W. Huntington and Company, Columbus, O., 1895- 
97; Treasurer, Beaumont and Chauncey Coal Company, Chauncey, O., 
1897-99; member of firm of P. W. Huntington and Company, bankers, 
Columbus, O., 1900-05 ; Cashier, Huntington National Bank, Columbus, 
O., 1905-13 ; Vice-president, Huntington National Bank, Columbus, O., 
1913 to date. President, Columbus Clearing House Association. 

Member of Columbus Club, Columbus Country Club, Athletic Club of 
Columbus, Sun Fish Club of Columbus. 

Brother, B. G. Huntington, graduated from Princeton in 1900; son, 
Theodore Lee Huntington is now preparing for Princeton at Lawrence- 
ville, and expects to enter Class of 1924. 

JOHN JONES HURST 





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1895 1920 

a, c — Room 27, 2 East Lexington Street, Baltimore, Md. 



Princeton University 



123 



b — 5 West Biddle Street, Baltimore, Md., or Sudbrook Park, 
Md. 

Born, April 28, 1871, Baltimore, Md. Son of John J. Hurst, 
merchant, and Martina Augusta Webster Hurst. 

Married, June 1, 1907, at Baltimore, Md., Louise Banks, daugh- 
ter of Charles A. Banks. 

Children, John J. Hurst, Jr., born March 28, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Hackettstown, N. J., entering Princeton in 
1891 and leaving in 1894. Roomed at 20 East Witherspoon Hall. Mem- 
ber of Whig Hall. Won Second Prize Whig Hall Junior Debate, and 
Second Prize Whig Hall Junior Exempore Speaking. 

Entered Maryland School of Law in 1894, graduating in 1896 with 
degree of LL.B. Has practised law in Baltimore, Md., from 1896 to 
date. 

Member of Nassau Club of Princeton, Maryland Club, Baltimore 
Country Club. 

Son, John J. Hurst, Jr., is preparing for Princeton and expects to 
enter the Class of 1930. 



PAUL GRISWOLD HUSTON 



A.B. 




a — Box 214, Berlin, Conn. 
b, c — The Choate School, Wallingford, Conn. 
Born, June 22, 1873, Cincinnati, O. Son of Alexander Botkin 
Huston, lawyer, and Alice Mindwell Griswold Huston. 



124 



Class of 1895 



Prepared for college at Woodward High School, Cincinnati, O., enter- 
ing Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895 A.B. Roomed 6 North 
West College. Member of Whig Hall and Philadelphian Society. Mem- 
ber of Honor Class in Latin in Sophomore year. Won Whig Hall Essay 
Prize. 

Post graduate degree, Princeton, A.M., 1896. Graduate student at 
University of Chicago, winter term, 1898. 

Private tutor for year or two after graduation. Served in Spanish- 
American war 1898 as private ; stationed at Port Tampa City, Florida, and 
invalided home with fever. In the United States Forest Service 1809- 
1900; teacher of English and the classics, Franklin School, Cincinnati, 
O., 1903-05; instructor in English, Oberlin College, Oberlin, O., 1905-07; 
head of the English Department, Blees Military Academy, Macon City, 
Missouri, 1908-1909; head of the English Department, Lake Forest 
Academy, Lake Forest, 111., 1909-19; master in English, The Choate 
School, Wallingford, Conn., 1919. 

Author of "An Old-fashioned Sugar Camp and Other Dreams of the 
Woods," "Around an Old Homestead," "The Day's Work of a Forester," 
and miscellaneous articles in periodicals. 



CLARENCE ILLINGWORTH 




1895 



1920 



a, b — Fox Chase, Philadelphia, Pa. 

c — Tacony and Lewis Streets, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Born, August 23, 1872, Newark, N. J. Son of John Illing- 

worth, steel manufacturer, and Madeline Williams Illingworth. 



Princeton University 



125 



Married, May 23, 1894, at New York City, Catharine Muckle- 
worth Drew, daughter of William Henry Drew, financier. 

Children, Dorothy Drew Illingworth, born February 20, 1895 
(married Raymond Elmer Pearsall, Feb. 10, 191 5) ; Cathleen 
Churchill Illingworth, born September 20, 1904. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1893. Roomed in 
University Hall. Member of Ivy Club. 

Assistant Manager of Benjamin Atha and Illingworth Company; As- 
sistant Manager of the Crucible Steel Company of America; General 
Manager and Treasurer of The John Illingworth Steel Company. 

Member of the Princeton Club of Philadelphia, Princeton Club of 
New York, Ivy Club of Princeton, Racquet Club of Philadelphia. 



ANDREW CLERK IMBRIE 



A.B. 






1895 1920 

a, c — 320 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

b — 115 East 53rd Street, New York, N. Y. (after Oct. 1, 
1920). 

Born, May 16, 1875, Jersey City, N. J. Son of Charles Frederick 
Imbrie, merchant, (Princeton, 1870 A.B., 1873 A.M.) and 
Charlotte Martha Clerk Imbrie. 

Married, January 12, 1918, Philadelphia, Pa., Dorothy Welsh, 
daughter of Herbert Welsh (U. of Pa. 1871 A.B.) of Philadel- 
phia. 

Children, (daughter) born and died October 20, 19 19. 



126 Class of 1895 

Prepared for college at Halsey Collegiate School, New York City, en- 
tering Princeton September, 1891, and graduating June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed 14 North East College. Member of Whig Hall and the Phila- 
delphian Society; Editor Nassau Literary Magazine; President, the Mon- 
day Night Club ; Class Secretary Senior Year and to date ; won Class of 
1870 Sophomore English Prize, Whig Hall Sophomore Essay Prize, Third 
Junior Orator Medal, Whig Hall Senior Extempore Speaking Prize, First 
Baird Prize Oration Senior year. 

Associated with Abbey & Imbrie (father's firm), manufacturers of fish- 
ing tackle, New York, 1895 to 1916, becoming Treasurer in 1901 and 
President in 1909 until business was consolidated with Baker, Murray & 
Imbrie, Inc., in 1916. Financial Secretary of the Board of Trustees of 
Princeton University, 1909 to 1912, engaged in reorganizing the business 
management of the University. Represented H. L. Crawford ('95) & Co., 
Bankers of New York, and the Amazon Pacific Railway Co. in negotia- 
tions with the Peruvian Government at Lima, Peru, 1913. Purchasing 
Agent of The United States Finishing Co., New York (bleachers, mercer- 
izers, dyers, printers and finishers of cotton fabrics), operating five mills 
in Connecticut and Rhode Island, 1914 to 1919. Director and Treasurer 
of The U. S. Finishing Co., 1916 to date. Also Director and Treasurer of 
the Queen Dyeing Co. and The C. P. Darling Co. of Providence, R. I. 
Director of Baker, Murray & Imbrie, Inc., New York. Director of the 
Princeton Alumni Weekly. 

In 1895 and 1896 was President of the " '95 Club of New York" — organ- 
ized to demonstrate the feasibility of a permanent Princeton Clubhouse 
in New York. Served on Committee to select site of first Princeton Club- 
house in 1899. Member of "Committee of Fifty" of Princeton University, 
1905, formed to establish an endowment for the Preceptorial Method of 
instruction. Chairman of the Committee that organized the present 
Graduate Council of Princeton University in 1908. 

Trustee of Princeton University, 1907 to 1912, serving upon the Com- 
mittees on the Curriculum and on Grounds and Buildings. Member of the 
Graduate Council of Princeton University, 1915 to date, and Chairman 
of its Committee on Publicity. Chairman, Committee on Medical Staff, 
the Demilt Dispensary, New York City, 1915 to date. From 1902 to 1909 
Director and then President of the West Side Juvenile Club, a social 
centre and trade school for boys and girls in "Greenwich Village," New 
York City. In 1913 Chairman of the Committee on Fire Prevention of the 
Merchants Association of New York. In 1919 and 1920 was one of three 
members of the Dyestuffs Committee of the Textile Alliance, Inc. (desig- 
nated by the Department of State to control the importation of German 
dyes through the Allied Reparation Commission). 

Member of Nassau Club, Princeton; Princeton Club of New York 
(member of Council) ; University Club, New York (served six years on 
Committee of Admissions); Merchants Club, New York; Hope Club, 
Providence, R. I. 



Princeton University 



127 



Related to Charles K. Imbrie, A.B. '35, A.M. '38, D.D. '60, who was 
trustee of Princeton 1861 to 1891 (grandfather) ; Charles F. Imbrie, A.B. 
'70, A.M. '73 (father) ; William Imbrie, A.B. '65, A.M '68, D.D '84 
(uncle) ; William H. Miller, A.B. '70, D.D. '89 (cousin) ; Charles K. Im- 
brie Miller, A.B. '71, A.M. '74 (cousin) ; Andrew H. Clerk, '88 (uncle) ; 
Harold Imbrie, A.B. 1900 (brother) ; Malcolm Imbrie, A.B. 1901, James 
Imbrie, A.B. 1901 and Charles K. Imbrie, A.B. 1903 (cousins). 

During the war, 1917 and 1918, was member of the Committee on Labor 
of the Advisory Commission to the Council of National Defense. 



ROBERT ALEXANDER INCH 



A.B. 




a, c — 123 William Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — Queens, Long Island, N. Y. 

Born, April 3, 1873, at Providence, R. I. Son of Philip John 
Inch, Rear Admiral U. S. Navy, and Clara Hannah Dibble Inch. 

Married, July 30, 1908, at New York City, Abigail Sarah Kings- 
land, daughter of Stephen Kingsland. 

Children, Kingsland Inch, born October 11, 1910. 

Prepared for college at Rittenhouse Academy, Washington, D. C, 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 33 University Hall Member of Philadelphian Society, 
Clio Hall, Cap and Gown Club, Triangle Club, University Glee Club. 
Secretary of Class in Junior year. Member of Class Day Committee. 

Entered New York Law School in 1895, graduating in 1897 with de- 



128 



Class of 1895 



gree of LL.B. Has practised law in New York City from 1897 to date. 

Son, Kingsland Inch, is preparing for Princeton and expects to enter 
Class of '33. 

During the war served on the Committee in charge of the draft in 
Queens County; on District Board for City of New York (Charles E. 
Hughes, chairman) August 4, 1917 to March 31, 1919. 



VERNON KREMER IRVINE 



A.B. 





189S 



1920 



a — Box 644, Butler, Pa. 

b— 439 North McKean St., Butler, Pa. 

c — Senior High School, Butler, Pa. 

Born, July 24, 1871, Bedford, Pa. Son of Henry Fetter Irvine, 
Horticulturist, and Emily Elizabeth Mann Irvine. 

Married, August 25, 1897, at New Rochelle, N. Y., Mary Erne- 
line Knapp, (died August 5, 1919) daughter of Obadiah Mead 
Knapp. 

Children, Emily Gertrude Irvine, born May 28, 1898; Lewis 
Vernon Irvine, born April 17, 1903; Sarah Louise Irvine, born 
June 19, 1905 ; Vernon Kremer Irvine, Jr., born November 30, 
1906; Mary Irvine, born June 18, 1909 (died July 2, 1909). 

Prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 12 South Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall ; editor of Daily 
Princetonian ; substitute on Football team. 



Princeton University 



129 



Head of Latin Department of Mercersburg Academy, 1895-97; Princi- 
pal of High School, Butler, Pa., 1897 to date. 

Related to William Mann Irvine, '88 (brother). Sons are preparing 
for Princeton; Lewis V. Irvine expects to enter in 1921, and Vernon 
K. Irvine, Jr., in 1825. 



DARWIN RUSH JAMES, JR. 



A.B. 




a, b — 301 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
c — 19 West 44th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, January 10, 1873, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of Darwin Rush 

James, importer and manufacturer, and Mary Ellen Fairchild 

James. 
Married, December 23, 1896, at Brooklyn, N. Y., Alice Burton 

Fonda, daughter of John A. Fonda, Treasurer of Mutual Life 

Insurance Company. 
Children, Alice Fonda James, born December 10, 1898, and 

Darwin Rush James, III, born September 6, 1901. 

Prepared for college at Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y., entering 
Princeton September 1891, and graduating June 1895, A.B. Roomed, 
University Hall. 

Member of the Philadelphian Society and Tiger Inn. Captain Fresh- 
man Football team ; substitute on University Football team ; Captain 
University Track Team ; Business Manager Daily Princetonian ; Busi- 
ness Manager, Alumni Princetonian ; served on Class Day Committee. 



13° 



Class of 1895 



Manager, Van Dnzer Extract Company, 1895-1912 ; President, Pyrene 
Manufacturing Company, 1912-16; President, American Chicle Co., 1916 
to date ; President, Canadian Chewing Gum Company, 1916 to date ; 
President, Adams and Beeman's, Ltd., 1916 to date; President, Fairchild 
Realty Company, 1912 to date. 

Chairman, Local School Board of Brooklyn, 1906-14; Civil Service 
Commissioner New York City under Mayor Mitchel, 1913-17; member, 
Brooklyn Public Library, 1916 to date. 

Member of Crescent Athletic Club, Brooklyn; Princeton Club of New 
York; Heights Casino, Brooklyn. 

His son, Darwin Rush James, III, is preparing for Princeton and 
expects to enter in, 1920. 

During the war was chairman of the Brooklyn Chapter of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross, and Chairman of the Second War Fund of American 
Red Cross in Brooklyn. 



FRANCIS deHAES JANVIER 



A.B. 







1920 

a, b — New Castle, Delaware. 
c — Wilmington, Delaware. 

Born, January 9, 1874, New Castle, Del. Son of Julian Darragh 
Janvier, farming and real estate (A.B. Princeton 1859) and 
Anne Elizabeth Mathiot Janvier. 

Married, March 2, 1901, at New Castle, Del., Annie Read Rod- 
ney, daughter of John Henry Rodney, lawyer (A. B. Princeton, 
i859). 



Princeton University 



131 



Children, Francis Darragh Janvier, born August 28, 1904 (died 
February 14, 1909) ; Margaret Janvier, born January 3, 1907; 
Sophie Rodney Janvier, born September 12, 1909. 

Prepared for college at Friends School, Wilmington, Del., entering 
Princeton in September 1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 1 University Hall. Member of Philadelphian So- 
ciety and Clio Hall. 

Graduated from Harvard Law School in 1899 with degree of LL.B. 
Practising lawyer in Wilmington, Del., from 1899 to date. Representa- 
tive in Delaware Legislature, 1909-10; Counsel, Delaware Legislature, 
1911. 

Member of Wilmington Country Club, New Castle Club. 

During the war attended Second Officers' Training Camp, August 27 — 
November 26, 1917; commissioned and served as Second Lieutenant, 
Infantry, U. S. Army, in Company H, Second Battalion, Replacements, 
Camp Lee, Virginia, until discharged on December 6, 1918. 



JOSEPH JESSUP 



B.S. 




a, b — 93 California Street, Ridgewood, N. J. 
c— 281 Washington Street, Newark, N. J. 
Born, January 20, 1873, Woodbury, N. J. Son of John Samuel 

Jessup, lawyer (A.B. Princeton 1865) and Mary Moore Howell 

Jessup. 
Married, October 11, 1902, at Woodbury, N. J., Louise Gertrude 



132 Class of 1895 

Bains, daughter of Andrew Reed Bains, manufacturer of 
leather goods. 
Children, Joseph Paschall Jessup, born November 3, 1903. 

Prepared for college at Friends Central School, Philadelphia, Pa., 
and by private tutoring with the Reverend James O'Brien of Clarks- 
boro, N. J., entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, B.S. 
Roomed at 19 North West College and 1 South East Brown Hall. 
Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall. 

Spent the summers of 1896 and 1897 as motorman and repairman 
for the Ocean City Electric Railway; was rodman and draughtsman 
for the Northwestern Railroad, September, 1897 to January, 1898; with 
the Electro Dynamic Company of Philadelphia, doing bench work and 
in the draughting room, 1898-99; with the American District Telegraph 
Company in their repair shop, 1899- 1901 ; since February 17, 1902 has 
been associated with the New York Telephone Company in various 
capacities, first as Traffic Inspector of the Westchester Division, to 
December 31, 1907; Manager of Traffic Inspection, New Jersey Division, 
January 1, 1908 to July 31, 1909; Manager, Putnam District, New Jersey 
Division, August 1, 1909 to June, 191 1; from June, 191 1, associated with 
the Traffic Rules Committee, which in March, 1914, was made a part 
of Traffic Engineers Force ; at the present time, Manager of Traffic In- 
spection, New Jersey Division. 

Member of Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, National 
Security League, New York Telephone Society, Ridgewood Rifle Club. 

During the war attended the Business Men's Military Instruction 
Camp of Brooklyn, N. Y., as private, then corporal, then sergeant, 
October, 191 5 to June, 1916; Sergeant, Depot Battalion, 14th N. G. N. Y., 
June, 1916 to October, 1917; Sergeant, 2nd Lieutenant, 1st Lieutenant, 
Ridgewood Battalion, New Jersey State Militia Reserve, April 1917 
to May, 1919. 



CHARLES RICHARD KELLERMANN C.E. 

a, b, c — South Pittsburg, Tenn. 

Born, August 22, 1872, Petersburg, O. Son of Francis George 
Kellermann, farmer and business man, and Anna Elizabeth 
Kleinschmidt Kellermann. 

Married, April 29, 1908, at South Pittsburg, Tenn., Edith Har- 
vey Lodge, daughter of Joseph Lodge, farmer and manufac- 
turer. 

Children, Charles Richard Kellermann, Jr., born April 29, 1909 ; 
Joseph Lodge Kellermann, born November 18, 1910; Francis 
Kellermann, born September 16, 1912; William Leslie Keller- 
mann, born November 19, 1914; George Harvey Kellermann, 



Princeton University 



133 



F 







1395 



I920 



born December 5, 1917. Elizabeth Kellermann, born December 
5, I9I9- 

Prepared for college at Pittsburgh (Pa.) High School, entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed at 
29 South Edwards Hall. Member of Gymnasium Team. 

Assistant Engineer in the Borough of Princeton, N. J., 1895-96; In- 
structor in Engineering in Princeton University, 1896-97 ; Draughtsman 
in the employ of the Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1898-99 ; 
Draughtsman in the employ of Riter Conley Manufacturing Company, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., 1899; Acting Professor of Engineering in the University 
of Alabama, 1899-1901 ; Chief Engineer, Central Iron and Coal Company, 
1901-05 ; Draughtsman for Riter Conley Manufacturing Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., 1906-07; in 1908 was Superintendent of the Blacklock Foun- 
dry, manufacturers of stone hollow ware, South Pittsburg, Tenn. ; since 
1911 Manager of the Lodge Manufacturing Company, Iron Foundry, of 
South Pittsburg, Tenn. 



LUCIUS CARTER KENNEDY 



A.B. 



a, b, c — 1030 Green Ridge Street, Scranton, Pa. 
Bom, September 8, 1872, Scranton, Pa. Son of William DeWitt 

Kennedy, retired manufacturer and banker, and Amelia Maria 

Carter Kennedy. 
Married, April 14, 1914, at Brantford, Ont, Margaret Jane 

Robertson, daughter of William Robertson. 



134 



Class of 1895 




1920 



Prepared for college at School of the Lackawanna, Scranton, Pa., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. cum laude. Roomed at 12 South East Brown Hall. Member of 
Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. 

Entered Medical School, University of Pennsylvania, September, 1895, 
graduating in June, 1898, with degree of M.D. 

Resident Physician at the Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pa., 
1898-1900; in private practice at Scranton, 1900 to date. Medical Chief, 
State Hospital, Scranton, Pa. President, Lackawanna County Medical 
Society, 1907 to date. 

Member of the Scranton Club and Country Club at Scranton. 

During the war served on the Medical Advisory Board at Scranton. 



RICHARD LEA KENNEDY A.B. 

a, c — Care of Legal Department, Chicago, St. Paul, Minnea- 
polis & Omaha Railway, St. Paul, Minn. 
b — 550 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Born, March 8, 1872, Pittsburgh, Pa. Son of Matthew Ken- 
nedy, banker and dealer in wholesale dry goods, and Mary Jane 
Cameron Kennedy. 

Married, September 17, 1902, at Woodstock, Ont., Jane Jeffrey 
McLeod, daughter of John Cochrane McLeod, merchant (Uni- 
versity of Glasgow, A.B.) 

Children, Richard Lea Kennedy, Jr., born June 8, 1905. 

Prepared for college at Cutler Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., en- 



Princeton University 



135 




tering Princeton in 1892 and graduating cum Ictude in 1895, A,B. 
Roomed at 3 South Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

Entered Harvard Law School in 1895, graduating 1898, LL.B. 

Engaged in the general practice of law, first in Colorado Springs, 
then in St. Paul, Minn., from 1898 to 1907 ; associated during this time 
with W. P. Warner; Grant Van Sant; and Davis, Kellogg and Severance. 
Since 1907 General Solicitor of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and 
Omaha Railway; Minnesota State Attorney of the Chicago and North- 
western Railway; General Solicitor of the Minnesota Transfer R. R., 
Minneapolis Eastern R. R., St. Paul Union Depot, St. Paul Bridge and 
Terminal R. R., Fairchild and North Eastern R. R. 

Member of Minnesota Club ; White Bear Golf and Yacht Club ; Minne- 
sota Boat Club. 

Author of "Trial Evidence." 

Son, Richard Lea Kennedy, Jr., is preparing for Princeton and ex- 
pects to enter the Class of 1924. 

During the war was General Solicitor, under Federal Administration of 
Railroads, of seven railroads and terminal companies. 



JOHN VALENTINE KOCH JR. 

a, b — 170^ Garfield Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Born, August 16, 1872, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of John Valentine 

Koch. 
Married, April 27, 1908, at Philadelphia, Pa., Ida Croskey 

Mackeown. 
Children, Elizabeth Mackeown Koch, born September 13, 1909. 



136 



Class of 1895 




Prepared for college at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1895, after taking 
special course in civil engineering. Roomed at 3 East Middle Witherspoon 
Hall. Member of Cottage Club. 

For the first five years after leaving college he spent his time largely in 
travel. In 1900 he was for a time employed in the New York office of 
the Central Railroad of New Jersey; in 1901, with the New York Long 
Distance Telephone Company; in 1902 with W. F. Simpson, Advertising 
Agency, New York; in 1904, with John Wanamaker, in Automobile De- 
partment, New York; in 1905 with Smith and Mabley, automobiles and 
motor boats. New York ; in 1908, with Isotta Import Company, New 
York; in 1910, with the New Jersey Zinc Company, in Purchasing De- 
partment, New York; in 1915, was Salesman for Piatt and Washburn Re- 
fining Company, New York ; in 1916, with the Bush Terminal Company, 
South Brooklyn, N. Y. 

During the war was a civilian employe in the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment at the Port of Embarkation. 



HARVEY WILSON KOEHLER A.B. 

a, b, c — Atglen, Pa. 
Born, October 2, 1869, South Bethlehem, Pa. Son of Elias 

Frederick Koehler, and Rose Anna Bittenbender Koehler. 
Married, May 11, 1898, at Kingston, Pa., Susan Emma Schoon- 

over, daughter of Simeon E. Schoonover. 

Prepared for college at Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895. A.B. Roomed 
at 19 South Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Philadelphia!! Society, 



Princeton University 



137 





1920 

Freshman Glee Club, Clio Hall, Track Team. Won Second Prize Vault- 
ing Horse, Sophomore year; First Prize Mile Run, Sophomore Year; 
Second Prize, Mile Run, Princeton-Columbia Games, Sophomore year; 
Second Prize, Mile Run, Caledonian Games, Sophomore year. 

Entered Princeton Theological Seminary 1895, graduating in 1898. 

Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Shenandoah, Pa., 1898-1901 ; Pastor, Pres- 
byterian Church, Mount Union, Pa., 1901-06; Pastor, Presbyterian Church, 
Mapleton Depot, Pa. and Newton Hamilton, Pa., 1901-04; Pastor, Pres- 
byterian Church, Atglen, Pa., 1906-09; Pastor, Second Presbyterian 
Church, Chester, Pa., 1909-17; Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Atglen, Pa., 
1917 to date. Acting Principal, High School, Atglen, Pa., September 
24, 1918 to January 1, 1919. Moderator, Chester Presbytery. 

Brothers, Norman Elias Koehler, 99, and Maurice Raymond Koehler, 
'12, are alumni of Princeton. 



RICHARD CHAMBERS KUMLER B.S. 

a, b, c — 611 Alpine Street, Pasadena, Cal. 

Born, September 29, 1872, Dayton, Ohio. Son of Samuel Ezra 
Kumler, merchant (A.B. Otterbein College) and Mary Cham- 
bers Kumler. 

Married, October 24, 1899, at Johnstown, Pa., Katharine 
Thomas, daughter of John Thomas, banker and merchant. 

Children, Mary Katharine Kumler, born December 15, 1903; 
John Thomas Kumler, born April 23, 1907. 
Prepared for Princeton at Otterbein College, Westerville, O. (B. S. 



133 



Class of 1895 




1894), entering Princeton in the fall of 1894 and graduating in 1895, 
B.S. Roomed at 22 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Gym- 
nasium and Track Teams. 

After leaving Princeton entered the family business of Rike Kumler 
Company, Dayton, O., retail dry goods merchants, which was established 
in 1852 and has now developed into a large general department store ; 
served in various capacities in above company until the present time ; 
now member of Board of Directors. 



EDWIN SNOW LA FETRA 



B.S. 



a, b — 301 Takoma Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

c — Bliss Electrical School, Takoma Park, Washington, D. C. 
Born, October 28, 1872, Washington, D. C. Son of George 

Henry La Fetra, (LL.B., Columbian College, Washington, 

D. C, 1878: M.D., Howard University, Washington, D. C, 

1885) and Sarah Doan La Fetra. 
Married, October 14, 1903, at Warren, Pa., Lucia Morse Noyes, 

daughter of Charles Henry Noyes, lawyer, judge. 
Children, Margaret Noyes La Fetra, born February 15, 1906. 

Prepared for college at Emerson Institute, Washington, D. C, en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. 
Roomed at 1 East Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and 
Whig Hall. Won First Group Honors in Freshman, Sophomore and 
Junior years ; graduated with Second Group Honors. 

Proprietor of La Fetra's Hotel, Washington, D. C., 1895-1907; 



Princeton University 



139 




Treasurer and Business Manager of Spanish Trade Company, New York, 
engaged in general exporting to South America, 1907-09; Secretary and 
Treasurer and Business Manager of Bliss Electrical School, Washing- 
ton, D. C, teaching theoretical and practical electricity, 1910 to date. 
Councilman, Takoma Park, Maryland, 1915-19. 

Member of City Club, Washington, D. C. 

During the war the Bliss Electrical School gave electrical training 
to about seven hundred soldiers in the S. A. T. C. 



CHARLES HENRY LEEDS 



B.S. 



a, b — Glenbrook, Conn. 

c — Care of Stamford Chamber of Commerce, Stamford, 

Conn. 
Born, January 6, 1873, Stamford, Conn. 
Married, July 19, 1899, at Middlebury, Vt, Agnes Adele Mac- 

Quivey. 
Children, John W. Leeds, born December 12, 1905. 

Entered Princeton in 1891, and graduated in 1895, B.S. Roomed at 
14 Middle Dod Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society and Whig Hall. 

Associated with the Stamford Trust Company in November, 1895 ; with 
W. B. Beekman and Company, bankers, New York, in August, 1896 ; 
pusuing studies in political science in Stamford, 1897-1900. In No- 
vember, 1902, was elected Mayor of Stamford, Conn., on the Democratic 
ticket. Was a post-graduate student at Yale University in Political 
Science, 1903-04, and took degree of M.A. at Yale in 1906. Dealer in 



140 



Class of 1895 




investment securities in Stamford, 1907. From 1916 to date, Secretary of 
Stamford Chamber of Commerce. 



THOMAS LEGGATE 



A.B. 




a, c — 607 Columbia Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
b — Backbone Road and Division Street, Sewickley, Pa. 



Princeton University 



141 



Born, May 4, 1873, Allegheny City, Pittsburgh, Pa. Son of 
Alexander Leggate, real estate agent, and Martha Reid Leggate. 

Married, December 6, 1906, at Edgeworth, Pa., Anne Hamilton 
Davis (died April 22, 1918, at Sewickley, Pa.) daughter of 
Charles Davis, County Engineer of Allegheny County, Pa. 
(C. E. Washington and Jefferson). 

Children, Martha Verner Leggate, born September 29, 1909. 

Prepared for college at Allegheny School, Allegheny, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 25 North Edwards Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and 
Whig Hall. 

Student at Pittsburgh Law School, 1895-97. From 1898 to the present 
time Attorney-at-law, practising in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Member of Duquesne Club of Pittsburgh, Edgeworth Club of Sewick- 
ley, Nassau Club of Princeton. 

THOMAS KEMMERER LEIDY 




1920 



a, c — 620 Washington Street, Reading, Pa. 
b — 132 Windsor Street, Reading, Pa. 
Born, September 5, 1873, near Quakertown, Bucks County, Pa. 

Son of Thomas H. Leidy, physician (M.D. Jefferson Medical 

College, Philadelphia, 1869) and Leah Kemmerer Leidy. 
Married, June 22, 19 10, at Philadelphia, Pa., Frances Buchanan 

Weiss, daughter of Henry Weiss, merchant. 



142 



Class of 1895 



Children, Thomas Weiss Leidy, born July 8, 1912; John Philip 
Leidy, born August 15, 191 5. 

Prepared for college at Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in November, 1892. Roomed 
at 14 North Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Philadelphia Society 
and Clio Hall. 

Entered Dickinson Law School, Carlisle, Pa., in September, 1895, gradu- 
ating in June, 1897, with degree of LL.B. Since 1897 an Attorney-at-law. 
Was First Assistant District Attorney of Berks County, Pa., at Reading, 
Pa., January 1, 1002 to January 1, 1905. Secretary of Berks County Bar 
Association, Reading, Pa., 1898 to date. 

Member of Wyomissing Club of Reading and Berkshire Country Club 
of Reading. 

During the war served on Legal Advisory Board No. 2 of Reading, 
and on the Berks County Committee of Pennsylvania Council of National 
Safety and Defense. 

CHARLES BORIE LEWIS 




a — 1000 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
c — 406 Peoples Building, Charleston, S. C. 



Born, October 12, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of John Thomp- 
son Lewis, Jr., banker (retired) A.B., A.M., Pennsylvania, 
1865, and Elizabeth McKean Borie Lewis. 

Married, November 6, 1900, at Denver, Colo., Mary Grace 
Gough, daughter of Thomas Washington Gough. 



Princeton University 143 

Prepared for college at the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, Pa., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891 and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed 
at 70-71 University Hall. Member of Colonial Club. Captain of Univer- 
sity Gun Team, '92, '93, '94 and '95. 

Engineer, Madeira Hill and Company, Philadelphia, Pa., coal miners, 
1895-98; during the Spanish-American war, private, First Troop Phila- 
delphia City Cavalry, U. S. V. July 27-November 8, 1898; with Porto 
Rican Expedition, July 28-September 10, 1898; Engineer, Pennsylvania 
Iron Works (globe gas engines), 1898- 1900; ranching and mining in 
Colorado, 1900-02; Consulting engineer in Los Angeles, Cal., 1902-03; 
City Engineer of Los Angeles Gas and Electric Company, and Con- 
solidated Lumber Company of Los Angeles, 1902-03 ; Consulting Engineer, 
Mitchell Mining Company, Los Angeles, Cal., 1003-07 ; Consulting Engineer, 
mining and mechanical, in Los Angeles, 1007-09; Vice-president and 
General Manager, Lewis Motor Truck Company, 1909-15; Consulting 
Engineer in San Francisco, Cal., 1916-17; Captain, Ordnance Department, 
U. S. A., 1917 to date. 

Private, First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry, National Guard of 
Pennsylvania, 1897-1902. 

Member of Society of Automotive Engineers, 1913 ; Princeton En- 
gineering Association, 1914. 

Related to Beauveau Borie '95 (cousin) ; James M. Rhodes, Jr., '97 
(cousin) ; Ralph Derr, '97 (brother-in-law) ; Hugh L. Hodge, '95 (brother- 
in-law). 

During the war entered the Reserve Officers Training Camp, Presidio 
of San Francisco, California; 1st Sergeant, Platoon Leader, 4th Com- 
pany, Prov. Tr. Regiment, May 11, 1917; Battery Commander, As- 
sistant Instructor, 2nd Battalion, 16th Prov. Tr. Regiment, June 15 to 
August 15, 1917. Commissioned Captain, Ordnance Department, August 
15, 1917; Camp Ordnance Officer at Camp Lewis, American Lake, Wash., 
91st Division, August 28, 1917 to April 2, 1918; engineer Buv. Edge- 
wood Arsenal, Md., April 8 to April 25, 1918 ; Augusta Arsenal, Ga., 
April 26, 1916 to July 12, 1919; District Ordnance Officer, Headquarters 
S. A. C. A. D., Charleston, S. C, July 12, 1919 to date. 



FREDERICK WHEELER LEWIS A.B. 

a, b — 617 Union Street, Emporia, Kas. 
c — College of Emporia, Emporia, Kas. 
Born, July 26, 1873, Columbus, Miss. Son of Hiram Wheeler 

Lewis, banker, and Lucy Strong Lewis. 
Married, June 22, 1896, at Montclair, N. J., Grace Howell, 

daughter of Murdock Howell, associated with Bradstreets, 

New York. 
Children, Katharine Ramsey Lewis, born June 10, 1900; Lucy 



144 



Class of 1895 




Strong Lewis, born August 1, 1904; Murdock Howell Lewis, 
born September 7, 1906; Hiram Wheeler Lewis, born October 
14, 1908; Henrietta Williams Lewis, born June 6, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Lewis Academy, Wichita, Kas., entering Prince- 
ton in 1891, and graduating cum^ laude in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 1 West 
Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. Won 
Clio Hall Divisional Debate Prize, Clio Hall General Debate Prize, 
Second Prize Clio Junior Essay, First Prize Clio Hall Senior Oratorial 
Contest, Second Prize Lynde Debate, Senior year. 

Student at McCormick Theological Seminary, 1895-98. Pastor of 
Roseland Presbyterian Church, Chicago, 1898^901 ; Pastor of First 
Presbyterian Church, Albion, N. Y., 1901-05; Pastor of First Presbyterian 
Church, Saginaw, Mich., 1905-09 ; Pastor of Forest Hill Presbyterian 
Church, Newark, N. J., 1909-18; President of College of Emporia, Kas., 
1918 to date. Received degree of Doctor of Divinity, conferred by 
College of Emporia, in June, 1914. 

Member of National Arts Club of New York, Country Club of Emporia, 
Current Club of Emporia. 



WALTER GILLETTE LIBBY A.B. 

a, c — 80 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
b — Summit, N. J. 
Born, March 26, 1874, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of Augustus F. 
Libby, Woolen Commission Merchant (Bowdoin College A.M.,. 
1864) and Harriet Robins Libby. 



Princeton University 



145 




%, f 



1895 




1920 



Married, November 19, 1901, at Philadelphia, Pa., Mary Eliza- 
beth Stokes, daughter of Dr. Charles Stokes. 

Children, Mary Elizabeth Libby, born September 17, 1902; Stella 
Katharine Libby, born May 1, 1905 ; Walter Stokes Libby, born 
June 12, 1908. 

Prepared for college at private school in Summit, N. J., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 18 North East College. Member of Philadelphia Society and Whig 
Hall. 

Associated with H. J. Libby and Company, Woolen Commission Mer- 
chants, 1896-1906 and a member of the firm for two years 1905-06 ; mem- 
ber of firm of Libby and Company, Woolen Commission Merchants, from 
January 1, 1907 to date. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Nassau Club of Prince- 
ton, Canoe Brook Country Club, and Highland Club of Summit, N. J. 

His son, Walter Stokes Libby, expects to enter Princeton about the 
Class of 1930. 

During the war was Corporal in Depot Troop, Squadron A, N. Y. G., 
1916-18; Second Lieutenant, Co. B., Summit, New Jersey, State Militia 
Reserve, April, 1918 to November, 1919. 



146 



Class of 1895 
WILLIAM HENRY LOGAN, Jr. 



A.B. 




a — 702 Van Buren Street, Wilmington, Del. 
b — Dillsburg, York County, Pa. 
Born, August 23, 1873, Dickinson, Cumberland County, Pa. 
Son of William Henry Logan, Presbyterian Minister (A.B. 
Princeton 1865, Princeton Theological Seminary 1870) and 
Elizabeth Ellen Green Logan. 

Prepared for college at Dickinson College Preparatory School, Car- 
lisle, Pa., and Wilmington Conference Academy, Dover, Del., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 23 North Edwards Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig 
Hall. 

Clerk in the employ of John T. Bailey and Company, dealers in rope, 
bags and twine, Philadelphia, Pa., 1895-98; clerk and assistant to New- 
Business Manager in United Gas Improvement Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1898-1915 ; statistician and assistant in Educational Department, in 
National Commercial Gas Association, New York City, 1915-1918. 

Member of the Red Dragon Canoe Club, Philadelphia, having been 
purser ten years, vice-commodore, two years, and commodore two years. 
Member of The American Canoe Association ; rear commodore, purser, 
of the Atlantic Division. 

Related to William Henry Logan '65 (father), John N. Logan, '69 
(uncle) ; Oliver M. Green, '67 (uncle) ; Richard Logan Cooch, 1923 
(nephew). 

During the war was Associate Legal Advisor of Local Exemption 



Princeton University 



147 



Board No. 104, New York City, January, 1918. Enlisted in Y. M. C. A. 
with American Expeditionary Force, June 15, 1918, sailing August 8, 
1918; assigned to Personnel Division, United Kingdom, at London head- 
quarters; Assistant Office and Field Secretary, Movement Department, 
August 22, 1918 to December 12, 1918; Secretary of Records, December 
12, 1918 to October 18, 1919; Business Manager, Personnel Division, 
February 15, 1919 to October 18, 1919; returned to the United States 
October 27, 1919. 



JOHN WALTER LORD 



A.B. 




a, c — 723 Munsey Building, Baltimore, Md. 
b — 4332 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Born, July 5, 1875, St. Louis, Mo. Son of Charles King Lord, 
Railroad man and coal merchant, and Frances Elizabeth Walter- 
house Lord. 

Married, Jauary 18, 1909, at Baltimore, Md., Henrietta Mactier 
Hoffman, daughter of Richard Curzon Hoffman. 

Children, Henrietta Hoffman Lord, born November 6, 1910; 
John Walter Lord, Jr., born October 8, 1917. 

Prepared for college at Marston's University School, Baltimore, Md., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 7 West .Witherspoon Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society, 
Philadelphian Society, Whig Hall, Fresbman Banjo Club, University 
Banjo Club, Colonial Club. 



148 



Class of 1895 



Entered Harvard University Law School 1895, graduating in 1898, 
LL. B. 

Attorney in the Law Department of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
1898-1906; member of firm of Keech, Wright and Lord, Baltimore, Md., 
Attorneys at Law, 1906-19; member of firm of Lord and Whip, Baltimore, 
Md., from October 1, 1919. Counsel for Maryland State Industrial Ac- 
cident Commission, 1914-16. 

Author of "Railroad Rate Regulation" (North American Review, No- 
vember, 1905) ; "The Post Roads Clause" (North American Review, June, 
1907). 

Member of Baltimore Club, Merchants' Club of Baltimore, American 
Bar Association, Maryland State Bar Association, Baltimore City Bar 
Association. 

His son, John Walter Lord, Jr., expects to enter Princeton in the 
Class of 1938. 

During the war was Director of Civilian Relief in the Baltimore 
Chapter of the American Red Cross from September, 1917 to February, 
1919. 



ROBERT LIVINGSTON LOUGHRAN 



A.B. 




a, b, c — 145 West 58th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Born, March 28, 1873, Kingston, N. Y. Son of Robert Lough- 
ran, physician, and Helen Maria Kiersted Loughran. 

Married, April 5, 1916, at Kingston, N. Y., Althea Hagadorn 
Briggs, daughter of George B. Briggs. 

Children, Althea Kiersted Loughran, born April 17, 19 19. 



Princeton University 



149 



Prepared for college at Kingston Academy, Kingston, N. Y., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 8 North Reunion Hall, 10 West Middle Witherspoon Hall and 11 
North West College. Member of Tiger Inn. 

Entered College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, 
in September, 1895, graduating in June, 1899 with degree of M.D. Interne 
at New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, New York 
City, 1899-1901 ; Resident Physician at Country Home for Convalescent 
Babies, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y., 1901 ; has practised medicine in 
New York City from 1901 to date. Instructor at New York Post-Gradu- 
ate Medical School and Hospital, 1901-07; Adjunct Professor at the 
same school, 1907-15; Professor of Diseases of the Ear at the same 
school, 1915 to date. 

Elected to the American Medical Association in 1905 ; to the American 
Laryngological and Otological Society in 1913. 

Member of the Princeton Club of New York, University Club of New 
York, Hospital Graduates Club of New York. 

Author of several articles on medical subjects. 

Commissioned First Lieutenant, Medical Reserve Corps, U. S. A. on 
inactive service, February 11, 1911 to April 2, 1917; Captain, Medical 
Reserve Corps, U. S. A., April 2, 1917 to February 12, 1918; Major, 
Medical Corps, U. S. A., February 12, 1918 to April 2~, 1919. Command- 
ing Officer, Ancon Hospital, Canal Zone, October 4, 191 7 to January 15, 
1919; Chief Health Officer, Panama Canal, January 15, 1919 to April 
10, 1919. 



LESLIE CLIFFORD LOVE 



A.B. 




1895 1920 

a, b, — 50 South Fullerton Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 



ISO 



Class of 1895 



Born, March 4, 1873, Montclair, N . J. Son of John James 
Hervey Love, physician, (A.B., A.M., Lafayette College; M.D. 
University City of New York) and Frances Jane Crane Love. 

Married, April 21, 1908, at Montclair, N. J., Edith Jane Manson, 
daughter of George Thomas Manson, manufacturer of in- 
sulated wire. 

Children, Elizabeth Love, born September 30, 1909, and Frances 
Love, born February 19, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at the Montclair High School, entering Princeton 
September, 1891, and graduating June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 3 East With- 
erspoon Hall. Member of Whig Hall, Cap and Gown Club, and University 
Track Team. 

Clerk in Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, 1895-6. 

Student at College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 
1896-1900, receiving degree of M.D. Resident surgeon St. Luke's Hos- 
pital, New York City, 1901-2. Practising physician, Montclair, N. J., 1903 
to date. Attending surgeon to the Mountainside Hospital, Montclair. 
Member of Montclair Board of Health, 1911-18. Vice-President, Es- 
sex Title Guaranty and Trust Company, Montclair, N. J. 

Member of Montclair Club, Montclair Golf Club, Mastigouche Fish 
and Game Club, Canada. 



VICTOR HERBERT LUKENS 



A.B. 




1895 1920 

a, b, c — 503 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Princeton University 151 

Born, March 24, 1873, Elizabeth, N. J. Son of Alan Wood 
Lukens, manufacturer of cordage, and Elizabeth Nelson Nevius 
Lukens. 

Married, April 15, 1903, at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Elsie Franck De 
Witt, daughter of George Leonard Franck, Professor of Mathe- 
matics in the University of Pennsylvania. 

Children, Alan Franck Lukens, born March 18, 1904; Jaywood 
Lukens, born May 10, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Pingry School, Elizabeth, N. J., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in 1895, A.B. cum laude. Roomed 
at 11 South East College. Member of Philadelphian Society and Clio 
Hall. Won second prize Sophomore Debate, Clio Hall ; second prize, 
Junior Debate, Clio Hall ; Second prize, Senior Oration, Clio Hall ; Baird 
Prize for Oratory, Senior year. 

Student at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1895-98. 

Ordained to the Presbyterian Ministry by the Presbytery of Lackawanna 
at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., November, 1898; Assistant in the First Presby- 
terian Church, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 1898-1903 ; Pastor, Stone Street Church, 
Watertown, N. Y., 1903-10; resident of Princeton, N. J., 1910-14; Pastor, 
Third Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, 1914 to date. 

Member of Friday Night Club, Watertown, N. Y. ; City Club, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ; Twentieth Century Cleric, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Author of "Presbyterian Church Membership" (with J. E. Russell), 
"A Pastor's Instruction Class for Children," "Infant Baptism," all pub- 
lished by Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sunday School Work. 

Related to Edward C. Lukens, '15 (nephew), and Lewis N. Lukens, Jr., 
'17 (nephew). His son, Alan Franck Lukens, is preparing for Princeton 
and expects to enter the Class of 1926. 

WILLIAM HAMILTON MacCOLL A.B. 

a, b, c — Saltsburg, Pa. 

Born, September 5, 1873, Hamilton, Ont. Son of John Alex- 
ander MacColl, minister (A.B. Toronto 1861, Knox College 
1865) and Mary Anne MacColl. 

Married, August 1, 1901, at New York, N. Y., Annie Belle Jones, 
daughter of Colonel William Alexander Jones, Deputy Collector 
of the Port of New York. 

Children, Jean Stuart MacColl, born July 8, 1903 ; John Duncan 
MacColl, born June 5, 1906 (died November 20, 1906) ; Betty 
Sutherland MacColl, born November 24, 1907 ; William Alex- 
ander MacColl, born November 20, 1909. 
Prepared for college at Hale Private School, Rochester, N. Y., enter- 



152 



Class of 1895 




ing Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 4 North Edwards Hall. Member of Clio Hall. Sophomore 
heavy weight Cane Spree ; member of Class Football Team in Junior 
year ; Captain of Gymnastic Team ; Editor of Nassau Herald. 

Teacher in Kiskiminetas Springs School, Saltsburg, Pa., 1895-1903 ; 
member of firm of Wilson Fair and MacColl, engaged in conducting the 
Kiskiminetas Springs School, 1903-1913; Vice-president of Kiskiminetas 
Springs School, 1913 to date. 



ORMSBY McCAMMON 

a, b — 3 Lenox Street, E., Chevy Chase, Md. 
c — Wilkins Building, Washington, D. C. 

Born, July 23, 1872, Washington, D. C. Son of Joseph Kay 
McCammon, attorney-at-law (A.B. Princeton '65, A.M. '68, 
LL.B. University of Pennsylvania; president of his class from 
his senior year until his death in 1907; also president of the 
National Alumni Association of Princeton) and Catherine 
McKnight McCammon. 

Married, June 21, 1904, at Philadelphia, Pa., Estelle Murray, 
daughter of Thomas Russell Murray. 

Children, Joseph Kay McCammon, III, born February 1, 1907. 

Prepared for college at private schools, entering Princeton in 1891 and 
leaving in 1892. Roomed with private family. Member of Whig Hall, 
Valhalla Club, Class of '95 Football Team, honorary member Cannon 
Club. 



Princeton University 



153 




Graduated from Columbian College, Washington, D. C. (now George 
Washington University) in 1896, LL.B. 

Attorney at law in Washington, D.C., 1896-1917. Associated with J. K. 
McCammon (father) and J. H. Hayden, 1896-1907; on death of father 
in 1907, formed the firm of Hayden, McCammon, Hayden and Dalzell, 
which continued until 1917. Deputy Sheriff, Montgomery County, Md. 

Member of Metropolitan and Chevy Chase Clubs, Washington, D. C. 

His son, Joseph Kay McCammon, III, is preparing for Princeton and 
expects to enter Class of 1930. 

On the outbreak of the war (having refused an officer's commission) 
enlisted in Medical Corps, U. S. Army, May 29, 1917 ; promoted to cor- 
poral June 8, 1917, to Sergeant, first class, July 1, 1917; commissioned 
First Lieutenant, July 31, 1917; Captain in Signal Corps, November 23, 
1917; at present, Captain, Air Service, with Advisory Board as Legal Ad- 
visor and Secretary. 



HAROLD FOWLER McCORMICK A.B. 

a, b — 1000 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 111. 

c — 606 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Born, May 2, 1872, Chicago, 111. Son of Cyrus Hall McCormick, 
(who invented the first practical reaping machine in 1831, and 
was elected to the French Academy in 1878), and Nancy M. 
Fowler McCormick. 

Married, November 26, 1895, at New York City, Edith Rocke- 
feller, daughter of John D. Rockefeller. 



154 



Class of 1895 




Children, John Rockefeller McCormick, born February 24, 1897 
(died January 2, 1901) ; Harold Fowler McCormick, Jr., born 
November 15, 1898; Muriel McCormick, born September 10, 
1902; Editha McCormick, born September 17, 1903 (died June 
11, 1904) ; Mathilde McCormick, born April 8, 1905. 

Prepared for college at Browning School, New York City, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 16 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Ivy Club. Played on scrub football 
team. Manager of the Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs. 

After leaving college was associated with the McCormick Harvesting 
Machine Company until 1902; then with the International Harvester Com- 
pany, first as Vice-president, then Vice-president and Treasurer, now 
President. President of the Chicago Opera Association. Has received the 
Freedom of the City of Parma, Italy, and decoration of Italy's "Order 
of the Crown." 

Member of Lake Forest Forestry Commission, Country Home for Con- 
valescent Children, Home for Destitute and Crippled Children, Apollo 
Musical Club, Young Men's Club of Lake Forest, Edgewater Beach 
Yacht Club, Press Club of Chicago, Brook Club of New York, Army 
League of the United States, Aero Club of America, Aero Club of Illinois, 
Aero Club of New York, Aeronautical Society, American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, American Association for Study and 
Prevention of Infant Mortality, American Economic Association, Art In- 
stitute of Chicago, Chicago Academy of Science, Chicago Historical So- 
ciety, Illinois Conservation Association, International Harvester Athletic 



Princeton University 155 

Association, Onphic Order of Princeton, The Reynolds Club, Virginia His- 
torical Society, Chicago Band Association, Chicago Athletic Association, 
Chicago Automobile Club, Chicago Club, Chicago Yacht Club, City Club of 
Auburn, City Club of Chicago, Cliff Dwellers, Commercial Club of Chicago, 
Gagemere Club, Germanistic Society of Chicago, Illinois Athletic Club, Ivy 
Club of Princeton, Mid-day Club, Old Elm Club, Onwentsia Club, Prince- 
ton Club of Chicago, Princeton Club of New York, Racquet and Tennis 
Club of New York, Racquet Club of Philadelphia, Saddle and Cycle Club, 
University Club of Chicago, University Club of New York, South Shore 
Country Club, Uptown Club, Motor Boat Club of America, Municipal 
Art League of Chicago, Lido Club of New York, Citizens' Association 
of Chicago, Chicago Musical Association, Rockefeller Association, The 
Casino, National Cadet Corps League, Sheridan Road Improvement As- 
sociation, Lake Forest County Fair and Horse Show Association, Navy 
League of United States, American Highway Association. 

Author of "Via Pacis" and "From my Experiences Concerning 
Aviation." 

Related to Cyrus H. McCormick, '79 ; Stanley McCormick, '95 ; Cyrus 
McCormick, Jr., '12; Gordon McCormick, '17; John A. Chapman, '95; 
Cyrus H. Adams, Jr., '03 ; Robert S. Adams, '88 ; Robert L. Smith, '85 ; 
alumni of Princeton. His son, Harold Fowler McCormick, Jr., is an un- 
dergraduate in the Class of '21. 

During the war was in charge of Bureau of Coordination, Purchases 
A. E. F., in Switzerland as a civilian under General Charles G. Dawes, 
September, 1917-May, 1918. Chairman of the Fifth Liberty Loan Drive 
in 21st Ward of Chicago, 1918. 



Stanley Mccormick a.b. 

a— 30 North La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. 

Born, November 2, 1874, Son of Cyrus Hall McCormick, in- 
ventor of the reaper, manufacturer and philanthropist (in 1878 
elected a member of the French Academy of Sciences as "hav- 
ing done more for agriculture than any other living man"), and 
Nancy M. Fowler McCormick. 

Married, September 15, 1904, at Geneva, Switzerland, Katherine 
Dexter, daughter of Wirt Dexter, lawyer (Cazanovia Seminary, 
N. Y.) 

Prepared for college at University School of Chicago and Browning 
School of New York City, entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating cum 
laude in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 16 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Philadel- 
phian Society, Clio Hall, Valhalla Club, Chicago Club, Banjo Club, Man- 
dolin Club, Ivy Club, Monday Night Club ; editor of the Tiger ; editor 
of the Bric-a-brac, member of the Sophomore Reception Committee ; chair- 
man of Casino Committee, 1894; played in the finals in doubles in the 
Princeton College Tennis Tournament, 1892; was a Princeton representa- 



156 



Class of 1895 




tive in singles and doubles for the Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament in 
the fall of 1893. 

After leaving college was associated with the McCormick Harvesting 
Machine Company; represented the McCormick Harvesting Machine Com- 
pany at the Paris Exposition in 1900; superintendent of the McCormick 
Works, 1901-02; Comptroller of the International Harvester Company, 
January 20, 1904 to June 2, 1906. Designated Officer de Merite Agricole 
by the French Government in 1900. Trustee of the Art Institute of 
Chicago, 1900-1907. Director of the Chicago Bureau of Charities, 1907. 

Member of American Anthropological Association, American Social 
Science Association, American Academy of Political and Social Science, 
Chicago Society of Egyptian Research, 1897-1903; Chicago Historical So- 
ciety, 1899; Chicago Arts and Crafts Association; Chicago Academy of 
Sciences (life member February 24, 1903) ; Municipal Art League of 
Chicago, 1911; Palette and Chisel Club (Life Member, December 27, 
1905) ; University Lecture Association. 

Member of Alliance Francaise, Browning Alumni Association, Chicago 
Athletic Association, Chicago Club, Civil Service Reform Association, 
Chicago Commercial Association, Chicago Horse Show Association, City 
Homes Association, Chicago Golf Club, Citizens' Association of Chicago. 
City Club of Chicago, Chicago Automobile Club, Lake Forest Winter 
Club, League of Social Service, Lake Forest Horse Show Association, 
National Civic Federation, National Municipal League, Onwentsia Club, 
Princeton Club of Chicago, Princeton Club of New York, Religious Edu- 
cation Association, Saddle and Cycle Club, Santa Barbara Country Club, 
Winter Club, Strollers, University Club of Chicago University Club of 
New York, Union Club. 



Princeton University 



157 



Related to Cyrus H. McCormick, '79 (brother) ; Harold F. McCormick, 
'95 (brother) ; Cyrus McCormick, '12, (nephew) ; Gordon McCormick, '17, 
(nephew) ; Fowler McCormick, '21, (nephew). 

FRANCIS HARRIS McGEE 



r 

1 


■ 




* 




189s 



1920 



a, b— Freehold, N. J. 

c — Office of Attorney General, Trenton, N. J. 
Born, April 29, 1872, Jersey City, N. J. Son of John Flavel 

McGee, lawyer, (Princeton, A.B. '65, A.M. '68), and Frances 

Eureka Harris McGee. 
Married, April 30, 1903, at Jersey City, N. J., Laura Frank Van 

Keuren, daughter of Charles Henry Van Keuren, marine 

architectural inspector and engineer. 
Children, Alan Van Keuren McGee, born April 13, 1904; Frances 

Eureka McGee, born May 5, 1906; Charles Henry McGee, born 

February 16, 1908 (died February 28, 1913). 

Prepared for college at Pingry School, Elizabeth, N. J., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891 and leaving in February, 1892. Roomed 86 Nassau 
Street. 

After leaving Princeton, traveled in the United States, France and Eng- 
land ; then became associated with father's law firm, McGee and Bedle, in 
Jersey City, N. J., and subsequently with the office of the Attorney Gen- 
eral of New Jersey. Has practised in Trenton, N. J. under Attorneys 
General Thomas N. McCarter, Robert H. McCarter, Edmund Wilson, 



158 



Class of 1895 



John W. Westcott, and Thomas F. McCran. Now Chief Legal Assistant 
to Attorney General (Deputy Attorney General). Attorney-at-law in New 
Jersey and in the United States Courts. In February 1920 drafted the 
"Bill in Equity to be filed in the U. S. Supreme Court, by the State 
of New Jersey, on the question of the right of a state to manage its own 
internal affairs and of the right to deprive a state of its police powers 
without its own consent — the question arising because of the so-called 
Eighteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution and by reason of the 
restriction of the National Prohibition Act." 

Member of Palma Club, Jersey City and Freehold (N. J.) Golf and 
Country Club. Entitled to membership in Society of Cincinnati. 

Related to Rev. John Pierson, signer of both Princeton charters (third 
great grandfather) ; Rev. Joseph Clark, S. T. D., 1781, trustee of Prince- 
ton (second great grandfather) ; Israel Harris, M.D., 1790 (maternal great 
grandfather) ; Rev. John Flavel Clark, S. T. D., 1807 (paternal great 
grandfather) ; Peter I. Clark, 1807, (paternal second great uncle) ; Rev. 
William Charles McGee, '36 (grandfather) ; John Flavel McGee, '65 
(father) ; William Henry McGee, M.D., '67 (uncle) ; Henry Schenck 
Harris, '70 (cousin) ; Franklin V. Harris, '82 (cousin) ; Bennington R. 
McGee, '05 (half-brother). His son, Alan Van Keuren McGee, is prepar- 
ing for Princeton and expects to enter the Class of 1925. 



ANDREW REED McNITT 



A.B. 




a, b, c — Bellefonte, Pa. 
Born, November 1, 1871, Siglerville, Pa. Son of Alexander 
Brown McNitt, farmer, and Sarah Reed McNitt. 



Princeton University 



159 



Prepared for college at Bucknell Academy, Lewistown, Pa., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 13 North Edwards Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig 
Hall. Student at Princeton Electrical School, 1895-97, receiving degree 
of E.E. 

After leaving college became interested in lumber operations in Central 
Pennsylvania ; in 1901 at Centre Hall, Pa. ; in 1902 as member of the 
firm of McNitt Bros., Mingoville, Pa.; later at Nittany, Pa. In 1907 
was President of the Small Real Estate Co., Treasurer of the Small 
Lumber Co., and Treasurer of the Huyett Lumber Co., of Bellefonte, 
Pa. Since 1910, Treasurer of the McXitt-Huyett Lumber Company, 
Bellefonte, Pa., manufacturers of sawed lumber; Director of Bellefonte 
Lumber Company ; Director of Maryland Lumber Company, Hagerstown, 
Md., Director of Dana Lumber Company, Winchester, Ky., Director of 
Bellefonte Trust Company, Bellefonte, Pa. 

Member of Nittany Country Club, Bellefonte Club, The Elks, all 
of Bellefonte, Pa. 



HENRY AUGUSTUS McNULTY 



A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — American Church Mission, Soochow, Ku., China. 

Born, February 22, 1874, West Orange, N. J., Son of Albert Mc- 
Nulty, Jr., insurance, (A.B., LL.B. Columbia) and Mary Knee- 
land McXulty. 

Married, January 2, 1913, at Wusik, Ku., China., Edith Clara 



160 Class of 1895 

Piper, daughter of the Reverend Canon Frederick Charles 
Piper, A.B. 
Children, Henry Piper McNulty, born November 12, 1913; John 
Bard McNulty, born July 13, 1916; Frederick Charles McNulty, 
born October 6, 1919. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's Hall, Salem, Washington County, 
N. Y., entering Princeton in the fall of 1891, and graduating cum laude 
in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 18 North East College. President of St. Paul's 
Society for two years; member of Whig Hall, Monday Night Club, Track 
Athletic Team. Won Albany, N. Y. Prize for entrance examinations, 
Freshman year; Wanamaker English Prize in Junior year; Whig Hall 
Essay Prize. 

After leaving college spent six years in teaching; entered the General 
Theological Seminary, New York City, in the fall of 1901, graduating 
in 1906 with the degree of B.D. He was ordained to the Diaconate of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church May 15, 1904; advanced to the Priesthood, 
June 4, 1905. General Secretary of the Church Students' Missionary As- 
sociation of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1904-1909; missionary of 
the American Church Mission in China, 1909 to date ; Principal of Soochow 
Academy, Soochow, China, 191 1 to date. Secretary of East China 
Christian Educational Association, 1919 to date. Member of Board of 
Education of American Church Mission, Shanghai District. President 
of East China Middle School Athletic Association, 1919 to date. Elected 
a member of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1917. 

Author of various articles, among them "The Appeal of Buddhism to 
the Chinese Mind." 

His son, Henry Piper McNulty, expects to enter Princeton in the Class 

of 1935- 



EGBERT SHEPARD MARSH 

b — 30 Stratfield Road, Bridgeport, Conn. 

c— Treasury Department, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., New 

Haven, Conn. 

Born, November 18, 1874, Bridgeport, Conn. Son of Francis 
Wanzer Marsh, banker, and Emma Clifford Wilson Marsh. 

Married, December 25, 1901, at Bridgeport, Conn., Charlotte 
Emma Scofield, daughter of Horace Granville Scofield, civil en- 
gineer. 

Children, Charlotte Scofield Marsh, born February 16, 1910; Eg- 
bert Shepard Marsh, Jr., born January 31, 1914; Edith Bishop 
Marsh, born May 12, 1916. 



Princeton University 



161 



Prepared for college at Park Avenue Institute, Bridgeport, Conn., a 
private school for boys, entering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving 
in January, 1895. Roomed in Reunion Hall. 

From 1895 to 1898 engaged in the study of music; 1898-1903, associated 
with the Bridgeport Trust Company of Bridgeport, Conn., bankers ; 1903- 
1906, student of music at Yale University, receiving the degree of Musical 
Bachelor ; 1907 to date, employed in the Treasurer's office of the New- 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, at New Haven, Conn. 



HENRY BUCK MASTER 



A.B. 





1920 



a, c — 423 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, October 28, 1871, Elizabeth, N. J. Son of George Buck 

Master, stock broker, and Esther Maria Coxe Master. 
Married, October 21, 1901, at Buffalo, N. Y., Lucy Olmsted, 

daughter of William Davenport Olmsted, manufacturer. 
Children, William Olmsted Master, and John Redman Coxe 

Master, born July 23, 1903 ; Henry B. Master, Jr., born Novem- 
ber 11, 1907; George Olmsted Master, born March 23, 1913. 

Prepared for college at Philadelphia, Pa., entering Princeton in 1891, 
and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 11 South East Brown Hall. 
Editor of The Tiger for four years. Won Class of 1870 Anglo-Saxon 
Prize ; Class of 1859 English Literature Prize ; Frederick Barnard White 



1 62 



Class of 1895 



Prize in Architecture ; Highest Honors in English on Graduation. Re- 
ceived Post Graduate degree of A.M. in 1897. 

Entered Princeton Seminary in 1895, graduating in 1898 with degree 
of S.T.B. Received degree of D.D. from Hanover College in 1918. 

Assistant Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Buffalo, N. Y., 1898-1900; 
Acting Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Buffalo, N. Y., 1900-1903; 
Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1906-19; General 
Secretary, Presbyterian Board of Ministerial Relief, 1919 to date. 

Member of Commercial Club, University Club, Quest and Country 
Clubs of Fort Wayne, Ind. 

His twin sons, William Olmsted Master and John Redman Coxe Master, 
are now preparing for Princeton at Hill School and expect to enter the 
Class of 1926. 

During the war was a Y. M. C. A. secretary, stationed at Gievres, 
France, March-July, 1918, in charge of Hut No. 2.; transferred to En- 
tertainment Department, and traveled all over France in that work; was 
in Toul Sector a month before the St. Mihiel drive ; attached to "Fighting 
First" and assigned to Field Hospital No. 3, stationed at Raulecourt, 
September n-12, 1918; carried stretchers up through Pannes and Seich- 
prey, into Nonsard Woods. Sent home to take part in war work drive 
and "talked all the way from New York to Valparaiso, Indiana." 



LAWRENCE PORTER MILLER 



A.B. 




a, b, c — Inwood, W. Va. 
Born, April 12, 1873, Gerardstown, W. Va. Son of William 
Smith Miller, orchardist, and Isabella Wilson McKown Miller. 



Princeton University 163 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J., 
entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 38 
North Edwards' Hall. 

Student in Sophomore Class of Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
1896-97. Since 1897 has been engaged in the work of an orchardist. 
Manager and President of W. S. Miller Company, apple growers ; Mana- 
ger and President of Upland Orchard Company, apple growers ; 
Manager and Secretary of Chert-Land Orchard Company, apple and 
peach growers. 



WILLIAM ALBERT MINOTT 




1920 

a, c — 135 William Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 244 West 61 st Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, October 5, 1873, East Orange, N. J. Son of Joseph Albert 

Minott, manufacturer, and Mary K. Mandeville Minott. 
Married, April 6, 1896, at South Orange, N. J., Clara Brewer, 

daughter of William A. Brewer, (B. S. Harvard, '56). 
Children, Margaret Minott, born January 15, 1897; Josephine 

Minott, born October 24, 1899; Mary Minott, born May 12, 

1902. 

Prepared for college with private tutors, entering Princeton in Septem- 
ber, 1891, and leaving in January, 1893. Roomed at 6 South West Col- 
lege. Member of Faust Club, Scrub Football team. 

In 1895 with New York Belting and Packing Co. In 1896 with Mercer 



164 



Class of 1895 



Rubber Co., New York; 1901, Manager, New York Office of Mercer Rub- 
ber Company; 1905, Secretary, The Nevins-Church Press, New York; 
1906 to date, Vice-President, Goodyear Rubber Company, New York. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Racquet and Tennis Club 
of New York, Racquet Club of Philadelphia, Princeton Club of Philadel- 
phia, St. George Golf Club, American Legion (James Ely Miller Post, 
Smithtown, Long Island). 

Related to Joseph Albert Minott, 1920 (nephew). 

During the war served in Office of Quartermaster General in Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; commissioned Captain in Quartermaster Corps, August 15, 
1918; honorably discharged December 17, 1918. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR HUGH MITCHELL 




1895 1920 

a, b, c— Milford, Pa. 
Born, September 29, 1873, Milford, Pa. Son of William 

Mitchell, merchant, and Helen Hall Mitchell. 
Married, November 30, 1916, at Elizabeth, N. J., Annetta Pearl 

Gilmore, daughter of John A. Gilmore, contractor. 

Prepared for college at Seeley's School, Deckertown (now Sussex), 
N. J., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in February, 
1892. 

Entered the New York University Law School in 1894, graduating in 
1896 with degree of LL.B. Since then has been in mercantile business 
with his father in Milford, Pa. Associate Judge of Pike County, Pa., 
November 12, 1907 to January 4, 1909. Borough Councilman of Milford, 
Pa., 1910-11. School Director, 1917-19. 



Princeton University 



165 



P. M. Milford Lodge No. 344, F. and A. M. 

During the war was Secretary of Committee of Public Safety for Pike 
County, Pa., and Chairman of the departments of Legislation, Civic Re- 
lief and Food Supply. 



FRANKLIN BLAKE MORSE 




a — Press Club, San Francisco, Cal. 
Born, May 4, 1873, Kobe, Japan. Son of William Horace 
Morse, merchant, and Sarah Virginia Center Morse. 

Prepared for college at John's School, Ossining, N. Y., and Columbia 
Grammar School, New York, entering Princeton in September, 1891, and 
leaving in June, 1895. Roomed in University Hall and 5 South East 
College. Member of Faust Club, Cottage Club, Triangle Club (president). 
Right Wing Club (charter member). Played on Varsity Football team. 
Editor of "The Tiger" and the "Nassau Literary Magazine." Presen- 
tation Orator on Class Day. 

Reporter on the "New York Sun" 1895-96; reporter on "New York 
Commercial Advertiser," 1896; insurance agent for Equitable Life As- 
surance Society, 1897 ; served in the New York Volunteer Cavalry during 
the Spanish-American war ; manager of Smith Baker and Company, Im- 
porters, New York, 1897-1905 ; newspaper work and mining in Nevada, 
1905-09; on editorial staff "San Francisco Evening Post" 1909-11; on 
"San Francisco Call," 1911-14; on "The Associated Press," San Francisco, 
1914-19; at present engaged in magazine and independent writing. 
Trustee, San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 



1 66 



Class of 1895 



Member of Kobe Club of Japan, Press Club of San Francisco, Olympic 
Club, of San Francisco. 
Author of newspaper and magazine articles. 
Brother, William Otis Morse, 1902, is an alumnus of Princeton. 



WILLIAM HUTCHINSON MORSE 



A.B. 




a, c — 916 Cobb Building, Seattle, Wash. 
b — 1747 26th Street North, Seattle, Wash. 
Born, March 22, 1874, Trenton, N. J. Son of Albert Morse, 

merchant, and Mary E. Hutchinson Morse. 
Married, July 25, 1919, at Spokane, Wash., Caroline Lyons, 

daughter of William Lyons. 

Prepared for college at Depuy Boys' School, Trenton, N. J., entering 
Princeton in the fall of 1891, and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 3 
University Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Freshman Banjo Club. 

Student at the Medical School of Munich University, winter of 1897- 
98; student at the Medical School of Leipzig University, receiving degree 
of M.D. in January, 1901. Since 1901 has practised medicine in the State 
of Washington — at Waterville, Spokane and Seattle. Elected a member 
of the Spokane Medical Society, 1902. 

During the war was in active service in Medical Corps of U. S. Army, 
from August 3, 1917 to August 11, 1919. Was abroad for a year with 
316th Ammunition Train, 91st Division, as Major, M. C, U. S. A. 



Princeton University 
WALTER MOSES 



167 
B.S. 






1895 



1920 



a, c — 102 1 Commercial Trust Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

b — 29 West Tulpehocken Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Born, May 10, 1872, Trenton, N. J. Son of John Moses, manu- 
facturing potter, and Olivia G. Forman Moses. 

Married, November 19, 1908, at Folcroft, Pa., Eleanor Chapman 
Jones, daughter of S. Preston Jones (M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania). 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton 
September, 1891, and graduating June, 1895, B.S. Roomed at 3 South 
Reunion Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society ; editor of '95 Bric-a-Brac ; 
member of Tiger Inn. 

Assistant Treasurer, Trenton Watch Company, 1896; Treasurer, John 
Moses and Sons' Company, 1896-1901 ; Secretary, Standard Lamp and 
Glass Company, 1902-05 ; General Field Superintendent, Columbian Na- 
tional Life Insurance Company, 1905-11; Philadelphia Manager, Phoenix 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1911-15; President, Pennsylvania In- 
demnity Company, 191 5 to date. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Princeton Club of Philadel- 
phia, Meridian Club of Philadelphia, Nassau Club, Princeton. 

Related to Frederick J. Moses, '92 (brother) ; Arthur G. Moses, '91 
(brother). 

During the war served a year as Divisional Secretary of Y. M. C. A. 
in France. 



1 68 



Class of 1895 
FRANKLIN MURPHY, Jr. 



A.B. 




a, c — 222 McWhorter Street, Newark, N. J. 
b — 1023 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 
Born, November 29, 1873, Newark, N. J. Son of Franklin 

Murphy, manufacturer and former Governor of New Jersey 

(LL.D. Princeton, 1902; LL.D. Lafayette, 1902) and Janet 

Colwell Murphy. 
Married, October 17, 1908, at Chicago, 111., Harriet Alexander 

Long, daughter of Eugene Conant Long. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at n North 
Dod Hall. Member of Glee Club, Triangle Club, Whig Hall, Tiger Inn. 

After leaving Princeton entered the Murphy Varnish Company of 
Newark, and has been associated with the same company ever since 
in various capacities ; now Chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
company. 

Member of Nassau Club, Princeton Clubs of New York and Newark, 
University Club of New York, Union League Club of New York, Essex 
Club of Newark, Somerset Hills Country Club of Bernardsville ; re- 
tired active member of University Glee Club. 



Princeton University 
WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM NEILL 



169 
A.B. 




b — Van Nuys Hotel, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Born, April 5, 1872, Titusville, Pa. Son of Samuel Tate Neill, 

Attorney-at-law (A.B. Washington and Jefferson 1865), and 

Julia Laura Sinclair Neill. 
Married, October 21, 1903, at New York City, Fanny Lockard 

Cockley, daughter of David L. Cockley, manufacturer. 
Children, William C. Neill, Jr., born August 15, 1904; James P. 

Neill, born June 23, 1906; Samuel S. Neill, born October 23, 

1909. 

Prepared for college at Pittsburgh Central High School, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at "T", University Hall, 6 East Middle Witherspoon Hall, and 3 Middle 
Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Ivy Club. Played on Freshman 
Baseball Team. 

After leaving college studied law in his father's office in Warren, Pa. ; 
admitted to the Bar of Warren County, Pa., June, 1896; practised law in 
Warren, associated with his father until the latter's death in 1901 ; 
entered the Legal Department of the National Transit Company at Oil 
City, Pa., and continued there until December, 1905 ; moved to Pittsburgh, 
Pa., and engaged in the independent practice of law until March, 1911, 
when he became attorney for the Manufacturers' Light and Heat Company, 
with office in Pittsburgh. Continued as attorney for that company until 
August, 1914, when he suffered a serious physical breakdown and has 
not been able to engage in active business since. 



170 



Class of 1895 



With regard to his sons entering Princeton he writes, "My three sons 
and myself all look with longing eyes toward Princeton as the 'Promised 
Land,' but the distance from California and other serious problems 
rather dim our vision ." 



ALEXANDER HOWARD NELSON 



A.B. 








1920 



a, c — Guarantee Trust Building - , Atlantic City, N. J. 
b — 163 States Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Born, November 19, 1874, Chambersburg, Pa. Son of Thomas 

McDowell Nelson, banker, (Lafayette College) and Annie 

Esther Hollinger Nelson. 
Married, Jauary 25, 1902, at Pittsburgh, Pa., Eliza Bartles Mc- 

Candless, daughter of Stephen Collins McCandless. 
Children, Margaret McCandless Nelson, born January 21, 1903; 

Alexander Kirkpatrick Nelson, born March 21, 1905; Stephen 

McCandless Nelson, born March 5, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Chambersburg, Pa., Academy, entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 4 South East College. Member of Whig Hall. 

Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, September, 1895 
to June, 1897. Since 1897 has been engaged as a civil engineer; Vice- 
president of the Pittsburgh Bridge Company, 1897-1901 ; general con- 
struction work, 1901-13, as a member of the firm of Nelson and 
Buchanan, then Nelson Construction Company, then Nelson-Merydith 



Princeton University 171 

Company. From 1913 to date, Engineer for Atlantic City, N. J. Member 
of American Societ}^ of Civil Engineers. 

Member of Seaview Golf Club, Old Colony Club. 

His son, Alexander Kirkpatrick Nelson, is preparing for Princeton, 
and expects to enter the Class of 1925. 



HUGH NELSON A.B. 




1895 
a, c — 54 Vandiver Building, Montgomery, Ala. 
Born, September 15, 1873, Selma, Ala. Son of William Ran- 
dolph Nelson of Petersburg, Va., and Octavia LeVert Owen 
Nelson. 

Prepared for college at public schools of Selma, Ala., D. M. Calloway's 
private school, Selma, Ala., and Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, 
Ala., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 
189S, A.B. Roomed at 1 University Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

For the first year after leaving college he was employed by the Loan 
Company of Alabama, at Selma, dealers in farm mortgages ; and at the 
same time was reading law. In 1896 and 1897 he was a student at 
the Harvard Law School. In 1897, having been admitted to the Alabama 
bar, he began practice in the office of Graham and Steiner in Mont- 
gomery. Since January, 1900, has practised alone in Montgomery. 

ANDREW PARKER NEVIN A.B. 

a, c — 30 Church Street, New York, N. Y. 
b— 26 East 8th Street, New York City. 



172 



Class of 1895 




j 





189; 



1920 



Born, April 6, 1874, Ridley Park, Pa. Son of David Robert 
Bruce Nevin, lawyer and journalist (A.M. Princeton '48) and 
Rebecca Cloyd Parker Nevin. 

Married, June 5, 1912, at Cincinnati, O., Josephine Welles, 
(Richardson) daughter of George Sill Welles. 

Prepared for college at Hamilton School, Philadelphia, Pa., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 20 South East 
College. Member of Philadelphian Society, Bohemia Club, Clio Hall, 
Second Glee Club ; played substitute on Freshman Football team. Man- 
aging editor of the "Tiger" and the "Nassau Herald." Won Second 
Prize Clio Hall Essay Contest. Won Sons of American Revolution Prize 
at graduation. 

Student at University of Virginia Summer Law School 1894; student 
at New York Law School, 1895-97. Admitted to New York Bar 1899. 
Partner in firm of Nevin and Farries, (R. M. Farries '95), 1899-1901 ; 
partner in firm of Nevin and Gilpin, 1901-04; practised alone 1904 to date. 
Republican candidate for Justice of the Supreme Court, New York 
County, 1918 (defeated). 

Member Commission on Foreign Industrial Research of National Civic 
Federation; Director of American Relief Administration, Serbia, 1919, 
receiving Order of the White Eagle (civilian) from King Alexander of 
Serbia. Accorded the decoration of Saint Sava by the Serbian Govern- 
ment, 1919. 

Member of University Club, New York, Republican Club, New York, 
Siwanoy Country Club. Society of the Pilgrims' Descendants, Military 



Princeton University 



173 



Order of the Loyal Legion, Military Order of the War of 1812, Bar As- 
sociation of New York City, New York County Lawyers' Association. 

Co-author of "Labor Conditions in Great Britain and France," 1919. 

His stepsons David Richardson, Class of '22, and Allan Richardson, 
Class of '24, are undergraduates at Princeton. 

During the war was a member of the Executive Committee of Labor, 
Council of National Defense, 1917; Counsel and Paris Representative of 
American Fund for French Wounded, visiting Marne and Nancy sec- 
tors in August, 1918. 



JOHN SARGENT NEWBOLD 



A.B. 




a, c — 511 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
b — 201 South 20th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Born, October 2, 1874, "Vernon," Jenkintown, Pa. Son of John 
Smith Newbold, note broker, and Anna Penrose Buckley New- 
bold. 

Married, January 4, 1902, at Archiepiscopal Residence, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., Virginia Mason Campbell, daughter of Mason Camp- 
bell, civil engineer. 

Children, Virginia Newbold, born September 2, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Blight's School for Boys, Philadelphia, took 
Freshman year at University of Pennsylvania in Class of 1894, and en- 
tered Princeton in September, 1891, graduating in June, 1895, A.B. cum 



174 



Class of 1895 



laude. Roomed at 8 West Witherspoon Hall. Member of Philadelphian 
Society, St. Paul's Society, Colonial Club. 

Entered the banking and brokerage business of W. H. Newbold's Son 
and Company, in December, 1895, as a clerk; became a member of the 
firm January 1, 1899, and has remained the same to date. 

Member of Philadelphia Club, Rittenhouse Club, Princeton Club, 
Huntington Valley Country Club, Philobiblon Club, all of Philadelphia; 
Princeton Club of New York, Corinthian Yacht Club. 

Related to Eugene D. Newbold, '15 (nephew). 

During the war was Associate Director of Civilian Relief, Pennsylvania 
Division, American Red Cross, from December 1, 1917 to March 1, 1919. 



COURTLAND NIXON 



C.E. 




a — Care of Adjutant General, U. S. Army, War Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

b — 753 Lafayette Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

c — Care of Dunlop, America, Ltd., Niagara River Road, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Born, July 10, 1874, Fort Brown, Texas. Son of John B. Nixon, 

officer of the United States Army, and Eliza Lockwood Nixon. 
Married, February 2, 1905, at Denver, Colo., Julia Grant Camp- 
bell, daughter of Lafayette E. Campbell, officer of the United 

States Army. 
Children, Margaret Courtland Nixon, born May 25, 1913. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory School, entering Prince- 



Princeton University 175 

ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed at 
73 University Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

Employed in Princeton on landscape grading and sewer construction 
under Professors McMillan and W. B. Harris, 1895-96; employed on 
Hydrographic survey of Allegheny River and on fortification work at 
Baltimore, Md., both under United States Engineer offices, 1896-97; em- 
ployed by Chief Engineer of New York and Philadelphia Traction Com- 
pany on construction of trolley lines in New Jersey, 1897-98; appointed 
Second Lieutenant, 1st United States Infantry, July, 1898; served in 
United States and in Cuba during Cuban occupation; promoted First 
Lieutenant, 2nd United States Infantry, March, 1899; served in Cuba, 
United States and in the Philippines during the Philippine campaign; 
served as Battalion Adjutant one tour of two years ; promoted to Cap- 
tain, 2nd United States Infantry, 1904, and December detailed to serve 
in the Quartermaster's Corps, this service including construction of Fort 
Oglethorpe, Ga., and relief and supply work during San Francisco fire. 
In 1908 ordered to Panama and served under the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission as Purchasing Agent and Depot Quartermaster, concerned with 
the upkeep, inspection and accountability of all stock construction sup- 
plies (except food and medicine) including distribution; in charge of 
Commission Printing plant. In 1914 returned to military duty with 5th 
and 30th United States Infantry at Plattsburgh, N. Y. In 1915 retired 
from active service, voluntarily, under privileges of Special Act of Con- 
gress in recognition of Panama Canal Construction Service. 

Elected an Associate Member of American Society Civil Engineers, 
1905. Member of Princeton Engineering Society. 

Member of the University Club of Denver, Army and Navy Club of 
Washington, D. C, Princeton Club of New York. 

Author of "The Adjutant's Manual" (five editions). 

Came back to active duty for the war in 1917 and was assigned 
under Depot Quartermaster, New York City; later was given separate 
charge of clothing material and production in New York, involving eighty 
per cent of the clothing for the National Army. In May, 1918, went to 
England, thence to France, with 83rd Division, as Division Quarter- 
master ; served in Montigny le Roi, Le Mans, with 83rd Division. Later 
graduated from the Army General Staff College, A. E. F., at 
Langres, and was assigned to "G-3" of the American Second Army. Re- 
turned to United States early in 1919 and served in Washington as 
Assistant Director of Storage. Planned and organized the Quartermaster 
Retail Stores to dispose of certain surplus supplies, and was transferred 
to New York City on this duty. Appointed Lieutenant Colonel in 1918 
and Colonel in 1919, as temporary war grade. 

Since April 1, 1920 following his discharge from the army, has been 
Purchasing Agent for Dunlop, America, Ltd., the American branch of the 
English company manufacturing tires. 



176 



Class of 1895 
EDWIN MARK NORRIS 



A.B. 




1920 



a — Princeton, N. J. 

b — 33 Cleveland Lane, Princeton, N. J. 

c — Care of Princeton Alumni Weekly, Princeton, N. J. 
Born, July 14, 1867, De Witt, Iowa. Son of James Mark Norris 

and Salome Wilbur Norris. 
Married, December 17, 1904, at Baltimore, Md., Katherine Kirby 

Hughes, daughter of Thomas Hughes, A.B., LL.B., lawyer. 
Children, Katherine Thorburn Norris, born September 20, 1905 ; 

Caroline Lawrence Norris, born May 25, 1907 ; Edwin Mark 

Norris, Jr., born December 1, 1908; Thomas Hughes Norris, 

born February 8, 1916. 

Prepared for college with private tutors, entering Princeton in Septem- 
ber, 1 891, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 24 
Nassau Hall and 1 South Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society 
and Whig Hall; editor of Nassau Literary Magazine. Won First Prize 
in Sophomore Oratorical Contest, Whig Hall; was Junior Orator; com- 
petitor in Baird contest ; won Second Group Honors and High Honors in 
Philosophy at graduation. Student in Princeton Graduate School, 1895- 
97, taking degree of A. M. During this time worked for the Sesquicen- 
tennial Celebration Committee. 

Reporter on the staff of the Philadelphia Press, 1897-1900; Associate 
Editor, Princeton Alumni Weekly, 1900-04; Editor, Princeton Alumni 
Weekly, 1904 to date. Member of the Borough Council of Princeton, 



Princeton University 



177 



N. J., 1912-14; President of the Borough Council of Princeton, N. J., 
1914; Acting Mayor of Princeton, N. J., May-September, 1914; mem- 
ber of Board of Elections, Second District, Princeton, N. J., 1916-19. 

Member and trustee of Nassau Club of Princeton; member and trustee 
of Princeton Golf Club; member of Nassau Gun Club, Princeton Club of 
Philadelphia, and Monterey Country Club. 

Author of "The Story of Princeton," "Life of Howard Houston 
Henry," numerous newspaper articles and articles in Princeton Alumni 
Weekly and other publications. 

His sons expect to enter Princeton, Edwin Mark Norris, Jr., about 
1927; Thomas Hughes Norris, about 1934. 

During the war served as member of Registration Board for Draft, 
Second District, Princeton, N. J., 1918; Solicitor in War Fund Drives 
1917-18. 



FREDERICK ALBERT NORRIS 



C.E. 




1895 1920 

a, c — Care of The Thompson and Norris Company, 212 Con- 
cord Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
b — Hewlett, Long Island, N. Y. 
Born, July 23, 1872, New York, N. Y. Son of Henry Dole 

Norris, manufacturer, and Sarah C. Hewes Norris. 
Married, October 23, 1912, at Brookline, Mass., Helen Elizabeth 
Brush, daughter of Charles Newcomb Brush, cotton merchant. 
Children, Henry Dole Norris, born August 14, 1913; Charles 
Brush Norris, born November 26, 1915; Vincent Norris, born 
February 22, 1917. 



178 



Class of 1895 



Prepared for college at Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. 
Roomed at 4 West Witherspoon Hall. Member of Track Team and 
University Cottage Club. 

Draughtsman for Elmira Bridge Company (structural steel), Elmira, 
N. Y., 1895 ; in the employ of The Thompson and Norris Company, 
manufacturers of corrugated paper, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1896-1904; treasurer 
of Emerson and Norris Company, manufacturers of concrete stone, Bos- 
ton, Mass., 1906 to date; Vice-president of The Thompson and Norris 
Company, manufacturers of corrugated paper, 1910 to date. 

Member of University Club of New York, Princeton Club of New 
York, The Country Club of Brookline, Mass., Algonquin Club of Boston. 



EDWARD ROE OTHEMAN 



A.B. 




1895 1920 

a, c — 31 Nassau Street, New York, N. Y. 
b— 41 East 53rd Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, October 29, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Francis Way- 
land Otheman, merchant, and Laura Bosworth Chamberlain 
Otheman. 

Prepared for college at Berkeley School, New York, entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. cum laudc. 
Roomed at 2 South East Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian So- 
ciety. Freshman Banjo Club, Triangle Club, Whig Hall and Tiger Inn. 

Student at New York Law School, 1895-7, receiving degree of LL.B. 

Since 1899 has practised law in New York, associated with Howard E. 
White, '95, and later with Roswell C. Otheman, '07. 



Princeton University 



179 



Member of Association of the Bar of the City of New York, Univer- 
sity Club, Downtown Association, and Princeton Club, of New York; 
Nassau Club, Princeton; West Side Tennis Club, Forest Hills, Long 
Island; University Glee Club, New York; New England Society. Director 
of the Musical Art Society of New York. Treasurer of Wesley House 
Neighborhood Settlement of New York. 
Brother of Roswell C. Otheman, '07. 

During the war served in Department of Labor, Bureau of Industrial 
Housing and Transportation, Legal Department, Washington, D. C. 



JACOB S. OTTO 



A.B. 




a, c — 135 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 
b — 460 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Born, August 29, 1872, Buffalo, N. Y. Son of John Otto, real 
estate, and Eliza Shipman Corning Otto. 

Married, October 15, 1902, Elisabeth Townsend Wheeler, daugh- 
ter of Edmund S. Wheeler (A.B. Harvard). 

Children, Elisabeth Townsend Otto, born August 1, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at public schools of Buffalo, N. Y., and with 
private tutors, entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in 
June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at "V" University Hall, 6 East Middle Wither- 
spoon Hall, and 23 Middle Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, 
Whig Hall, Ivy Club. Captain of Freshman Baseball Team; played on 
Varsity Team, 1893-94-95. Secretary and Treasurer of the Class in Fresh- 
man year. Chairman of Class Day Committee at graduation. 



i8o 



Class of 1895 



Entered the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo in 1895, 
graduating in 1898 with degree of M.D. ; Interne at Rochester City Hos- 
pital, Erie County Hospital, Buffalo, and Buffalo General Hospital, 1898- 
1900; since 1900 has practised medicine in Buffalo, N. Y. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Therapeutics, Medical Department of University of Buffalo. 

Member of Saturn Club of Buffalo, Buffalo Tennis and Squash Club. 



ORREL ARDREY PARKER 



B.S. 




a, b — 2126 Surrey Road, Cleveland Heights, Cleveland, O. 
c — 3778 East 78th Street, Cleveland, O. 

Born, January 14, 1873, Muskingum County, O. Son of John 
Ardrey Parker, merchant, and Lucy Drumm Parker. 

Married, May 22, 1907, at New York City, May Robertson Gib- 
son, daughter of William Gibson. 

Prepared for college in the public schools of Fostoria, Ohio, and in 
Princeton Preparatory School, entering Princeton in September, 1892, 
and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed at 13 South Middle Re- 
union Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall. Stood 
first in class (School of Science) in Sophomore, Junior and Senior years. 
Was first to graduate with "High Honors" in School of Science. 

Entered the New York Law School in September, 1895, graduating 
in June, 1897, with degree of LL.B. 

Practised law in New York City, 1897-1912; spent considerable time 
in Porto Rico, as representative of the Associated Press, 1898-1900; 
lecturer for J. B. Pond Lyceum Bureau of Education of New York City, 



Princeton University 181 

and others, on various subjects, chiefly "Porto Rico and Its People," 
"Aviation" and "Automobiles"; President of Newmastic Company, of 
New York City, 1907-19; licensed Hydraulic Pressed Steel Company, 
Cleveland, Ohio, under various patents on metal automobile wheels and 
demountable rims, 1914-19; was employed as manager of Wheel Depart- 
ment up to time of entering Government service in July, 1917; served in 
various capacities as civilian employee up to December 15, 1918; Pro- 
prietor of Parker Wheel Company, Cleveland, Ohio, manufacturing 
patented automobile wheels of pressed steel, aluminum, malleable iron and 
steel, 1919 to date. 

Member of Phi Beta Kappa, Society of Automotive Engineers, Cleve- 
land Engineering Society, Princeton Engineering Association. 

Charter member Aero Club of America (resigned) and Aeronautical 
Society (resigned) ; formerly member of Automobile Club of America, 
Lawyers Club, Graduates Club, Rotary Club of New York (past Presi- 
dent) ; now member of Ohio Society of New York, Cleveland Athletic 
Club, Highland Park Golf Club. 

Author of technical papers read before engineering societies, articles 
and photographs concerning Porto Rico. 

His brother, Frederick Dalton Parker, '96 (deceased) was an alumnus 
of Princeton. 

During the war served as engineer in Inspection Section, Ordnance De- 
partment, Department of War, July-August, 1917; Substitute Chairman, 
Automotive Products Section, War Industries Board, Council of Na- 
tional Defense, September-October, 1917; Consulting Engineer, Motor 
Transport Section, Quartermaster's Department, November-December, 
1917; Aeronautical Mechanical Engineer, assigned to Air Service, in 
charge of technical records, January-December, 1918, during which time 
he established a uniform system of records at all flying fields in the 
United States. 



WILLIAM PATERSON 

a, c — 543 Broadway, Albany, N. Y. 

b — 262 Hamilton Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Born, April 2, 1875, Saint Paul, Minn. Son of Andrew Bell 
Paterson, clergyman of the Episcopal Church and for some 
time rector of Trinity Church, Princeton (A.B. Rutgers, D.D. 
General Theological Seminary, New York, N. Y.) and Frances 
Converse Webb Paterson. 

Married, April 16, 1902, at New York City, Bertha Gillet, daugh- 
ter of Elmslie Morven Gillet (B.S. Columbia). 

Children. Bertha Gillet Paterson, born October 26, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory School, entering Prince- 



1 82 



Class of 1895 




1920 

ton in September, 1891 and leaving in the fall of 1894. Roomed at 12 
Stockton Street. 

From 1894 to 1901 was engaged in general civil engieeering, with the 
Wagner Palace Car Company, the Adirondack and St. Lawrence Railroad, 
and the New York Central Railroad. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 
Artillery, United States Army, in February, 1902; First Lieutenant, Coast 
Artillery, January, 1908; Captain, Coast Artillery, April, 1911; Major, Coast 
Artillery, May, 1917 ; Lieutenant-Colonel, Coast Artillery, May, 1918. Has 
served at various Army posts in and out of the United States among 
others, at Alcatraz Island, San Francisco; Fort Miley, Cal. ; Sandy Hook, 
N. J.; Fort Totten, N. Y. ; Fort Monroe, Va. ; and the Philippines. 

During the war served in France with the 82nd Division and 60th 
Artillery, from April, 1918 to December, 1918; took active part in Saint 
Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne campaigns. 



JAMES DONALDSON PAXTON 



C.E. 



a, c — 1719 Real Estate Trust Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
b — St. David's, Pa. 
Born, October 29, 1872, New York City. Son of William Miller 

Paxton, Presbyterian Minister (Pennsylvania College, 1843; 

Princeton Theological Seminary, 1848; D.D. Jefferson College, 

i860; LL.D. Washington and Jefferson, 1883), and Caroline 

T. Denny Paxton. 
Married, October 21, 1897, at Princeton, N. J., Myra Reading 

Gulick, daughter of Alexander Gulick. 



Princeton University 



183 




Children, William M. Paxton, 3rd, born October 14, 1898; Myra 
Reading Paxton, born December 9, 1903. 

Prepared for college at Hill School, Pottstown, Princeton Preparatory 
School, and with private tutors, entering Princeton in September, 1S91, 
and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Member of Whig Hall. 

Since leaving college has been engaged as a civil engineer, associated 
with the Southwark Foundry and Machine Company, 1896; from 1897 to 
the present time with Frank C. Roberts and Company of Philadelphia. 
Member of the Union League Club of Philadelphia. 

Related to A. R. Stevenson, '76 (cousin) ; Wiliiam P. Stevenson, '76 
(cousin) ; J. O. H. Denny, '77 (cousin) ; Charlton R. Gulick, '79( brother- 
in-law) ; Frank H. Denny, '80 (cousin) ; James D. Paxton, '80 (brother) ; 
Frank C. Roberts, '83 (brother-in-law) ; Robert McKnight, '83 (cousin) ; 
William Gulick, '83 (brother-in-law) ; Alexander R. Gulick, '89 (brother- 
in-law) ; Lewis S. Mudge, '89 (brother-in-law) ; William M. Paxton, 
'89 (brother) ; Harmar D. Paxton, '91 (brother) ; T. K. Stevenson, '05 
(cousin) ; Walker Stevenson, '05 (cousin) ; William Paxton Roberts, '14 
(nephew) ; A. R. Stevenson, Jr., '14 (cousin) ; Frank C. Roberts, Jr., '16 
(nephew) ; Stuart Stevenson, '18 (cousin) ; William M. Paxton, 3rd, '19 
(son); H. Denny Roberts, '21 (nephew). 



JAMES WILSON PAXTON C.E. 

a, c — Care of Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, O. 
Born, December 27, 1874, Cumberland, Md. 

Prepared for college at Blight's School, Philadelphia, entering Prince- 



1 84 



Class of 1895 




189s 

ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed at 12 
South West Brown Hall. 

In the fall of 1895 was a civil engineer with the Washington, Alexandria 
and Mount Vernon Electric Railway Company. In 1897 with F. C. 
Roberts and Company, engineers, Philadelphia. In 1898, engineer at 
Vischer Ferry, N. Y., on Government survey for ship canal from the 
Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. In 1890. in Detroit on similar Govern- 
ment engineering work. In 1901 with National Tube Company, Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. In 1903, civil engineering in Washington, D. C, associated 
with D. J. Howell. In 1907 with McDermott Contracting Company at 
Tola, Va. In 1909 with same firm in Philadelphia. In 1910 member of 
firm of Southern States Engineering and Equipment Company at Nor- 
folk, Va. In 1912 to 1918 Superintendent of Street Cleaning, Washing- 
ton, D. C. In 1920 was offered, but declined, appointment as Superin- 
tendent of Street Cleaning of Philadelphia. Now with the Goodyear 
Tire and Rubber Company (Tire Department), Akron, O. 



CHRISTY PAYNE 



A.B. 



a, c — 424 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
b — Backbone Road, Sewickley, Pa. 
Born, February 27, 1874, Butler, Pa. Son of Calvin N. Payne, 

oil and gas operator, and Martha Elizabeth Dempsey Payne. 
Married, October 7, 1897, at Warren, Pa., Anne Laura Neill, 

daughter of Samuel T. Neill, attorney (A.B. Washington and 

Jefferson). 



Princeton University 






1920 



Children, Neill Sinclair Payne, born September 14, 1898 (died, 
January 14, 1899) ; Martha Payne, born May 17, 1900; Christy 
Payne, Jr., born April 29, 1904. 

Prepared for college at High School, Titusville, Pa., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating Magna Cum Laude in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 6 East Middle Witherspoon Hall. Member of Philadel- 
phian Society, Whig Hall, Faust Club, Ivy Club, Monday Night Club, 
Glee Club. Played on Freshman Baseball team, and University Base- 
ball teams in '93, 94 and 95. Won Sophomore Special Honors in Mathe- 
matics and Latin. President of the Class of '95 in Senior year and to 
date. 

Admitted to bar in Venango County, Pa., December, 1898; in Allegheny 
County, Pa., December, 1901 ; in Supreme Court, 1901. 

In the employ of the South Penn Oil Company, Land and Title De- 
partment, Oil City and Pittsburgh, Pa., 1895- 1903 ; Secretary and Attor- 
ney of the People's Natural Gas Company, 1903 to date; Secretary and 
Attorney of Hope Natural Gas Company, 1903 to date ; Secretary and At- 
torney of Reserve Gas Company, 1906 to date; Secretary and Attorney of 
The River Gas Company, 1909 to date ; Secretary and Attorney of The 
Connecting Gas Company, 1909 to date ; Vice-president of Marion Oil 
Company, 1912 to date. Director in the People's Natural Gas Company, 
1904 to date ; Reserve Gas Company, 1906 to date ; River Gas Company, 
1910 to date ; Marion Oil Company, 1912 to date. Elder, Presbyterian 
Church, Sewickley, Pa., 191 1 to date. 

Member of Edgeworth Club, Sewickley, Pa. ; Allegheny Country Club, 
Sewickley Heights, Pa. ; Union Club, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



1 86 Class of 1895 

Related to F. H. Payne, '91 (brother) ; F. Dana Payne, '16 (nephew). 
His son, Christy Payne, Jr., is preparing for Princeton at Hotchkiss and 
expects to enter the Class of 1926. 



LEWIS FREDERIC PEASE 



A.B. 




a, b, c — 126 East 24th Street, New York, N. Y 
Born, August 23, 1872, Germantown, Pa. Son of James Oliver 

Pease, merchant and treasurer of the Phoenix Iron Company 

of Philadelphia and Mary Dwight Rathbone Pease. 
Married, January 24, 1905, at Germantown, Pa., Laurette Eustis 

Potts, daughter of George Cumming Potts, merchant. 
Children, Mary Zelia Pease, born January 19, 1906; James Oliver 

Pease, born April 11, 1909. 

Prepared for college at Penn Charter School and Germantown Acad- 
emy, Philadelphia, Pa., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and 
graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 2 North Dod Hall. Member 
of Whig Hall, Philadelphian Society, Freshman Glee Club, Varsity Glee 
Club, Triangle Club, Football scrub team, Freshman Baseball Team, Class 
Football Team for four years, Tiger Inn, Right Wing Club, Philadelphia 
Club, Penn Charter Club. Class Vice-president in Sophomore year; 
leader of Freshman Glee Club, Varsity Club and Chapel choir; Musical 
Director of Triangle Club; College organist; member of Class Day 
Committee. 

Teacher of Latin and German in Germantown Academy, Germantown, 
Pa., 1895-96; rancher as Ensenada, Lower California, Mexico, 1896-97; 



Princeton University 



187 



General Superintendent, Bar-7-K Ranch, Cimarron, New Mexico, 1897-99; 
student at Graduate School of Harvard University, 1899-1900; student at 
Royal Music School, Munich, 1900-01 ; student of music in Paris and 
Berlin, 1901-03 ; Lecturer on music and University Organist in Princeton 
University, 1903-04; Organist and Choirmaster of North Avenue Presby- 
terian Church, New Rochelle, N. Y., 1904-18; Conductor of New Rochelle 
Oratorio Society, 1905-07; Choirmaster, Rosemary Hall School, Green- 
wich, Conn., 1907-12; Curator of Music Collection, Princeton University 
Library, 1907-09; member of Musical Art Society Choir, New York, 1907 
to date; Conductor of Eurydice Club, Pelham Manor, N. Y., 1908-15; 
Cataloguer of Reference Library, Institute of Musical Art, New York, 
1910 to date; Conductor of Scarsdale Chorus, Scarsdale, N. Y., 1913-16; 
teacher of singing in New York City, 1913 to date ; instructor in School 
of Music, Yale University, 1917 to date; teacher in Music School Settle- 
ment, New York City, 1918 to date. 

Elected to membership in Internationale Musikgesellschaft, 1908; New 
York State Singing Teachers' Association, 1919. 

Member of Orpheus Club of Philadelphia, Princeton Club of Philadel- 
phia, Princeton Club of New York, Nassau Club of Princeton, Harvard 
Club of New York, Graduates' Club of New Haven, University Glee Club 
of New York, The Bohemians of New York. 



GILBERT BROOKE PERKINS 




a. i^l 


|gg| 








'--'- 





■ 





1920 



a, b — Chevy Chase, Maryland. 
Born, May 27, 1871, Covington, Ky. Son of George Gilpin 
Perkins, retired Judge of Circuit Court, Kenton County, Ky. 



1 88 Class of 1895 

(A.B. Belmont College, O. 1861) and Lavinia Jane Smith 
Perkins. 

Married, April 30, 1902, at San Francisco, Cal., Clara Hunting- 
ton. Now divorced. 

Children, Huntington Todd Perkins, born November 29, 1910; 
Jane Perkins, born September 29, 1912; Mary Perkins, born 
February 22, 191 5. 

Prepared for college at private school, Covington, Ky., entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1895. Roomed at 6 East 
Witherspoon Hall. 

Student at University of Berlin, 1897-8. Admitted to practise law in 
Kentucky, 1897. Cashier and General Manager for H. Knickerbacker and 
Company, member of New York Stock Exchange, 1900-06; Second Vice- 
president of Huntington Land and Improvement Company, Los Angeles, 
Cal., 1907-10; Secretary and Treasurer of Army and Navy Preparatory 
School, Washington, D. C, 1910-12; representative of Nordyke and Mar- 
mon, manufacturers of motor cars, in Brooklyn and Long Island, 
1914-18. 

Member of Chevy Chase Club, Maryland; Princeton Club of New 
York. 

During the war was commissioned 1st Lieutenant, Motor Transport 
Corps, October 30, 1918; served as Adjutant, Headquarters Motor Com- 
mand No. 33, during entire time of service; discharged June 1, 1919. 



THOMAS HAINES PIERSON C.E. 

a, b — Lawrence, Long Island, N. Y. 
c— 63 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 

Born, November 15, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Henry 
Lewis Pierson, merchant, and Henrietta Broom Haines Pier- 
son. 

Married, September 27, 1905, at Montreal, Canada, Virginia Kent 
Lowrey, daughter of Grosvenor Porter Lowrey, lawyer. 

Children, Henry Lowrey Pierson, born April 3, 1908 ; Charlotte 
Jocelyn Pierson, born July 20, 1910. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed at 10 South 
Dod Hall. Member of Freshman Glee Club, Varsity Glee Club, Tiger 
Inn, Gun Club. 

With Post and McCord New York, structural steel engineers and con- 
tractors, 1895-98, starting as a laborer in the shop and ending as in- 
structor ; served as private in Troop A, U. S. V. Cavalry, in Spanish War, 
1898: Assistant Contract Agent of American Bridge Company for Met- 



Princeton University 



189 




1920 



ropolitan District, 1898-1900; President of Pierson and Goodrich, Inc., 
engineers and contractors for steel work, New York, 1900-1915; Manager 
of Greater Fairmont Investment Company of Fairmont, W. Va., 1916-17; 
engaged on construction of residences for DuPont Company, Wilmington, 
Del., 1918; member of Board of Review of Construction for War De- 
partment 1918-19; Manager of New York office of Paul Cleland, Financial 
Engineers of Cleveland, O., 1919 to date. Trustee of the Village of 
Lawrence, Long Island, N. Y., 1912. 

Member of Princeton and University Clubs of New York, Troop A, 
U. S. V. Cavalry. 

His son, Henry Lowrey Pierson, is preparing for Princeton and expects 
to enter the Class of 1930. 



DAN FELLOWS PLATT 



A.B. 



a, b — Englewood, N. J. 

c — 52 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Born, June 10, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Charles B. Piatt, 

banker, and Lillie D. Fellows Piatt. 
Married, October 2, 1900, at Englewood, N. J., Ethel Appleby 

Bliss, daughter of Delos Bliss, box manufacturer. 

Prepared for college at Englewood School, entering Princeton in 
September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Magna cum laude. 
Roomed at 4 East Middle Witherspoon Hall. Member of St. Paul's So- 
ciety and Whig Hall. Won honors in Classics, Mathematics, economics, 



190 



Class of 1895 




1920 



history, jurisprudence, politics and German; first group for four years; 
English salutatorian at graduation. 

Student at American School of Classical Studies, Rome, 1895-6; student 
at New York Law School, 1896-98, receiving degree of LL.B. ; Post-gradu- 
ate degree M. A., Princeton, 1898. 

Associated with James B. Dill in the practise of law, 1898-1901 ; at 
present art critic and publicist. Has been lecturer on Renaissance Art 
at Princeton, and lecturer at Harvard, Yale and Wellesley colleges. 

Councilman-at-large for the city of Englewood, N. J., 1902-04; Mayor 
of the city of Englewood, 1904-06; Democratic State Committeeman, New 
Jersey, 1910-16; chairman of Sinking Fund Commission, city of Englewood. 

Author of "Through Italy with Car and Camera" and "Motoring in 
Europe before the War." 

Member of Englewood clubs ; member of Order of Elks ; 32nd degree. 
Mason. 

During the war was member of U. S. Fuel Administration for Bergen 
County, N. J., 1917-19; President of War Camp Community Service for 
Camp Merritt and Bergen County, 1917-19; Chairman of Bergen County of 
Red Cross Drive, 1917. 



ROBERT WEST POGUE 

a, c — 4th and Race Sreets, Cincinnati, O. 

b — 527 Hale Avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati O. 
Born, September 4, 1872, Cincinnati, O. Son of Samuel Pogue, 
merchant, and Frances West Pogue. 



Princeton University 191 




1920 

Married, October 26, 1899, at Cincinnati, O., Sara Russell 

Letcher, daughter of William Letcher. 
Children, Russell Letcher Pogue, born February 17, 1908. 

Prepared for college at Woodward High School, Cincinnati, O., enter- 
ing Princeton in September, 1892, at the beginning of Sophomore year, 
and leaving in June, 1894, at the end of Junior year. Roomed at 2 South 
West College. 

After leaving college he entered the employ of the H. and S. Pogue 
Company of Cincinnati, Dry Goods. He became Vice-president of the 
company in 1898 and President in 1912. He is President of the Retail 
Stores Association; a director of the Citizens National Bank of Cincinnati, 
and a director of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce. 

Member of University Club, Queen City Club, Business Men's Club, 
Cincinnati Country Club, Cincinnati Golf Club, Optimists Club, Cincinnati 
Automobile Club, Cincinnati Gun Club. 

Related to Henry Pogue '04, John C. Pogue '06 and Thomas W. Trevor 
'12 (cousins). 



JOSEPH POLCAR 

a, b — 5200 Cass Street, Omaha, Neb. 
c — Omaha Daily News, Omaha, Neb. 
Born, April 22, 1872, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Joseph W. Pol- 
car, manufacturer, and Mary Smith Polcar. 



192 



Class of 1895 




Married, May 30, 1899, at Omaha, Neb., Emma Lewis, daugh- 
ter of John Lewis, farmer. 
Children, John Joseph Polcar, born June 23, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Omaha, Neb., High School, entering Princeton 
in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1893. Roomed in North Edwards 
Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall ; played on 
Freshman Football Team. 

Since leaving college has been engaged in newspaper business ; since 
1902 has been associated with the Omaha Daily News, of which he is 
now publisher. 



CHARLES ARTHUR POOLE C.E. 

a, b — 60 Westminster Road, Rochester, N. Y. 
c — 52 City Hall, Rochester, N. Y. 
Born, June 23, 1874, Rochester, N. Y. Son of Charles A. Poole, 
railroad transportation, and Amorette Otis Poole. 

Prepared for college at Columbia Institute, New York City, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed 
in University Hall. Member of St. Paul Society, Clio Hall and Cap 
and Gown Club. Won Sophomore and Junior First Group Honors. 

Draftsman, Department of Engineer, State of New York, 1895-99; 
Assistant Engineer engaged on railroad construction, 1899; draftsman, 
New York State Barge Canal Survey, 1900; Draftsman, New York Cen- 
tral Railroad, 1900-01 ; Assistant Engineer on railroad construction in 



Princeton University 



193 






1920 

Norway, 1902-04; Resident Engineer, Barge Canal Construction, State 
of New York; 1905-09; Engineer, Ferguson Contracting Company, 
general contractors, of New York, 1910-11; Assistant Engineer, Sewage 
Disposal Construction, City of Rochester, 1911-16; City Engineer, Ro- 
chester, N. Y., 1917 to date. 

Elected to American Society of Civil Engineers, June, 1907. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Genesee Valley Club of 
Rochester, University Club of Rochester, Rochester Engineering Society, 
Rochester Chamber of Commerce. 

During the war was commissioned Captain, Engineers, U. S. Army, 
August 31, 1918; honorably discharged December 23, 1918; now holds 
commission as Captain, Engineers, U. S. Reserves. 



HENRY MORGAN POST 



A.B. 



a, c — 52 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

b — 67 East 53rd Street, New York, N. Y. 

Born, October 12, 1873, Brooklyn, N. Y. Son of Stephen Rush- 
more Post, commission merchant and Caroline Bulkley Morgan 
Post. 

Married, June 21, 1919, at Galilee, N. J., Mary Riker Haskell, 
daughter of J. Amory Haskell, Vice-president of General 
Motors Corp. and E. I. du Pont Powder Company. 

Prepared for college at Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 



194 



Class of 1895 




at 11 South East Brown Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Cannon Club. 
Won Lyman H. Atwater Prize in Political Science, Senior Year. 

Entered the New York Law School in 1896, graduating in 1897 with 
degree of LL.B. Attorney-at-law in State of New York, 1897-1905 ; 
member of the New York Stock Exchange, 1905 to date ; partner in the 
firm of Post Brothers and Company. 

Member of University and Princeton Clubs of New York, Rumson Club 
of New Jersey. 

Related to Charles Post '98 (brother) ; Morgan B. Post, '00 (brother) ; 
Amory L. Haskell, '16 (brother-in-law), Professor Arthur L. Frothingham, 
'96 Hon. (brother-in-law). 

During the war served for six months in the New York State Militia 
Veteran Corps of Artillery. Served as Assistant Field Director (Captain) 
in the Red Cross from December, 1918 to June, 1919. 



FRANK REYNOLDS C.E. 

a, b, c — Greenfield, la. 
Born, April 2, 1870, Lockport, N. Y. Son of Job Reynolds and 

Martha Amanda Maynard Reynolds. 
Married, October 1, 1913, at Greenfield, la., Pearl Power, daugh- 
ter of Robert S. Power, farmer. 
Children, Edith Frances Reynolds, born April 2, 1915 ; Robert 
Power Reynolds, born March 15, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory Shool, entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed at 
73 University Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society. 



Princeton University 



195 




m 


A ' 


i. 




'N 


1 



1920 

After leaving college was associated with the Iowa Engineering Com- 
pany at Clinton, la., as civil engineer. In 1901 was Assistant Engineer 
of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Northern Railroad at Cedar Rapids, 
la. ; in 1907 was civil engineer for the Chicago', Burlington and Quincy 
Railroad at Maquoketa, la. ; in 1909 was resident engineer for the Iowa 
Engineering Company, Clinton, la., in charge of municipal improvements. 
In 1916 formed a partnership with Robert F. Power to engage in the 
hardware and implement business in Greenfield, la. 



PIERRE EVERTSON RICHARDS 

a, c — 46 Holborn Viaduct, London, E. C, England. 

b — "King's Gam/' Arterderry Road, Wimbledon, London, 
S. W. 19, England. 

Born, March 22, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Pierre C. 
Richards, exporter, and Kate L. Cornell Richards. 

Married, June 5, 1902, at New Bedford, Mass., Hetta M. Hervey, 
daughter of E. W. Hervey, banker. 

Children, Homer Hervey Richards, born April 2, 1905 ; Emma- 
line Helen Richards, born December 5, 1907 (died Oct. 25, 
1910). 

Prepared for college at Dwight School, New York City, and with private 
tutors, entering Princeton in June, 1891, and leaving in 1895. Roomed in 
South Reunion Hall. Member of St. Paul Society and Tiger Inn. 
Assistant Manager of "Princetonian." 



196 



Class of 1895 





1920 

Student at Cornell University Summer School and Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 

After leaving college he took a course in Chemistry at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, and was, in 1896 a chemist in the employ of the 
New York and New Jersey Fire-proofing Company, Keyport, N. J. 
In 1897 he was associated with Whitman Mill Corporation, New Bed- 
ford, Mass., cotton manufacturers. In 1905 he removed to England, and 
has since then been the Managing Director of American Agencies, Ld., 
of London. At the present he is also Manager of Colgate Department, 
John Morgan Richards and Sons, Ltd., of London, and is a director of 
Thompson & Norris Mfg. Co. of London. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York ; American Club, Piccadilly, 
London. 

His son, Homer Hervey Richards, will prepare for Princeton at Hotch- 
kiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and expects to enter the Class of 1927. 

During the war did volunteer fire work with the London Fire Brigade. 
The Class Secretary learns also that in January 1920 he was awarded a 
testimonial at Wandsworth Town Hall by the Royal Humane Society of 
England for saving the life of a drowning boy in the River Thames at 
Putney, under circumstances of extreme difficulty and at the risk of his 
own life. 



WILLIAM HENRY ROBERTS, JR. A.B. 

a, b — 119 Walnut Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 

c — 143 1 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, January 8, 1873, Princeton, N. J. Son of William Henry 



Princeton University 



197 




Roberts, clergyman (A.B. 1863, A.M. 1866 College City of New 

York; D.D. Western University of Pennsylvania 1884; LL.D. 

Miami 1888; D.D. Lafayette 1907) and Sarah Esther McLean 

Roberts. 
Married, January 12, 1904, at Mansfield, Ohio, Katharine 

Temple Caldwell, daughter of George Buckner Caldwell. 
Children, William Caldwell Roberts, born March 9, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Franklin Academy, Cincinnati, O., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 12 South West Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, Fresh- 
man Banjo Club, University Banjo and Mandolin Clubs, Cap and Gown 
Club. 

Was a law student in the office of the Hon. William M. Lanning, Tren- 
ton, N. J., 1895-98, and admitted to the Practice of Law in- the State of 
New Jersey, 1898. Entered the Law School of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1898, graduating in June, 1900 with degree of LL.B. Secretary- 
Treasurer of Cumberland and Westemport Electric Railway Company, 
1904; Manager of Corporate Trust Department, Real Estate Trust Com- 
pany of Philadelphia, 1906; Treasurer and Director of American Public 
Service Company, 1912; Vice-president and Director of Fairmount Sav- 
ings Trust Company of Philadelphia, Pa., 1910 to date; Assistant Secre- 
tary, Treasurer and Director of Helena Gas and Electric Company, 191 1 
to date; Director of Pacific Marine and Construction Company, 1918 to 
date; Director and Vice-president of United Concrete Pipe Company, 
1919 to date. 



198 



Class of 1895 



Member of Cap and Gown Club of Princeton, Princeton Club of 
Philadelphia, Nassau Club of Princeton, Union League Club of Philadel- 
phia, Merioru Cricket Club of Haverford, Pa. 

Related to Frank C. Roberts, '83 (uncle) ; William Paxton Roberts, '14 
(cousin) ; Frank C. Roberts, Jr., '16 (cousin) ; H. Denny Roberts, '21 
(cousin) ; Roger Sherman Mitchell, '00 (cousin). His son, William Cald- 
well Roberts, is preparing for Princeton and expects to enter the Class 
of 1929. 



WILLIAM DEE ROBERTSON 



A.B. 




1895 : 9 2 

a, b, c — 142 South Third Avenue, Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Born, November 20, 1872, Cambridge, N. Y. Son of James Ed- 
ward Robertson, farmer, and Mary Reed Robertson. 

Married, October 30, 1906, at Mount Vernon, N. Y., Elizabeth 
Goodwin, daughter of Thomas F. Goodwin, physician (A.B. 
New York University). 

Prepared for college at Cambridge, N. Y., High School, and Monmouth 
College, Monmouth, N. Y., entering Princeton in September, 1892, and 
graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 1 East Witherspoon Hall and 
1 South Reunion Hall. Member of Whig and Triangle Club. 

Entered Bellevue Hospital College in 1895, graduating in 1898 with 
degree of M.D. Interne in Bellevue Hospital, 1898-1900. Since 1900 has 
been a practising physician at Mount Vernon, N. Y. Attending Phy- 
sician to Mount Vernon Hospital, 1906; Chief Surgeon to New York, 
Westchester and Boston Railway, 1912; Chief Surgeon to Westchester 
Street Electric Railway, and New York and Stamford Railway, 1918. 



Princeton University 199 

Elected to the Society of the Alumni of Bellevue Hospital, 1901 ; 
American Medical Association, 1902 ; New York State Medical Asso- 
ciation, 1902; Westchester County Medical Association, 1902; Mount 
Vernon Medical Association, 1904; Jenkins Medical Association, 190S. 

Author of several papers on various medical subjects. 

Related to Rev. W. C. Robinson '88 (cousin), and Rev. Stewart Mc- 
Master Robinson '15 (cousin), who are alumni of Princeton. 



ALEXANDER VINTON ROE 




1920 

a, c — 52 William Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — 129 East 78th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, August 8, 1873, New York, N. Y. Son of Albert Seely 

Roe, merchant, and Amy Aims Chamberlain Roe. 
Married, February 10, 1909, at Orange, N. J., Ruth Coney, 

daughter of George Eaton Coney, lawyer (A.B. Yale). 
Children, Nathalie McLean Roe, born January 24, 1910; Sylvia 

Coney Roe, born August 16, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Chapin School, Columbia Grammar School, 
and Harvard School, New York City, entering Princeton in September, 
1 891, and leaving in February, 1893. Roomed in North West College. 
Member of St. Paul's Society. 

In employ of Central Lard Company, New York City, 1893-98; part- 
ner in firm of Compton and Roe, dealers in investment securities, 1898- 
1902; member of New York Stock Exchange, 1902; partner in firm of 
Millett, Roe and Hagen, bankers, 1902 to date. Director of Industrial 



200 



Class of 1895 



Finance Corporation, Morris Plan Company of New York, Merchants 
Fire Assurance Corporation, Virginia Iron and Coke Company. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York. City Midday Club, Pelham 
Country Club, Green Meadow Country Club. 

During the war was a member of various Liberty Loan Local com- 
mittees; served at National Red Cross Headquarters in Washington from 
November, 1917 to February, 1918. 



ROBERT EDWIN ROSS 



A.B. 




a, b — 1235 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. 

c — 928 Marquette Building, Chicago, 111. 
Born, September 19, 1871, Chicago, 111. Son of Joseph P. Ross, 

physician (M.D. Ohio Medical College, 1852; A.M. Kenyon 

College, Ohio) and Elizabeth Havens King Ross. 
Married, August 6, 19 14, at Charlevoix, Mich., Mary T. Lord, 

daughter of John B. Lord, dealer in railroad ties. 

Prepared for college at West Division High School, Chicago, 111., en- 
tering Princeton in 1891 and graduating cum laude in 1895 A.B. Roomed 
at 4 South Reunion Hall. Member of Whig Hall. Was Washington's 
Birthday orator in sophomore year. Won Theodore Cuyler Prize in 
Economics in senior year. 

Entered the Law School of Harvard University in 1895, graduating in 
1899 with degree of LL.B. Since 1899 has been engaged in general practice 
of law in Chicago. 

Trustee and Deacon of Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago; ex- 



Princeton University 



201 



president of the Presbyterian Social Union of Chicago ; ex-president of 
the Presbyterian Brotherhood of Chicago. 

Life member of the Sons of the Revolution; life member of Chicago 
Bar Association ; member of University Club of Chicago and Union 
League Club of Chicago. 

During the war was assistant to the chairman of the Chicago Branch 
of the American Red Cross from December i, 1917, until after the 
armistice. 



THOMAS ROSS 



A.B. 




a, b, c — Doylestown, Pa. 
Born, September 16, 1873, Doylestown, Pa. Son of George Ross, 

lawyer (A.B. Princeton, 1861) and Ellen S. L. Phipps Ross. 
Married, April 20, 1907, at Philadelphia, Pa., May Louise Blakey, 

daughter of Thomas Blakey, iron broker. 
Children, John Ross, born October 24, 1910; Thomas Ross, Jr., 

born June 27, 1912; George Blaikie Ross, born July 14, 1915. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
the fall of 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 11 North East 
Brown Hall. Member of St. Paul Society and Whig Hall. Won Whig 
Hall Junior Essay Second Prize. 

Since 1896 has been a practising lawyer, first as a member of the firm of 
Yerkes, Ross and Ross ; in 1910 a member of the firm of Thomas and 
George Ross of Doylestown, Pa. 

Defeated as a candidate for District Attorney in 1903, and for Judge 



202 



Class of 1895 



of Court of Common Pleas in Bucks County in 1913, running in opposition 
to the Republican organization; was also defeated in 1916 for Congress- 
man-at-large. 

Vice-president and Director of Bucks County Trust Company; Vestry- 
man of St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church of Doylestown ; member 
of Democratic State Committee of Pennsylvania. 

Member of Doylestown Country Club, Princeton Club of Philadelphia, 
Bucks County and Pennsylvania State Bar Associations; President of 
Union Horse Company. 

Related to George Ross, 1805 (gradfather's uncle) ; Thomas Ross, 1825 
(grandfather) ; Henry P. Ross, 1859 (uncle) ; George Ross, 1861 (father) ; 
George Ross, 1900 (brother). 

During the war helped in First Liberty Loan organization, 3rd Federal 
Reserve District; was chairman of Second, Third, Fourth and Victory 
Loans, Middle Bucks County, District 5, 3rd Federal Reserve District ; 
Vice-chairman for Bucks County in "War Chest," 1918; member of 
Legal Advisory Board for Bucks County in the drafts. 



LYNN RYERSON RUTTER 



B.S. 




1895 1920 

a — 108 Rose Terrace, Lake Forest, 111. 
b — Virginia Hotel, Chicago, 111. 
Born, September 13, 1873, Chicago, 111. Son of David Rutter, 

coal merchant, and Mary Elizabeth McMurtrie Rutter. 
Married, December 7, 1898, at Highland Park, 111., Mabel Ade- 
laide Hill, daughter of Lysander Hill, counselor-at-law (A.B. 
Bowdoin). 



Princeton University 203 

Children, David Ryerson Rutter, born May 27, 1900; Catherine 
Burton Rutter, born September 14, 1901 ; John Turnley Rut- 
ter, born October 2, 1902. 

Prepared for college at Shattuck School, Faribault, Minn., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed 
at 3 North Dod Hall and 11 West Brown Hall. Member of St. Paul 
Society, Philadelphian Society, and Whig Hall. 

Entered the Northwestern University Law School in September, 1895, 
graduating in June, 1898, with degree of LL.B. Admitted to the Bar in the 
State of Illinois by examination, 1897. Admitted to practise in various 
United States courts at subsequent dates upon motion. 

Was law clerk in the office of Otis and Graves, attorneys-at-law, Chi- 
cago, 1897-98; then took up the practice of law until 1901 actively; in 1901 
elected Vice-president and Treasurer of David Rutter and Company, do- 
ing a general coal business in the State of Illinois and elsewhere; in 1902 
elected President and Treasurer of said firm and continued as such until 
October, 1917. On April 6, 1917, entered Government service (United 
States Naval Forces) with rank of Lieutenant Commander, National 
Naval Volunteers ; placed upon inactive status June 30, 1919. 

Officer for ten years in Naval Militia of Illinois. Vice-president and 
then President of Chicago Coal Merchants' Association, and a director 
thereof for many years, also Counsellor thereof in Chamber of Commerce 
of the United States. 

Member of University Club of Chicago and Exmoor Country Club of 
Highland Park, 111. 

His son, David Ryerson Rutter, is an undergraduate in the Class of 
'22, and his son, John Turnley Rutter, is preparing for Princeton at Shat- 
tuck School, Faribault, Minn., and expects to enter the Class of '24. 

During the war served in the United States Navy. Lieutenant Com- 
mander, N. N. V., January 5, 1917 ; Lieutenant Commander, U. S. N. R. 
F. 2, July 1, 1918; Commander, U. S. N. R. F. 2, November 17, 1919. 
Mobilized April 6, 1917 ; ordered to command U. S. S. "Yantic," April, 
1917; U. S. S. "Case," June, 1917; U. S. S. ''Gopher," February, 1918; 
also to command U. S. Naval Auxiliary Reserve Training School, Chicago. 
Ordered to command U. S. S. "Essex," March, 1918. Ordered to France 
in October, 1918, as Executive Officer, Lafayette Radio Station ; also 
served there as Acting Commanding Officer. Ordered to command U. S. 
N. Relief Unit, Lille, France, March, 1919. Returned from France June 
5, 1919, and placed on Inactive Status June 30, 1919. 



WARREN LOCKHART SAWYER 

a, c — 2 Rector Street, New York, N. Y. 
b — Shippan Point, Stamford, Conn. 



204 



Class of 1895 




1895 x 920 

Bora, September 12, 1871, New York, N. Y. Son of Merritt E. 

Sawyer, counsellor-at-law, and Hannah J. Logan Sawyer. 
Married, October 23, 1901, at Brooklyn, N. Y., M. Marguerite 

Kimberly, daughter of Charles H. Kimberly. 
Children, Merritt K. Sawyer, born April 2, 1910; Warren L. 

Sawyer, Jr., born August 23, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Rockland Institute, Nyack, N. Y., and West 
End School, New York City, entering Princeton in September, 1891, 
and leaving in June, 1892. Member of Whig Hall and Freshman Glee 
Club. 

Student at New York Law School, 1894-95 ; admitted to the Bar in New 
York State, July, 1895. Has been an attorney-at-law since 1895, and since 
June, 1912, a member of the firm of Howe, Smith and Sawyer of New 
York. 

Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, 1898-99; in 1915 Lieutenant Com- 
mander, Naval Militia of New York, and Judge Advocate. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, Army and Navy Club, New 
York Athletic Club, Transportation Club, Stamford Yacht Club, Wood- 
way Country Club. Member of Masonic Order, 32nd Degree. 

His sons are preparing for Princeton ; Merritt K. Sawyer expects to 
enter the Class of 1932; Warren L. Sawyer, Jr., the Class of 1933- 

During the war was placed on active duty in New York State Militia on 
February 3, 1917, guarding bridges around New York City. On Feb- 
ruary 23, 1917, was commissioned Lieutenant Commander in the National 
Naval Volunteers and placed in command of U. S. S. "Granite State" 
on April 7, 1917. Placed on Inactive Duty in the U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force, August 27, 1919. 



Princeton University 
ARTHUR WILLIAM SCHUMACHER 



205 




a, b — 70 West 55th Street, New York, N. Y. 
c — 409 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Born, April 14, 1873, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J., 
entering Princeton in Sept. 1891 and leaving in June 1895. Roomed at 5 
West Witherspoon Hall. Member of St. Paul Society, Cottage Club, 
Triangle Club. Editor of Bric-a-Brac. 

After leaving college read law in Los Angeles, Cal. In May, 1896 was 
in Civil Engineer Corps of New York Central Railroad. In February, 
1898, member of firm of Gibbs and Schumacher, consulting engineers of 
New York; 1900 to date, with Tiffany and Company, jewelers, of New 
York. 

Member of Racquet and Tennis Club of New York, Princeton Club of 
New York, Nassau Club of Princeton. 



EDWARD ELY SCOVILL 

a, b — Verplanck Avenue, Shippan Point, Stamford, Conn. 
c — 21 East 40th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Born, August 6, 1872, New York, N. Y.. Son of Thomas Lam- 
son Scovill, manufacturer and banker, and Mary Elizabeth Ely 
Scovill. 

Married, October 8, 1902, at Brooklyn, N. Y., Medora Hurlbut 
Piatt, daughter of Dr. Lucien Tudor Piatt. 



206 



Class of 1895 




Children, Helen Scovill, born June 9, 1905 ; Edward Ely Scovill, 
Jr., born October 14, 1909; Mary Brewster Scovill, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Mt. Pleasant Academy, Ossining, N. Y., enter- 
ing Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1893. Roomed at 12 East Wither- 
spoon Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society. 

Secretary of the Mechanical Boiler Cleaner Company, 1893-95 ; engaged 
in mining in Colorado, Utah and New Mexico, 1896-1900; associated with 
N. W. Harris and Company, bankers of New York, in Sales Department, 
1900-10; resident partner in charge of the New Haven office of Trow- 
bridge and Company, bankers of New York and New Haven, 1910-13; 
Manager of Bond Department of William Morris Imbrie and Company, 
1913-16; President of Silver Metal Manufacturing Company, Inc., of 
New York and Farmingdale, Long Island, manufacturers of white metal 
alloys, 1916 to date. 

Member of City Club of New York, Princeton Club of New York, 
Quinnipiack Club of New Haven, Woodway Country Club of Stamford, 
Suburban Club of Stamford, Stamford Yacht Club, Sachem's Head Yacht 
Club. 

Related to Walter S. Ely, '97 (cousin). 

During the war enlisted for two years as private in Company F, Bat- 
talion B, 4th Military District, Connecticut State Guard, March, 1917; 
promoted to First Sergeant, April, 1917; First Lieutenant, May, 1917. 
Adjutant, Sixth Separate Battalion, Infantry, Connecticut State Guard, 
headquarters at Stamford, February 27, 1918. Reserve officer, 1919. Was 
Chairman of Stamford War Bureau. 



Princeton University 
HARRY ENGLISH SHAW 



207 
A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — 172 Garfield Avenue, Long Branch, N. J. 
Born, December 9, 1872, Monmouth County, N. J. Son of 

Henry Martin Shaw, and Catharine Ann VanNote Shaw. 
Married, April 23, 1902, at Long Branch, N. J., Nellie Good- 

nough, daughter of Joseph B. Goodnough, M.D. 

Prepared for college at Long Branch High School, entering Princeton 
in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 9 
Middle Dod Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall. 

Entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College, October, 1895, graduating 
in June, 1898, M.D. 

Practising physician and surgeon in Long Branch, N. J., 1898 to date. 

Physician and surgeon, Monmouth Memorial Hospital, Long Branch, N.J. 

Member of Practitioners Society of Eastern Monmouth, Monmouth 

County Medical Society, New Jersey State Medical Society, American 

Medical Association. 

During the war was chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of 
Monmouth County. 



ARTHUR MASON SHERMAN A.B. 

a, b, c — Boone University, Wuchang, China. 
Born, August 19, 1874, Long Branch, N. J. Son of Henry Bar- 
tine Sherman, merchant, and Catherine Maria Woolley Sher- 
man. 



208 



Class of 1895 





1895 



1920 



Married, June 14, 1906, at Ruxton, Md., Martha Keyser Lever- 
ing, daughter of Joshua Levering, merchant. 

Children, Ann Catherine Sherman, born May 23, 1907; Martha 
Levering Sherman, born April 22, 191 1 ; Faith Sherman, born 
June 10, 191 5 (died July 4, 1917) ; Arthur Mason Sherman, 
Jr., born November 7, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Long Branch High School, Long Branch, N. J., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 33 Edwards Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society, Philadel- 
phian Society, and Whig Hall. 

Student at the General Theological Seminary, New York City, Septem- 
ber, 1895 to May, 1898. Ordained Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, 1898, and spent his Diaconate at the Associate Mission of the Dio- 
cese of New Jersey, 1898-99. Ordained Priest, May, 1899. Missionary of 
the American Church Mission in China, June, 1899 ; stationed at Wuchang, 
China, 1899-1900; stationed at Hankow, China, 1900-12; in charge of the 
New China Fund campaign of the Protestant Episcopal Church in New 
York, 1913-15; returned to China in 191S; stationed at Hankow, 1915-16; 
missionary at Wuchang, 1916 to date. Dean of St. Paul's Divinity School, 
Boone University, Wuchang, China. Member of the Standing Committee 
of the Diocese of Hankow. Member of the Bishop's Council of Advice 
of the Diocese of Hankow. Chaplain of St. Hilda's Boarding School, 
Wuchang. Member of the Town Council, Kuling, China. President of 
the Board of Directors of the Church General Hospital, Wuchang. Mem- 
ber of Board of Directors, Kuling General Hospital. 



Princeton University 



209 



Elected a member of the Naval History Society (U. S. A.) but did not 
accept the election. 

Member of American University Club, of Hankow. 

Author of Part II of "Story of the Church in China," and various 
magazine articles on China. 



CHARLES SINNICKSON 



A.B. 




a, c — 1318 Real Estate Trust Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
b — Rosemont, Montgomery County, Pa. 

Born, August 19, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Charles P. 
Sinnickson, and Emma S. Rosengarten Sinnickson. 

Married, October 31, 1903, at Haverford, Pa., Rebecca M. "Wal- 
lace, daughter of John Craig Wallace, wool broker. 

Children, Priscilla Sinnickson, born January 1, 1909. 

Prepared for college at the Protestant Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, 
Pa., entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 
10 University Hall. Member of St. Paul Society, Whig Hall, Zodiac 
Club, Colonial Club. Played on Class football team in Junior and Senior 
years. 

Entered the University of Pennsylvania Law School in December, 1895, 
graduating in June, 1898, with degree of LL.B. Has been an attorney and 
counsellor-at-law in Philadelphia from 1898 to date. 

During the war served as Associate Legal Adviser on draft boards in 
first and second drafts. 



210 



Class of 1895 

THOMAS SLIDELL 





1895 



1920 



a, b — Racquet and Tennis Club, 370 Park Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 
Born, October 6, 1874. 

Entered Princeton in September, 1891, leaving in June, 1895. Roomed 
at 74 Bayard Lane. Member of St. Paul's Society and Cottage Club. 

For two years after leaving college he was associated with N. W. Harris 
and Company, bankers of New York. In June, 1898, he enlisted for ser- 
vice in the Spanish War and was a member of General Brooke's first 
expedition to Porto Rico, returning in September. The Class Secretary 
is informed that he has not engaged in business in recent years, although 
occasonally serving as a newspaper correspondent. He was reported 
to have acted as war correspondent for a London newspaper at Rheims 
during one of the many bombardments of that city. He was one of the 
survivors of the Lusitania disaster when that steamship was torpedoed 
by a German submarine. 

Member of Knickerbocker Club of New York, Racquet and Tennis Club 
of New York, Princeton Club of New York. 

JOSEPH CURTIS SLOANE A.B. 

a, c — 320 West Colorado Street, Pasadena, Cal. 
b — 1050 South Madison Avenue, Pasadena, Cal. 
Born, October 22, 1873, Allegheny City, Pa. Son of the Rever- 
end James Renwick Wilson Sloane, (A.B. Jefferson, A.M., 
D.D.) and Frances Brard Swanwick Sloane. 



Princeton University 



211 




1920 



Married, June 25, 1904, at Lake Forest, 111., Julia Larned Moss 
(died September 30, 19 19 at Pasadena, Cal.), daughter of 
Jesse Lathrop Moss (A.B. Yale 1869). 

Children, William Milligan Sloane, II., born August 15, 1906; 
Joseph Curtis Sloane, Jr., born October 8, 1909. 

Prepared for college at Geneva College, Beaver Falls, Pa., entering 
Princeton in 1891 and graduating Magna cum laude in 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 14 South Edwards Hall. Member of Whig Hall. Was French Medal- 
list of Whig Hall. Won honors in Philosophy and High honors in 
Classics at graduation. 

Was Assistant Classical Master, then Assistant Head Master, at De- 
Lancey School, Philadelphia, 1895-1901 ; Head Master of Lake Forest 
Academy, Lake Forest, 111., 1901-06; Latin Master, the Hill School, Potts- 
town, Pa., 1906-10; Head Master, Berkeley School, New York, 1910-14; 
President of the Vitalait Laboratory of California, 1917 to date. 

Member of Nassau Club of Princeton, Princeton Club of Philadelphia. 

Related to Renwick T. Sloane, '86 (brother) ; James R. Sloane, '00 
(nephew) ; Francis J. Sloane, '04 (nephew) ; James R. Sloane, '17 
(nephew). 

During the war was head of Bureau of Military Relief and Vice-chair- 
man of the Pasadena Chapter of the American Red Cross; Chairman 
Chapter School Committee, Pasadena Chapter, American Red Cross. 
Member of Liberty Loan committees, etc. 



212 



Class of 1895 
EDGAR MASON SMEAD 



A.B. 




a, c — Bethlehem Presbyterian Church, corner of Bird Avenue 
and Hoyt Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Born, October 13, 1871, Owego, N. Y. Son of David James 

Smead and Almira Stanton Smead. 
Married, February 6, 1906, at Buffalo, N. Y., Grace Matilda 

Zink, daughter of Henry Zink, real estate broker. 
Children, Margaret Smead, born May 7, 1909 ; Dorothy Smead, 

born August 29, 191 1; Elizabeth Smead, born April 9, 1919. 

Prepared for college at Owego Free Academy, Owego, N. Y., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, AB. Roomed 
at 4 South Dod Hall and 13 Nassau Hall. Member of Philadelphian 
Society, Clio Hall and the Track Team. Won George Potts Bible Prize 
(Second Prize) at graduation. 

Student at Auburn Theological Seminary, 1895-98; Pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Naples, N. Y., 1898-1900; post graduate student at 
Princeton, taking degree of A.M. in 1901 ; and at the Princeton Theol- 
ogical Seminary, taking degree of B.D. in 1901 ; pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Milford, Pa., igoi-06; pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church at Montgomery, Pa., 1906-08; pastor of the Presbyterian Church 
at Union City, Pa., 1908-17; pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Olean, 
N. Y., 1917-20; pastor of the Bethlehem Presbyterian Church, Buffalo, 
N. Y., 1920 to date. 

Is a 32nd Degree Mason. 

During the war served as a "four-minute man." 



Princeton University 
JOHN CLARENCE SMITH 



213 
A.B. 





1895 



1920 



a, b — 430 Fourth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

c — Manual Training High School, 7th Avenue, 4th and 5th 

Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Born, January 24, 1870, Asbury, N. J. Son of Joseph S. Smith, 

lawyer; superintendent of Public Instruction for Warren 

County, N. J., and Sarah Julia Richey Smith. 

Married, November 26, 1896, at Trenton, N. J., Hanna Haines 

Eastburn, daughter of Isaac S. Eastburn, farmer. 
Children, Eastburn Richey Smith, born January 28, 1898. 

Prepared for college at State Model Schol, Trenton, N. J., en- 
tering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. cum laude. Roomed at 13 North East College. Member of 
Whig Hall. 

Student at State Normal School, Trenton, N. J., March-June, 1896, 
receiving First Grade Teacher's Life Certificate. Post-graduate course at 
New York University, 1909-10, receiving degree of M.A. 

Instructor in Latin and Greek in State Model School, Trenton, N. J., 
1806-1905 ; Assistant Teacher in Latin, Manual Training High School, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1905 ; Dean of the First Year in Manual Training High 
School, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1910-14; since November, 1914, Teacher in charge 
of Girls' Annex, Manual Training High School, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Member of Brooklyn Teachers' Association, New York Classical Club 
(secretary for three years), Classical Association of the Atlantic States. 



214 



Class of 1895 
WILLIAM HENRY SNYDER 





1920 

a, c — 905-7 Lafayette Building, Fifth and Chestnut Streets, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
b — Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Born, April 5, 1873, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of W. Frederick 

Snyder, President Northern Trust Company, and Anna Harris 

Longcope Snyder. 
Married, September 7, 1907, at Chelsea, N. J., Elizabeth Wood, 

daughter of James Roberts Wood, Passenger Traffic Manager 

of Pennsylvania Railroad. 
Children, Molly Wood Snyder, born October 31, 1908; William 

Henry Snyder, Jr., born September 16, 1910. 

Prepared for college at Cheltenham Military Academy, Ogontz, Pa., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in June, 1893. Roomed 
at 10 West Middle Witherspoon Hall. Member of Freshman Baseball 
team, Freshman Banjo Club, Whig Hall. 

Entered University of Pennsylvania Law School in September, 1893, 
graduating in June, 1896, LL.B. 

Since June, 1896 to the present time has been engaged in the practice 
of law. 

During the war made application to the Y. M. C. A. for overseas work 
in May, 1918; served in camps in the United States from May, 1918 to 
January 1, 1919. 



Princeton University 
DAVID SPEER 



215 
B.S. 




a, b, c — 6742 Thomas Boulevard, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Born, November 28, 1873, Pittsburgh, Pa. Son of David Robins 
Speer, lumber manufacturer, and Amelia Rosalie Caroline 
Hausen Speer. 

Prepared for college at the Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, Pa., en- 
tering Princeton in the fall of 1892 and graduating in 1895, B.S. Roomed 
at 6 South Reunion Hall. Member of Mandolin Club. 

Has been engaged in lumber business in Pittsburgh from leaving college 
to the present time ; was General Manager of the Speer Box and Lumber 
Company, 1895-1904; in business for himself in real estate and lumber, 
1904-08; General Manager of the Three State Lumber Company 1908-10; 
in business for himself in real estate, 1910-11. 

FITZHUGH COYLE SPEER A.B. 

a, b— Madison, N. J. 

Born, April 4, 1874, St. Louis, Mo. Son of Archibald Alexander 
Speer, retired (A.M. Princeton, 1869), and Mary Switzer 
Mead Speer. 

Married, September 4, 1908, at Elberon, N. J., Elizabeth Sergeant 
Burrell, daughter of David James Burrell, D.D.. LL.D., clergy- 
man. 

Children, Elizabeth Burrell Speer, born July 3, 1915- 

Prepared for college at Blair Academy, Blairstown, N. J., entering 



2l6 



Class of 1895 




Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 4 North Reunion Hall. Member of Clio Hall, Banjo Club, Cap and 
Gown Club. Editor of Daily Princetonian and Bric-a-Brac. 

Associated with the Export Iron and Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
1895-98; with the American Steel Hoop Company of Pittsburgh and Xew 
York, and the Carnegie Steel Company of Pittsburgh, 1898-1901 ; Treas- 
urer of the United Coal Company of Pittsburgh, 1902-06, and in the coal 
business by himself during the same time ; with H. L. Crawford and Com- 
pany, dealers in investment securities. New York, 1907 to 1917. 

During the war was engaged in the New York Camp Community 
Service. 



ERNEST TAYLOR STEWART A.B. 

a, b, c — Indiana, Pa. 

Born, November 27, 1874, Indiana, Pa. Son of James M. Stew- 
art, merchant, and Virginia Kelly Stewart. 

Married, July 20, 1903, at Indiana, Pa., Emma Sutton (died De- 
cember 6, 1905) ; September 15, 19 14, Caroline Daugherty, 
daughter of John M. Daugherty, druggist. 

Children, Emma Sutton Stewart, born November 6, 1905 ; John 
Daugherty Stewart, born October 16, 1915; Ernest Stewart, 
Jr., born May 10, 1918. 

Prepared for college at the Indiana Normal School, Indiana, Pa.,enter- 
ing Princeton in the fall of 1892 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. 
Roomed at 2 North Reunion Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 



Princeton University 



217 




1895 



1920 



After leaving college was for a few months a teacher in the Indiana 
Normal School, Indiana, Pa. ; student in the New York Law School, 
January-June, 1896; admitted to the practice of law June 13, 1898; mem- 
ber of firm of Telford and Stewart, Indiana, Pa., 1000-05; has practiced 
law alone at Indiana, Pa., from 1005 to date. 

Member of University Club, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



RICHARD STOCKTON 

a, b, c — Princeton, N. J. 
Born, August 27, 1873, Princeton, N. J. Son of Samuel W. 
Stockton, Army officer and farmer (Princeton 1854), and 
Sarah Bache Stockton. 

Prepared for college at Princeton Preparatory School, entering Prince- 
ton in 1891 and leaving in 1894. 

Associated with the Girard Trust Company, Philadelphia, Pa., 1894-99; 
served in the Spanish American War as private, then corporal, in Sixth 
Pennsylvana Volunteers in 1898; since 1900 has been engaged in farming 
in Princeton, N. J. 

Member of Cottage Club and Nassau Club of Princeton. 

During the war was a member of the Plattsburg Training Camp, 191S- 
16 and 1917; commissioned First Lieutenant, August 15, 1917 ; assigned 
to 304th Machine Gun Battalion, 77th Division, as Adjutant; transferred 
to 305th Machine Gun Battalion, 77th Division, at Camp Upton. Over- 
seas service March 28, 1918 to April 24, 1919; served in the Baccarac 
sector, at Vesle, in the Oise-Aisne offensive, and the Meuse-Argonne offen- 



2l8 



Class of 1895 




1920 

sive. Was wounded October 2, 1918 (fractured skull). Commissioned 
Captain, Company A, 305th Machine Gun Battalion, 77th Division. 



WILLIAM RIDGELY STONE 



A.B. 




a, b, c — 73 West 49th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, September 2, 1871, Washington, D. C. Son of James 



Princeton University 



219 



Henry Stone, physician, and Sarah Sophia Greer Stone. 
Married, April 22, 1920, at Washington, D. C, Mabel Grace 
McKay. 

Prepared for college at Emerson Institute, Washington, D. C, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 13 and 19 University Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society. 

Entered John Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, Md., in September, 
1895, graduating in June, 1899, with degree of M.D. Resident House 
Physician at City Hospital, Blackwell's Island, New York, June, 1899 to 
April, 1 001 ; practising physician in New York City from 1901 to date; 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician in City Maternity Hospital, New York, 
from May, 1901 to January 1, 191 7. Attending Physician to the outdoor 
departments of Bellevue Hospital, Cornell Medical Dispensary, etc. 
Formerly Instructor in Obstetrics at Post Graduate Medical School, New 
York. Formerly member of New York State and County Medical So- 
cieties. Formerly Secretary of New York County Medical Association. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York, University Club of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Author of various medical magazine articles. 

During the war was a member of district and local medical boards in 
the City of New York. 



EDWARD FORRESTER SUTTON 



A.B. 




1920 



a, b, c — 37 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 
Born, February 15, 1874, Philadelphia, Pa. Son of the Rever- 



220 



Class of 1895 



end Joseph Ford Sutton, D.D., Presbyterian clergyman (A.B. 
Rutgers, 1852, A.M., 1855 ; B.D. Union Theological Seminary, 
1855; D.D. Maryland College, 1883) and Katharine Judson 
Holden Sutton. 

Prepared for college at Dwight School, New York City, entering 
Princeton in May, 1890, (special examination) remaining out one year, 
entering in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 18 University Hall and id South West College. Member of Philadel- 
phian Society and Whig Hall. 

Entered College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 
1895, graduating in 1899, M.D. Interne and House Physician, Roosevelt 
Hospital, New York City, from January, 1900 to July, 1001. Contracted 
diphtheria during the last weeks of term, and was prevented from taking 
up the practice of medicine. Since 1901 engaged in literary work. 

Author of a quantity of verse, published m Scribner's, Century, Harper's 
Weekly, Army and Navy Register, Infantry Journal, N. Y. Herald, 
British Army and Navy Gazette, and in various anthologies. 



KNOX TAYLOR 



B.S. 




a, b, c — High Bridge, N. J. 
Born, October 19, 1873, High Bridge, N. J. Son of William J. 

Taylor, manufacturer of steel and iron, and Mary Alward 

Taylor. 
Married, October 14, 1903, at Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., Lucy 



Princeton University 221 

J. Miller, daughter of Llewellyn Miller, insurance (graduate 
of Friends' School, Westtown, Pa.) 
Children, Robert Knox Taylor, born November 9, 1909; Mary 
Summers Taylor, born October 9, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Model School, Trenton, N. J., and The Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and gradu- 
ating in June, 1895, B.S. Roomed at 19 East Witherspoon Hall. Mem- 
ber of St. Paul's Society, Clio Hall, Football and Track Athletic Teams, 
Cap and Gown Club. 

From 1895 to 1902 engaged in mining engineering work in Rocky 
Mountains. In 1902 entered the Taylor Iron and Steel Company of High 
Bridge, N. J., being the fifth generation of the Taylor family engaged in 
that business in High Bridge ; has served the same company and its suc- 
cessor, the Taylor-Wharton Iron and Steel Co., in various capacities to 
date ; President since March 1, 1910. 

During the war the Company was called upon carry out a number of 
munition contracts, some of which, such as Gun Forgings, were entirely 
new products. In addition to the work on the company's own contracts, 
he helped to supply track material for the Expeditionary Forces, repre- 
senting, as Chairman of the Manganese Track Society, all of the principal 
manufacturers of this class of material. 

Elected a life trustee of Princeton University, 1918. 

Member of Downtown Association, Engineers' Club, Rocky Mountain 
Club, University Club, American Iron and Steel Institute, American So- 
ciety for Testing Materials, American Institute for Mining and Metal- 
lurgical Engineers, Princeton Engineering Association, Society for Pro- 
motion of Engineering Education, all of New York City; also Interna- 
tional Association of American Society for Testing Materials. 

ARTHUR ROGERS TEAL A.B. 

Address unknown. 
Born, September 30, 1873. Son of the Reverend Dr. Teal, a 

clergyman of Elizabeth, N. J. 
Married, June 7, 1900, at New York City, Jane Cross Babcock, 

daughter of Rowse Babcock. 

Prepared for college at the Pingry School, Elizabeth, N. J., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 1 South West Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, Clio 
Hall, Triangle Club, Cap and Gown Club, Freshman Glee Club. Leader 
of the University Glee Club. Member of the Chapel Choir. 

After leaving college he entered the Auburn Theological Seminary, 
graduating in 1898. He then became assistant to the Rev. G. Parsons 
Nicholas, D.D., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Binghamton, 



222 



Class of 1895 




^ <f 



1895 

N. Y. In 1900 he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Katonah, 
N. Y. In August, 1902, he disappeared from home and was not heard 
from until the fall of 1918 when he was for a short time in Newburgh, 
N. Y., temporarily employed in shipbuilding. In June, 1919, he was re 
ported by Leigh Wyman to be in business in St. Louis. The Class Secre- 
tary is informed that a brief letter was received from him from Galves- 
ton, Tex., in October, 1919. Since then his family and friends have been 
unable to trace him. 



JOHN HAMILTON THAGHER 



A.B. 



a, c — 927 New York Life Building, Kansas City, Mo. 
b — 3434 Main Street, Kansas City, Mo. 

Born, October 12, 1872, Kansas City, Mo. Son of Luin Ken- 
nedy Thacher, lawyer (graduate Alfred University, New 
York) and Carolyn Hamilton Thacher. 

Married, November 15, 1906, at Cambridge, Mass., Edith Gil- 
man, daughter of Frank Brown Gilman. 

Children, John Hamilton Thacher, Jr., born November 19, 1908; 
Edith Gilman Thacher, born September 21, 1910; Nicholas 
Gilman Thacher, born August 17, 191 5. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
the fall of 1891 and graduating in 1895. A.B. Roomed at 10 South Re- 
union Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society, Whig Hall, Triangle Club, 
Cap and Gown Club; member of Track team in Junior and Senior years; 



Princeton University 



223 




editor of Tiger, managing editor Nassau Literary Magazine; Washing- 
ton's Birthday Orator in Freshman year; Second Prize for Oratory, Whig 
Hall ; Class Prophet on Class Day. 

Studied law with Karnes, Holmes and Krauthoff, Kansas City, Mo., 
1895; student in Kansas City School of Law, 1896; student in Harvard 
Law School, 1897-98, taking degree of M.A. : member of law firm of Vine- 
yard and Thacher, 1899- 1901 ; member of firm of Rozzelle, Vineyard and 
Thacher, from 1902; Assistant City Counsellor of Kansas City, 1905-06; 
Member of Board of Freeholders that framed present City Charter of 
Kansas City, 1908; Member of Board of Civil Service, Kansas City, 1910- 
12. Treasurer of Kansas City branch of Archaeological Society of 
America. 

Member of University Club of Kansas City (President, 1902), Coun- 
try Club of Kansas City (Secretary), Princeton Club of New York, Har- 
vard Travellers' Club, Harvard Law Club, Phi Delta Phi. President, 
Western Association of Princeton Clubs. 

Correspondent for Washington Post, in Porto Rico in 1898. Author of 
"Black Hand in Porto Rico," published in Harper's Weekly, 1898; 
"Agony of the Tump Line," "The Quest of the Golden Fleece," "Boars 
and Barbarians," "Morocco Bound," etc., published in Recreation. 

Related to Thomas B. Hamilton, '88 (uncle) ; Charles S. Hamilton, 
'84 (uncle). Son, John Hamilton Thacher, Jr., is preparing for Prince- 
ton and expects to enter Class of 1929. 

Served in National Guard Missouri, Capt.-Adjt. 1st. Bn. Mo. F. A., 
1915; Adjutant 1st. Bn. Mo. Field Artillery Capt., Mexican Border 
Service, 1916. Called into Federal service August, 1917, Capt.-Adjt. 1st. 
Bn. 129 Field Artillery; Trained at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Grad- 



224 



Class of 1895 



uated from School of Fire, Fort Sill, February, 1918. Captain, 
Battery D, 129 F.A. Sailed on Transport "Saxonia" from Hoboken, 
May 20, 1918. Attacked by submarines. Arrived Tilbury Docks, London, 
June 4. Encamped at Winchester, England ; thence, via Southampton, 
to Le Havre, France. Thence to Angers area. Thence to Camp Coet- 
quidan for artillery training. Entrained for front August 17; on line 
in Vosges Mts. near Kruth until September 3. Active service, St Mihiel, 
September 10. Reserve. On march continuously until September 23, on 
which date took up position near Neuvilly for Argonne offensive. Fired 
barrage September 26 and took up advance behind infantry of 35th Div. 
into Argonne, Cheppy, Charpentry, Baulny. Battalion position at Char- 
pentry. Relieved October 3. Active service. Reconnaissance officer for 
battalion at Baulny. In billets at Seigneulles until October 12. Marched 
to Verdun front, taking up position October 17, near Verdun, between 
Fort de Vaux and Fort Roselier. Started on Metz offensive when armistice 
was signed. Promoted to Major March 4, 1919. Transferred to 128 F.A. 
Returned on Transport "Vedic." Discharged April 29, 1919. 



THOMAS GAWTHROP TRENCHARD 



A.B. 




a, b, c — Lake City, S. C. 
Born, May 3, 1874, Church Hill, Md. Son of George Ogden 

Trenchard, merchant, and Laura Newman Trenchard. 
Married, November 18, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., Rosa Eleanor 

Lamdin, daughter of James Freeborn Lamdin. 
Children, George Ogden Trenchard, born August 14, 1906, 



Princeton University 



225 



William Edward Sewell Trenchard, born December 16, 1907 ; 
Sara Lamdin Trenchard, born November 8, 1909 ; a daughter, 
born and died February 10, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Lawrenceville School, entering Princeton in 
1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 4 North East College. 
Played on Freshman Football Team and Freshman Baseball Team. 
Captain of University Football Team in 1893 and 1894. Member of 
Colonial Club. President of Class in Sophomore year. Master of cere- 
monies on Class Day, 1895. 

After leaving college engaged in the lumber business in North Car- 
olina; in 1905 was a partner in the firm of W. E. and T. G. Trenchard, 
manufacturers of lumber at Gumberry, N. C. ; at the same time was Vice- 
president of the Northampton and Hartford Railroad; from 1911 to 
1913 was also a real estate broker ; from 1913 „to 1916 was Head Coach 
and student of law at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C, 
still retaining his interest in lumber and real estate ; from 1916 to 1918 
engaged in lumber business, real estate and the practice of law. 

During the war he served with the Y. M. C. A. in France, and is at 
present with the International Y. M. C. A. in Czecho-Slovakia. 



OLIVER WELTON UPSON 



A.B. 




1920 



a, c — 1310 West nth Street, Cleveland, O. 
b — 17 Frissell Road, Euclid Village, O. 
2033 Cornell Road, Cleveland, O. 



226 



Class of 1895 



Born, January 25, 1875, Cleveland, O. Son of Joseph E. Upson, 

and Cornelia M. Lyman Upson. 
Married, October 14, 1903, at Detroit, Mich., Helen R. Burkert, 

Daughter of Edwin A. Burkert. 

Prepared for college at Central High School and University School, 
Cleveland, O. Two years at Adelbert College, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. Entered Princeton in September, 1893, and graduated in June, 1895, 
A.B. RJoomed at 15 North Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Clio Hall. 

From 1895 to the present time has been associated in various capacities 
with The Upson-Walton Company, dealers in cordage, wire rope, ship 
chandlery, railroad, mill, mine and ship supplies. Now Secretary of the 
company. Director of The Vaughan Paint Company, The American Fire 
Clay and Products Company, The Builders Investment Company, The 
Pringle Barge Line Company. President, Convention Board of Cleve- 
land Chamber of Commerce, 191 1. President, Manufacturers and Whole- 
sale Merchants Board of Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, 1915. 

Member of Cleveland Athletic Club and Union Club of Cleveland, and 
Princeton Club of New York. 

Brother, Walter L. Upson, is an alumnus of Princeton, 1899. 



WILBUR MARSHALL URBAN 



A.B. 




a, b — 71 Vernon Street, Hartford, Conn. 
c — Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. 
Born, March 27, 1873, Mount Joy, Pa. Son of Rev. Abram 



Princeton University 227 

Lin wood Urban, clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal 

Church, and Emma Louisa Trexler Urban. 
Married, July 27, 1896, at London, England, Elizabeth Newell 

Wakelin, daughter of Amos Wakelin, General Agent of New 

England Life Insurance Company (retired). 
Children, Lisbeth Marshall Urban, born December 21, 1897; 

Isabel Wakelin Urban, born November 1, 1903. 

Prepared for college at the William Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, 
Pa., entering Princeton in 1891 and graduating magna cum laude in 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 2 South East College and 19 West Witherspoon Hall. 
Member of Whig Hall and Monday Night Club. Editor of Nassau Lit- 
erary Magazine. Won Whig Hall Freshman Essay Prize, Whig Hall 
Sophomore Debate Prize, and Francis Biddle Sophomore Essay Prize. 
Junior Orator. Washington's Birthday Orator in Junior year. Class 
Poet at graduation. Chancellor Green Fellow in Mental Science. Mem- 
ber of Phi Beta Kappa. 

Student at the University of Jena, 1895-96, and at the University of 
Leipsic, 1806-97, taking degree of A. M. and Ph. D. magna cum laude at 
Leipsic University. Reader in Philosophy at Princeton University, 1897-98; 
Professor of Philosophy at Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pa., 1898-1902; 
Brownell Professor of Philosophy, at Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., 
1002 to date. In 1912-13 was a student in the University of Munich and 
The University of Graz. In 1918-19, was Visiting Lecturer at Harvard 
University. In 1919-20 was lecturer at Hartford Seminary. At different 
times had been a lecturer in Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn. 

Member of American Philosophical Association (twice member of 
council) ; and American Psychological Association. 

Member of Twentieth Century Club of Hartford (member of Execu- 
tive Committee), Educational Club (at one time president), Drama 
League (at one time president), and Get-Together Club (at one time 
president). 

Author of "Valuation, Its Nature and Laws," London and New York, 
1900 ; "Onteological Problems of Value," New York; and numerous con- 
tributions to journals, technical and otherwise. 



LEROY WORTHINGTON VALLIANT 

a, b, c — Leota, Miss. 
Born, December 22, 1871, Greenville, Miss. Son of Leroy 
Branch Valliant, lawyer (Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Missouri, 1898-1912; Chief Justice, 1908-12; A.B. Mississippi 
1856; B.L. Cumberland Law School, 1850; LL.B. Mississippi) 
and Theodosia Taylor Worthington Valliant. 

Prepared for college at Wyman Institute, Alton, 111., entering Princeton 



228 



Class of 1895 






1920 

in 1891, and leaving at the end of Freshman year in June, 1892. Roomed 
at 13 University Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

In 1895, associated with the Johnson Company, Steel manufacturers, 
Lorain, O. ; in 1898 was salesman for Roberts Johnson and Rand Shoe 
Company of St. Louis, Mo. ; in 1902 was in the Engineering Department 
of the Choctaw Construction Company, Ardmore, I. T. ; in 1903 was en- 
gaged in railroad construction work at Big Bend, W. Va. ; from 1904 to 
date has been a cotton planter at Leota, Miss. 

Member of the Masons, Elks and local clubs. 

Related to Franklin Valliant, 1853 (uncle). 



FRANK COLLINS VAN SELLAR A.B. 

a, b, c — Paris, 111. 
Born, August 4, 1874, Paris, 111. Son of Henry Van Sellar and 
Sarah Ann Pattison Van Sellar. 

Prepared for college at Crawfordsville, Ind. and Ann Arbor, Mich., 
entering Princeton in September, 1893, at the beginning of Junior year, 
and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 2 North Re- 
union Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

After leaving college he studied law at the Northwestern University 
and at the same time became a clerk in the law office of General Hunt in 
Chicago. Upon graduation from the law school in 1897 he returned to 
his home in Paris, 111., and became a member of the law firm of Van 
Sellar and Shepherd. In 1903 the firm became Van Sellar and Van Sellar. 
In January, 1910, he visited Princeton for the first time since graduation 



Princeton University 



229 




1895 
and called upon the Class Secretary who happened to be there. He wrote 
shortly afterwards that ill health had interfered considerably with his prac- 
tice. No further letters have been received. 

JOHN BENNETT VAUGHN 





1895 1920 

c — 700 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston, Pa. 
b — 834 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston, Pa. 



230 



Class of 1895 



Born, March 7, 1873, Kingston, Pa. Son of Stephen Bucking- 
ham Vaughn, (real estate operator, coal miner), and Marion 
Wallace Preston Vaughn. 

Prepared for college at the Pennsylvania Military Academy, Chester, 
Pa., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in December, 
1893. Roomed at E. East Brown Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society. 

Engaged in real estate and insurance business, 1896-1900; Manager for 
F. H. Payne, banker and broker, New York Stock Exchange, 1001-06; in- 
surance, real estate and lumber business, 1906 to date. Senior partner 
of Vaughn and Company, lumber dealers, Kingston, Pa. 

During the war served as Chairman of the Registration Board and 
member of the Legal Advisory Board, of the local district draft board; 
and in the Red Cross Canteen of the local district. 



RAYMOND LYNDE WADHAMS 



A.B. 




a, b, c — 72 North Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Born, September 25, 1872, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Son of Calvin 

Wadhams, lawyer (A.B. Princeton 1854) and Frances Del- 

phine Lynde. 
Married, October 18, 1900, at New York City, Mary Bergmann 

Dobbs, daughter of Charles Garden Dobbs, dealer in stocks and 

bonds. 
Children, Dorothy Lynde Wadhams, born April 28, 1902 ; Agnes 

Elizabeth Wadhams, born November 7, 1903. 



Princeton University 231 

Prepared for college at Harry Hillman Academy, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at 5 South Dod Hall. Member of Clio Hall and Gun 
Club team. Won prize in Histology in Junior year. 

Entered College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 
New York, in September, 1895, graduating in June, 1899, M.D. 

Resident Physician in Wilkes-Barre City Hospital, July 1, 1899 to 
July 1, 1900; from July 1, 1900 to date, practised medicine in Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. 

Elected to Wyoming Historical and Geological Society in 1898; Luzerne 
County Medical Society in 1900 ; American Roentgen Ray Society in 1910. 

Member of Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre, Kiwanis Club of Wilkes- 
Barre, Lodge No. 61, F. and A. M. ; Shekinah Royal Arch Chapter No. 
182; Mt. Horeb Council No. 34 R. and S. M. ; Dieu le Veut Com- 
mandery No. 45, Knights Templar; Irem Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. 

During the war was commissioned 1st Lieutenant, Medical Corps, Na- 
tional Guard, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1915 ; Captain, Medical Corps, 
October 6, 1917; 3rd Pennsylvania Field Artillery, August 17, 1916 to Au- 
gust s, 1917; 109th Field Artillery August 5, 1917 to February 23, 1918; 
Division Surgeon's Office, 28th Division, February 24, 1918 to April 7, 1918 ; 
Field Hospital in, April 8, 1918 to September 28, 1918; Department of 
Radiography October 23, 1918 to July 7, 1919. Mustered into Federal 
Service September 8, 1916; discharged July 7, 1919. At Camp Stewart, 
El Paso, Texas, October 5, 1916 to March 13, 1917 ; at Camp Han- 
cock, Augusta, Ga., September 10, 1917 to April 25, 1918. Sailed for 
France April 29, 1918. Returned to the United States July 5, 1919. 

CHARLES SAMUEL WALDO A.B. 

a, b — 1677 60th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
c — 1 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Born, January 30, 1871, Big Rapids, Mich. Son of Theron 
Linsley Waldo, clergyman of the Presbyterian Church (A.B. 
Hamilton College 1863, graduate of Union Theological Semi- 
nary, New York City, 1866) and Delia Eliza Conkling Waldo. 

Married, August 16, 1905, at Hulburton, Orleans County, N. Y., 
Lillian May McLean, daughter of Alexander Eugene McLean, 
produce dealer. 

Prepared for college at Franklin Academy, Prattsburg, N. Y., entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895 A.B. Roomed 
at "A," East Brown Hall. Member of Whig Hall.. 

Professor of Mathematics and Greek in Ramsdell's School, Sedalia, Mo., 
1895-96; in business with L. D. Waldo, Prattsburg, N. Y., 1896-07; law 
student in the office of James Flaherty, Prattsburg, and of John Van- 
Voorhis, Rochester, N. Y., 1898-1900; admitted to the bar of New York 



Class of 1895 




State, 1900; practised law in Rochester, N. Y., 1901-05; in 1905 was in 
the Law Department of the Title Guarantee and Trust Company, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Title Examiner with Lawyers' Title Insurance and Trust 
Company, New York City, 1910-13; from January 1, 1913 to date, Counsel 
for Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, in office of General Solicitor, 
New York City. 

Elder in Borough Park Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1916 to 
date; Secretary of Men's Club, Brick Church (Presbyterian), Rochester, 
N. Y. ; Secretary of Men's Class, Grace Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Secretary and afterwards President of Men's Forward Club, 
Borough Park Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Member of National Geographic Society, Brooklyn Young Republican 
Club (member of Advisory Committee), Steuben County Society. 

His brother, Jesse Conkling Waldo, '97, was an alumnus of Princeton. 



PHILIP GEORGE WALKER A.B. 

a, c — Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 
b — Rochambeau Apartments, Washington, D. C. 

Born, September 8, 1872, Charleston, W. Va. Son of Henry 
Streit Walker, Attorney-at-law (A.B. Washington and Jeffer- 
son College) and Emma Elizabeth Bier Walker. 

Married, November 19, 1919, at Washington, D. C, Lilian 
Elizabeth de Brodes, daughter of Bertram George de Brodes 
physician and surgeon (M.D. University of Paris). 
Prepared for college at Pantops Academy, Virginia, and Princeton 



Princeton University 



233 




1895 



1920 



Preparatory School, entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating 
in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 32 University Hall and 8 North Middle 
Reunion Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Triangle Club. Played on 
Freshman Football Team and Class Football Team during the four 
years. Captain of Class Football Team for two years. 

Student in the law school of the University of Virginia, 1895-96; prac- 
tised law in Charleston, W. Va., associated with the Hon. Joseph H. 
Gaines (Princeton '86), 1897-98; enlisted for the Spanish-American war 
in the U. S. Volunteers, 1st West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, April 26, 
1898; mustered out with regiment as First Lieutenant, February 4, 1899. 
Member of the Common Council, City of Charleston, W. Va., 1912-15 ; 
Assistant Attorney, Department of Justice, Washington, D. C, 1915-16; 
Attorney, Department of Justice, Washington, D. C, 1916 to the present 
time. Has also been engaged in raising horses and cattle in the Shenan- 
doah Valley, Rockingham County, Va., for the last ten years. Was a 
member of the National Guard of West Virginia as Sergeant, Lieutenant 
and Captain, Co. C, 2nd Regiment, from 1895 until removal to Washington 

in 1915- 

Member of Army and Navy Club of Washington, Edgewood Country 
Club of Charleston, Princeton Club of New York, Nassau Club of 
Princeton, Southern Society of Washington, Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. 



WILLIAM DOUGLAS WARD A.B. 

a, b, c — 20 Grove Place, Rochester, N. Y. 
Born, August 25, 1874, Rochester, N. Y. Son of Frank Addison 
Ward, President of Ward's Natural Science Establishment 
(A.B Princeton 1870) and Mary Hawley Douglas Ward. 



234 



Class of 1895 




Married, May 10, 1905, at Riverside, Cal, Anne Marie Devine, 
daughter of Francis Bernard Devine, orange commission 
merchant. 

Children, Francis Bernard Ward, born April 30, 1906; William 
Douglas Ward, Jr., born July 10, 1909. 

Prepared for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., entering 
Princeton in September, 1892, and graduating magna cum laude in June, 
1895, A.B. Roomed in Dod Hall and at 6 South East Brown Hall. Mem- 
ber of St. Paul's Society, Philadelphian Society, Whig Hall, Monday Night 
Club. Played on Class and Varsity Football and Baseball Teams. Won 
Sophomore Mathematical Prize. Was Washington's Birthday Debater in 
Sophomore year. Member of Class Day Committee. Won fellowship 
in Mathematics at graduation. Was Latin Salutatorian of Class. At 
graduation was First Honor Man of the Class. 

Instructor at Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J., 1895-96 ; stud- 
ent at the University of Michigan, 1896-97 ; entered the Medical School of 
the University of Pennsylvania in 1897, graduating in 1899 with degree of 
M.D. Physician and surgeon, 1899 to date. 

Elected to the American College of Surgeons, June 22, 1914. 

Member of University Club of Rochester (treasurer), Rochester 
Medical Association (treasurer); Rochester Pathological Association; 
New York State Medical Society, Hospital Medical Society, Rochester 
Academy of Medicine, Medical Society of the County of Monroe, Amer- 
ican Medical Association, Rochester Athletic Club, Rotary Club, Young 
Men's Christian Association. 

Author of several medical monographs. 



Princeton University 



235 



Related to George K. Ward, '69 (uncle) ; Frank A. Ward, '70 (father) ; 
Frank H. Ward, '96 (brother) ; Edwards P. Ward, '96 (cousin) ; Edward 
S. Ward, '05 (brother) ; Dudley L. Ward, '15 (brother). His sons are 
preparing for Princeton ; Francis B. Ward expects to enter the Class of 
1928 and William D. Ward, Jr., the Class of 1931. 

During the war was a member of Medical Advisory Board No. 41, 
Selective Service System, New York State, August, 1918 to March, 1919. 

GUY SCOTT WARREN 




1895 I 9 20 

a, b — 1 106 Oak Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

c — 1822 Transportation Building, Chicago, 111. 

Born, July 19, 1872, Kirkwood, Mo. Son of Isaac Shelby 
Warren, physician and later member of the firm of Warren, 
Jones and Gratz, now American Manufacturing Company, 
manufacturers of bagging (A.B., M.D., Transylvania Univer- 
sity 1840) and Anne Emily Warren. 

Married, February 12, 1901, at Lexington, Ky., Katherine Mc- 
Creary Bronston (died July 26, 1909), daughter of Charles 
Jacob Bronston, lawyer (A.B. Transylvania University; LL.B. 
University of Virginia) ; May 15, 1918, at St. Louis, Mo., Ellen 
Balee Fisher, daughter of John Jacob Fisher, (Transylvania 
University). 

Children, Anne Warren, born May 4, 1902 ; Sallie Warren, born 
June 23, 1903 (died March 4, 1908) ; Katherine Warren, born 
June 11, 1905. 



236 



Class of 1895 



Prepared for college at Wyman Institute, Alton, 111., entering Princeton 
in September, 1891, and leaving in the fall of 1894. Roomed at 13 Uni- 
versity Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 

Engaged in the wholesale lumber business as member of the firm of 
Powe and Warren, St. Louis, Mo., 1895-96 ; in 1897 traveled through the 
Orient and in South America; served in the Army in the Spanish War 
in 1898; in 1899 was in the fruit business and a prospector in the Bahama 
Islands with Gaston Drake of the Class of '94; Cashier and Manager of 
the Postal Telegraph Cable Company, Chicago, 111., 1900-04; Business 
Manager of McClure and Bronston, printing and stationery, Lexington, 
Ky., 1904-1905 ; Cashier of Southern Division, Postal Telegraph Cable Com- 
pany, Atlanta, Ga., 1906-08; Auditor of Washburn Crosby Milling Com- 
pany, Louisville, Ky., 1909; Purchasing Agent of Western Weighing and 
Inspection Bureau, Chicago, 111, 1910-17; Sales Manager of Heco En- 
velope Company, Chicago, 111, 1917-18; Purchasing Agent of Western 
Weighing and Inspection Bureau, Chicago, 111, and Secretary and Director 
of Brown Paper Goods Company, Chicago, 111., 1919 to date. 

During the war was member of the American Protective League with 
rank of operative, under direction of United States Department of Justice, 
Bureau of Investigation; served on Exemption Board as clerk; was Ser- 
geant, Company B, 4th Regiment, Illinois Home Guards. 



DEXTER MASON FERRY WEEKS 



A.B. 




a, b— Skaneateles, N. Y. 
Born, May 31, 1867, Rochester, N. Y. Son of William H. 
Weeks, farmer, and Augnsta Ferry Weeks. 



Princeton University 



237 



Married, August 17, 1897, at Geneseo, N. Y., Mary Mather, 
daughter of John C. Mather, retired. 

Prepared for college at the Geneseo Normal School, Geneseo, N. Y., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 
1895, A.B. Roomed at 11 South Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall. Was 
Washington's Birthday Debater in Freshman year. Won Boudinot His- 
torical Fellowship. 

Head of general office of American Blower Company, heating, ven- 
tilating and drying engineers of Detroit, Mich., 1895-99; President of 
Bashford-Burmister Company, wholesale and retail dealers in general 
merchandise, Prescott, Ariz., 1899-1903; Branch Manager of Studebaker 
Corporation, dealers in vehicles, harness and automobiles, Kansas City, 
Mo., 1904-12; Director and General Sales Manager of Studebaker Corpor- 
ation, South Bend, Ind., 1912-16; retired in April, 1916. 

Ex-president of Kansas City University Club ; member of Skaneateles 
Country Club and Owasco Country Club ; 33rd Degree Mason. 

JOHN FOX WEISS A T> . 




1920 



a, b — 507 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
c — 506-508 Bergner Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Born, January 4, 1873, Harrisburg, Pa. Son of John H. Weiss 

(A.B. Washington and Jefferson College), and Mary Virginia 

Fox Weiss. 
Married, November 26, 1901, at Harrisburg, Pa., Christine Belle 

Brandt, daughter of Levi Brandt. 



238 Class of 1895 

Prepared for college at Pennsylvania Military Academy (now Pennsyl- 
vania Military College), Chester, Pa., entering Princeton in September, 
1891 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 8 North Reunion 
Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Cap and Gown Club. Played on Uni- 
versity Banjo and Mandolin Clubs. Class Historian in Sophomore, Junior 
and Senior years. 

Law student in the office of Hon. S. T. M. McCarrell, Harrisburg, Pa., 
1895-97 ; Attorney-at-law, in practice by himself at Harrisburg, Pa., 1898- 
1904; elected District Attorney for Dauphin County, Pa., November 8, 
1904, and took office for three years in January, 1905; reelected November 
5, 1907 to serve from January, 1908 to January, 1912. On July 1, 1918, 
was appointed Assistant Counsel of the Public Service Commission of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by the Attorney General of the 
Commonwealth, and now holds this position. 

Was chairman of the Republican Committee of Dauphin County, Pa., 
1899-1912 ; Director of the Commonwealth Trust Company, Harrisburg, 
Pa., 1906 to date ; Director of First National Bank, Harrisburg, Pa., 1913 
to date: Director of Young Men's Christian Association of Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Director of Harrisburg Hospital, 191 1 to date, and Secretary of the 
Board of Directors of Harrisburg Hospital, 1916 to date; Trustee of Pine 
Street Presbyterian Church of Harrisburg, since 1916; President of the 
Board of Trustees of the same church since September, 1918; Treasurer 
of the Sunday School of the same church since 1906. President of the 
Country Club of Harrisburg, 1916-18, and now and at different times a 
member of the Board of Governors. Treasurer of the Harrisburg 
Benevolent Association, 1918 to date. 

Member of the Country Club of Harrisburg, Harrisburg Club, Univer- 
sity Club of Harrisburg, Princeton Club of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Society of New York, Harrisburg Republican Club, West End Republican 
Club, Harrisburg Rifle Club, Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce, Motor 
Club of Harrisburg. 



ARTHUR REGISTER WELLS A.B. 

a, c — 524 Omaha National Bank Building, Omaha, Neb. 
b — 113 No. Happy Hollow Boulevard, Omaha, Neb. 
Born, December 1, 1873, Corning, Iowa. Son of Arthur Wells 

and Lucina Register Wells. 
Married, April 28, 1897, at Corning, Iowa, Helen Wilson. 
Children, Mary Wells, born January 2, 1904 (died January 5, 

1904) ; Theodore Wells, born March 12, 1907. 

Prepared for college at Corning Academy, Corning, Iowa, and Lake 
Forest Academy, Lake Forest, 111., entering Princeton in September, 1891, 
and graduating magna cum laude in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 1 South 
Dod Hall. Member of Whig Hall and Philadelphian Society. Was First 



Princeton University 



239 




1895 1920 

Honor man in Freshman year. Won First Group Honors in Sophomore 
year. Won Whig Hall Junior Debate First Prize. 

For one year after graduation he studied law at the State University of 
Iowa, Iowa City, and was admitted to the Iowa bar May 13, 1896; member 
of law firm of Davis and Wells, Corning, la., 1896-1907; member of the 
State Board of Law Examiners of Iowa, 1906; Attorney for, and then 
Assistant Solicitor of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, for 
Nebraska and Kansas, with offices at Omaha, 1907-13; member of the 
law firm of Stout, Rose and Wells, Omaha, Neb., 1913 to date. 

Member of Board of Education of the City of Omaha, and Chairman 
of its Committee on Teachers and Course of Study, 1917-1920. Member, 
University Club of Omaha and Masonic K. T. and Shrine. 

His son, Theodore Wells is preparing for Princeton and expects to enter 
the class of 1928. 

During the war, in 1918, he was Chairman of the Local Committee at 
Omaha of Military Training Camps Assn. and Chairman of the Com- 
mittee to pass on civilian applicants from Nebraska for Field Artillery 
Officers Training School (Camp Taylor) and Coast Artillery Officers 
Training School. April 7, 1918 applied for service in Judge Advocate 
General's Dept. Oct. 22, 1918, commissioned Captain, Army Service 
Corps, U.S.A. Oct. 29, 1918 reported at Camp Upton, N. Y. and received 
overseas orders. Nov. 9, 1918 received orders to report on transport; 
orders cancelled Nov. 10. Discharged Dec. 11, 1918. 



240 



Class of 1895 
WILLIAM HENRY WELLS 



C.E. 






1895 



1920 



a, c — 706-708 Grand Street, Jersey City, N. J. 
Born, August 24, 1873, Jersey City, N. J. Son of Ephraim 

Stockton Wells, manufacturer, and Susan Sarah Titus. 
Married, April 2, 1904, at New York, N. Y., Aurora Hilda Von 

Latzen, daughter of John Von Latzen. 
Children, Marcella Wells, born September 26, 1905 (died 

March, 1906) ; Margaret Susan Wells, born September 25, 

1906; William Henry Wells, Jr., born February 13, 1908; Mary 

Louise Wells, born January 1, 1910; Sylvia Stockton Wells,, 

born 1912; Hope Virginia Wells, born 1914. 

Prepared for college at Jersey City High School, Jersey City, N. J., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. 
Roomed at 23 South Edwards Hall. 

After graduation returned to Princeton for a special course in Chemis- 
try, 1895-96; student at the New York College of Pharmacy, 1896-98, taking 
degree of Ph.G. ; entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New 
York, in 1898, graduating in 1902 with degree of M.D. ; Interne in Xew 
York Hospitals, 1902-04; practised medicine in New York City, 1904-05; 
General Manager of his father's business (E. S. Wells, Manufacturing- 
Chemist) manufacturing exterminators, Jtersey City, N. J. 1905-13;:, 
Trustee of the Estate of E. S. Wells, 1913 to date. 

Related to George Titus Wells, 1905 (brother). 



Princeton University 
DANIEL PARVIN WESTCOTT 



241 
C.E. 




a — 301 North Fifth Street, Camden, N. J. 
Born, August 22, 1873, Alloway, Salem County, N. J. Son of 

John Bunyan Westcott, Methodist clergyman, and Margaret 

Townsend Westcott. 
Married, September 6, 1898, at Camden, N. J., Ida Mabel 

Cramer, daughter of Alfred Cramer, real estate dealer. 
Children, Alfred Cramer Westcott, born July 8, 1899 (died De- 
cember 5, 1900) ; Muriel Westcott, born April 15, 1903 ; (a son) 

born October 15, 1916. 

Prepared for college at Pennington Seminary, .entering Princeton 
in September, 1891 and graduating in June, 1895, C.E. Roomed at 
34 North Edwards Hall. Member of Philadelphian Society. 

From 1895 to 1903 associated with the Economical Gas Apparatus 
Construction Company, Gas Engineers, of London, England; from 1903 
to date engaged in real estate business in Camden, N. J. 

Member of Philadelphia Princeton Club. 

GEORGE WHITE A.B. 

a — Marietta, Ohio. 

b — 322 Fifth Street, Marietta, Ohio. 
c — St. Clair Building, Marietta, Ohio. 
Born, August 21, 1872, Elmira, N. Y. Son of Charles Watkins 
White, watchmaker and jeweler, and Mary S. Back White. 



242 



Class of 1895 





1920 

Married, September 25, 1900, at Titusville, Pa., Charlotte Mc- 
Kelvy, daughter of David McKelvy, lawyer. 

Children, David McKelvy White, born August 8, 1901 ; Mary 
Louise White, born May 3, 1906; Charlotte White, born Feb- 
ruary 2^, 1908; George White, Jr., born August 23, 191 1 ; Rob- 
ert White, born November 10, 1912. 

Prepared for college at Titusville, Pa. High School, entering Princeton 
in 1891 and graduating in 1895, A.B. Roomed at 16 North East College. 
Member of Philadelphian Society, Whig Hall, and University Mandolin 
Club. 

Engaged in gold mining in Alaska, 1808-1900; from 1902 to date, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Permian Oil and Gas Company at Marietta, O. 
Member of the Ohio State Legislature, 1905-08. Member of the sixty- 
second, sixty-third and sixty-fifth Congress from the Fifteenth District 
of Ohio (member of the Committee on Ways and Means in the sixty- 
fifth Congress). 

Honorary A.M. conferred by Marietta College, Ohio. 

His son, David McKelvy White, is preparing for Princeton at the Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa., and expects to enter the class of 1924. 



HOWARD ERSKINE WHITE A.B. 

a, c — 31 Nassau Street, New York, N. Y. 

b — 1 125 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Born, September 27, 1874, Buffalo, N. Y. Son of the Rev. 



Princeton University 



243 




1895 



1920 



Erskine Norman White, D.D. (Yale '54 A.B.), and Eliza Tracy- 
Nelson White.. 

Married, October 14, 1899, at Ogontz, Pa., Virginia Thomas 
Shoemaker (died April 23, 1916). 

Children, Thomas Shoemaker White, born November 10, 1901 ; 
Stanley Cleveland White, born January 22, 1903 ; Daniel Hale 
White, born August 1, 19 10. 

Prepared for college at Halsey Collegiate School, New York, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, ad graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed 
at 11 South West College. Member of Philadelphian Society and Whig 
Hall. Editor, Nassau Literary Magazine. Won First Prize Whig Hall 
Freshman Debate. Won First Junior Orator Medal. Intercollegiate 
Debater. Class Orator at graduation. 

After leaving college he was a law student in the office of Ritch, Wood- 
ford, Bovee and Wallace, lawyers, 1895-6, and at the same time was a 
student at the New York Law School, where he was elected President of 
his class ; admitted to the New York Bar June 28, 1897 ; managing clerk 
in the office of Manierre and Manierre, lawyers, 1897-98; member of 
firm of White and Otheman, 1898-1907 ; President of Taylor Iron and 
Steel Company, High Bridge, N. J., 1907-08; practised law in New York 
City, 1908 to date. 

Member of Apawamis Club, Rye, N. Y. (Member of Board of 
Governors and Secretary, 1914 to date) ; Engineers Club, Princeton Club, 
Bar Association of New York ; and the American Yacht Club. Member 
of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Rye, N. Y. 1911-1918. 



^44 



Class of 1895 
ISRAEL LOSEY WHITE 




1920 

a, c — Newark Evening News, Newark, N. J. 
b — 19 Hobart Road, Summit, N. J. 
Born, April 18, 1872, Ithaca, N. Y. Son of Theodore Freling- 

huysen White, Doctor of Divinity, and Evalina Bridge Losey 

White. 
Married, September 25, 1907, at Worcester, Mass., Grace Peck- 
ham Baldwin, daughter of Charles Clinton Baldwin, editor and 

publisher of the Worcester Spy. 
Children, Charles Baldwin White, born October 26, 1908 ; Esther 

Brockett White, born March 20, 191 1; John Howell White, 

born September 12, 191 3. 

Prepared for college at Summit Military Academy and Morristown 
Academy, entering Princeton in September, 1889, with the class of '93. 
Was out of college two years. Joined '95 in Junior year. Roomed at 
10 North East College. Member of Whig Hall. Student in Princeton 
Theological Seminary, 1894-1897, receiving degree of B.D. 

Pastor in Whippany, N. J., 1897-1903; pastor of Tabernacle, Newark, 
N. J., 1904-06, resigning on account of ill health; traveled in Mediter- 
ranean, Egypt and Holy Land, 1907; editorial work, 1907 to date; at 
present, foreign editor of Neivark Evening Ncivs. 

Author of various articles in Review of Reviews, Journal of American 
History, The Intematioml Studio, etc. 

Related to Henry White (grandfather) hon. A.M. 1867. Henry Dun- 



Princeton University 



245 



ning (cousin) '82, William Wisner White (brother) '88, Charles Dun- 
ning White (brother) '91, Benjamin Vroom White (brother) '92, Howell 
White (cousin) 1901. 



ALLAN DERRICK WILLIAMS 



A.B. 




a, b — 240 Derrick Road, Uniontown, Pa. 
c — Blackstone Building, Uniontown, Pa. 
Born, June 2, 1872, Uniontown, Pa. Son of Josiah Van Kirk 

Williams, born January 12, 1916; Jonathan Byrer Williams, 
Married, January 25, 191 1, at Moundsville, W. Va., Julia 

Willard Burley, daughter of William Jonathan Burley, (A.B. 

Allegheny College). 
Children, Allan Burleigh Williams, born September 2, 1912 ; 

Cecil Dunn Williams, born January 13, 1914; Mary Virginia 

Williams, born January 12, 1916; Jonathan Byrer Williams, 

born July I, 1919. 

Prepared for college at Redstone Academy, Uniontown, Pa., and the 
University of West Virginia, Morgantown, entering Princeton in Sep- 
tember, 1892 and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed at 4 North Dod 
Hall. 

Admitted to the bar of Fayette County, Pa., 1897, and later admitted to 
practise in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. In 1901 admitted to prac- 
tise law in Marshall and Wetzel Counties, W. Va., and in the Supreme 
Court of that state. Worked on titles to coal lands in West Virginia during 
years 1901, 19.02 and 1903; then returned to Uniontown, Pa., and practised 



246 



Class of 1895 



alone until June, 1915, when with his associates he formed the law partner- 
ship of Umbel, Robinson, McKean and Williams, and is still a member of 
that firm. 

Member of Laurel Club of Uniontown, Uniontown Country Club, Prince- 
ton Club of New York, and various Masonic organizations. 

Related to Dr. Charles B. Williams, '88 (uncle) ; Donald Williams '15 
(cousin). 



LINSLY RUDD WILLIAMS 



A.B. 




1895 



1920 



a — Care of Stephen G. Williams, Esq., 30 Broad Street, New 
York, N. Y. 

b — 4 Rue Thiers, Paris, France. 

c — 12 Rue Boissy d'Anglas, Paris, France. 
Born, January 28, 1875, New York, N. Y. Son of John Stanton 

Williams, of Williams and Guion Steamship Company, and 

Mary Maclay Pentz Williams. 
Married, January 18, 1908, at New York, N. Y., Grace Kidder, 

daughter of Edward H. Kidder of Barrett Manufacturing 

Company (A.B. Harvard '63). 
Children, Virginia Williams, born November 24, 1908; Mary 

Hathaway Williams, and Linsly Rudd Williams, Jr., born 

October 10, 19 10. 

Prepared for college at Halsey Collegiate School, New York, entering 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A..B. Roomed 



Princeton Univers t ty 247 

at 12 University Hall. Member of St. Paul's Society, Whig Hall and 
Colonial Club. 

After leaving college he entered the Medical School of Columbia Uni- 
versity, taking degrees of A.M. and M.D. in 1899. House Physician at 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York, November, 1899-December 31, 1901 ; 
Senior Physician at Sloane Maternity Hospital, New York, June-October, 
1902; Instructor in Histology at Columbia University, 1902; Assistant 
Physician and Chief of Clinic at Vanderbilt Clinic, New York, 1902-1912; 
Visiting Physician at House of Rest for Consumptives, 1904-08; Visiting 
Physician at Seton Hospital for Consumptives, 1904-07; Visiting Physician 
at Sea Breeze Hospital, 1904-10; Assistant Physician, City Hospital, New 
York, 1906-10; Visiting Physician at City Hospital, New York, 1910-15. 
Proudfit Fellow in Tuberculosis at Columbia University, 1904-06. Member 
of Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, 1908-14. Deputy Commissioner of 
Health, New York State 1914-17. Secretary, New York State Bovine 
Tuberculosis Commission, 1914-16. President of New York State Tuber- 
culosis Hospital, 1915-17. 

Elected to the Academy of Medicine, New York City, 1004; to the New 
York State Medical Society, 1902; to the New York County Medical 
Society, 1902. 

Member of Commission of National Research Council, studying condi- 
tions in France and England, April-July, 1917. Director of Commission 
for the Prevention of Tuberculosis in France, Rockefeller Foundation, 
March, 1919 to date. 

Member of University Club of New York, Princeton Club of New York, 
Century Association of New York. 

Author of various medical monographs. 

During the war was commissioned First Lieutenant, Medical Reserve 
Corps, U. S. A., May 12, 1917; promoted to Major, Medical Reserve Corps, 
August 21, 1917; promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, No- 
vember 14, 1918; Discharged April 12, 1919, at St. Aignan, France. 



ALFRED McCALMONT WILSON 

a, c — Lakeside Petroleum Company, McCormick Building, 

Chicago, 111. 

b — 5231 Cornell Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Born, June 1, 1876, Franklin, Pa. Son of John Adams Wilson, 

oil salesman (A.B. Princeton 1873) and Ida Gordon Wilson. 

Married, December 31, 1902, at Highland Park, 111., Edythe 

Pardee, daughter of Hayden Pardee, Lieutenant U. S. A. 
Children, Elizabeth McCalmont Wilson, born January 25, 1905. 

Prepared for college at Franklin (Pa.) High School, entering Princeton 
in September, 1891, and leaving in May, 1893. Roomed at 3 South East 
Brown Hall. Member of Whig Hall. 



248 



Class of 1895 





1895 



1920 



In 1895 he was appointed Cadet in the United States Military Academy 
at West Point, and was graduated in 1899 an d commissioned a Lieutenant 
in the United States Army (20th Infantry) which he held until 1908. Dur- 
ing this time he served live years in the Philippines and was on active 
duty during the San Francisco disaster. In 1908 he resigned from the 
Service and entered the employ of the Galena Signal Oil Company as 
Northwestern Representative in Portland, Ore., where he remained until the 
United States entered the World War when he reentered the military 
service as Major of Infantry. After his discharge he entered the employ 
of the Lakeside Petroleum Company of Chicago, as Assistant to the Presi- 
dent, on September 4, 1919, and he now holds this position. During the 
war he was instructor at First Officers' Training Camp at Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, Indiana ; organized and commanded 84th Division Machine Gun 
Battalion; afterwards Brigade Adjutant 167th Brigade. Transferred to 
the Quartermaster Corps and sent overseas to France in May, 1918; served 
in France as Assistant to the Chief Quartermaster, A. E. F. Acted as chief 
inspector of Procurement and Distribution of Petroleum Products. Pro- 
moted to Lieutenant-Colonel, Q. M. C, in September, 1918. Returned to 
the United States, January, 1919, and acted as expert adviser on petroleum 
products to the Quartermaster General, United States Army. Discharged 
from Active Service September 3, 1919. Promoted to be Colonel, Quarter- 
master Reserve Corps, October 1, 1919. 

Member of Columbia Club of Indianapolis, Mnsons, Elks and Royal 
Arcanum. 



Princeton University 249 

EPHRAIM KING WILSON 

a, b — 1720 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 
c — 608 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md. 
Born, December 29, 1872, Snow Hill, Md. Son of Ephraim 
King Wilson, Lawyer, Judge and U. S. Senator and Julia Ann 
Knox Wilson. 

Prepared for college at Columbian College, entering Princeton in the 
fall of 1891 and leaving in 1894. Roomed at 20 East Witherspoon Hall. 
Member of Whig Hall. 

After leaving Princeton was a student at Johns Hopkins University and 
the Law School of the University of Maryland. From that time to date 
has been an Attorney at Law. Attorney for American Bonding Company 
of Baltimore since October, 1905. Attorney for Fidelity and Deposit Com- 
pany of Maryland. 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER WOOD 




1920 



a, c — 50 Church Street, New York, N. Y. 

b — ico Morningside Drive, New York, N. Y. 
Born, October 31, 1870, Cold Spring, Putnam County, N. Y. 

Son of John Wood, foundryman, and Catherine Dunsieth 

Wood. 
Married, (1) December 3, 1895, at Cold Spring, N. Y., Lilian 

Warren; (2) April 17, 1906, at Albany, N. Y., Georgie Eleanor 



2 SO 



Class of 1895 



Beach Hoag; (3) October 30, 1912, at Dunellen, N. J., Lucile 
Colby Brodnax, daughter of Thomas Brodnax. 
Children, William Alexander Wood, Jr., born August 29, 1915; 
Thomas Brodnax Wood, born November 13, 1916. 

Prepared for college at home, entering Princeton in September, 1891, 
and leaving in June, 1894. Roomed at 41 North Edwards Hall. Member 
of Clio Hall. Played on Freshman Football Team. 

Mechanical draughtsman at Farrell Foundry and Machine Company,. 
Ansonia, Conn., 1894-96; Chief Engineer, first for the Coe Brass Manufac- 
turing Company, and later the American Brass Company, operating mills at 
Torrington, Waterbury, Ansonia and Shelton, Conn. 1896-1906 ; Consulting 
Engineer and President of the New York Cableway and Engineering Com- 
pany, New York, 1906-07; President of W. A. Wood Automobile Manufac- 
turing Company, New York, 1911. For the past ten years has specialized 
in engineering work with particular attention to brass and copper mills. 
"Have been intimately associated," he writes "with seventy-five percent of 
the present development in that line." 

He expects both his sons to go to Princeton ; William A. Wood, Jr., will 
probably enter the Class of 1937; Thomas B. Wood the Class of 1938. 



LOUIS CLAYTON WOODRUFF 



A.B. 





1895 



1920 



a, c — 311 West 83rd Street, New York, N. Y. 
Born, November 17, 1872, Southington, Conn. Son of Oliver 
Dwight Woodruff, clergyman, and Emerjean Clyde Neale: 
Woodruff. 



Princeton University 



251 



Prepared for college at Mt. Hermon, Mass., entering Princeton in Sep- 
tember, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. Roomed in town. Mem- 
ber of Clio Hall. Won a classical fellowship. Post graduate degree 
A.M. Princeton, 1896. 

Teacher in Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J., and in Columbia 
Grammar School, Allen School, Browning School, Columbia Institute, 
Berkeley School, all of New York City ; several years traveling with 
different families as private tutor ; at present is teaching in Berkeley- 
Irving School, New York City. 

LEIGH WYMAN 





1895 



1920 



a > b — 3957 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Born, February 20, 1872, St. Louis, Mo. Son of Henry Purkitt 
Wyman and Ann Eliza Leigh Wyman. 

Married, September 28, 1899, at Alton, 111., Fanny Fearn Clapp, 
daughter of Elmus Augustus Clapp. 

Children, Helen Hadley Wyman, born September 4, 1900 ; Henry- 
Leigh Wyman, born May 9, 19 13. 

Prepared for college at Smith Academy (Branch of Washington Uni- 
versity) St. Louis, entering Princeton in 1891 and leaving in 1895. 
Roomed at 7 and 11 North Middle Reunion Hall. Member of Philadel- 
phian Society, Clio Hall, Cap and Gown Club, Junior Promenade Com- 
mittee, University Mandolin Club. 

Clerk in the employ of the Tennent Stribling Shoe Company, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1896; teacher in Western Military Academy, Alton, 111., 1897-99; 



2S2 



Class of 1895 



superintendent, Piasa Mining Company, Joplin, Mo., 1899-1900; cashier, 
salesman, agent, Waters Pierce Oil Company, 1901-04; secretary, 
treasurer, St. Louis and Mississippi Valley Transportation Company, St. 
Louis, Mo., 1904-05 ; office manager, Huntington and St. Louis Tow Boat 
Company, Cairo, 111., 1905-07 ; secretary, treasurer, Cairo Milling Com- 
pany, Cairo, 111., 1907-10; farming in Bourbon, Mo., 1910-11 ; secretary, 
Illinois Coal Company, Alton, 111., 1911-12; cashier, Bauman Jewelry Com- 
pany, St. Louis, 1912-13 ; office manager, Klein Cloak Company, St. Louis, 
1913-15 ; public accounting, Westerman, Trader and Company, St. Louis, 
1915-16; assistant secretary, Monarch Metal Weather Strip Company, St. 
Louis, 1916-19; public accounting, E. H. Wagner and Company, C. P. A., 
St. Louis, 1919. 



ROBERT LANSING ZABRISKIE 



A.B. 




a, b, c — Aurora, N. Y. 
Born, October 23, 1872, Aurora, N. Y. Son of Nicolas Lansing 

Zabriskie, lawyer (retired), (A.B., 1857, L.H.D., 1916, Union) 

and Louise Fidelia Morgan Zabriskie. 
Married, May 11, 1899, at Princeton, N. J. Aubin Markham 

Wells ( died February 25, 1917, at Aurora, N. Y.) daughter of 

Robert William Wells, Merchant. 
Children, (a son) born and died June 11, 1900; Louise Morgan 

Morgan Zabriskie, born December 20, 1901 ; Robert Lansing 

Zabriskie, born January 14, 1904 (died September 16, 1904) ; 



Princeton University 253 

Aubin Wells Zabriskie, born November 19, 1905 ; Robert Wells 
Zabriskie, born May 14, 191 1. 

Prepared for college at Cayuga Lake Military Academy and with private 
tutor, entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. Roomed at F University Hall and 12 South East College. Member 
of Philadelphian Society and Clio Hall. 

Returned to Princeton in September, 1895, entering the Electrical School, 
and in June, 1897, received the degree of E.E. Was draughtsman and 
erecting engineer with Westinghouse, Church, Kerr and Company, contract- 
ing engineers, 1897-99 ; employed by the New York Telephone Company 
with traffic engineer, 1900-04; member of firm of Aurora Drug and Supply 
Co., 1908-19. Treasurer of Wells College, 1905 to date ; Trustee of Wells 
College, 1906 to date; Acting President of Wells College, 1912 and 1913. 
President of the Village of Aurora, 1906, 1907 and 1908. Street Commis- 
sioner of the Village of Aurora, 1918 to date. Director of First National 
Bank of Aurora. Trustee of Presbyterian Church of Aurora. Trustee 
(also Treasurer) of Aurora Public Library. Trustee of Cayuga Lake 
Academy. Treasurer of the local Red Cross. Scoutmaster of Troop 1, 
Boy Scouts. 

Member of Princeton Club of New York. 

During the war served as a member of Liberty Loan Committee ; Chair- 
man of War Saving Stamp Committee; a "four minute man"; associate 
member of Legal Advisory Board, Cayuga County Selective Service Board ; 
Chairman of the Home Service section of the local Red Cross. 




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262 



Class of 1895 




Snapshots at headquarters during the 20th Year Reunion in 1915. T\he 
Class Boy guards Colby's Sarsaparilla Wagon. 



Princeton University 



263 



4. — '95 lays the 
cornerstone of 
Patton Hall in 
1905. 



1. — '95 passes 
the grandstand 
at the Yale 
game in 1915. 




i goo 




1902 



1905 



Our Class Bog 

Geoffrey Cooke Bunting, the son of Joseph S. Bunting and 
Katherine Cooke Barney (Bunting), was born in Philadelphia, 
October 13, 1896. When a year and a half old, in June, 1898, he 
was carried into Oddfellows Hall on Witherspoon Street, Prince- 
ton, on his father's shoulder, and met with such a roar of approval 
from the assembled members of the Class of '95, then engaged in 




1920 

eating a rather indifferent class dinner, that he dissolved into 
tears His father gracefully accepted in his behalf the Class of 
'95 Cup with its beautiful silver rattles for handles, and an en- 
graved rabbit on one side of it with the familiar lines : 

Bye, baby Bunting, 

Daddy's gone-a-hunting, 
To get a little rabbit skin 

To wrap his baby Bunting in. 

Ever since then our Class Boy has been a regular and most wel- 
come attendant at all our reunions, so that by this time he knows 
us all by our first names. It was natural that he should look for- 
ward to entering Princeton. He prepared for college at Law- 



266 Class of 1895 

renceville School and entered Princeton September, 1916, as a 
member of the Class of 1920. He roomed in Patton Hall, the dor- 
mitory to which our Class contributed an entry as our decennial 
gift. He was a member of the Freshman swimming team. 

In April of his Freshman year the United States entered the 
war with Germany. Goeffrey had already enrolled in the course 
in Military Training which he completed in June, 19 17. During 
that summer he worked in the Big Gun Shop of the Midvale Steel 
Company until August, when he entered the Second Officers' 
Training Camp at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, and was commis- 
sioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery in November, 
1917. 

From that time until August, 1918, he was stationed at Fort 
Dupont, Delaware. He sailed for France on August 22, 1918, 
on the staff of the 36th Artillery Brigade, C. A. C. His brigade 
was still in training at Libourne, France, when the armistice was 
signed November 11, 1918. He returned from France in March, 
1919, and is now (January, 1920) attached to the 56th Artillery, 
C. A. C. at Camp Jackson, South Carolina. 



The War Record of the Class 

By Major John Hamilton Thacher 
129th Field Artillery, United States Army 

This regimental review of the war z'eterans of the Class of '95 
occurred only on a parade ground located in a realm of reverie 
and fancy. But it was a fancy reverently associated with the 
old front campus and a fading twilight on the steps of Old North 
in the Commencement season of 1920. The Seniors do not sing 
tonight but have graciously yielded their place to these hoary and 
honored guests. Lounging about in the shadozvs, on the velvet 
green, or leaning against the ancient elms, are the shades of each 
Class of the Golden Nineties — silent and enraptured witnesses 
of this ceremony. Johnny Degnan and Topley are hovering 
obscurely in the background, on the outskirts of the throng, 
appalled and entranced by the unchastened language of the re- 
viewing officer. They know, however, that his harsh firmness is 
none too severe for so wild and undisciplined an organization, 
especially as it is assembled here in one of its most exuberant 
moods. But listen! The bugle sounds "assembly!" 

Ninety-five ! — 'ten-Shun ! 

Hey, you, fall in there, and make it snappy ! Fall in ! For 
the love o'Mike ! What outfit is this ? A Creche ? or an In- 
stitute for the Cure of Obesity? Boy howdy, — but here's a 
sight for you ! And look at the gang of stars and bars and 
eagles ! 

Fall in ! You, over there — Fat Moses and Freddie Poole — who 
ordered you to wear packs at this inspection? It isn't a pack? 
.It's just you? Oo-/a-la-la ! ! A month's settin'-up drill for yours 
until you train down to the size of Spider McNulty. 

Right Dress! Front! Call the roll! 

"All present or accounted for." 

Who is that coming around the corner of Witherspoon, moving 
like the hour-hand on a wrist watch? Dick Stockton, you say? 
Stop him! The man will die of cerebral hemorrhage if he keeps 



268 Class of 1895 

up that pace. Still working on Andy's questionnaire and he's not 
yet ready to report. 

Company Attin-shun ! Call off ! Squads right ! March ! 
Left! right !— left !, right! Hep! hep! Hep! hep! 

"Wan ! — two ! — time, mark ! 

Ye walk like the aigle in Cintral Park !" 

Column left ! "And when I columns you left, you marches 
toward the reviewing stand, and not toward Dohm's or the 
Princeton Inn — get me ?" 

Halt! At ease! 

A fine lookin' bunch of huskies ye are! All who are not can- 
didates for a Cane Spree and the Sophomore Rush tonight will 
step one pace forward. 

Company — halt ! 

As we pass down the line we observe that most of you seem 
to be wearing the regulation number of arms and legs. But 
doughty warriors ye are, none the less! You're not carrying a 
mob of gold stripes on your arms but every man jack of ye 
has seen war service ! 

It becomes the duty of the reviewing officer on this highly 
auspicious occasion to distribute D.S.C.'s and D.S.M.'s to all 
those members of the class of '95, who were directly or indirectly 
responsible for booting the Boche and landing the Hohenzollern 
Family in the Brig. 

On the list, one finds two classes of candidates. The first is 
composed of those who did all the work in the war, and in the 
second class are those who had all the fun. The first includes the 
great army of fighters in the Home Reserve lines, those who had 
to sell bonds, or pay for 'em, who had to serve on draft boards 
or live on short rations or do Red Cross work, and who stood 
Reveille and Retreat in the daily grind of office service, — the kind 
of service that was all fatigue-duty and no Paris leaves. The 
second class includes the lucky ones, who wore the khaki and 
perhaps even did a trick close up to the Big Music. 

PRIVATE ROCKSY AGENS, step forward. We pin this 
little bronze souvenir on your breast for working on every Liberty 
Loan and Victory Loan committee that upheld the honor of your 
country in Newark, New Jersey. You further earned this 
honor by serving as Lieutenant in the Civilian Police of the. 



Princeton" University 269 

Fourth Precinct of Newark; also for service in the Salvation 
Army Campaign Drive. 

KID ANDREWS, step forward. This one for you, because 
you served on the Legal Advisory Committee of your Local 
Draft Board, like a good citizen and the able lawyer that you 
are. 

PORKY BROOKS! That was good work you did on the 
Liberty Bond campaigns and every campaign of the Y.M.C.A. 
and Red Cross and as Director of Distribution and Sales in your 
Liberty Bond district. Moreover, you left your business in the 
Brooks Building, in Scranton, and went over to New York to take 
the directorship of the campaign for recruiting overseas secre- 
taries of the Y. M. C. A. 

Will the RIGHT REVEREND WILLIS BUTLER step for- 
ward? You tried to enlist, Ben, old man, and they told you 
to stay at home on the job. Good work ! We don't know a man 
that was better calculated to keep good cheer in the hearts of 
those whose brothers and husbands and sons had sailed away 
to fight. Did you sing 'em an occasional glee, from the re- 
pertoire of that Penn's Neck Quartette? 

And the REVEREND W. J. BONE likewise served as a good 
soldier in the Red Cross and War Chest and Liberty Loan 
drives. That one sermon of yours, "The Call of the War" was 
doing your bit as much as any man who shouldered a rifle or 
manned a machine gun, for it soothed and helped a widowed 
mother. "After that sermon I was perfectly willing for my boy 
to go," she said. 

BILLY BELDEN, step forward! When the irate Britisher 
wishes to fulminate against the mistakes of his government, he 
sends his communications to the "Thunderer," — the London 
Times. So, you, too, in the war, put your emphatic protests on 
paper and sent them to the New York Times. If more Americans 
did the same, there would be fewer Bolsheviks and a better 
ordered Republic. You did your bit, too, towards the Red Cross 
and the Liberty Bonds and the Salvation Army. 

GEORGE BARTON. When we were rushing out ships at 
the rate of thirty days from keel to cargo, you were helping to 
build cranes at Hog Island and making coal-handling equip- 
ment for the Emergency Fleet Corporation and turning out 



270 Class of 1895 

equipment for the Philadelphia Navy Yard and Norfolk Navy 
Yard. 

BABE BUNTING. You did your share, Babe, as a '95 end- 
rush on the Liberty-Bond and draft-board teams ; but, better 
than all, you sent your son, "our hope and pride," the class boy 
Geoffrey C. Bunting to military training school and on the com- 
pletion of his course at the Artillery School at Fortress Monroe, 
he came out Second Lieutenant of the Coast Artillery and was 
sent to France as officer in charge of motor vehicles in the 36th 
Artillery Brigade, and at the time of the signing of the armistice 
his brigade was under orders to move to the front. In March, 
1919, he was assigned to the 56th Regiment Coast Artillery and 
since then has been acting as Battery Commander and Motor 
Transport Officer of his regiment. 

You also sent another son, Sidney S. Bunting, to the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, and he saw three months active service 
in the summer of 191 8, and will graduate next June as an ensign. 

HENRY CAN BY. This bit of bronze will serve to remind 
you of your Red Cross and Y.M.C.A. work as treasurer of the 
Delaware Chapter of the A.R.C., member of the executive com- 
mittee, team captain of the Red Cross war drives and the Y. M. 
C. A. and in other war drives, as well as work on local committees 
for the Liberty Bond and War Savings Stamp sales. 

FUZZY CRAWFORD. You did your bit out there at Beloit 
in Beloit College, knocking patriotism into the heads of the 
pseudo-socialists of Wisconsin and as assistant registrar in 
registering men for the draft. 

REV. CHARLIE CANDEE will step forward. You pounded 
away in your pulpit, responding, not only to the call of duty, but 
the call of patriotism. You were also at various times speaker 
at Y.M.C.A. and other meetings at Camp Sherman, Camp Lee, 
Camp Mills. Fort du Pont, Cape May Naval Station and at 
various street corners, working for the Liberty Bonds and war 
work drives. 

JIMMY CRAWFORD. You were another four-minute man ! 
making speeches in moving picture shows two or three times a 
week, through the various campaigns. Take this bit of bronze to 
hang with your certificate of honorable discharge from the ser- 
vice of the United States on the Committee of Public Informa- 
tion. 



Princeton University 271 

AL COOK, one pace to the front! You assisted the draft 
boards and the Liberty Loan committee as director of the war 
Savings Stamp campaign for Baltimore County and helped to 
organize work on the various Councils of Defense. 

AL CORWIN. You were chief of the Field Organization 
for Orange County, chairman of the Home Savings section of 
the American Red Cross, director of the United States Food 
Administration in the city of Middletown. You unwound legal 
red tape on the Legal Service Committee of the bar on Question- 
naires ; a member of the American Protective League ; served in 
special police reserves ; were special prosecutor under the espio- 
nage law, and Corporal of Company "L" of the First Regiment 
New York Guard. 

KID CARROLL. Special Agent to the United States Depart- 
ment of Justice, Bureau of Investigation. We add our com- 
mendation to those leters of approval that you received from the 
Department for your patriotic efforts to put the anarchists and 
the I.W.W.'s behind the bars. Our records do not show whether 
you lulled them to sleep with that song of yours, "Still His 
Whiskers Grew" or whether you gained your first experience as 
a sleuth as one of the conspirators in the "Honorable Julius 
Caesar." 

REV. SAM CRAIG. Vice-director of the Department of 
Allied Bodies of the Committee of Public Safety of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania. In the Department of Allied Bodies 
you represented the religious bodies of the state. 

HARDY CRAWFORD. When you were rejected by the 
board as being over age, and were limited to your opportunities to 
training others, you became Captain of Company "C", Third 
Battalion, New Jersey State Militia Machine Gun Company and 
trained two hundred men who went from your company into the 
service. You served on the Committee on Mediation and Con- 
ciliation of the Labor Board of the Council of National Defense 
at Washington and, Lord knows, in these times of Labor Auto- 
cracy, that ought to have been some job, too! We also note that 
you did your share on the Liberty Loan in the New T Jersey drives 
and sent your borough clean over the top. 

TRUSTEN DRAKE. Chairman of the Red Cross committee. 
Some of those free "Camels" the boys smoked in the Argonne 
came, no doubt, from vour Yalaha contributions. 



272 



'lass of 1895 



WILLIE DAVEY. You were appointed by Secretary Mc- 
Adoo one of the Advisory Board of the Marine and Seaman's 
Division Bureau of War Risk Insurance; one of the original 
members of the Insurance Committee of the United States 
Shipping Board; member of the Committee of Three appointed 
by the United States Shipping Board, with the approval of the 
State Department, to negotiate the settlement of claims of the 
owners of the Dutch steamers requisitioned in the United States 
ports by the United States. Trust you, for not leaning over 
backwards when it came to settling up those Hollander's claims ! 

JOHN DAVIS. Good old Scout! We'll wager you would 
have had the uniform on if they had not put the age kibosh on 
you. President and General Manager of a large producing coal 
company you had your job cut out for you at home. 

Is DR. WALTER DAVIS present ? Ah, there you are, Walt ! 
Draft Board No. 2 Wilkesbarre, Pa., examined about four 
thousand papers of registrants, and made physical examinations 
of a thousand or so. Walt earned the D.S.M. all right. 




He received special orders from his G.H.O. one day, when his 
wife was chairman of a ward committee. She ordered Walt to 
go out and sell some bonds. He stuck his head into the office 
of his first prospective victim — keeping his retreating end in the 
hall, as he expected to leave suddenly. 



Princeton University 273 

"On behalf of the leaders of the Eighth Ward I want a sub- 
scription to the Fifth Loan" quoth Walter, timidly. 

"All right," said the victim. 

"How much?" said Walt. He hoped it might be $50.00. 

"$500,000.00," said the prospect. 

"Good Lord !" said Walt. 

He rushed home and applied for promotion from the ranks. 
His wife promoted him to the next ward for distinguished service 
in the field. 

CHARLIE FISK. Took part in War Chest drives, Liberty 
Loans, War Savings Stamp loans ; tried to enter the officers' train- 
ing camp, and his Denominational leaders told him to get back on 
the job, after he had arranged for a year's absence to go into war 
work. There was many a man in these ranks, Charlie, who had 
those same pangs of disappointment. 

RALPH HOAGLAND. Unfitted by age and early piety for 
active service, did his bit in the employ of the Wright-Martin 
Aircraft Corporation, as labor supervisor; was indirectly con- 
nected with the Aircraft Board at Washington ; did good work in 
securing high class machinists for the Curtis Aircraft Company 
of Buffalo. 

Ed. HOOS. Served in the "Battle of the Draft Board" ; sold 
Liberty Bonds, and was block chairman for several of the big 
drives. 

CHARLIE HENDRICKSON. Steered a manufacturing com- 
pany through the intricacies of war contracts, in making trench 
warfare supplies, and served on all the Liberty Loan campaigns 
that hove in sight. 

TOMMY HUDSON. Chairman of the Red Cross campaign 
for members for Fayette County, Pennsylvania ; member of the 
local advisory board Fayette County ; member of the Secret Ser- 
vice board, and executive committee of the War Chest fund; was 
a four-minute speaker; assisted in the Liberty Loan, Y.M.C.A. 
and Red Cross drives. 

OLLIE PARKER. Here was a man that tipped and refused 
a commission. Orrel felt that he could do a more helpful, con- 
structive work in a civilian capacity than to take a Majority in a 
departmental job at Washington. He accepted a position in the 
Automotive Products Section of the War Industries Board of 
the Council of National Defense. He later served on a com- 



274 Class of 1895 

mission of engineers, called to design wheels for standard army 
trucks. He was afterward made assistant in the Lubrication De- 
partment by which lubrication experiments were tried at twenty- 
nine flying fields and which was later charged, with the main- 
tenance and lubrication of all the mechanical equipment of the Air 
Service. His department did much to bring order out of the chaos 
that existed in the Air Service and was responsible for establish- 
ing a business-like system with detailed technical reports com- 
ing from all parts of the world. 

SELDEN L. HAYNES. One of our good sky-pilots, who had 
to stay out of uniform and keep pegging away at home. Served 
on the Draft Advisory Board and Executive Committee for the 
Liberty Loan for his district. 

BILL LIBBY. Just as young, Bill, as you were on commence- 
ment day of '95. Attention! Who's that, removed your cap? 
Never mind ; there are plenty of others here with a roof thatch 
that is growing a bit thin. Your work in the National Security 
League and with the National Defense Organization Rifle Club, 
of Summit, New Jersey, will do a little quiet echoing down the 
corridors of time long after Article X of the Peace Treaty has 
been forgotten. Stick to it, Bill. That National Rifle Range 
idea is at the very basis of preparedness, and we hope to see you 
put it across. You were in the New Jersey State Militia Re- 
serve, Second Lieutenant of Company "B," besides being in the 
Defense League of New Jersey. 

SOC HUSTON. Well, that's going some! We'll say it is! 
Volunteered in five different branches of the service and got five 
rejections on account of decrepitude and antiquity. Well, we'll 
wager that you put the patriotic pep into the Choate School of 
Wallingford, Connecticut, even if these examining Boards 
wouldn't let you do any 75mm. work on the Hun. 

JOHN HARDING. There he is — as suave, debonair and 
handsome as when he sang "Nellie Was A Lady" on the Glee Club 
trip and in the rare old days of the Triangle Club. Lord bless 
you, John, but they would have welcomed that tenor voice of 
yours in some of the singsongs up in the dugouts back of Verdun ! 
But you served your country just as well at home on Red Cross. 
Y.M.C.A. and Liberty Loan Campaigns. 

ARZIE HARTZLER. Present! East Orange, New Jersey. 
Home Guard; Chairman of the Committee on Liberty Loans and 



Princeton University 



275 



other war drives ; did his best to make the populace come across 
and get the material for billion-dollar airplane construction — 
even though the airplanes didn't get across. 



fi 







ALFRED HAYES. Chairman of the Local Law Board No. 
93 of the Borough of Manhattan. Alf had to talk a combination 
of English, Yiddish, Russian and Italian, to do his bit on the 
Draft Board, but he got away with it, all right. 

JUDGE HURST. Ah, pardon us, Judge, we almost over- 
looked you ! We are all glad you were not Judge Advocate on a 
General Court over there; if you had prosecuted any unfortunate 
officer with the same vigor that you conducted your case against 
Walter Lord at the 191 5 reunion, Heaven have mercy on his 
soul ! On the Draft Board ; rendered yeoman service under the 
direction of the Lnited States Housing Corporation; served on 
Liberty Loan and Victory Bond campaigns and, best of all, did 
work for the Legal Aid Bureau in helping families of men in the 
service. 

TED HUNTINGTON. You didn't do anything, Ted?— 
That's old stuff! Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps? 
You bet ! You were one of the hard-workers who raised the 
money at home. W r e are glad when we make out our income tax 
returns that we are all blissfully ignorant as to how that monev 



276 Class of 1895 

was spent. If we had spent it, Ted, with as much good system 
as you raised it, the Americans would not have had to borrow 
their ammunition, their artillery, their machine guns, their tanks 
and their airplanes from their Allies. 

REV. NORMAN HARRISON. Ben was a good pulpit- 
soldier who helped put 114 stars on his church service flag, and 
preached the gospel of loyalty and good cheer to those who had 
to stay at home. 

DICK HATCH. Served like a good citizen on the Draft Board 
No. 13, Fairfield, Connecticut. He had 150 service men on his 
list and kept in constant touch with their homes and did good 
comforting work in looking up the sick and suffering relatives of 
men in the services. 

Atten — shun ! Your CO. is about to receive his decoration ! 

ANDREW IMBRIE. Just side-step up here, Andy, and let 
us put a whole hardware store of bronze on and about your tall 
person! Got a '"blue slip" about you, Andy? Hand it up here 
and we will fill in the blanks for you. While we pin these medals 
on your manly facade we will permit you to bow your head and 
solemnly recant those bachelor philippics that you used to hurl 
at the Holy Estate of Matrimony; "I'm thirty-two years old, — 
and my heart don't flutter at the rustle of any skirt, By Gosh!" 
And now ! Vanquished, at last ! It took a World War to do it. 
And speaking of the war you did your part. You ran five Liberty 
Loan drives among the three thousand employes of your six plants 
and sold a million dollars worth of fifty and hundred dollar bonds. 
You served on the Committee on Labor of the Advisory Commis- 
sion to the Council of National Defense. You were one of the 
executive officers of your company when it was drafted for the 
service of Uncle Sam and called upon to produce cotton cloth 
for uniforms, tents, gas masks and various army and navy supplies 
to an extent unequalled by any other similar factory in the coun- 
try, and for which it was awarded a certificate of distinguished 
service by the War Department. 

JACK FRAME. You had your hands full, Jack, out in that 
Socialistic community in North Dakota. The excitement of the 
trenches had nothing on you when it came to being a member of 
a Home Guard and conducting a Red Cross campaign in Fargo, 



Princeton University 
o 



277 




North Dakota. You were a four-minute man and did your 
share on the Draft Board, and then when the call was too strong 
for you to resist, you put in your application for the field artillery 
training camp in Kentucky and were cut short, like a lot of 
others, by the Armistice in November. 

DUTCH FULPER. Organized a Home Guard. Had the rank 
of Captain and Acting Adjutant, and went into the State Militia 
as Supply Officer, with the rank of Second Lieutenant. Having 
been paymaster in the United States Navy, he applied to the 
Navy Yard for examination and reinstatement, but failed to pass 
the physical examination. Did his share as county chairman of 
the Red Cross, Y.M.C.A. and Liberty Loan drives. 

REV. JOHN FARIS. Served through several long, hot sieges 
in Washington, in connection with Food Conservation work ; was 
associated with Herbert Hoover, and was appointed to the Divis- 
ion of Co-operating Agencies of Food Administration. Did his 
level best to form a system of efficient business routine in his 



278 Class of 1895 

office, even at the danger of getting himself disliked by the Red 
Tape Specialists of Washington. 

POP FRY. On the War Service Committee of the War In- 
dustrial Board and Chairman of the Chemical Glassware Division. 

DOC LOVE. Good old Doc wheezed along on the job at 
home and ran a surgical service in the hospital at Montclair, and, 
while a lot of M.D.'s were holding down comfortable jobs in 
some base hospital, he was taking care of their patients at home. 
There were a lot just like him who did good, patriotic work at 
home in that battle which took the deadliest casualties of the 
war — "The Battle of the Flu." 

BERT LUKENS. Was another booster who did his work 
in stimulating and comforting the members of families of en- 
listed men and preached at the Y.M.C.A. in Fort Ethan Allen, 
Camp Mills and Fort Slocum. 

ELSIE KENNEDY. Was on the Medical Advisory Board of 
Scranton. 

JESSE JAMES. Chairman of the Home Service Section of 
the Red Cross, Brooklyn Chapter ; tussled with the problem of 
looking after the families of interned Germans and Austrians. 
Was on the National Alien Enemy Relief Committee, Prisoners 
of War Relief Committee and other similar activities. 

BUCK IRVINE. Tried to get into the Y.M.C.A. work 
abroad, but had to confine himself to the Liberty Bond and var- 
ious forms of war relief campaigns, making speeches and con- 
tributing to the success of Butler, Pennsylvania, in this most 
important work. 

BOBBY INCH. Was a member of the District Board of the 
City of New York, of which Charles E. Hughes was Chairman, 
where he heard the appeals from 185 local boards. Bob's appoint- 
ment to this board was a very considerable honor as it included 
most of the eminent lawyers of New York City. 

BILL Mac COLL. Local Chairman of the Red Cross Y. M 
C. A. and United War Work drives, Liberty and Victory Bond 
campaigns ; was a four-minute man, and held down the stage at 
various moving picture theatres, churches, railroad shops, hotel 
balconies and street corners. 

HAROLD McCORMICK. Was at Zurich, Switzerland, dur- 
ing a large part of the war and did much active work in working 
out a method by which terms of peace could be arranged while the 



Princeton University 279 

war was going on. Presented the outline of the plan to the rep- 
resentatives of various nations in various languages. He was 
summoned by General Charles G. Dawes, to Paris, and delegated 
by General Pershing to take charge of the purchase of certain 
supplies of the A.E.F. in Europe. Headquarters were estab- 
lished in various countries, and he was asked to take charge of 
the Bureau of Coodination in Switzerland. 

FRED NORRIS. Chairman of the War Service Board of 
various manufacturing plants whose product was used in the 
packing and shipping of essential commodities. The combined 
business of this Board approximated something like sixty million 
dollars in value. 

EDGAR HOLDEN. During the war you were the Orth- 
opaedic Specialist of the Medical Advisory Board of Essex 
County from the foundation of the board to the end of the war. 

WALTER LORD. Come hither, Walter! Let us put this 
laurel wreath about thy curl-embellished brow. Let's see, Walter. 
Yes? Still curly! You were Director of Civilian Relief in the 
Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross from September 
1917 to February 1919. 

If you served as toast-master or chairman of that Civilian 
Relief Chapter — it's dollars to doughnuts that all hands were re- 
lieved all right. The Baltimore Chapter of the American Red 
Cross must have had old King Cole lashed to the mast for good 
cheer and conviviality. Do you know that there are about a 
hundred and fifty or more of grown men folks who have left 
their wives and families and their business and come from all 
over this American continent, on the cushions or riding the rods, 
to get the kind of Relief you hand them, Walter, at every '95 
reunion ? 

JOHN NEWBOLD! You also were a Red Cross worker. 
You served for a good long 15 months as Director of Civilian 
Relief, on the Pennsylvania Division of the American Red Cross. 

LES CONROW. You were one of those good old militant 
sky pilots that did their bit and then some, during the war. Your 
flock was called the "Fighting Church," not because of internal 
dissension but because of its fighting spirit that helped to win 
the war. You organized the War Work Council in your com- 
munity — presided at its organization and were on its executive 
committee. You served as a "Four Minute Man," a member of 



280 Class of 1895 

the Legal Advisory Board, were a speaker at the Red Cross and 
Y.M.C.A. drives ; you applied for a Chaplain's commission in the 
Army and also for service overseas with the Y. M. C. A. You 
were accepted and were only prevented from seeing service 
abroad by the signing of the Armistice. 

SHAD ROE ! Stand forward "Shad" ! We pin this decora- 
tion on you for your work on the Liberty Loan committee and 
for your service at the National Red Cross Headquarters in 
Washington from November 1917 to February 1918. 

HARRY SNYDER! You made application for overseas 
work in the Y.M.C.A. and served in camps in the United States 
from May 1918 to January 1919. 

HARRY SHAW! You served faithfully as a loyal member 
of the Medical Advisory Board of Monmouth County, New 
Jersey. 

BILLY BAIRD! Good old scout! Volunteered to go over- 
seas ! Turned down — by the bone-headed medicos ! Then you 
went around the corner and registered voluntarily on both drafts! 
You were solicitor on all drives, Liberty Loans, Y.M.C.A., War 
Chest, Red Cross, and Salvation Army. 

". . . and that's about all one feller can do !" 

AL CRAMER ! You served from beginning to the end of 
the war as member of the Selective Service Board and also on the 
Medical Advisory Board. 

JOHN VAUGHN ! You helped the cause as Chairman of 
a Registration Board, Member of Legal Advisory Board and by 
service in the Red Cross Canteen ! 

ELLWOOD HARLOW! You also were one of the Draft 
Boards and you did your bit when the Liberty Bond flood swept 
over the land. 

HUSTON DIXON. You served for six months during the 
war as chairman for Mercer County, N. J. of the U. S. Food 
Administration and as adviser to the Adjutant General of New 
Jersey on the Draft Law. 

EDWIN La FETRA ! You did your valiant part in the war 
bv sacrificing the interests of your Electrical School in Takoma 
Park, Washington to the needs of Uncle Sam and in turning out 
the first Searchlight Company of the Reserve Army. Your 
school trained some several hundred soldiers for electrical work 
in various branches of the service, all of whom gave a good 



Princeton University 281 

account of themselves and received well earned promotions in 
the service both at home and abroad. 

WILFRED HAGER! You served as member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of your local Red Cross for the term of the war. 

BEN HIRSHFIELD. You were another one of those 4 
minute men who put over the Red Cross and Liberty Loan drives. 

TEDDY NORRIS. Ted, you put a lot of good, cheering news 
into the best Alumni Weekly in the U.S.A. and you managed 
during the war to serve also on the draft registration board for 
Princeton and as solicitor in all the War Fund drives. 

PIERRE RICHARDS! Well, bless your bloomin' soul! If 
'ere isn't old Dick ! Gorblimey, but we're glad to see you, Dick ! 
Served on the London Fire Brigade and it was some job, too! 
The Boche didn't calculate when they built their incendiary 
bombs, that our Dick was going to be CO. of a hook-and-ladder 
squad. 

WILLIE STONE. You served for the duration of the war 
as member of the District and Local Medical Boards of City 
of New York. 

GUY WARREN ! You did your trick as a sleuth of the 
American Protective League under direction of the U. S. depart- 
ment of Justice, Bureau of Investigation. You also served on 
an Exemption Board and did a bit of military duty as top Ser- 
geant of Company ''B" 4th Reg. Illinois Home Guards. 

BOB ZABRISKIE ! You showed your patriotism as a worker 
on the Liberty Loan Committee for your district and as Chairman 
of the W. S. S. Committee, as 4 minute man, on your Local Red 
Cross Board and as associate member of the Legal Advisory 
Board of Cayuga County. 

JOE JESSUP ! Was a military wild-cat of New Jersey 
State Militia Reserve. Worked up in line of promotion from 
private as 1st Lieutenant. His preparation for the war game 
began in the Business-men's Military Instruction Camp at Brook - 
ly'n, N. Y., afterwards serving in Depot Battalion 14th N. G. N. Y. 
Then from Sergeant, he advanced to 1st Lieutenant in the Ridge- 
wood Battalion of the N. J. State Militia. 

CURTIS SLOANE. You were Chairman of the first mem- 
bership drive of the Pasadena Red Cross Chapter in April 1917; 
and from then on there was no service on the part of the Chap- 
ter with which vou were not activelv identified. You were Chair- 



282 Class of 1895 

man of its Finance Committee ; Chairman of its Committee on 
Military Relief and Vice-Chairman of the Chapter itself. You 
were a member of the Executive Committee of the Patriotic 
Committee of the Pasadena Board of Trade; a member of the 
War Finance Committee ; and either a Captain or a solicitor in 
every one of the Liberty Loan drives. And when the war was 
over and most people were suffering under the usual psychologi- 
cal reaction which took place after the armistice was signed, you 
continued with unflagging enthusiasm to carry on the work of 
the Red Cross in Pasadena. "War," as you say, "is simple as 
compared with the complexities of peace." You did your bit,, 
and with good measure. 

THE RIGHT HONORABLE A. PARKER NEVIN! 

The regiment will come to attention during the customary 
salute of 21 guns, given for all foreign ambassadors. 

After a hectic period of activity in 19 17 as a member of the 
Executive Committee on Labor of the Council of National De- 
fense from which issued the original draft of the bill for insur- 
ance, compensation for wounds, allowance for dependents of sol- 
diers and sailors, Parker breezed over to Paris at the request of 
the trustees of the American Fund for French Wounded. With 
the head of the American Red Cross he visited the battlefields of 
Chateau Thierry, Fere-en-Tardenois and Dormans, and saw the 
ravages of the battles of two weeks previous. He was at Xancy 
a few days before the St. Mihiel drive. While there some Boche 
night visitors from the sky passed over the city and dropped their 
delicate confetti. A hotel 100 feet away from Parker's billets 
was completely demolished. Parker's own room was on the top 
floor. His time, ten seconds flat, roof to cellar, still remains the 
unchallenged world's record of the war. A few jealous and dis- 
gruntled critics sought at first to discredit the performance on 
the grounds that Parker finished his dressing in the cellar. But 
this trifling technicality was overruled. Parker obtained an hon- 
orable wound-stripe by his encounter in the Rue de Rivoli with 
a wild and ferocious, man-eating Ford. The animal is supposed 
to have been in the employ and training of the Boche. In spite 
of his efforts to defend himself the bloodthirsty creature hit him 
viciously on the arm. When Parker came to, he was in a French 
Military hospital surrounded by incredibly beautiful French 
nurses dressed in angelic white and Parker, himself, singing 
melodiously in his rich contralto : "I don't want to go home !" 



Princeton University 283 

After his return to New York in September 1918, and a brief 
set-back in the local political war with Tammany, Parker sailed 
for England again in March 19 19 as a member of the commission 
on Labor of the National Civic Federation. In London he inter- 
viewed Arthur Henderson, Lord Leverhulme and others promi- 
nent in the British Labor world. In Paris he conferred with 
the Minister of Labor, the head of the Federation General du 
Travail and others active in the Socialistic groups. His report 
has just been published in book form. Autographed copies will 
be distributed through the ranks. In April, just as he was about 
to return home he was pounced upon by the American Relief 
Administration, then engaged in food relief work and economic 
reconstructon in Central and Southern Europe. He was put in 
charge of the Jugo-Slavia office at Belgrade, Servia. His work 
was mostly with the Jugo-Slavia ministry and brought him in 
contact with many high officials including Prince Regent Alexan- 
der. He took a junket down through Bosnia, Herzogovina, and 
Dalmatia and in Ragusa he had the exquisite rapture of being 
taken for William Jennings Bryan by an old Dalmatian who had 
lived in Denver. Parker could write several volumes on con- 
ditions in the Balkans and would, if permitted (which same he 
will not be) in this war record! 

JAKE OTTO ! Avance before the assembled multitude and 
receive this decoration for taking your place as a good faithful 
man of science in the ranks of the Home Guard and spending 
many a sleepless night on the firing line by the bedsides of 
patients of the doctors who were in uniform. 

TEDDY OTHEMAN! One step to the front while we put 
this bit of metal on your left breast for your work on the draft 
board through the long gruelling hot days of a New York Sum- 
mer; for assistance given by you to the U. S. District Attorney 
in licensing enemy aliens ; and finally in leaving your office and 
practice and hiking down to Washington to work under the U. S. 
Department of Labor on the Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation and the U. S. Housing Corporation. Three 
strenuous months of it Teddy, and you knew what the barrage 
of Washington red tape meant when you ran your scissors through 
it, slicing and cutting for results ! 

CHRISTY PAYNE ! The same genial, handsome, urbane old 
Chris ! The munitions factories of the Youngstown and Pitts- 



284 Class of 1895 

burgh districts knew what your efforts meant to them in keeping 
gas under their furnaces while they were turning out guns and 
High Explosive shells for the boys, overseas. A battle star for 
you also for getting out with the Home Guards and drilling like 
a veteran, and none the less credit to you if an ungrateful republic 
furnished you no better weapons than those made of the wagon- 
tongue hickory that you wielded so valiantly at the plate twenty- 
five short years ago ! 

HARRY POST ! More power to you for doing Squads East 
and Squads West with the N. Y. State Militia when the Doctors 
turned you down for Plattsburg! You marched in the guard of 
honor for Joffre and Balfour and were assistant field director 
of the Red Cross in charge of entertainments at Debarkation 
Hospital No. 5 which had the good record of 566 shows with a 
total attendance of some 45000 grateful men in uniform. 

POLER ROSS ! Our portly friend, here is a souvenir of your 
good and unselfish devotion to the cause of the Red Cross in 
Chicago. You devoted practically all your time to work in the 
executive office of the Chicago Branch from December 1st, 1917 
until long after the armistice. Your labor was of especial value 
from the fact that you had pre-war experience with the organiza- 
tion and had assisted to organise the Illinois State Red Cross and 
had served on its Board of Directors for several years. 

TOMMY ROSS! With a wife and three kiddies and a law 
practice that all needed attention you took off your coat and 
slaved on the Liberty Loan drives in Middle Bucks County, Penn- 
sylvania ! Then you peeled down to the buff and got in the game 
for the War Chest Campaign and served on the Draft Boards 
until your law clients yelled their heads off at you because you 
wouldn't give up your patriotic work to file demurrers and 
counter-claims for them ! 

CHARLIE SINNICKSON ! You too were one of the legal 
advisors of a draft board in Montgomery County, Pa. 

KNOX TAYLOR! Come forward, Old Dear! Don't try 
to pretend that you are not proud of the Taylor- Wharton Iron 
and Steel Company of which you are President! Gun forgings 
for the Liberty Motors, castings for tanks, and anti-aircraft gun 
mounts ! Fritz trembled when old Knox fired his furnaces to 
a white heat for the boys on the front lines. And then when the 
war was over he made his quiet arrangements for the successful 



Princeton University 285 

job of beating Yale! And incidentally no man in the class had 
a keener pang than old Knox, at not actually wearing the uni- 
form ! 

OLIVER UPSON ! This decoration is in recognition of 
your goodly efforts to help the Shipping Board furnish and in- 
stall rigging on all ships built on the South Atlantic and Gulf 
Coasts ! Night and day you worked for the duration of the 
war ! 

GEORGE WHITE ! No, you don't have to "point-with-pride" 
or "view-with-alarm," reverend Solon, of the House of Repre- 
sentatives ! Deacon is our sole and only Congressman and he 
proved himself well worthy of the honor of being elected — a 
Democrat, from a Republican district ! The Deak got this 
decoration for being a member of the War Congress from Ohio 
and on the Ways and Means Committee of the House of Repre- 
sentatives ! There was some debate in the Committee on Decora- 
tions as to whether this medal should be awarded. Not from 
any doubt as to the value of his services but because of the purely 
technical objection that no man should receive the award who 
had been an inmate of an Institution for the Hopelessly Insane. 
But it was pointed out to the Board that George was the only 
member of the Committee who was not really violent ; had never 
been in straight-jacket during his whole war term in the House; 
had nothing whatever to do with the office of the Secretary of 
War and that none of the Air Craft or Ordinance expenditures 
could be traced to him. The medal was finally awarded by un- 
animous vote. 

DOUGAL WARD ! "Doogal" put his curly head down and 
bucked the line on Medical Advisory Board No. 41, Selective 
Service, State of New York, and take it from us he put the same 
punch into his work that he did when he made that touchdown 
against Yale back in '93 ! 

AND NOW ! Company Attew-n-n-shun ! 

The Puttee-and-Blouse Squad will form at the right of the lines. 
Right face! Forward March! Column left! Column left! Halt! 
Right Face ! Heels together ! Stand up straight ! Button up 
your blouses — well — we'll waive that, for the present ! Silence 
in the Ranks ! You men in the rear ranks come to attention — 
and quit grinning ! Think it's funny, do you, to see so much 
embonpoint and Byzantine architecture in uniform! 



286 Class of 1895 

What's that? No, this isn't the Delegation of Honor from 
the Old Soldiers' Home at Leavenworth. Two weeks' Kitchen 
Police to you for suggesting it ! This is the Class of Ninety Five 
of Princeton University in the uniform and habiliments of War ! 
Look 'em over! Our discipline is a little ragged and our equip- 
ment "A" seems to run mostly to adipose tissue ! We are also a 
little shy on the hirsute embellishment which should be the glory 
and pride of the most blood-thirsty brand of warrior. Some have 
even suggested that, from a tactical standpoint our usefulness 
would be enhanced if we all wore gas-masks to conceal the fact 
that we came in on the Landwehr draft. 

But here we are, the brutal and licentious soldiery ! Large and 
square! — Or better, large and rotund! Sacre! What a martial 
array ! Wouldn't it put a crimp, — a large, fat salient — in the 
Hindenburg line ! And a slight dent in the Kriemhilde-Stellung 
too! Just at the very ferocious sight of 'em! Mong Doo! 

For the Love of Mike, MOTHER BRADY, it's your feet that 
should make the angle of 45 ° in the position of the soldier, not 
your elbows ; and your chin ! hold it in ; — one of 'era anyhow ! 

Commissioned Major in the Inspector General's Department, 
assigned for duty at the Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J. 
A man's-size job! Assistant to the Port Inspector, at Hoboken. 
N. J. Well, that's about as near the other side as you could get 
without swimmin' — so you ought to have brevet overseas stripes 
at the very least. 

ARTHUR POOLE ! Mother of Moses ! Look at the child ! 
How you have grown ! Roll forward, Captain ! Owing to ad- 
vancing years and increasing avoirdupois, your demands for a 
place in the Service were held up until August 1918. When you 
were commissioned a Captain in the Engineer Corps, L T . S. A., 
you were ordered to the Engineers Officers' Training School at 
Camp Humphreys. Va. The torture you there endured- — in daily 
setting-up exercises — was equal to any perpetrated by the Huns 
on the Belgians. When a merciful order of deliverance trans- 
ferred you to Camp Shelby, Miss, you had just resolved never 
to love another country. You arrived on Armistice Day to join 
the 150th Engineers, just as they were making final preparations 
for overseas duty. Freddie felt like a buck private with a Paris 
leave and not a franc in his kit. You had the same misfortune. 
Freddie, that kept a few million American thoroughbreds like 



.Princeton University 287 

yourself from seeing the real show. It's only a jinx that kept you 
out of the fighting 10th. 

BUCK McCAMMON! Front and Center! Buck was the 
military Saint Anthony of the class. The siren forms of com- 
missions in the Judge Advocate's Office, captaincies in the Q.M. 
and Ordnance departments and other desk jobs presented them- 
selves to him, with all their alluring young charms, but Mac 
spurned their temptations and marched off to the recruiting- 
sergeant around the corner like a good, loyal son of the McCam- 
mon clan and enlisted in the ranks. He had previously started 
recruiting an overseas ambulance unit which was to cooperate 
with the French at the front. But he chucked all that for a 
private's pack and mess-kit and left Washington one June morn- 
ing in 191 7 as a Corporal in charge of 70 men. On July 1st he 
was a Sergeant and on the 31st of July he was commissioned 1st 
Lt. U.S.A. A.C. That's a record of about ten flat on the military 
hurdles ! His first duty as CO. of his unit was to discharge him- 
self as an enlisted man and accept the commission he already 
held as an officer. That sounds Irish enough even for a Mc- 
Cammon! In the fall of 1917 when Buck was on leave in Wash- 
ington he saw a short-cut to get across the ocean before his out- 
fit did, and applied for a commission in the Signal Corps and 
in November was commissioned a Captain in the Air Service. 
After the completion of a period of work at Camp Funston as 
President of the Aviation Examining Board, he was transferred 
to Camp Dick, Texas, where he served as chief of Inspection De- 
partment and president of an Efficiency Board. Here Capt. 
McCammon had a command of about 200 officers and men under 
him. After the Armistice he had the responsibility of closing 
the camp and discharging the personnel, subsequently reporting 
to Love Field, Texas, for duty. Before the Armistice he tried 
one more crack at overseas duty and applied for service in Russia. 
He has been twice recommended for his majority. He is now on 
duty at Washington with the Advisory Board of the Air Service. 
Buck claims no credit, however, for that vast unnumbered, my- 
riads of American-built aeroplanes that hovered over the front 
lines, at the close of the war ; nor for those products of American 
aviation genius, the "Flying Incinerators." 

CAPTAIN ARTHUR WELLS. Stand up Cherub, to your 
f nil five foot five, and stick out vour chest. We know how 



288 Class of 1895 

modest you are, but you should be proud of yourself. It was 
what we might have expected of our Junior year First Honor 
Man. In 1918 you were Chairman of the Omaha Committee of 
the Military Training Camps Association ; you were Chairman of 
the Committee to pass upon civilian applicants from Nebraska 
for the Field Artillery Officers Training School at Camp Taylor ; 
and for the Coast Artillery Officers Training School. On April 
7, 1918 you applied for service in the Judge Advocate General's 
Department and on Oct. 22, 19 18, you were commissioned Cap- 
tain in the Army Service Corps. A week later you reported at 
Camp Upton, N. Y. and received your overseas orders. On No- 
vember 9th, you were ordered to report on board a transport. 
On November 10th, the day before the armistice was signed your 
orders were cancelled and you were honorably discharged from 
the Service on December 11, 1918. It was not your fault that 
the old war stopped too soon to give you a chance to get in it ! 

CAPT. THEODORUS BAILEY ! After some service in the 
9th Coast Artillery, N. Y. Guard, you joined the U.S. Army as 
Captain of the Medical Corps. You saw your service at the Base 
Hospital, Camp Dix. There was enough going on there with 
4700 patients to keep you busy and when you were discharged 
you had been in charge of a "double decker" ward of 64 beds, 
and had the sidejobs of looking after the Disciplinary Barracks 
and the Prison Ward, and you were Sanitary Inspector. Summary 
Court Officer, Property Check Officer and Social Director. The 
rest of your time was your own. 

MAJOR BOB LOUGHRAN! Step up here, Minnie, and 
assume an attitude of becoming modesty while we slather you 
over with praise for your work down in the Canal Zone. That 
was rather handing you one, wasn't it? To send you overseas 
but not to France ! After you received your Captain's commis- 
sion and left Fort Benjamin Harrison you must have struck the 
Zone at about the season for the regular annual reunion pee-rade 
of the yellow-fever mosquito! There aren't any? Well, all the 
more credit to you saw bones in the Medical Corps ! You were 
assigned as Chief of the Ear, Nose and Throat Department on 
your arrival, at Ancon Hospital. Then by a well-deserved pro- 
motion you were made Superintendent of Ancon Hospital and 
received your majority. Then the 'Governor of the Panama 



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Zone took you on his staff as Chief Health Officer which position 
you held until your discharge in March 19 19. It was a good day's 
work, Minnie, with that army of 20,000 to look after, and a 
germ-ridden outer country to guard against and all about you a 
luke-warm collection of Latin-American States to keep an eye on. 
It was a silent war — far from the noise of battle, but a gallant 
fight, nevertheless ! 

CAPTAIN RALSTON FLEMMING! You pulled a Cap- 
taincy of Field Artillery out of the Second Officers' Training 
Camp at Camp Warden McLean at Chickamauga ! That was one 
big battle won, wasn't it, Ral, old scout ! A big battle, to pinch 
a Captain's commission in the Field Artilleree ! Did they teach 
you the song of the clan? 




"Over hill, over dale 

When we hit the dusty trail 

And the caissons go rolling along, 
Up and down and in and out, 
Counter march and right about, 

As the caissons go rolling along. 
In the dark and in the night 
Action left and action right 

As the caissons go rolling along 
Was it high, was it low 
Where in h 1 did that one go? 

As the caissons go rolling along. 
Then it's High! High! Hee! 
In the Field Artillery/ 
Sound off your orders loud and strong 
(Battery one Round! Four two Hundred!) 
Where'er we go, you may always know 

That our caissons are rolling along 

(Keep those caissons a-rolling along). 



290 Class of 1895 

Yes, this is the life! But, Ral, me lad! did they hale ye back 
to your college days — after 25 years, and chain you down to a 
school-boy's desk and torture you night and day with Trig and 
Geometry and Calculus with secants and tangents and sines? 
And were your waking hours haunted by those hideous phantoms, 
the "Probable Error" and the "Ballistic Coefficient ?" And were 
your slumbers threatened by those grisly nightmares — "Angles 
of Sight," "Angles of Fall," "Angles of Departure," "Maximum 
Ordinates," "Errors of the Moment" and all the others of their 
liated tribe? If so, then you know that life isn't all a dashing 
rattle of bits and flashing of spurs where you "follow the red 
guidon !" They ordered you to the War College at Washington 
and assigned you as Chief of the Political Section of Military 
Intelligence. You asked for field duty and were sent to the 
Artillery Replacement Camp at Camp Jackson. You were there 
given the duties of Naturalization Officer and handled some 5000 
aliens and several hundred conscientious objectors. We hope 
you treated 'em rough ! You were then put on the overseas list 
and were ordered to Washington for detailed instructions and 
were there when the referee blew the whistle and the game was 
over. From Washington you were sent to Camp Mason, Georgia 
and served during the winter of 1918-19 which position included 
the duties of Camp Morale Officer, Athletic Officer, Naturaliza- 
tion Officer, Officer in charge of Judge Advocate's Office. You 
were afterwards transferred to the Army Supply Base at Nor- 
folk, Va., where you are still on duty. You had reason to be 
proud moreover of the record of your son, who took his examina- 
tions for the Aviation Service at Camp Jackson in the Summer of 
191 8 and passed with a particularly high grade. He is now 
a captain of the Princeton R.O.T.C. 

MAJOR GEO. W. BARR. Wipe off your glasses, Baron, and 
step to the front! You served on a Philadelphia committee that 
did a much needed work in the fall of 1917 in recruiting trained 
employees for the Ordnance Department and after a struggle 
with the departmental red tape you were given a commission of 
Captain, and assigned to the Field Branch of the Ordnance De- 
partment. This Branch had to secure skilled men to fill the 
requisitions of the various divisions of the Ordnance Depart- 
ment for such especialy trained personnel as they needed. You 
did good work on recruiting campaigns through the Eastern 



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half of the U.S. and in April 1918 were assigned to Pittsburgh 
as Personnel Officer of the Pittsburgh Ordnance District. This 
was one of the most responsible positions in the field because of 
the vast amount of material manufactured and shipped from 
this district. The clerical force and inspection department in- 
volved a personnel of some 2000 men. You were CO. of the 
Enlisted detachment and bumped into their heads a knowledge 
of discipline, Courts Martial and Summary Courts. All matters 
of promotion, appointments and pay-rolls, fell under your 
supervision. You assisted the local examining board, of the 
Civil Service. You were Ordnance District Intelligence Officer, 
and held this arduous job during the steel strike. You received 
your Majority in August 1919 and were discharged October 19 19. 



VNWltVQ THIS 

-o i?£OTftpe,_J 

ANra i'll ccnHt, 

SHELLS TMeLui^i 



rrnTnTrrr 




/Uui?.i?v\\ 



Inasmuch as you were in the field, George, and not at Wash- 
ington, we will give you the Medal of honor, and the Cross and 
the Distinguished Service Medal, too. But just in a whisper now, 
Baron, — below your breath, as it were — can any of the boys down 
in the Dep't at Washington tell us why we cock-sure world- 
beating, world-conquering Americans, after three years of warn- 
ing, had to go to the front with artillery, machine-guns, tanks 
and ammunition not to speak of aeroplanes, that were mostly 



292 Class of 1895 

borrowed from our Allies? Not knocking, you understand, 
George, but why was it? We're the greatest nation — as Kipling 
says — on the Lord- Almighty's Foot-stool! We admit it. But 
why? In the Spanish War — Mexican Border — World's War — 
the same bone-headed unpreparedness and confusion! And 
why is it that if we went to war next year — five years from now, 
— ten — twenty — and spent another thirty-billion — we'd still find 
ourselves in the same blessed fix? Je ne sais pas! Which trans- 
lated means "Yez kin soich me\" 

CAPTAIN MINNIE MINOTT. You served in the office 
of the Quartermaster General in Washington. You were com- 
missioned Captain in the Quartermaster Corps, in August 1918 
and served until December 17 when you were honorably dis- 
charged. Minnie, Old Dear, look at me. Look me in the eye ! 
Hold up your right hand! Now repeat the oath "I do solemnly 
swear that I had nothing to do with shipping overseas those 
800 billion tons of "Corned Willie" as rations for the men on 
the fighting front ! Nor was I accessory to the crime of sending 
them a single can of "gold-fish." Swear it, Minnie : — or these 
overseas men, here, will quietly but promptly form a firing squad ! 
You swear ! The Saints be praised ! Yez haven't such a bad 
heart in ye, me bye, after all ! But ye sarved wid a mighty 
rough bunch ! 

LT. FRANK JANVIER. You attended the second Officers' 
Training Camp and were commissioned Lt. of Infantry U.S.A. 
Co. H. 2nd Bn. Replacements and served at Camp Lee, Va. until 
discharged Dec. 6, 1918. 

CAPTAIN BOB FRANCIS. When the War Department 
sent out a despairing cry for doctors and more doctors, Bob heard 
the call and left his practice to do his bit, with the ether-cone 
and the O.D. pills. They tried to talk him out of it with that 
old stuff about the 45 dead-line-age-limit. But Bob showed 'em 
ez how he was just as spry as he was in the good old days when 
he covered all of Mercer County and several adjacent counties, 
with a paste-brush and a load of sticky, green proclamations to 
the Freshman Class. So they took him on and assigned him 
as 1 st Lieutenant, Medical Reserve Corps. In December he 
was ordered to report for duty to the Commanding General, 
Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J. He was here assigned 
for permanent duty in the office of the Port Surgeon. His work 



Princeton University 293 

here comprised the important duties connected with the pre- 
embarkation inspection of troops. When the Transport Divis- 
ion, Office of the Surgeon, was organized he was assigned to this 
Division. It had control of the medical phases of troop em- 
barkation and the assignment and control of transport surgeons 
on commercial and army transports and the debarkation of sick 
and wounded. In the discharge of his duties he had charge of 
the embarkation inspections at Camp Merritt, N. J., the largest 
of the embarkation Camps. He supervised the inspection, during 
the period of the war, of more than a million of the troops that 
went overseas. In December 1918 the return of the troops with 
their sick and wounded from overseas brought a new floor of 
responsibilities to Bob's Division. He staggered along under 
his 24-hour-a-day job, holding to his work when more than half 
sick with the flu' himself. At the end of March, after a brief 
absence from duty on sick leave he was sent down to Camp 
Meade, Md. to inspect the replacement troops that were about 
to be sent to the Army of Occupation. He was sent abroad on 
special duty. Visited many of the principal ports, spent a month 
at Camp Pontenezan, the largest debarkation camp in France, 
and returned from overseas in August 1919. He had expected 
to receive his discharge in September, but was assigned to the 
Chief of the Transport Division again and was made Chief oi 
the Evacuation of Sick and Wounded Division at Hoboken where 
he is still on duty. He was promoted to his captaincy May ist, 
1918 and was several times recommended for his Majority. 

CAPTAIN GERARD HERRICK. Approach the reviewing 
officer in a military manner, while we recite the deeds of the old 
Squadron "A" war-horse. You were always handy with small 
arms. So handy in fact, Gerardus, that you pitched in during the 
war and helped to write the "Small Arms Instructors' Manual." 
You were executive officer of the Small Arms Instructor's Corps 
1917-18 and commissioned as Captain in U. S. Air Service March 
1918, and honorably discharged June 10, 1919. Gerard, me lad, 
when we were after strollin' about the Air Service Department 
at Washington did yez happen to run onto those forty or fifty 
thousand air boats that they promised us beyant the seas, no? 
Did yez look in the safe and behind the filing cabinet? Shure 
lad, they must have been mislaid somewhere, about the office, 
down there, for they never arrived, overseas, at all, at all ! 



294 Class of 1895 

CAPT. CHARLES B. LEWIS. "Chub" just right o-blique 
out here where the ladies can observe a real veteran of two wars. 
Why, the grizzled old-timer has enough fogies to his credit to 
make his pay-voucher look like a dividend from an oil well in 
Burkburnett ! Trooper in Pennsylvania Nat'l Guard. Then 
enrolled in the First Troop Pa. Volunteer Cavalry, served through 
the Porto Rico Campaign. Entered the service again May 19 17, 
Commissioned Captain, Ordnance Department, Aug. 191 7. As- 
signed to duty American Lake, Washington with the 91st Division 
as Receiving Officer for the National Army Draft. There, as- 
signed to the office of the Engineering Bureau, Trench Warfare 
Section, Edgewood Arsenal, Baltimore, Md. Then transferred 
to the Augusta Arsenal in April 19 18. Here the Captain had 
practically nothing to take his mind away from his reveries of 
college days. He was Adjutant, Assistant Armament Officer, 
Officer in charge of Ships and Grounds, Storekeeper, Liberty 
Loan Officer, Summary Court Officer, Intelligence Officer and 
Recruiting Officer. Through an oversight at Washington nobody 
asked him to act as Mayor of Augusta and President of the 
Southern Railroad as well as Chief of Police and head of the Fire 
Department. He was assigned Ordnance Officer Hq. S.A.C.A.D. 
— this doesn't mean anything so vicious as it sounds. It stands 
for South Atlantic Coast Artillery District — in which he is still 
District Ordnance Officer. His post is at Charleston, South Car- 
olina, where he is in charge of the inspection and repair of all 
armament of Coast Defense from Washington to Galveston. 
The Captain was not long enough on duty in the ordnance de- 
partment at Washington to be informed why the excellent ma- 
chine gun which bore his name, was rejected after it had been 
tested and approved by all our Allies. 

BUCK EWING! The honorable Dr. Edward Hilts Ewing 
served in the Medical Corps of the United States Army at various 
hospitals in the U. S. He was commissioned 1st Lieutenant, De- 
cember 7, '18 and after an efficient and strenuous service through 
the influenza campaigns was honorably discharged May 9, 191 9. 
WARREN LOCKHART SAWYER. Tommy, protrude 
your manly breast here and receive a decoration in recognition 
of your active service in the New York State Naval Militia. You 
faced the February breezes on guard duty around New York 
City and by reason of your keen surveillance the hated Hun was 



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295 




unable to steal dynamite or purloin a single bridge that you 
guarded. You were commissioned Lieutenant-Commander in 
the National Naval Volunteers and were placed on active duty in 
command of the U.S.S. "Granite State" on April 7, '17 and in 
August 1919 were placed on inactive duty in the U.S. Naval 
Reserve Force. 

EDWARD ELY SCOVILL. One step to the front Eddie- 
do they "call you Eddie," still, — after this long quarter of a cen- 
tury? You were one of the home red-legs of the Artillery with 
two years service in Battery "B."- — 4th Military District and if 
years and weight and other handicaps had not prevented you 
would have been on the gunner's seat, behind a 75, setting off 
the sight and deflection of Grandpre or Montfaucon. 

LT. COLONEL CHARLES C. CRESSON. The "Kid" 
started his military career by a short experience with the Texas 
Militia. Then in 1916 he attended the Citizens' Training Camp 
at Ft. Sam Houston, graduating as Second Lieutenant of In- 
fantry. Attended the first Officers Training Camp at Leon Springs 
in May 191 7 and pulled down a Captaincy. He reported, Aug. 
25, 1917 to Camp Travis, Texas, for duty as Captain of Infantry 
and was assigned as Adjutant, 165 Depot Brigade. He was pro- 
moted to Major, December 19 17. The Kid's long and efficient 



296 Class of 1895 

record in the U.S. District Atty's office at San Antonio now in- 
fluenced his military career and his skill as a lawyer and prose- 
cutor caused him to be transferred to the Judge Advocate 
General's Department as Assistant Judge Advocate of the 90th 
Division, with which he served later as acting Judge Advocate. 
In July 1918, he was sent to Camp Lewis, American Lake, Wash- 
ington as Judge Advocate of the 13th Division. In October 
1918 he received his promotion to Lieutenant-Colonel, Judge 
Advocate General's Department and in April 1919 was ordered 
to Washington for duty. In June 19 19 he was transferred to 
Governor's Island, New York, for duty in the office of Depart- 
ment Judge Advocate, Eastern Department, which position he 
now holds. It was he who tried the celebrated Bergdoll case and 
obtained the conviction of that well known draft dodger. 

AND NOW ! You one and two stripers of the overseas de- 
tail step to the front while the regimental band plays an ap- 
propriate army melody "The Ole Gray Mare, She Ain't What 
She Used to Be!" 

Toot sweet, now ! 

Kess ker say? Non! No compr^^f 

Pas, de vin rouge ! It costs beaucoup francs in this sector, 
buddy ! Tres chere ! 

Where are those trench-coats and hob-nails in which you used 
to stump around those French billet-towns in search of "erfs" 
and "vin blink?" All partee. Hey, buddy! Par bon! You're 
old stuff, now, — you and your yarns of long night-marches in 
mud and rain, of whistling shells and night-raids and bombs and 
gas-barrages : of General Courts ; of crowded transports and 
stealthy submarines. But, Oh boy ! wasn't it a lovely war while 
it lasted! Decorations for you? You? Ye bunch of fakirs! 
Not on your mess kits ! You've had all the fun while these others 
here, did the hard work at home ! You wouldn't cash in your 
war experiences for all the wealth that was spent on the A.E.F. ! 
Jamais de la vie! You've collected all that's coming to you, 
you overseas men, and a fat margin besides ! Lady Luck, she 
held you by the hand, and don't you ever forget it ! 

COMMANDER LYNN RUTTER. Will hitch up his trousers 
like a good, seafa'rin' man and roll for'ud whilst we keel-haul 
him for a few yarns of the fo'c'stle. 



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|M©W LETS ri^V-e O. 

UOCorioT ( ve.i 
[i(P- H'iPl-l 




"TWE- 



» Klbb« — «** 



" — when the winds begin to blow 

I generally go below 
And seek the seclusion that my cabin grants, 

— And so do his sisters and his cousins and his aunts." — 

But Lynn wasn't that kind of a sad sea-dog! He had walked 
the quarter-deck long before this war called him into action ! 
Lieutenant Commander N.N.V. in January 1917; again Lieu- 
tenant Commander U.S.N.R.F. July, 1918; Commander, U.S. 
N. R. F. November, 1919. Mobilized in April, 1917, his first 
command was the U. S. S. "Yantic" ; then the U.S.S. "Case"; 
in February he had the "Gopher." In March, 19 18, he was 
ordered to command the "Essex." In October, 1918, he was 
ordered to France as Executive Officer, Lafayette Radio Station. 
Served as CO. of U.S.N. Relief Unit, Lille, France, until his 
return from abroad in June, 19 19. 

Lynn didn't acquire a sweetheart in every port, but he did 



298 Class of 1895 

accumulate a bunch of loyal admirers amongst the blue-jackets 
of every ship he commanded. 

MAJOR WILLIAM FOSTER BURNS. Put down that 
copy of "La Vie Parisienne" and step to the front ! Bobbie was 
commissioned Captain of Infantry in August 1917 and was sent 
overseas within a month after he received his commission. After 
his arrival in France in September 19 18 and until his return in 
January 19 19, he served in a wide range of military duties. He 
commanded a Company and a Battalion. He was Camp Com- 
mander and Judge Advocate. He served in the office of the 
Director General of Transportation in charge of the distribution 
of labor at Base Ports. He was promoted to Major, April 23, 

19 19. After his return he was a member of the Clemency Board 
of the Judge Advocate General's Department. He was a member 
of the War Claims Board in Canada from May 1919 to January 

1920. This Board passed on the claims of Canadian contractors 
running to over 20 million dollars. He is now in the Claims and 
Contracts Section of the Judge Advocate General's Department 
at Washington. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JOE FLINT. Joe is a real, 
double-distilled super-veteran. His first experience in the Great 
War began in June 191 5 when he was asked to take charge of a 
French Hospital established by American funds at the Chateau de 
Passy. Joe sailed with four or five assistants to aid him in the 
work of reorganization. The old Chateau, long in the possession 
of the Bishop of Sens and rich in memories of many distinguished 
visitors, had been turned over to the French Government, and in 
this environment he found a hospital with a splendid American 
equipment working for the French Sanitary service. Joe spent 
the early months after his arrival in the expansion and entire 
reorganization of the personnel and methods, utilizing the newer 
discoveries that had been made in the localization of projectiles, 
as well as the use of mechanotherapy, and, by his investigations 
and study, contributing much original data to these discoveries. 

Nobody could have had a more stimulating, thrilling, and in- 
structive experience than Joe Flint. His contact was not only 
with men in high authority in the Sanitary Service of the French 
Army, but with the very heart and spiritual being of the French 
people as they came to visit their wounded. Let him tell the 
story himself in the lines of a letter to a classmate: 



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Col. Flint, with personnel and convalescents at Hopital 32 bis, Chateau 
de Passy. 



"We have become used to tales of heroism since then, but in those days 
we met daily the evidence of supreme sacrifice and superb endurance all 
given in a simple, matter-of-course way, an example of duty which spurred 
us to our greatest efforts to salvage every man we could for France. My 
summer vacation expired in the midst of the preparations being made for 
the great Champagne drive of 1915. The French requested an extension 
of my leave of absence from Yale which was granted. That drive was 
a period of the greatest strain on doctors and nurses alike. I finally left 
my work in the hands of my successor — another Princeton man, by the 
way — and sailed for America on December 4th after six months of in- 
tensely interesting, concentrating and fatiguing work. 

On my return to this country I spent a good deal of time locally in 
propaganda work in behalf of the Allied countries and with America's 
final entrance into the War received, a few days after its declaration, an 
appointment on the Medical Board of the Council of National Defense. 
My work in Washington was chiefly associated with an effort to conserve 
our Medical personnel. As Chairman of the Committee on Medical 
Schools we were able to stop the stampede for the enlistment of American 
Medical students and members of the faculty and thus avoid the disaster 
that overtook the British Medical service at the outbreak of the Great 
War. As Chairman of the Committee on Medical Manuals we also started 
the work which led to the production of a series of medical manuals 
containing the latest information available from the Allied armies for 
the use of our own Medical service. 



300 Class of 1895 

During my experience in 1915 I had become familiar with the type of 
organization which the French had developed and brought to a high stage 
of perfecton known as the Mobile Hospitals. Realizing that America 
would have to adopt an organization of this type which had become 
nearer the solution of the difficult problem of early operations on battle 
casualties immediately behind the lines. I organized and raised the funds 
to finance this type of organization in Yale University. The Unit was ap- 
proved by the Surgeon-General and called into active service August g, 
1917 when I was appointed Commanding Officer. It sailed on the trans- 




Co/. Flint's Mobile Hospital 39 entirely under tents at Chignon Heu- 
dicourt. 

port "Baltic" August 23, 1917 and was among the first 40,000 troops to 
arrive in France. We gave a great sigh of relief as the ship finally left 
port and we were free from the fear of being kept at home in the hot sum- 
mer camps. We were ready, as one man said "To sit on the sands of Calais 
and eat sea-weed if we could only get there." But our adventures had 
just begun. We missed a convoy and had to wait twelve days in Halifax 
under pretty trying circumstances, for as a Senior Medical Officer I was 
responsible for the health of the 2400 troops on board, but at last we 
were off and had all the thrills and satisfaction of seeing how splendidly 
we were convoyed, and how accurately our rendezvous with the de- 
stroyers was kept out on the high seas at four o'clock on a certain morn- 
ing. Owing to the uneven speed of the transports, the faster ones were 
sent ahead, the "Baltic" leading. We were all ready to land that night, 
when, five miles off the coast of England, we were torpedoed. The 
submarine had been skulking off the Holyhead Light and had succeeded 



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301 



in getting in her shot at us despite destroyers, "blimps" and everything 
else that spelled watchfulness. A few officers were on the hurricane deck 
but the men and nurses had just gone down to supper and were still 
unconscious of the true danger until five short blasts of the Baltic's 
whistle called then to the lifeboats. I was proud of those men and wom- 
en. Someone shouted "Keep to the right !" and that great crowd obeyed 
quickly, silently with strained but courageous faces as they went to their 
posts. The morale was perfect.. In the meantime, destroyers were 
discharging depth bombs while the "Baltic" was circling away from 
danger until thirty minutes later a destroyer signalled "Go ahead. Dan- 
ger past. Your destroyer got it." Then there was a mighty cheer and 
the "Baltic" limped into Liverpool in the early morning hours. The 
Captain looked like death and said all was well but a man told me later, 
in France, he had seen the 9-foot hole as the ship was being repaired on 
rush time to sail again within ten days. 

When we finally reached France in the middle of September, our plans 
were considerably delayed and modified by the Italian debacle which re- 




The first wounded in the Expeditionary Forces to be moved by the 
Sixty Centimeter Railroads from Col. Flint's Mobile Hospital 39 
to Evacuation Hospital No. 1. Methods worked out by the per- 
sonnel of this Hospital in collaboration with the 26th Engineers. 



suited in the confiscation of our equipment by the French service to meet 
•the emergency so the Unit was stationed at Limoges in one of the 
Haviland porcelain factories where we made a survey and prepared plans 
for a Hospital Center of 5000 beds. This was approved and authorized 
by the Chief Surgeon and construction began early in February 1918. 
It is of interest to know that this was the only hospital center in France 



302 



Class of 1895 




Interior of the Barrack Ward of Col. Flint's Mobile Hospital 30. 



which, during the great period of stress in October 1918, had more than 
its authorized number of beds occupied. Immediately after the com- 
pletion of this work I was appointed Liaison Officer from the Chief 
Surgeon's Office to the French War Office for mobile sanitary forma- 
tions and undertook a survey of these units in the French service.. A 
study of their equipment, personnel and methods of operation resulted 
in a recommendation of the purchase of twenty mobile hospitals and 
twenty mobile operating units. These reports likewise supplied the data 
upon which were based the general orders covering this new type of 
hospital, now a permanent unit of the Medical Department of the United 
States Army. 

in 1915, our Hospital, though situated 180 kilometers from the front, 
received battle casualties with no other surgical aid than their first dress- 
ings from 24 to 48 hours after they were wounded. During this period 
of transport infections developing in the wounds usually did more 
damage than the wound itself. It was imperative that cases should be 
operated upon within 12 hours after the reception of the wound if possible 
to prevent the ravages of the infections that supervened. The mobile 
hospitals were designed to provide facilities for intensive surgery under 
the best conditions coupled with a great degree of mobility. They could 
take a position from five miles to ten miles behind the front line trenches 
to which the seriously wounded could be brought with a minimum delay. 

The equipment of the first unit was turned over to us by the French 
service in the latter part of February and was erected in the Grand 
Palais in Paris for inspection by the Chief Surgeon. During this period 



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of work in Paris, our nights were punctuated by air raids and Big Bertha 
took her first death-toll of the population. When I entered the church 
of St. Gervaise a few hours after the bombardment on Good Friday and 
I saw what had happened to that kneeling congregation no task seemed 
too great to conquer the brutal enemy. 

Our Unit, now called Mobile Hospital 39 (to keep our numerical 
designation in the Base Hospital series, on account of the paper-work) 
left under orders from the front line on the 9th of April, the first of its 
kind in the expeditionary Forces and the second hospital established im- 
mediately behind the American lines. We were stationed in the Toul 
Sector at Aulnois-sur-Vertuzey, just six miles behind the front line 
trenches, and began treating the wounded, training men and studying in 
detail the equipment. Later fourteen of our enlisted men were corn- 




Co/. Flint and the officers of Mobile Hospital 39 on occasion of the 
visit of Major General Gorgas, Surgeon General of the United States 
Army. 



missioned and sent to other organizations. These Hospitals proved so 
valuable I was again sent to Paris in August 1918 to arrange for the 
purchase of thirty more units of each type in preparation for the spring 
campaign. We went through the St. Mihiel drive with the First Army 
and the November Offensive with the Second Army. After the St. 
Mihiel affair, we were ordered from Aulnois to Haudincourt where we 
were stationed at the time of the Armistice. The move was made in 
record time. I had told the Chief Surgeon we would be ready for work 
8 hours after the equipment reached its new site. We admitted our last 
case at the old station at 3 o'clock in the afternoon. 



304 Class of 1895 

We admitted and operated on the first case at our new station at n 
o'clock the next morning after a desperate period of work. We had our 
share of excitement caused by enemy planes. For a period of three 
weeks I had orders to be ready to move at a moment's notice as the 
enemy was organizing a drive on Toul. The French at that time con- 
sidered our position untenable and advised us to move, but we begged 
to remain and, fortunately, were able to move forward instead of back. 

"The Mobile Unit," after three days in box cars and six in the mud 
of Camp Pontenezan, sailed for Boston on January 12, 1919, and was dis- 
charged at Camp Devens on the 28th of the same month." 

And Joe adds with a touch of pardonable pride: 

"I was as proud of the organization as a cat of her first litter of kittens." 

And now, will another one of our seven little Colonels advance, 
three paces to the front! 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL LINSLY WILLIAMS . 

In September, 1917, after a preliminary trip to the front lines 
as a representative of the National Research Council, Doc Wil- 
liams returned home and buttoned up his blouse and rolled his 
puttees and reported to the CO. of the 80th Division at Camp 
Lee. He was appointed assistant to the Division Surgeon and 
had to pitch in at once, without previous military experience, and 
instruct the regimental surgeons as to how to get out their morn- 
ing Reports explaining patiently that S.I.H. doesn't mean "Sizzle 
in H— 1," but "Sick in Hospital." When Linsly finished this 
job he was ready for a cot in the "mentally-sprained" ward, him- 
self. Then in January he was made Sanitary Inspector of the 
Division, and went through the Winter's epidemics of measles 
and pneumonia and had a real taste of the charms of unprepared- 
ness, when he observed a few of the lurid jobs of diagnosis 
offered by the surgeons under his command. 

On May 22, 1918, he sailed on the "Leviathan" with 11,000 sol- 
diers and marines on board. This was the particular trip when 
many of the cheerful patriots of Wall Street were betting even 
money that the big boat would never reach her moorings at Brest. 
She was attacked by three subs., but none of them had a chance to 
launch a torpedo. After two days at Brest, Linsly boarded a 
troop train and was jammed in with seven other officers, for his 
first forty-eight hours' trip amongst the sardine and corned- 
Willie cans of a French railroad compartment. He arrived at 
Calais in time to see an air raid. After several weeks of train- 
ing and the stimulant of many more air raids at Samur, he was 



Princeton University 



305 



sent to a sector west of Arras, where his men went into the line 
for the first time on July 4th — one of the first casualties being a 
medical officer, killed by a shell while he was going into the 
trenches. From Arras, Linsly went by easy stages to the Cote 
d'Or, passing through Paris on the morning of the last air-raid, 
then to Stenville, Trouville, Ippencourt, Osches, and Lempire. 
Here his officers were in an old dug-out P.C. of the French 10th 
Army, occupied by them during the battle of Verdun. On the 
fateful morning of the 25th of September his Division jumped 
off from the trenches south of Forges and took the village of 
Bethincourt. During the next three weeks Linsly saw all the 
usual grisly work that grim-visaged war brings to a surgeon of a 
field hospital behind a battle line. He had supervision of the 
evacuation of the wounded from his Division. He served here 
until the 24th of October, when he received orders to report to 
the Chief Surgeon at Tours, where he assisted in the sanitary 
supervision of the troops in the S.O.S. zone. On the 14th of 
November he received a well-earned commission as Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Medical Corps. He was ordered up to Treves 
with the Army of Occupation, thus winning a bet from a Yale 




Dr. Linsly Williams at the Ceremony of Inauguration of the Cour- 
ville Dispensary, Department of Eure et Loir, France, in 1919. To 
the right of "Doc" is Mrs. Williams; on her right is the Conseiller 
du Prefet. To the left of "Doc' is the Mayor of CourzHlle. 



306 Class of 1895 

man of his outfit that he would eat his Christmas dinner in Ger- 
many. He was attached to the office of the Civil Governor and 
had for some weeks the supervision of Heine's physical well- 
being on this sector of the occupied area. He was then ordered 
back to Paris for service with the Red Cross. He then had one 
of those hard-luck details that took him down to the Casinos and 
palm trees and flowering paradise of the blue Mediterranean. 
Linsly accepted this hardship of war with the heroism of a 
soldier and took part in the Red Cross conferences which re- 
sulted in the League of Red Cross Societies. He was discharged 
in April ; sailed for home, shed his uniform, collected his family, 
and returned to Paris to take up the new job of "Director of the 
Commission for the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the Interna- 
tional Health Board of the Rockefeller Foundation." 

He is now apparently under stern sentence of exile to a land 
that knows not the beneficent influence of an XVIII Amend- 
ment. Languishing amongst the cafes, night-life and boulevards 
of Paris, he has sternly refused to make application to be 
pardoned out even though his service stripes and battle-stars 
would entitle him to executive clemency. 

COLONEL COURTLAND NIXON: Here's another 
"wearing, tearing, always swearing, reg'lar army man !" A griz- 
zled, old veteran of more years of service, ye callow young rookies, 
than you've beans in your mess-pan ! After a long and honor- 
able service in the Canal Zone the Great War brought the old 
sodger-man down off the shelf and caused him to cancel his 
contract with the Remington Arms Company the moment war 
was declared. He gave up a responsible and lucrative position 
like a good sport, a Princeton man and a '95 thoroughbred. In 
recognition of his highly specialized skill he was assigned to 
the New York Quartermaster Depot in the Supply Branch, with 
a responsibility that ranged from buying housewives' needles to 
robbing the Navy of coal for transports. On his shoulders fell 
a large part of the burden of outfitting the first expedition which 
left in June, 191 7. Just then he resisted a tempting offer to 
become Officer in Charge of the Princeton Training Camp. It 
took good sand to turn down that congenial position but Court- 
land knew that his duty and training pointed elsewhere. He 
took a slow, hard, prosaic quartermaster job in New York as 
assistant in charge of the procurement of clothing. He had 



Princeton University 



307 



charge of the purchase, inspection and distribution of cloth- 
ing, 80 percent of which was furnished from New York for our 
National Army. About this time that fine old veteran, Major 
General Glenn, mindful of Courtland's record for efficiency in 
the Canal Zone days, importuned the General Staff until Courtland 
was assigned as Division Q.M. of the 83rd Division, which 
sailed for France in May, 1918. He went first to the Province 
of Haute-Marne, and then when a replacement outfit was made 
of his Division, he was sent back west to the Le Mans area. 
Here he started a great warehouse system, in which he built four 
warehouses and furnished supplies sufficient to equip six to ten 
thousand men per day. A weary, long, dusty road for a Q.M. 




Man! ''Belts, waist, 10,000; Breeches, service, pairs, 10,000; 
Drawers, jean, summer, 10,000; leggins, pairs, 10,000; Shirts, 
O.D. flannel, 10,000; Laces, leggin, pairs, 10,000;'' etc. Do you 
get it? — With "responsible and accountable officers" and a Quad- 
ruple and Quintuple system of requisitions and receipts and 
every blasted pair of shoe laces to be traced through on the books 
from the transport to the front-line trenches? — And then, there 
were laundries and reclamation plants to be built and a thousand 
or two of similar details to be looked after. In the midst of 
this thankless labor of the S.O.S. he realized that in spite of a 



308 Class of 1895 

well-deserved promotion to Lieutenant-Colonel he was not 
getting much nearer the front than he had been when he was 
talking Yiddisher with his East side clothing friends in New 
York. So he applied for a front-line job and said he wanted it 
toot-sweet and the tooter the sweeter. But they sent him in- 
stead, to the army General Staff College at Langres, where, 
twenty-four years out of college — he had to sweat through 
several long weeks of endless examinations required by that 
famous "get-rich-quick" institution. He graduated successfully 
and was assigned as a G-3 of the Second Army. The Armistice 
overtook him at Verdun just as he had obtained leave for a three 
week's visit to Nice and Paris. C'est la guerre! Late in the 
winter of 1919 he came back to the United States and was 
assigned to duty in the Quartermaster General's office, becoming 
Assistant Director of Storage, charged with the responsibility 
for the sale of surplus Quartermaster's supplies. In the summer 
of 1919 he was promoted to Colonel of the Quartermaster's 
Corps and placed in the charge of the sales organization under 
the Zone Supply Officer, New York City. 

It is safe to say that no war record of the class was more 
clean and efficient than this one. If Uncle Sam could have made 
requisition at the outset of the war for a few dozen Nixons as 
per sample, the taxpayers of the country might have been spared 
at least part of an expenditure of $36,818,000.00 — an amount 
equal to all the government's appropriations from its foundation 
to 1917. 

CAPTAIN RAYMOND L. WADHAMS. Ray was mus- 
tered in the Federal service as First Lieutenant of the Medical 
Corps for service with the Third Pennsylvania Field Artillery in 
September, 1916. He fought the sandy battle of El Paso until 
March, 19 17. He was not mustered out of the service, but 
remained on duty when he returned from the Border and went 
to Camp Hancock in August with the 109th Field Artillery. 
In October he was promoted to the rank of Captain and in 
February he was transferred to the office of the Division Sur- 
geon of the 28th Division. He served there until April of 1918, 
when he was transferred to Field Hospital No. ill. In the 
last of April he was sent ahead with an advanced school de- 
tachment, arriving at St. Nazaire, France, in May, 1918. After 
a period of training in the army Sanitary School at Langres and 



Princeton University 



309 



in Paris, he was sent to the 111th Infantry for temporary duty 
along the Marne in the thrilling days from July 1st to July 9th, 
1918. Returning to his Field Hospital No. in, he began his 
real war experience near Nogent during the first big counter- 
offensives of the Allied forces. He was moved up to Chateau 
Thierry and followed the 28th Division in its advance inch by 
inch through the Hindenburg line along the banks of the Aire, 
up to within six miles of Fismes, "being very busy all the time," 
as he modestly observes ! 




on THf w»v 

To Twe. ;DoCTd(^» 



you,_ tie- Pout For PoT^, 
YounG- mam! 



iperoiL. 1 Have such 
SoRepeer, 1 CANT" 
TuT I-1Y ee-cr To 
THE. ORoUN0,HmtVi, 

ft 1 "' I COX ft pftl* 

in ciy srorinict;, 

(MM ft AwFuL tAR 
►«•«£. , ft<* AN — 



Early in September his Division was relieved by the French 
and from this sector he was sent to the southern border of the 
Argonne and opened up a hospital at Les Islettes. He was just 
beginning to receive the flood of "flu" and pneumonia cases when 
he was stricken with influenza himself and was sent to Base Hos- 
pial No. 27 at Lang-res. When recovered he was transferred to 
the X-Ray Department and served in this branch of the service 
at Bordeaux, Tours, and Limoges. He returned with a convoy 
of sick and wounded from Brest, arriving at Hoboken in July, 
1919. 

MAJOR WILLIAM H. MORSE. Here is another of our 
army surgeons who saw active service in the Medical Corps 
from August 3rd, 191 7, to August nth, 1919. He wears a ser- 
vice stripe on his left arm by reason of one year abroad with 
the 316th Ammunition Train of the 91st Division. This brings 
to mind the fact that at the jump-off in the Argonne on the 
fateful 26th of September, he was one of five '95 men within 
a few miles of each other, each unfortunately ignorant of the 
other's presence. 



310 Class of 1895 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL WILLIAM PATERSON : Pat 
was doing a hitch in the Philippine Islands when he entered the 
war, and was hustled back to Camp Gordon, Georgia, to help 
organize the 82nd Division. After undergoing the rigors and 
hardships of a winter at Camp Gordon, he was prepared for 
any discomforts that foreign service had to offer. He under- 
went there, one of those especially comforting experiences that 
a pacifist and unprepared Republic offered to its hard-working 
army officers. Having received large drafts of the stalwart men 
of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi, and having made a fine 
start in the training and discipline of his organization orders came 
that sent 98 percent of his Division to the several National 
Guard camps, thus completely smashing his organization and 
compelling him to begin all over again, the heartbreaking work 
of licking a new Division into a semblance of military efficiency. 

As Brigade Adjutant of the 187th Field Artillery Brigade of 
the 82nd Division, he landed in France via England April, 1918. 
His outfit was sent to the La Courtine area for training, and 
here the Brigade received its French 75 's and 155 howitzers, 
and made its first acquaintance with those marvelous products 
of the French artilleryman's inventive genius.. On July 1st 
he was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel and transferred to the 
Army Artillery. This transfer took him from La Courtine in 
South France to Mailly le Camp, just south of Chalons. From 
here his regiment was sent to a camp just outside of Bordeaux 
for target practice. These trips gave him as excellent opportu- 
nity to see a large part of France, and one of his broad-minded 
comments is worthy of wide publication : 

"Since returning home I have heard much of how the French people 
tried to exploit the American soldiers. I cannot help taking this opportu- 
nity of protesting against such a false impression. The hospitality, 
kindness and assistance that I met with during my whole stay in France 
was far behind anything I experienced in the United States. It is true 
in some of the larger cities merchants did take advantage of us, but none 
to the extent that our own people did in and around our training camps ; 
and in the smaller towns and villages the inhabitants would deprive 
themselves of the bare necessities in order to make the Americans more 
comfortable." 

During the last of August his regiment received orders to 
entrain for the front. On this particular occasion someone had 
passed the buck to Pat and left him the job of entraining and 



Princeton University 



3ii 



shipping twenty-four big guns and some one hundred and sixty- 
motor trucks and autos. It took several trains of the little 
French cars to get them off, and it was here that miracles of 
American strength and hustle were put into the task. Know- 
ing the shortcomings of railway service in war times, Pat very 
cannily kept out an auto and two chauffeurs and drove clear 
across France in thirty-two hours stopping only for gas or oil. 
He arrived at Toul six hours before the first train of his outfit 
pulled in. He had the usual nerve-racking search for his regi- 
ment which had gone into the lines somewhere, no one knew 
where. The roads were jammed and there was all the desperate 
confusion of night concentrations and conflicting orders. He 
located his outfit at last, and arrived at a crossroad a half mile 
in the rear of his position, just in time, apparently, to keep an 
engagement with a squall of German shell-fire designed to render 
this particular crossroad uncomfortable. Pat and his French 
chauffeurs hoisted their car, got it out of the road and suffered 
no further damage than that from broken glass and flying stones. 
He arrived at his regimental position just in time to pick up his 
firing data and take part in the great opening barrage of the 
St. Mihiel offensive. 




OirliNGPoirtT!? 

WlNTMIU. ON 
OoK. L£FT FI^Oc^t!! 
PEFLfcCTIOK 3 -» Oo ' 

on noa-opeNs! — 
Si TE 3o»- ) 

Co^ecroie, 3o» 



"Take it from me," [says Pat,] "if any man tells you that he didn't feel 
squeamish when his first shell burst near him, you can put him down as 
a blood relation of Ananias. It sometimes passes unnoticed in the ex- 
citement of combat, but oh ! that first whine and — pow-ee! I remember 
one incident we had which happened while the battery was in action. I 
was talking to the officer who was directing the fire when a messenger 



312 Class of 1895 

who was standing some ten or fifteen feet away butted into our conversa- 
tion in a most unmilitary manner. The officer's face wore the horrified 

expression: 'What the — do you want?' A 'heavy' had burst nearby, 

not close enough to do any harm, but had lifted the poor orderly and 
propelled him against us as if he were bucking the Yale line." 

From the St. Mihiel sector he went overland by long gruelling 
night marches, to the scene of the Meuse-Argonne battle. Sep- 
tember 22nd found him with his regiment stationed at Les Is- 
lettes just south of the Argonne. His batteries went into posi- 
tion south of Boureilles on the East bank of the Aire River. 
Here he underwent one of the trying experiences of an artillery- 
man's life in running up ammunition and pieces by night along 
the straight road running north from Clermont-en-Argonne, — a 
road under perfect observation from the German lines in the 
daytime, and crowded at night with endless lines of trucks, with- 
out lights, in pouring rain, and subject to shell fire at regular 
intervals. His outfit took part in the capture of the Hindenburg 
line and the subsequent drives that cleared the Germans out of 
the Argonne forest. His batteries of heavy artillery beat the 
light artillery in the race after the fleeing Huns. 

Pat came out of it all unscathed, the picture of rugged health, 
and returned to this country and was assigned to duty at Sandy 
Hook. 

COLONEL A. M. WILSON. Here's a reg'lar, too ! With a 
long, long trail to his service record: a cadet in the U.S.M.A. 
1895-1899; Lieutenant in the U. S. Army 1899-1908; spent five 
years in the Philippines ; on active duty during the San Fran- 
cisco disaster; resigned from the service in 1908; re-entered the 
service as Major of Infantry; instructor at First Officers' Train- 
ing Camp, Ft. Benjamin Harrison; organized and commanded 
the 84th Division Machine Gun Battalion; Brigade Adjutant, 
167th Brigade ; transferred to Q.M. Corps and sent overseas to 
France in May, 1918; served in France as assistant to the Chief 
Q.M.A.E.F. ; promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, September, 1918 ; 
returned to the United States in January, 1919 ; discharged from 
active service September 3rd, 1919; promoted to Colonel Q.M. 
Reserve Corps October 1st, 1919; transferred to the Judge Ad- 
vocate General's Department and assigned as Assistant Judge 
Advocate of the 90th Division. 

WALTER MOSES. All along the front from the English 
Channel to the Swiss border, throughout the leave areas, and at 



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313 



every port of embarkation, there was one familiar uniform that 
brought solace and good cheer to the soldier's heart. It was 
the uniform of the Y.M.C.A. Hard words have been spoken 
of that uniform — hard words that are undeserved, unjust and 
unmerited. If a package of cigarettes happened to be sold for 
a few centimes more than the commissary price, the whole 
Y.M.C.A. was blamed for it. If an overworked clerk happened 
to make a mistake on the price of chocolate or chewing tobacco, 
abuse and contumely were heaped upon the "Y." But every 
fair minded man of the A.E.F., officer or private, knows that if 
the American Army, its supplies, transport, and ammunition, 
had been managed with the efficiency, skill and unselfish pat- 
riotism that was displayed by the army of workers of the 
Y.M.C.A., thousands of lives and billions of dollars would have 
been saved. 



( gO fW VlNCPeM F"o <t ft C« O 





When your battery was en route to the front and some 
French railway official cut the train in two in the night and 
took off your supply-cars with your rations, and you landed at 
some ruined and demolished village at 2 A.M with one hundred 
and ninety-four hungry and famished soldiers on your hands, 
who was it that was ready on the ground with hot coffee and 
supplies to fill the breach? Who was it that kept the "Camels" 



314 Class of 1895 

and the "Fatimas" close up behind your advancing lines? Who 
was it that got your pay-check safely home to your wife and the 
kids? Who was it that always had an extra dozen cots or so 
ready for your stranded detachments of dough-boys that landed 
in a devastated town where the billets were full to overflowing? 
It was the "Y," always the good, old "Y" ! In the leave-areas 
where the men came with pockets full of accumulated pay, fresh 
from the mud and cooties of the trenches, it was the "Y" that 
met them at the train, provided them with wholesome amuse- 
ment at magnificent Casinos with movies, with books, vaude- 
ville, dancing, and every clean and wholesome form of enjoy- 
ment for the whole period of their leaves. All honor to the 
"Y." 

Walter Moses was one of these "Y" workers. Failing to gain 
admission into military service, on account of advancing years, 
he applied to the Overseas Committee of the Y.M.C.A. and was 
accepted in April, 1918, sailing from New York in May and land- 
ing at Liverpool July 2nd. He was assigned to work at Brest, 
where he built up a "Y" centre covering an entire city block. He 
sailed for home on December 8th, arriving here in time for Christ- 
mas after which he again sailed for Brest, landing on the 12th 
of January. He was assigned to G.H.Q. at Chaumont as Divis- 
ional Secretary, and on March 1st was transferred to Paris as a 
member of the Board of Discipline, the General Court of the 
Y.M.C.A. On May 15th he left for home via England, landing 
in New York May 1st after a year of hard but interesting work. 

WILLIE LOGAN. After being for six months on a Local 
Exemption Board in New York City, of which he was made 
Assistant Legal Adviser, he enlisted in June, 19 18, in the 
Y.M.C.A. for work in England. He sailed from New York on 
the "Lapland," and landed at Liverpool August 20th. He was 
assigned to the Movement Department of the Personnel Division 
in London where his duties were receiving Y.M.C.A. workers, 
obtaining hotel accommodations for them, and getting them off 
to France. He also did some of the passport work at the French 
Consulate. In December, 1918, he was made Secretary of 
Records for the Personnel Division in the United Kingdom, and 
in February, 1919 assumed additional duties, being made Busi- 
ness Manager, both of which positions he held until he left 
London for New York on October 18th, 1919. In his own 



Princeton University 315 

words, "'For six months it was a ten-hour job, seven days a 
week, but it was an unusual experience and full of enjoyable 
memories." 

DOGGIE TRENCHARD. Will the Captain of Princeton's 
Championship Team of 1893 step out in front and receive his 
decoration? You served with the American Y.M.C.A. from 
August 1, 1918 to September 15, 1919. You arrived in France 
on October 1, 1918 and served on the firing line in the St. Mihiel 
sector with the 113th, 114th and 115th Field Batteries, 25 kilo- 
meters east of Souilly, near Troyes. After the armistice you 
were assigned to the American Aviators at Vevincourt, France ; 
arrived in Treves, Germany, on December 1, 1918, and in Cob- 
lenz on February 1, 19 19. There you remained until July 15, 
1919. Since then you have served with the International Y.M. 
C.A. in the new Republic of Czechoslovakia with headquarters 
at Bratislava, formerly Pressburg, working on the Hungarian 
frontier across the Danube River, 50 kilometers north of Buda- 
pest. Of what consequence is it that the war is over and the 
armistice signed? If there is a job to be done; a difficulty to be 
surmounted ; a line to be bucked ; we may trust Doggie to make 
his distance. 

JACK CATON. After his application for a Chaplaincy had 
been rejected by the Adjutant General in Washington on account 
of "old age," Jack enlisted as a private in the New Jersey State 
Militia Reserve, where he was on duty guarding highways and 
bridges- and rounding up slackers. He also served as Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Armenian and Syrian Relief Association. But Jack 
couldn't resist the call of the firing line. He wanted to breast 
the tape at the finish as he used to do in his old half-mile days. 
He offered his services in the Y.M.C.A. and sailed for France 
in July, 19 1 8. After serving a few days in the hospitals in 
Paris, he was sent to the 4th Division of the regular army, which 
was stationed not far from Chateau Thierry then brigaded with 
the 6th French Army. After leaving the Vesle River he served 
in field hospitals during the St. Mihiel drive, being stationed near 
Verdun. Later he went into the Argonne on the 26th of Sep- 
tember and was in the struggle for twenty-six consecutive days 
as field secretary. He was then transferred to the office of 
religious work director for the 4th Division and appointed to 
go up with the Army of Occupation ; and you know that if 



316 Class of 1895 

Jack was there the "Y" kept up with the marching men 
and furnished all the supplies that were procurable. He made 
strenuous efforts on Thanksgiving and Christmas days to reach 
every individual man. Thanksgiving was spent near Dieden- 
hofen and Christmas was celebrated at Bad Bertrich. Later the 
Division moved up to the Rhine and headquarters were at Neider 
Breisig, where, in six weeks after arriving the "Y" succeeded 
in getting every warehouse full of supplies, in buying all the 
musical instruments in Coblenz for the soldiers' entertainment, 
furnishing stoves for the huts, and building and organizing new 
huts where accommodations were insufficient. 

After recounting the difficulties and misunderstandings under 
which the "Y" worked, and the splendid and invaluable service 
which was rendered in spite of these, Jack writes, "Should there 
be another war the Y.M.C.A. would profit by experience. Per- 
haps both the government and army would also profit by it. I 
have known times in the Argonne when my "Y" supplies were 
all the men had to save their lives." 

One of his interesting experiences was in running across 
"Doggy" Trenchard at the railhead at Luxemburg, where the 
latter was dispensing "Y" supplies. He lost no time in renewing 
acquaintance and getting a big supply of his priceless treasures. 
BUCK MASTER. His application for a Chaplaincy having 
been rejected (on account of the age-limit), "Buck" sailed for 
France early in 1918 as a Y.M.C.A. Secretary. During the 
voyage on the "Niagara" they had a brush with a floating mine 
which the ship's second officer blew up when it was about three 
hundred yards away, no damage having been done except for 
broken glass on one side of the ship. He was sent to Gievres 
and there was Secretary in charge of Hut. No. 2 for about four 
months, eating with the men and going through the horrors of 
mess-kit washing for six weeks, until the CO. of the outfit came 
to his rescue and invited him to mess with the Staff. In July 
he was transferred to the Entertainment Department of the 
"Y." He was in the Toul Sector during the month immediately 
preceding the wiping out of the St. Mihiel Salient. He was then 
attached to the "Fighting First" and worked in and out of Raule- 
court with Field Hospital No. 3. From here he went to Beau- 
mont, and then through Parnes and Seichprey and Nonsard and 
into the Nonsard woods, and from there to Paris, sailing for the 
L'nited States on the "Agamemnon." 



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317 




MIKE HUNT. In October, 1918, he sailed for France for 
Red Cross work, where he was assigned as an Assistant Hospital 
Representative at Keohuon Hospital Center near Brest, later be- 
coming Hospital Representative. After that he was in the R.C. 
Headquarters at Brest as Chief of the Home and Hospital Sec- 
tion. He then went to the Western Zone Headquarters at St. 
Nazaire as Director of its Army and Navy Department, and 
finally did some work at the Red Cross Headquarters at Paris 
in assisting with the organizing of a Department of Claims and 
Adjustment. He sailed for New York in June, 1919. 

Attin-shun ! 

The regimental band will give the proper flourishes ; the gun- 
squads will man their pieces, prepare for action, and fire the 
number of guns prescribed in the Army Regulations for ministers 
and ambassadors. 



JOHN W. GARRETT ! 

United States Minister to the Netherlands. John's war service 
entitles him to special recognition in another part of this history 
but we here and now, call the '95 regiment to attention and pay 



3i8 



Class of 1895 




him his military honors earned as a veteran diplomat and highest 
ranking official present with us on this occasion. 

CAPTAIN DICK STOCKTON! Front and Center! Snap 
into it, Dick! Oh — well then — take your time, boy, take your 
time ! That wound-stripe of yours entitles you to all the time 
you want, — we'll tell the world it does! Dick served in the 1915- 
16 Plattsburg Camp and in the 1917 Plattsburg Training Camp. 
He was commissioned from this camp as 1st Lieutenant and 
assigned to duty as Adjutant of the 304th Machine Gun Battalion 
of the 77th Division. Later he was transferred to the 305th 
Machine Gun Battalion of the same division at Camp Upton. 
He sailed for overseas service in March 1918. He stuck to this 
same service and earned his promotion to the Captaincy of Com- 
pany "A" of the 305th M.G. Brigade. He saw service at the front 
In the Baccarat Sector along the Vesle, the Oise, in the Aisne 
offensive and finally with the fightin' 77th in the big push through 
the Argonne. He was wounded Oct. 2, 1918. All this bald data 
is on the back of the Captain's honorable discharge certificate. 
Wild horses and dynamite can not pull or blast out of him any 
further details of this record. But since Dick modestly refuses 



Princeton University 



319 



to talk, hear what an impartial witness, Frederick Palmer, says 
of the glorious achievements of Dick's division in his book : "Our 
Greatest Battle." 




" * * * a straight frontal attack must be made. "There's the Forest, go 
through it" paraphases the simple orders of the Division Commander. 
This put the responsibility squarely on the shoulders of the young platoon 
and company commanders." "On the 30th, the whole line made pro- 
gress, against machine-gunners who had cummingly prepared paths to 
give them visibility for a greater distance, and to draw the attackers into 
their line of fire. They charged down the slopes of the Charleraux 
ravine and its irregular branches, across the streams and swamps at 
their bottoms, and up the slopes on the other side — all this, through woods 
and thickets, of course. The next day an even deeper advance was made 
over very irregular ground, while the right in triumphant ardor pressed 
forward, ahead of the left and center, across the Fontaine-aux-Charmes 
ravine and its branches and their streams until it was past the heights of 
the Chene Tondu." * * * 

(From the description of the attack on Grand Pre). "From their 
heights on the North bank of the river the Germans were covering all the 
approaches to the town with artillery, trench-mortar, and machine-gun 
fire clear to the edge of the Argonne. Where they appeared in various 
avenues of approach, they brought down heavy barrages.. The "Libertys" 



320 Class of 1895 

could not make a move in the open without being seen ; but they kept on 
infiltrating forward with the rare canniness that they had learned ijj 
fighting machine-gun nests through underbrush. By the morning of 
the 15th they were ready for the final attack. All day their artillery 
was pounding the town and approaches. All day they were maneuvering 
and advancing as they held the enemy's attention, until at dusk a de- 
tachment rushed the ford and entered the town. Other detachments 
built boat-bridges, and swam the river in the dark to add to their num- 
bers in making sure that we held what we had gained." * * * 

"For nearly three weeks the "Libertys" had been in action. For all 
but five days of that time, they had been in the damp woods out of sight 
of the sun. In its taking of the Forest of Grand Pre and Saint- 
Juvin, and its subsequent advance to the Meuse after it came in line 
for a second time, the 77th had 4,803 casualties and captured 720 
prisoners." * * * 

Step back in the ranks, Dick, and snatch out 36 hrs. of bunk 
fatigue ! 



Now, softly on the evening air there comes to us the bugle's 
requiem — "Taps" — the long, plaintive notes that greet, each 
night, the soldier's hour of slumber and soothe him to his long, 
last sleep. And as the shadows of the elms lengthen across the 
campus, as the dying sun gilds the tower of Old North and the 
gentle breeze stirs the folds of the flag on its staff above ; while 
the sounds of youthful laughter and vigor of young life and hope 
are all about us here we stand uncovered, with bowed head, as 
there comes to us wafted across the years, the memory of that 
lovable Knight-Errant of '95, who marched so gallantly away, 
never to return. And we seem to see him now, not as one who 
has gone but as a "friend who stands and waves to us a cheerful 
greeting before he takes a turn in the trail that hides him from 
our view." 



JOHN PRENTISS POE, JR. 

A SOLDIER OF THE BLACK WATCH 

KILLED IN ACTION IN NORTHERN FRANCE 

SEPTEMBER 25TH, I915. 



A Postscript to the War Record 

Edited by the Class Secretary 

The distinguished artillery officer who conducted the foregoing 
Regimental Review, was doubtless restrained by the canons of 
military etiquette from pinning a decoration upon himself. It 
therefore devolves upon a plain citizen, who never wore the 
khaki, to expose to the delighted gaze of his compatriots the 
following record of his achievements abroad. The editor of 
this Postscript has resorted without the slightest qualm to the 
privacy of his letter files, and presents without apology the 
following extracts from the letters of Major John Hamilton 
Thacher of the 129th Field Artillery, United States Army: 

A. C. I. 



On The Way, May 12, 1918. 
, Packing up harness, stencilling barrack bags, issuing first-aid 
kits drawing supplies checking in property turning back horses 
to the remount station, cleaning up corrals, transferring invalids 
to the casualty detachment, shooing my 194 ducklings into line 
and counting their beaks as they waddle into the train, are my 
excuses for not writing sooner. 

. . . Our men are all eager to get into the game. My top 
sergeant — a typical fighting temperamental Irish boy — has turned 
from a constitutional grouch into a grinning cheerful merry- 
hearted soul. Scowling conspirators have turned into upstand- 
ing soldier men and not a peep came from the whole battery 
when it was loaded like cattle into day coaches, three in a section. 
We pulled into St. Louis in the darkness and mud and rain. Out 
in the yards with trains and engines passing and switching it was 
a trying job keeping them in hand and marching them from the 
train threading our way through the tracks to the Y.M.C.A. 
There we got a bath and leg stretch for every one of them. Our 
engine was wrecked as we came out of the yards, but none of 
the men were hurt. 



Princeton University 



323 



June 26, 19,8. 
I am in the home of the Mayor of the Commune and have 
wonderful quarters. Have breakfast at 5 130 and ride 2 miles 
through fields red with poppies and past rose-covered little stone 
cots to my battery for Reveille. They are in an old abandoned 
chateau (plate above the door "1776" and the Latin for "Here 
God gave Us Happiness"). The residence is the most ghost 
haunted old ruin you could imagine with old illuminated MSS 
and vellum books and old engravings in tumbled confusion in 
one small room on the second floor and my battery tumbling 
through the rest of its musty corners and my kitchen in what 




The 35th Division en route to Commercy for its final review by 
General Pershing. 

was once the grand drawing or reception room. A lawn in front 
where our 75 's are parked and then a little lake with long rushes 
in it besides which is the picket line for our fresh horses. Our 
billet is also an old bowling alley at a crossroads inn known as 
the Silver Pot Hook where the boys of Battery D congregate 
from 6 to 9. 



Somewhere in France, July 20, 1918. 
Our regiment is undergoing its last intensive work before 
getting shot up. Our battery came safely through from Ft. Sill 



324 Class of 1895 

to France without losing a man or having any of them get in any- 
very serious trouble. The last two days of the voyage we had 
some very satisfactory excitement which I cannot tell about ex- 
cept to say that from what I saw the submarine is pretty well 
under control and that I would hate to belong to an enemy sub- 
marine crew. 

One of the most thrilling experiences was coming up the 
Thames just at sunset between green fields and country estates, 
the band playing Dixie and the Star Spangled Banner while 
every man, woman and child, tug-boat, ocean liner, and automo- 
bile waved and tooted a greeting to the Yanks. The Briton cer- 
tainly behaved as though he were glad to see us. 

We are on the last big strain before we hit the front line. 
Working night and day. 

August 10th, 1918. 
Well I have a tin hat, canteen, mess kit, a San Brown Belt and 
a gas mask, so I can reasonably feel that the government is going 
to have active need for my services before long. The tin hat is 
very becoming, but the summer styles this year are a triflle heavy 
in design. I am told my gas mask is even more becoming. It 
conceals some of the latent and many of the obvious defects of 
my facial architecture and discourages fluency of conversation. 
I have to wear it every day and give orders in it and I feel more 
and more like killing Germans each hour I wear it. Suppose you 
had to look up the last decisions of your Supreme Court with a 
contrivance on your head that pinched your nose like a black- 
smith's tongs, bound your brow and chin and cheeks with an iron 
grip and put a contraption in your mouth like a throat specialist's 
"Say Ah' h" machine and then you slobber all over it and dim 
the goggle eyes, your gums get sore and you wish you had never 
loved your country at all, at all. 

Somewhere in Somewhere, August 27. 
Well, we are really at the place we started for and doing the 
work we started to do. Behold us, then, in a little chalet high 
up a mountain-side, our windows looking out into the tops of pine 
trees, far below us in the valley a little toy village in the greenest 
of fields. The pine covered mountains roll to the skies on both 
sides. We are with a charming French artillery man who will be 



Princeton University 325 

our host for a few days and then will turn over his Swiss chalet 
to Miles and me to take command. Our boys have had their 
little "bapteau de feu' and nobody has been hurt and they are 
all in high spirits over it. We have the action that comes from 
the hourly whistle of little artillery pleasantries from the Boches 
far up the valley. People live in the village below us and women 
and children come and go and attend to their daily affairs and 
then when the whistling begins they rush to the dug-outs and 
cellars just like the dough boys and artillerymen. It all seems 
like a great night-before-the-fourth-of- July-affair — this pop-pop 
of machine guns down over the mountain back of us and the 
boom of the pieces over the hills behind the "beyond." One can 
not think of it as real war save for occasional little processions 
to the French-American cemetery in the valley below us. These 
pocessions are interrupted now and then by whistling messengers. 
It was very thrilling when a few days ago I crawled around a 
camouflaged path along the mountain and entered a dark little 
hole in the ground and looked out through a narrow slit and saw 
the trenches and the German lines for the first time, gray streaks 
of barbed wire and little sack-like burrows like mole hill tracings 
over the knob-like hills and no sign of life anywhere. 

Somewhere at the Front, August 31, 1918. 
As I write I can hear the put-put of our machine guns and the 
deep croak of the enemy's Maxims. It is supposed to be a quiet 
sector but durn me if this is quiet. The French call it "Sector 
Tranquil." A young lieutenant in a French battery near us who 
has the cross and the cordon and all the rest and has just come 
from the Chemin de Dames where all but 12 of his battery were 
lost — ("and we left the beggars 2 cases of champagne and 5 cans 
of jam, damn them!") says it really is a quiet sector. Neverthe- 
less the valley below us is shelled morning and evening and we get 
a few stray hot biscuits tossed over in our headquarters neighbor- 
hood once in a while. The other night after we had finished a gas 
barrage Major Miles and I started back home from Regimental 
H.Q. and in the rain and pitch darkness missed a side trail that 
leads off to our camp on the mountain side. We found ourselves 
down in the valley and the first thing we knew a big rocket flare 
showed us we were on the wrong route. We turned back into a 
little side vallev and took to a dugout in the hillside. We had 



326 



Class of 1895 




Major Thacher's Battery going up to the front 

no sooner gotten into it than all Hades broke loose in the valley 
we had just left. Gee! Gosh! 150's, 77's, gas shells. It was 
lovely. Slept in my gas mask. Got out all right in the morning 
and made our way back to camp. Found from the map that we 
had just about walked over into friend Fritz's country. The best 
thing that you can keep in mind to do for us here is to pray for 
us like sixty. Have gone through 48 hours once again without 
sleep so must break off now. 

Sept. 1, 1918. 
Am writing now by the light of a sputtering candle. It will 
soon be out and when it does we are all starting on more big 
adventure somewhere else. We had just had our little corned 
beef and tomatoes (canned) with a new bunch of French officers. 
They are all war-scarred veterans of four years and are most 
affable and charming. I really hate to leave this wonderfully 
picturesque bit of our wandering but we are going to have action 
with a bis: "A." That's what we came for. 



Somewhere in the Big Doings, Sept. 7. 
Our first little whirl at the front is over, nobody hurt and 



Princeton University 327 

everybody pleased at having been under shell fire and having be- 
haved themselves like little gentlemen. A few horses killed by 
shells, a sergeant with leg broken when a piece rolled off a cliff 
with him, an awfully tired and somewhat gaunt bunch of bronzed 
chow hunters — we find ourselves in billets now close up to the 
Grand Music. 

The day I got here was a lovely one, a typical day of soldiers' 
ups and downs. Started with the Regiment to lead our bat- 
talion over to the entraining point. Hustled my chickens to- 
gether, had the usual fight with the Q.M. to get them "corned 
Willie" and rations, to get forage for our horses, to get our 
telescope, aiming circle and plotting boards, etc., all on the buck- 
board wagon. 

Then started off, map in hand, in the drizzling rain to make 
a 12 mile hike. Passed great streams of French poilus, cavalry, 
artillery and trucks, supply wagons, all seething through the 
narrow road, some going our way, some against us. 

Made it in three hours, leading our horses most of the way to 
save them. We were a wet, muddy, bedraggled outfit as we 
came in. I no sooner lit than I heard that by great good luck 
Col. Gordon Johnston '96 was on duty there as chief of staff 
of the 7th Army Corps. 

We had a long rail ride after I left Gordon and landed late at 
night in the pitch dark. No lights allowed either in unloading or 
en route on account of Boche air bombers. 

Getting horses, gun caissons, wagons, and supplies off a train 
in 90 minutes on a crowded quay in the dark is no soft ordnance 
department job. We got the column started at last, me out in 
front with my covered flashlight and my map in leather case in 
the blackest blackness you ever felt through. I went on ahead 
leaving connecting files behind to keep in touch with Major 
Miles and the Battalion. At first it was the usual turmoil of 
a night march in an active sector. Masses of dough boys, trucks, 
motors, Generals' cars, ammunition trains marching and seeth- 
ing along the road in both directions. We turned off from them 
where my map showed the bridge crossed the river, and I fol- 
lowed along the valley until I came to two lonely American 
sentries who halted me and seemed glad to see home folks so 
near the front. Then I passed on through one or two villages 
and by net works of cross roads we had to work out, leaving men 



328 



Class of 1895 



as markers to guide the battalion and keep them from straying. 
We halted occasionally to loosen the cinches and rest the horses. 
When we stopped each time I would drop down in the mud and 
snooze for a few minutes, then get up, tighten up and go at it 
again. We had to get the outfit in before daylight, as we are not 
allowed of course to do the foolish stunt of trapsing artillery 
around after sun-rise, and if I missed a cross-roads and piled 
the column on some blind road it means serious delay. Well, 
somehow, just before daybreak, I pulled into a little village, 
smelling to heaven, dark and comfortless — but "our billets." I 
disposed of my men and horses, found Maj. Miles in bed, got 
the wagons out of sight, and tumbled off to bed in the back of a 
wine shop. 

Somewhere near the Big Music, Sept. 10, 1918. 
I can hear machine guns and see hostile Boche planes and I 
am in a place where bombs are dropped like delicate, fragrant 




One of Major Thachcr's dugouts in the Argonuc. 

confetti from the clouds — especially if you live in or near any- 
thing that looks like a hospital. An American Lieutenant in 
the French Artillery told me he was out in Albania with the Red 
Cross and connected with a hospital that was the only big build- 



Princeton University 329 

ing in a green dish of a valley and nothing remotely resembling 
a military camp or building anywhere near it. It was plastered 
over with red crosses — but in spite of everything the delicate Hun 
sped thither at five every morning in his aeroplane and turned 
his machine gun loose on the hospital and dropped bombs on the 
sick and wounded. So they used to evacuate the building for 
the dugouts every morning at 4 :3c Gee ! but it will be sweet to 
kill the barbarians — and we're going to have a whack at them 
again soon ! 

We had a long hard trip up here after our little baptism of 
fire up in the mountains. Nearly all night watches and some 
hard, trying work in reconnaissance at night. You get off a 
railroad train in the night. A French official shoves a map under 
your nose, of a country you have never seen before and only 
distantly heard of. He points to some little cross-roads village 
on it twenty-five miles away and jabbers a stream of French 
until his brakes slip and he skids. Then you are expected to get 
the battalion off the train in the pitch black, get the horses, 
caissons, pieces, our guns and all hitched up, all without a light, 
and start off in the Stygian darkness through a network of 
crossroads to your billets. On this last hike we started at 11 
P. M. and got in at 5 in the morning — all by map and compass 
and signboards and bum French. A smelly little village with 
manure heaps in the street half as high as the houses and an open 
sewer through the principal street. 

On the Move, Sept. 14. 
We are camped in a great forest near the front. The sound 
of big guns is almost incessant, and we got here just in time to 
see one of the most terrific barrages of our experience so far. 
It has been one long night march after another, mostly in rain 
and mud, men and animals dead tired, then resting for a day or 
two and pressing on. The night out from "Stinkville" as we 
called the town I last wrote you from, was a hard one — rained 
all the time. We camped in some woods under cover from planes, 
and when I got in I just dropped in the mud, drew a shelter half 
over me and slept like little Nicholas in his crib. In the morn- 
ing we got dried out a little and got some fodder for our tired 
horses and were ready to pull out again the same evening. That 
night was a bad one truly. Constant cold rain, long halts when 



33° 



Class of 1895 



the wind swept man and horse, and made both shake and shiver 
until our teeth rattled. At every halt we would lurch awkwardly 
out of our saddles and seek some eves or roadside shelter, squat 
down in the mud and doze until from the head of the column 
came the command, "Prepare to mount — Mount!" At one place 
we went through an historic old town, our caissons and horses' 
hoofs rattling and re-echoing on the cobble stones — past chateaux, 
hotel de ville, palais de justice, gare, and squares with statues, 




Major Thachcr's Post of Command at Charpentry, Sept. 28th-Oct. 
3rd, 1918, during the Meuse-Argonne offensive. 



all the time the sky lightened and blazoned with the terrific can- 
nonade. The latter kept up for eight solid hours. I know less 
than you do about it all except that it was preliminary to a great 
American push that was entirely successful, gained all its ob- 
jectives, captured 10,000 prisoners and found the morale of the 
enemy poor and weakening. To us it was just rain and mud 
and plodding eternally into the dark through long crowded roads, 
past artillery stuck in the mud, or infantry columns that dodged 
under our horses' feet, and always a few miles away, like sum- 
mer lightning glare, like the constant rumble of a great river 
falling over a precipice, the roar and thunder and flash of the 
great barrage. 



Princeton University 331 

It is wonderful to see the spirit of the men — tired, gaunt, 
hungry — give them but a little wink of sleep and sniff of coffee 
and a bit of hard tack and they are singing and whistling and 
joking. If people could just understand the soul and mind and 
spirit of the American civilian at war — You can't beat him — God 
bless him ! 

Somewhere Back of the Front, Sept. 19, 1918. 
Am lying in my pup tent, the rain spattering on its sides, my 
men just fed their bacon and coffee, after a hard night of fifteen 
hours on the road in the mud and rain. The usual paradox of 
the tired-out soldier person is that he cannot sleep and his mind 
races over distant scenes and places. We are undoubtedly to be 
again a part of some Big Music soon. Big cannons are roaring 
in the distance, the men cursing the horses on the picket line be- 
hind me, the rolling kitchens of the battery smoking in the valley 
below me, the 75's parking beside the road ready to jump out 
again, a bunch of tired animals and men, ants now crawling 
through my blanket. C'est la guerre! 

Cablegram received October 7th, 1918: 'Through battle OK. 
Well and happy." 

At the Front. 
A boy from one of the doughboy regiments who is a liaison 
runner has just been talking with me and had an interesting 
souvenir of the fight we were last in. He was one of the in- 
fantry scouts sent forward in front of the advancing lines to 
draw the enemy's fire and thus locate the machine guns. It 
was of course a ticklish job for a youngster lately from a farm 
near St. Joseph, Missouri. He worked his way forward, dodging 
from one shell hole to another, and finally when the Boche shell 
fire became too heavy he ducked into a crater to wait a bit until 
things quieted down. He was astonished as he lay there to have 
a moist, friendly muzzle shoved over the rim of the crater — 
not the muzle of a Boche rifle, but of a Boche dog. The creature 
wagged his tail in a friendly way and then crawled down into 
the pit with the soldier. He would lie flat as your hat when he 
heard a shell whistling, and after it burst he would jump up 
on the alert to see what had happened and where it had burst. 
It was one of the German "Dienst-Hunden" or service dogs. 



332 



Class of 1895 




Graves of men of Major Thacher's Battalion, I2g F. A., killed in action 
at Charpentry in the Argonnc Sept. 28th-Oct. 3rd, 1918. 

They are sent out with messages and occasionally with supplies 
for the wounded. He was thoroughly familiar with shell fire 
and he knew just where to go and how to behave when it was in 
the air. He made friends with my man and stayed with him 
until he was finally through with his mission and started back 
to the rear. He refused to go in that direction and no coaxing 
or blandishments could take him away from the German lines. 
The soldier, before he left, took off his dog collar and chain. It 
was all carefully numbered with his division and sector and 
branch of the service and a word that showed that he had been 
given the "Mylene Test," a medical inoculation given to horses 
and animals. The heavy metal of the collar, the thoroughness of 
the system by which even that dog had been inoculated, tested, 
numbered, registered, trained and put into his groove in the great 
German war machine, was almost terrifying. 



December 10, 19 18. 
I am sitting in a little gem of a cafe with old paintings and 
Roman bas reliefs around me and the "Patron" bowing and 
scraping as he shows me his genuine Murillos and his coins and 



Princeton University 333 

relics of the time of that gentleman who invented the Latin sub- 
junctive and indirect discourse, "Vercingetorix" ; the only old 
Gaul who licked one J. Caesar several years ago and to whom 
there is a monument in the square here. A tall bottle of Chateau 
Lafitte occupies the right sector of my tactical position. I am 
threatened on my left by "Poulet" (unknown in the mud and 
cootie-ridden regions of Verdun), and my immediate front is 
menaced by a frontal attack of "Potage," "Canard," and "Patis- 
serie et Fromage." It is indeed a critical situation calling for 
all that the Field Regulations and the Drill Regulations of F. A. 
and the maxims of Napoleon have to offer. 

All of which, being simplified, means that I have been sent 
down as Commandant of a section of 1200 "permissionaires" — 
7-day furlough men — who are enjoying Uncle Sam's hospitality 
for a week at a choice French summer resort and former Monte 
Carlo in the Auvergne Mountains, where they have clean beds 
and six course table d'hote dinners and movies and hot baths, 
all free for one blissful week, before they are returned to dug- 
outs and cooties and "canned Willie." I am Police Commissioner 
and censor and Father Confessor to 1200 lively Americans and, 
if I survive, I will rejoin my regiment and receive membership 
in the Acadamie Francaise with the Croix de Guerre and the 
Cordon d'Honneur and all the rest — including the Congressional 
medal. The five days under fire in the Argonne and the service 
at St. Mihiel, Verdun and the rest are nothing to this. 

Verdun, December 18, 19 18. 

Just back from a trip to the leave area. Maybe you think 
it was not a job to keep those husky young Americans under 
control. Feel pretty nearly ready for a leave myself. But I bore 
away from Mont Dore, the town we invaded, a statement from 
the commanding officer of the district that our cherubs behaved 
most angelically and my services were satisfactory. 

Speaking of cooties, I must tell you one of the trip that was 
delicious as a typical soldier stunt. When our men had had 
their long four clay trip down to the leave area and were lined 
up just ready to go to the promised land — good beds, clean rooms, 
table d'hotes, hot baths and' all, a Gorgon suddenly stood in their 
path with medical insignia on his collar and went clown the line 
demanding, before they went into those clean beds and Elysian 



334 



Class of 1895 



fields, to know who had cooties. Horrors! Visions of a fast 
fading Paradise. At the very gates and then cast out because 
of an innocent entomological collection. Oh, no ! Nobody had 
them ! All had been "de-loused" before leaving as required by 
brigade orders. There were only some fifty odd out of twelve 
hundred that confessed ownership. These were ordered to re- 
port for baths and clean underclothes before they used the beds. 
When the crowds poured into the Roman baths and saw the great 
piles of attractive clean underwear and clean warm wool socks 
and clean shirts, their own travel-worn outfits were sudddenly 



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One of Major Thacher's dugouts in the Mleuse-Argonne offensive 



uncomfortable. They crowded up to get the new stuff. "Oh 
no !" said the medico-Gorgan, "these are only for men with 
cooties." Oh that was it, was it? Divers of the crowd dis- 
appeared. There were consultations, market quotations, barter- 
ing and trading. Then divers and sundry ones trooped back. 
"We've got cooties," they shyly admitted. "Show 'em," said the 
doctor. Up came hems of undershirts. Sure enough, there they 
were — lively and educated. The new underclothes were issued. 
Instead of fifty there were some two hundred who had 'em. But 
what the ruling price of cooties mounted to that day, I will never 
tell. It is a military secret. 



Princeton University 335 

Verdun, December 22, 1918. 
Our regiment was in the final advance that was made towards 
Etain here in front of us, but we were not up at Sedan as some 
of your letters from home seem to have placed us. Our big party 
was in_ the Argonne Forest where we were under fire and had 
such a lively time for five days at Charpentry and Baulny. Have 
you found those two little towns on the map? They are just 
north of Varennes where Louis XVI was captured on his flight 
from Paris. We shall always remember Charpentry and Baulny. 
At the later town our infantry of the 5th Division were being 
mauled and enfiladed by cross-fire from machine guns and artil- 
lery and our little battalion stood behind them in their second 
line trenches and supported them when they needed it most. It- 
was the real artillery stuff. Just the thing we had lived for, and 
dreamed about — shells whistling over while our little Miss "Swa- 
zant Kanze" talked back most saucily. And when I had the 
chance to take our artillery wire forward up in:o the infantry 
trenches to establish the forward O. P. I had the greatest picture 
of the real battle scene that one could hope to see in a whole 
war. Machine guns with white puffs along the edge of the 
woods and barrages falling just in front of them and men firing 
from the trenches and all that. Only I wish the blamed Boche 
hadn't cut up my wire with their 7.7's so that I could have had 
some fun adjusting on the beggars all by my lonesome. Well, 
that's all history now, and here I be, maundering about it already. 

Jan. 19, 1919. 
The "Mess Fund" sprinkled its generous torch over certain 
spots in this regiment on the 25th of last month. It was like the 
ghost of Christmas Present in the Christmas Carol. Our ration 
issue is an uncertain wheel of fortune. On Christmas Eve the 
ball just about hit the double zero. The Christmas packages had 
not come through and the meat issue was just plain, ordinary, 
abominated Corned Willy. It isn't always that way and we 
have plenty to eat now, but Christmas just simply wasn't in the 
O.M. Calendar, this year. And that was where Old Father 
Mess Fund just naturally walked out and enjoyed "hisself." I 
had a little chat with Harry Truman and he sent some of his 
most trained chow scouts out to comb every nook and corner of 
this devastated land. Also I sent out my Irish Sergeant Major 



336 



Class of 1895 



with a bunch of francs to find the elusive "oeuf" and "poulet" 
and Vin Rouge. Those boys walked 28 miles and brought back 
eleven dozen eggs with them. Then the Battery D bandits dug 
up a large and corpulent lady pig of just the proportions to 
furnish "two rounds sweeping" on the battery table. You ought 




The Battlefield in front of Verdun. 

to have seen that Mess Hall ! We had a Christmas tree with 
decorations of stars made out of old tin cans and tin-foil off of 
cigarette packages and a chocolate bar for each man, and a khaki 
handkerchief and cigarettes and cigars. And a genius of a cook 
made cherry cobblers from some canned cherries we bought 
down at Bar-le-Duc. Picture it for yourself. A dingy little shack, 
tacked over with tar-paper to keep out the snow — an island in 
a sea of mud — but inside ! Christmas greens, mistletoe, a piano 
snitched out from Lord knows what French billets. And 
crammed with singing and cheering American boys, thinly dis- 
guised as soldier-men — all smoking when they weren't stoking, 
and Tommy Murphy singing in his melodious tenor, "Oh, how 
I hate to get up in the morning" and the tables loaded with roast 
pig and jam and beans and, at the supreme moment of climax — 
pie ! One of the boys from Headquarters had borrowed a violin 
from some poilus and made it sob in melodies of homes and 



Princeton University 337 

wives and sweethearts and kids and all the rest until the Battery 
D quartette had to step in with "Keep your head down Alle- 
mand" in order to restore the morale of the occasion. It was a 
real Christmas and nobody thought of suggesting that we were 
a long way from the firesides that — well, nobody SPOKE of 
them anyhow. The sob-stuff is a long way down deep in the 
artilleryman's ego and it doesn't get to the surface often — once 
in a while when the mail bag come in but not often. 

Last Sunday night we heard there was a minstrel show from 
the 110th Ammunition Train wandering round loose in these 
barbed wire hills and we started out to capture it to cheer up 
our battalion. We found an old "Foyer du Soldat" shed — dirty, 
cold, dark, full of old straw from bed-ticks and althogether un- 
promising as a home of Thespis. But we turned the three bat- 
teries loose on it and made a first-rate Muehlebach-Comedy- 
Club theatre out of it between daylight and dark. Cleaned it out, 
wired it, got lights and power from headquarters, built a solid 
and substantial stage, put in stoves, benches, poster proscenium, 
curtain and "foots." Borrowed an old, half-wrecked piano, 
nailed two planks together for pedals and had a back drop and 
wings and three "sets." You'd never guess how much music 
there is in a cigar box guitar or a hack-saw hit with a padded 
hammer. Right there is where you have to hand it to the Amer- 
ican kid soldier again. His fiendish ingenuity and freakish 
humor. Over at Verdun where the somber old Meuse flows 
through this historic ground, the other day, two doughboys were 
put-putting up the current under the shell-scarred walls lolling 
with magnificent ease in an old scow that they had raised from 
the mud and fitted with a cast off motor from a salvage dump. 
The French lined the bank and watched with the troubled look 
of a small pup with his head on one side trying to understand 
the antics of the pet coon. To these polite and polished allies 
of ours we must be a strange, uncouth, inscrutable tribe. This 
astonishing Western savage — who comes in an army of two 
million, raised over night, brushes aside all military precedent, 
fights like Hades for France, then turns and steals France's 
choicest furniture from billets for firewood, cusses everything 
French when the price of eggs is raised on him, wounds the 
Frenchman considerably in his finer sensibilities by calling him 
"Frog," makes parodies on his marching song "Madelon," feeds, 



338 



Class of 1895 




Major Thacher inspects his barbed "mire entanglements during the 
Verdun-Metz offensive of Nov. gth-nth, 1918. 

and fraternises with German prisoners, sneaks grub out of his 
mess line for friendless Russians on their way home, rides like 
a demon, curses like a maniac, helps the peasant at his ploughing, 
attracts little children to him like a magnet and grins at every- 
thing! And on top of that he seems to have but one stern, un- 
swerving ambition in life and that is to collect German souvenir 
helmets. 

Am hoping to beat it for Paree and Nice, tomorrow on my 
long awaited leave. If you hear of somebody swimming up 
New York harbour — that's me. I've just natcherly kept agoin', 
when I got to salt water. 



(Postal card) 

January 27, 19 19. 
Now storming Italy on leave. Am looking out over the 
Mediterranean with a large bottle of Italian Capri wine in front 
of me. It's a terrible war. 

J. H. T. 



The Battlefields of France 



340 



Class of 1895 




Near B e thine our t, occupied by Doc Williams' Division. 




Ruined Chateau at Apremont in the Argonne, in the Sector of R'orf- 
Jiam's Division (the 28th) and on the right of Stockton's Division 
(the 77th). 



Prixceton University 



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Battery of 60th Brigade, Field Artillery, (Thacher's Brigade) in action 
at I 7 are nncs. 







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77&g Gate of Verdun. 

were stationed here. 



Caton's, Nixon's, and Thacher's Divisions 



342 



Class of 1895 




Firing "Reveille Kate" in the Sommedieu Sector (Thacher's Brigade). 




On the Varennes — Four de Paris Road in the Sector occupied by 
Paterson's and Thacher's Divisions. 



Princeton University 



343 




The battlefield in the Chatel-Chehery Sector assigned to Stockton's 
Division. 




A Y. M. C. A. show at Les Islettes occupied by Paterson's and Wad- 
ham's Divisions. 



344 



Class of 1895 




In the Verdun Sector occupied by Caton's, Nixon's, and Thacher's 
Diz'isions. 




The Clermont — Varennes Road. A battlefield of the 28th and 35th 
Divisions (Patcrson's, Thacher's, and VVadham's). 



Princeton University 



345 




Wounded of the 35th Division (Thacher's) at Chcppy-Varennes. 




Ruined bridge at Boureuilles, in the Sector of Paterson's and Thacher's 
Divisions, and on the right of Stockton's Division. 



Five Years in Europe 

1914-1919 

By John W. Garrett 
Minister to the Netherlands 1917-19 

These last five years have meant for me continuous "war 
work" and intimacy with the World War. When Austria sent 
her ultimatum to Serbia I was still Minister to the Argentine, on 
leave in Europe. It came over me that for a man in my line of 
business, life or even existence out of Europe during the tragedy 
that had begun would be intolerable and I therefore came home 
to get a European billet, and got it — a commission as special agent 
of the Department of State to assist ambassadors. War was 
declared while I was on the ocean on a German ship that some 
years later did proper and very welcome service in carrying our 
troops to France. I was on shore only sixty hours, caught the 
U. S. S. North Carolina at Boston, landed at Falmouth nine 
days later. This was the third week in August. England was 
sending what later was called the "Contemptibles" across the 
Channel and the difficulties of an outsider were rendered almost 
insurmountable by the great masses of men and stores that were 
being rushed across. I managed, however, the next day to get 
to France and Paris. 

My first aim was to reach Switzerland with the mission of 
helping to get as many as possible of the stranded Americans out. 
The Swiss had become panic-stricken, the banks had shut down 
on all credits and even the hotels were treating Americans and 
other foreigners abominably. At Paris I was lucky enough to 
find an American army officer bound for Geneva by automobile, 
with a vacant place in his car. We left Paris early in the morn- 
ing and made perhaps a record run (it was 338 miles), rushing 
through crowded villages and arriving at Geneva that night, 
having been held up sixty-eight times en route to show our 
papers and prove who we were. When we got to Bellegarde, the 
last French town, it was nearly nightfall and we were told we 
could not get through after dark. Mobilization was not yet 



Princeton University 



347 



completed ; the enemy was held momentarily at Liege ; every 
energy of every Frenchman was being bent and strained to meet 
the oncoming wave, and very special precautions had been taken 
at the frontiers to prevent the leakage through of information. 
But my officer was not the kind of a man to be deterred and we 
started down that steep, rough, winding road that leads into 
Switzerland, in the pitch blackness challenged every few hundred 
yards by sentries, stopping to show our papers, watching while 
they were minutely examined in the light of our motor lamps, 
then hurrying on to the next stop. Several times we missed the 
challenge, or rather did not stop for it, and I had all the sensation 
of being shot in the back where I sat huddled up in the car. 
Switzerland had already stopped running many of her trains and 
there was the greatest difficulty in getting back to St. Moritz 
which I had left three weeks before. There I was met at the 




The Princeton Club of Holland, in 1918 
Suydam '13 {of the Committee on Public Information) ; Rimy on '08 
{Vice Consul at Rotterdam) ; Garrett '95 {American Minister) ; 
Poster '10 {Assistant Naval Attache). 



34§ Class of 1895 

station by my wife and Jack Hibben, who was one of the 
American refugees. It seemed that several hundred Americans 
were stranded there, some of them scared, some of them on the 
verge of panic, and Hibben had called a meeting for that night 
at the hotel in the hope that I could say something that would 
reassure and quiet them. I did what I could, but it was an extra- 
ordinary gathering that, except for Hibben (who saw straight) 
and a few others, had pretty well lost its head. By strenuous 
action trains were secured a few days later and these people and 
hundreds of others were gathered together from all parts of 
Switzerland and dumped in Geneva where no provision had been 
made for them except that trains were supposed to have been 
engaged to carry them on to Paris. These, however, were taken 
over by British refugees and we found ourselves unable to move. 
The Embassy in Paris being appealed to, took the matter up with 
its usual diligence, and we finally pulled out on the long journey 
to the French capital. It zvas a long journey — a night and the 
best part of two days by the roundabout route we had to travel. 
There were about a thousand Americans and loud claimants to 
American citizenship on our train and other thousands on the 
trains that followed, most of them without papers for it had not 
occurred to Americans to provide themselves with these some- 
times useful things. We were in third class carriages, without 
food of any kind, for the thousands of British and other for- 
eigners who were ahead of us had eaten up every scrap of eatable 
stuff at every station along the road. The six people in our com- 
partment sustained themselves during those many hours on one 
sole bottle of port — which I hold is an example of the high value 
of good drink. 

There was no thought but of war at that moment. Aviatiks 
were flying daily over Paris, dropping bombs, the small de- 
structiveness of which we learned later on to ridicule. They 
were being shot at promiscuously by equally ridiculous and in- 
effective weapons. (It was much later on that we saw one night 
the first Zeppelin over Paris — a sight, when the searchlights 
found it, never to be forgotten.) No one believed that it would 
be possible to stop the Germans short of Paris. Ambassador 
Herrick had very properly decided to stay in the city to protect 
the many interests confided to his charge. On the 2nd of Sep- 
tember he was informed that the French Government and the 



Princeton University 349 

diplomatic corps would leave that night for Bordeaux and he 
asked me to go and establish a branch of the Embassy there. 
Gallieni had requisitioned all the taxis in Paris and getting to the 
train, particularly getting our baggage down, was a long-drawn- 
out task. I managed to "buy" an awfully old cab with a horse 
lacking all "understandings," with which I made journey after 
journey from our hotel to the railway station. Everybody else 
was doing the same thing. Indeed, it was estimated that about a 
million people got out of Paris, and yet there did not seem to be a 
panic. There was excitement of course, and certain dread, but 
what stands out of it now is the grim determination. It was well 
to get all people out of Paris who would in any way be a handicap 
in its defense. They were better away from the front and Paris 
came very near being the front during those few awful days. 
There were two official trains to Bordeaux — one for the President 
and Government of France, and the other for the diplomatic 
corps. Together with the small staff that Herrick gave me, my 
wife and I were sandwiched in between the Legation of Monaco 
and the Embassy of .Japan. Each compartment in that long 
train was ticketed with the name of one of the Powers or little 
countries of the world bound for the temporary capital of 
France — just as they had been bound for the same place forty- 
three years before. Curiously enough, one of the diplomats on 
the train — the Dutch Minister — had been an Attache of the Dutch 
Legation in '71 and was making this trip for the second time. 

Bordeaux was in a great state of confusion. Houses had been 
requisitioned by the Government for the use of the foreign 
diplomats but as our Embassy had notified the Government that 
it was staying in Paris, none was requisitioned for us until after 
our train started. So we found the owners still in the shabby 
house assigned us, helped them pack up and get out, and entered 
into possession that night. Later on we were able to get a suit- 
able place and I established there a branch Embassy which during 
the three months that the Government was in Bordeaux was in 
constant touch with it. 

Our chief duties, aside from purely American interests, were 
brought about by our charge of German and Austro-Hungarian, 
and later on of Turkish, interests, and our hands were full. 
French statistics show that several hundred thousand citizens of 
these countries were resident in France shortly before the out- 



350 Class of 1895 

break of the war. Many of the Germans had had warnings of 
what was coming and got out, but the round up finally com- 
pleted brought many tens of thousands of enemy civilians into 
the concentration camps. This whole business of concentrating 
civilians was a new one and there were no treaties or under- 
standings to govern it. There had been concentrations, of course, 
in Cuba and in South Africa, and elsewhere, but nothing on this 
scale. These people, men, women and children, were necessarily 
huddled together under every available roof. A million Belgians 
and more than a million French refugees are said to have poured 
down before the advancing foe. They had to be taken care of 
in some way or another. It was natural and proper that they 
should be given first choice ; but often the impossibility of finding 
any places at all for such a multitude resulted, insofar at least as 
our charges were concerned, in their being crowded and over- 
crowded into all sorts of buildings, and it was many long months 
before these difficulties were overcome — as they finally were. 
There were of course at this time few military prisoners. When 
these began to come in they added to the complications and to 
our cares. The French Government had brought with it from 
Paris tons and tons of its important archives and many officials 
of the Central Government who were spread around through 
houses in Bordeaux requisitioned for the purpose. The difficulty 
of finding the particular bureau or man you were after resulted 
in the beginning in many a long search. I wish I had kept notes 
about what went on then. I did, indeed keep voluminous notes, 
but I no longer have them for they belong to the archives of the 
Government and are deposited in them. My staff was slowly in- 
creased but it never reached a point which permitted any let-up in 
the work of each individual and the whole lot of us gave our days 
and nights to the job on hand. 

Many curious incidents came up and had to be met. In the 
midst of the turmoil Mr. Bryan sought to have his Arbitration 
Treaty with France agreed to. It was hard to induce a feeling 
of the value of any treaty at that moment when the most solemn 
covenants were being torn into "scraps of paper," but Delcasse 
finally acquiesced and this treaty with us went into effect. The 
question of nationality was one of the curious things we had to 
deal with. For instance the little principality of Lichtenstein on 
the Austrian border had always had its foreign affairs managed 



Princeton University 



35i 



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John W . Garrett '95 and Mrs. Garrett, zvith the Staff of the American 
Legation at The Hague, 1919. 



by the Austrian diplomatic officers abroad. When we succeeded 
them, the Lichtenstein authorities claimed that we were in charge 
of their affairs. Four natives of the little country had been 
raked in and they appealed to us to get them out on the assump- 
tion that France and Lichtenstein were not at war. There were 
some interesting debates or rather discussions on this subject, 
which brought me up against the wonderfully learned legal ex- 
perts of the French Foreign Office, to whom I take off my hat 
and admit my profound admiration. I wish we made use of 
men like them. They knew the dots and crossings where I 
hardly knew the ABC's. Finally they concluded that Lichten- 
stein was independent, that France and Lichtenstein were not at 
war, and that its subjects were free to go. Questions in regard 
to the nationality acquired by Germans in Monaco also came up 
pretty frequently. The most notorious one was the case of the 
head croupier at Monte Carlo who had acquired Monaguasque citi- 
zenship without losing his German nationality. His appeal to us, 
however, put him in a quandary because if he were a Monaguas- 
que it was to his own Legation that he must appeal for freedom, 
and not to us ; if he were a German, we were the people to appeal 



352 Class of 1895 

to, but the appeal could of course only result in his continued 
confinement and in the sequestration of his goods. It took a 
long time to get this into his head but we were finally disem- 
barrassed of the case, as well as of other similar ones. I kept 
on hoping that some questions in regard to the status of the 
citizens of Andorra would come up but, as far as we were con- 
cerned, this little republic stayed completely out of the war. 
When the Turks came in we were confronted with new compli- 
cations. The territories in Thrace and Macedonia that had a few 
years before become Greek or Bulgarian contained thousands of 
individuals most of whom it seemed to us had drifted into France 
and did not know or could not prove what they were If they 
claimed to be Turks, they ran the same risk in appealing to us as 
the head croupier at Monte Carlo ; if they claimed to be Greeks or 
anything else, they of course could not avail of such influences as 
our representations might have. I think many of them had vivid 
qualms as to the most profitable allegiance to assume. Most 
Americans were quickly gotten out of France and we had little 
difficulty in regard to them after the first few weeks. 

On the 9th of December the Government went back to Paris, 
all danger to which had been relieved by the turning movement of 
the forces of von Kluck. The German plans for the piece-meal 
destruction of Paris were put in temporary limbo and a new 
breathing spell began. We knew that we were going back some 
days before and made all our preparations. 

All through this time and though the years that followed every 
man that was a man desired to fight and many of the younger 
secretaries in our Service and some of the older ones left it to 
take up the burden of active defense ; but the stage was large 
and offered chances for every sort of work, and the men before 
the footlights needed the prompting and the help of those behind 
the scenes. Some day somebody will write up the history of our 
foreign service during the war and it will be a very proud history. 
It was a terrible thing to be a neutral in France and even with 
strenuous endeavor out of the question to be "neutal-minded." 
But whatever may have been our mental leanings, the facts are 
that in doing what we were called upon to do as representatives 
of the enemies of France and her Allies, we leaned over back- 
wards until sometimes our backs seemed to break. Necessarily 
our representations of enemy interests put us in an invidious 



Princeton University 353 

position that required all the tact and ability that could be sum- 
moned to gain our objectives without compromising the position 
of our country. In every one of the belligerent capitals we had 
charge of some enemy interests. In the Embassy in Paris there 
were three men of Ministerial rank. One of them, Coolidge, was 
given charge of Turkish interests, and the two others, Dodge and 
myself, took over the care of German and Austro-Hungarian 
interests, Dodge particularly those relating to military prisoners 
and I those in regard to the civilians. 

The lot of the civilian prisoners were harder, it seems to me, 
and more pitiable than that of the military prisoners. The latter 
were mostly young, vigorous men (if they were sick or wounded 
they got the best care available) and they had the satisfaction 
of feeling that they had done their work for their country ; they 
mere in the minds of their kinsmen at home who never forgot 
them but organized for their relief, sent them food and clothing 
and the many little things that help to ease prison life, and cared 
for their dependents. Moreover they could look forward to 
being kept from want on their eventual return. Many of the 
civilians had abandoned all or mostly all ties with their country 
of origin, many had almost become French, had married French 
women, and had their big or little businesses and all their worldly 
possessions and interests in France. For them the future was 
hopeless. Their goods were sequestrated, their business ruined 
— all that they had devoted their lives to gone over night. Few, 
if any, people across the Rhine thought of them or sent them 
anything. Their Government eventually put at their disposal 
sums large in the aggregate but small when they got down to the 
ultimate division, not enough for the little daily "luxuries" — much 
less for the big necessities. They were men of all ages, women 
and children. I have seen little tackers beginning to walk who 
had never been out of the prison camp. Eventually most of these 
people were liberated or sent home, but while war is going on it 
is nearly impossible for belligerent Governments to meet each 
other and the media through which all attempts at agreements 
must pass work slowly and often very ineffectually. Govern- 
ments and people have other things to think of. Men who have 
gone through the experience of such a charge as ours are in- 
sistent that something shall come out of this war that shall make 
such sufferings as far as possible absent from the next catas- 



354 Class of 1895 

trophe. It is one of the minor things, if you like, but it is one 
of the avoidable ones and therefore one of the inexcusable ones. 
There should be no civilian prisoners outside the categories of 
enemy agents, though I admit the practical difficulties under every 
circumstance of knowing where to draw the line now that the 
era of "standing armies" has passed into that of "nations at war." 
Because this thing had never been worked out, it was necessary, 
as I have said, to start without any prearranged scheme and com- 
plete an organization which should carry on correspondence be- 
tween belligerents not on speaking terms, and make the necessary 
representations ; should visit frequently and systematically all 
the prison camps ; care for the sick and wounded, for the women, 
children and old men; supplement the feeding and clothing of 
the prisoners, dole out money to them, arrange as between the 
belligerents for the interchange of packages, letters and informa- 
tion, and before long take up and carry through to such an extent 
as might prove possible the release of certain classes, the re- 
patriation of others, evacuation to neutral countries, and ex- 
change Of all the thousand and one questions that came up, 
those regarding reprisals and hostages were not the least difficult 
to handle. Oh the weary discussions on the meaning of the word 
"hostage" which never was defined ! The different viewpoints 
of the native and the occupier of Alsace-Lorraine could not be 
brought together to the satisfaction of anybody. The whole epic 
would take a Walt Whitman to catalogue. 

In the course of the work arrangements were come to between 
the belligerents covering many details and large categories both 
of civilians and prisoners of war were eventually rrmtually re- 
leased. We travelled over the whole of France and to Corsica 
and North Africa visiting the camps. Some years before the 
French Government had taken over the properties of the religious 
congregations and these old convents and monasteries generally 
in out-of-the-way places, were now turned to the new purpose of 
housing enemy prisoners. The putting of hundreds of people 
into an old monastery where a few dozen monks had lived and 
meditated sometimes brought up appalling incongruities. Asce- 
ticism covered a multitude of unsanitary sins — of that the evi- 
dence could not be gainsaid. These places were without what 
one may call "facilities" for the decent care of numbers of people. 
With every energy bent upon saving France the difficulties of 



Princeton University 



355 



every kind of installation were very real and could only be over- 
come gradually. Rules and regulations were finally formulated, 
committees were appointed in all the camps, and a system evolved 
which, with two or three exceptions, was working smoothly and 
as satisfactorily as could be expected when the end of our charge 
came with America's entry into the war. 

In 19 1 6 I was able to make personal comparisons between the 
prisoners' camps in France and Germany, the French Government 




Baseball teams of the American Legation at The Hague and the Canadian 
Officers interned in Holland. 

The Scores : 
July I, 1918 (Dominion Day) 

American Legation 13 — Canadian Officers 8. 
July 4 1918 (Independence Day) 

American Legation 13 — Canadian Officers 11. 

having asked me to go to Germany on behalf of the French offi- 
cers prisoners there. This was a trip of most profound interest. 
Two of us went together and we were able to work out a schedule 
which carried us from the Rhine to the Polish frontier and en- 
abled us to see a great deal of what was really going on inside 
Germany. However we visited in an official capacity only camps 
where officers were detained, although we went to a civilian and 
to a soldier camp to see what they were like. Many of the great 
abuses in Germany were in the camps of civilians and private 



356 Class of 1895 

soldiers, in the "working parties," and in the zones of the Army, 
into none of which could we officially penetrate. Perhaps the 
worst places that we actually officially inspected were two so- 
called "reprisal" camps. They had been instituted as reprisal 
against alleged conditions in a certain camp in France and the 
hardships undergone by the poor men confined in them put bitter 
anger in one's heart. They were given up not long afterwards 
as the Germans received proof which they had to consider satis- 
factory that the conditions in the camp in question in France 
were not as they had been represented to be. Generally speak- 
ing, the chief hardships in the camps could be mitigated by the 
choice of the right sort of man as commandant. The wrong sort 
of man made it a hell under him, and there were many of the 
wrong sort. 

Several times I visited the front, and was twice under what 
seemed to me very heavy fire but which to you military men 
would have seemed nothing at all. It scared me sufficiently and 
I was chagrined to find no mention of it in the communiques the 
next day. After the retreat to the Hindenburg line, I paid 
several visits to the devastated regions, particularly around 
Noyon and Arras. The utter destruction was beyond human 
imagination. Villages and often towns had disappeared. You 
could see refugees coming back and hunting for some trace of 
a landmark that would identify the place where they had always 
lived. The trees were gone, the soil even was blown away from 
the ground, and most of the time everything seemed to be covered 
with a sea of mud and shell-holes and the leavings of such a 
human havoc as nothing in all the wars before had wrought. 

It is hard to recount— and I do not suppose it would be suffi- 
ciently interesting — the many things that come up as I begin to 
think back over the three years in France. I saw Pershing arrive 
and joined in the emotion of the 13th of June, 1917, and went to 
St. Nazaire the next week to see the first American troops come 
ashore. Early in September my wife and I visited the "American 
front" near Gondrecourt and saw the beginning of the training 
which long afterward enabled those wonderful fellows to save 
an almost hopeless situation. 

In November, 191 6, I had been offered the appointment to The 
Hague on the resignation of my predecessor but my nomination 
took a long time. It was only in the following September, when 



Princeton University 357 

my papers finally arrived from Washington, that I could leave 
Paris for the new post. 

Crossing the Channel isn't a joke, and in those days it was 
often a tragedy. From Calais to Folkestone we were on a British 
transport filled with troops on leave. We had to wait ten days 
in London, on five of which it was bombarded by Gothas. The 
splendid backbone of the British people — the crowd that has to 
stay at home — was shown by their behavior in these awful raids. 
They didn't lose control and self-possession, and German mis- 
reading of British psychology never went further than in the 
expectation that such wretched work as this would bring the 
British people to the end of its moral resources. Their other 
calculation, however, perhaps had more in it for the threat held 
over London did result in keeping hundreds of needed men and 
guns away from the fighting area in France. The sailings of 
the rare periodical boats between London and Holland were kept 
a profound secret. The few passengers allowed to go were held 
for days and nights at a stretch waiting for the four-hours' notice 
which was supposed to allow them time to catch the train to 
Greenwich where the boat could be boarded. Our four-hours' 
notice came one midnight and we left London in the very early 
hours of the morning, got on board the boat, dropped down the 
river and waited there until nightfall. During the night we were 
convoyed across- — wide awake all the way, sitting on deck im- 
agining all sorts of horrors and frankly hating the thing. 

Getting back to Holland was coming again to very familiar 
surroundings for I had spent four years in The Hague as Secre- 
tary at the beginning of my diplomatic service. I confess that it 
seemed rather queer to me to be the head of the Legation instead 
of "the" Secretary, but I rather liked the feeling ! The Legation 
back in 1901 consisted of a Minister, a Secretary, and a clerk. 
When I got to The Hague this second time I found a staff of 
twelve or fifteen men and women, which was increased as the 
work grew until at the time of the armistice we mustered over 
a hundred, including the offices of the Military and Naval 
Attaches and of the representatives of the War Trade Board and 
the Committee on Public Information, all of whom worked as 
part of the Legation. The American colony in Holland during 
the war was at a minimum. We kept close tab on them, closer 
than they knew, for several reasons. For instance, if the over- 



358 Class of 1895 

running of Holland, which was sometimes expected, had taken 
place, it would have been part of our duty to get them safely 
somewhere. Most of them were loyal, helpful compatriots. 
Some of them were enemy agents but out of reach of Uncle 
Sam's police power. 

Holland lay behind the lines, with intercourse generally un- 
interrupted but stringently safeguarded across the German 
frontier. Belgium and parts of Germany were shut off by 
electric wire and armed guards but the marvel is how men and 
messages got through constantly, day after day and night after 
night. We collected information, every scrap of it, and put it 
to use. We read the papers of most of Germany, digested them 
(which required mighty stomachs!) and sent all that off too. 
Our telegraph bills ran into figures that I should hate to have put 
before the Congress in its present economical mood. One may 
say that outside intercourse save with Germany did not exist, for 
the little steamers that occasionally crossed the Channel to and 
from England could carry little and were loaded down with food 
supplies for the prisoners and with their mail. Sometimes six 
weeks passed without even one of them getting across and there 
were no other means of communication with the outside of any 
kind except the cables. We had to uncolor all our news, for it 
was tinged and tainted quite beyond belief. We were not only 
news gatherers but news givers and I think it could be shown 
that the American propaganda assisted bye and bye the wonderful 
effectiveness of the British and French work in that line. 

We had our very serious troubles, about some of which I think 
it is hardly well for me to write. As far as our relations with 
the Dutch Government were concerned the thing that seemed to 
occupy most attention at home was the requisitioning of the Dutch 
ships. I hoped until the last moment that this would not become a 
necessary thing to do but military necessity knows only some laws 
and the salvation of the world depended upon getting American 
troops to France while Dutch ships were lying idle in every 
harbor. Dutchmen may feel a consolation in that their country 
aided, unwillingly perhaps, and certainly with travail, in the great 
final outcome. 

I had a very wonderful lot of men and women helping me, 
loyal Americans and Allies, who held out against the terrible 
waves of depression that overcome all but the bravest spirits and 



Princeton University 



359 



fought for the final outcome as much as anyone at the front. 
My post included also Luxembourg but obvious circumstances 
continually prevented the presentation of my letter there. Even 
correspondence with the Grand Duchy was pretty difficult though 
we managed to keep up some sort of communication in ways that 
might be called devious. 

Even in Holland I could not get away from the prisoners. 
Besides the thousands of British, Belgians, Canadians, and 
French who were interned there and who of course had their 
own people to look out for them, a certain number of Americans 




American Commissioners to the Prisoners of War Conference at 
Berne. Front row, left to right: John W. Davis, then Solicitor 
General of the United States, now Ambassador at London, repre- 
sentative of the Department of Justice; John W. Garrett 'g$, 
American Minister to the Hague; Chairman of the Commission, 
representative of the Department of State; General F. J. Kernan, 
representing the War Department; Captain H. H. Hough, repre- 
senting the Navy Department. This Commission negotiated and 
signed a convention with the German delegates on November n, 
1918. 



turned up — men who had escaped in some marvelous fashion 
from the enemy's clutches, or aviators who came down in Holland 
after bombarding Zeebrugge or Ostende. And then in August, 
1918, I was made Chairman of a Commission to meet the enemy 
face to face at Berne and negotiate and sign a treaty for the treat- 



360 Class of 1895 

ment of our captured men. I went to London the last day of 
August, swearing that I would come back to The Hague over- 
land, because we began to believe then that the end was in sight 
and that the clearing out of the enemy was about to begin. My 
Commission met first in London and adjourned to Paris where 
it held conferences and, after thorough discussion of all we knew 
on the subject and exhaustive study of every Convention re- 
garding prisoners of war, we drew up a form of a treaty. The 
other Commissioners were Solicitor General Davis, now Am- 
bassador in London, General Kernan, the organizer of the S.O.S., 
and Capt. Hough of the Navy, besides twice as many assistant 
Commissioners, all experts in their lines, and a very efficient 
clerical staff. We met the Germans at Berne in plenary council 
on September 24th and labored with them for seven weeks. We 
decided that we would not speak to them directly in the plenary 
meetings or outside. All intercourse was through the admirable 
Swiss Minister who presided at our long table. There were 
many things that we were insistent should be in the Treaty which 
they did not want. Most of us had had experience with German 
treatment of prisoners and felt the obligation upon us to provide, 
insofar as any written arrangement could provide, that our 
American boys should suffer the minimum. 

Those were wonderful days in the world. We eagerly followed 
the fighting at St. Mihiel and in the Argonnes and watched the 
effect on the faces of the men who sat across the table from us. 
Bulgaria gave in ; then Germany asked for an armistice, and 
Turkey and Austria-Hungary too. We were to have had a 
meeting with Austro-Hungarian delegates for the purpose of 
negotiating a Treaty with them as well, but this turned out to 
be unnecessary. We finally concluded our negotiations with 
the Germans and actually signed our Treaty on the nth of 
November — possibly the last document signed by Germans with 
Imperial Commissions. I celebrated armistice night at Chau- 
mont, American G.H.Q., and went back to The Hague overland 
as I had promised to do — through Brussels where I arrived to 
see the streets jammed with the crowds welcoming the return of 
their heroic king. 

The whole atmosphere of the world had changed when I got 
back to The Hague and the burden which weighed on everyone 
throughout those long years and which seemed almost over- 



Princeton University 361 

whelming in the spring of this year, was cast off. One danger 
had been overcome. 

The Peace Conference began its sessions in Paris and I went 
down there several times to try to find out what was going on, 
and was one of the witnesses of the signing of the Treaty at 
Versailles on the 28th of June. On one of these trips I travelled 
through the occupied parts of Germany and saw our flag flying 
over Ehrenbreitstein. 

I had been in very close association with many French people 
during their struggle, I had seen their elation change to the 
uttermost desperation, I had seen the revivication that came 
through our help — and it could have come in no other way. 
There is no love lost between nations and there never will be, 
but I know that the depth of the feeling of the French for us and 
of our feeling for them can be overcome, if it is overcome, only 
momentarily. You cannot bind people together in a death 
struggle where each man does his part and saves the other and 
have them forget what it means. In the next few years America 
has got to play her part, an equally great part, to make the world 
worth living in. Whether she wants to or not, she has to play it 
— whether she keeps herself great in doing it depends upon 
herself. 

My work at The Hague was finished. I longed to get home, 
and finally I found the opportunity in July. 

Baltimore, Feb. 29, ip20. 



Deceased Members of the Class 

ERNEST GRAVES BERGEN, A.B. 

Died March 6, 1906 

Ernest Graves Bergen, the son of the Reverend George S. 

Bergen, Harbor Springs, Mich., was born September 19, 1873, 

and entered Princeton in September, 1891, graduating in June, 

1895 with the degree of A.B. He was a member of the Phila- 




delphian Society and Clio Hall, and roomed at 14 North West 
College. 

In the fall of '95 he entered the New York Law School, and at 
the same time was a law clerk in the office of Carter and Fal- 
lows. In June, 1897, he received the degree of LL.B. from the 
New York Law School, was admitted to the bar, and was a prac- 
tising lawyer from that time on, at first by himself and then, in 
May, 1905, as a member of the law firm of Brower, Bergen 
and Stout, New York City. He was a member of the Princeton 
Club. 

He died March 6, 1906, at his home in New York City. He 
was unmarried. 



Princeton University 363 

HERBERT MONTGOMERY BERGEN 

Died July 22, 1893 
Herbert Montgomery Bergen, the son of the Reverend George 
S. Bergen, Harbor Springs, Mich., and brother of Ernest G. 
Bergen, '95, entered Princeton in 1891 in the Academic course. 




In college he was a member of the Philadelphian Society and 
Clio Hall, and roomed at 185 Nassau Street. He was only with 
the class during the Freshman and Sophomore years. He died 
during the summer vacation, July 22, 1893. 

CLARENCE HAMLIN BISSELL, A.B. 

Died June 30, 1912 

Clarence Hamlin Bissell was born in Milford, N. Y., April 6, 
1873, the son of George N. Bissell and Sarah Hamlin Bissell. 
His paternal ancestors came to this country prior to 1642 and 
were prominently identified with Colonial life in Connecticut. 

He prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Arademy, Exeter, 
N. H., entering Princeton in September, 1891 and graduating in 
June, 1895, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

In college he was a member of Whig Hall and the Tiger Inn 
and roomed at 2 North West College. He played on the Fresh- 
man baseball team; was president of the University Baseball 



3 6 4 



Class of 189^ 



Association; and editor of the Daily Princetonian. After leav- 
ing college he was in business for a while at Bay City, Mich. ; 
was then in business in Chicago for a few months ; and later re- 
turned to Princeton in March, 1896, to succeed Henry Duffield 
as General Athletic Treasurer. This position he held until Sep- 
tember 1, 1896 when he entered the employ of the Murphy 
Varnish Company at Newark. 

In 1898 he became superintendent of the Newark factory of 




the Murphy Varnish Company, in the course of time becoming 
General Superintendent and then Second Vice-president and Di- 
rector of the company. For several years he was Director of the 
National State Bank of Newark. 

On September 24, 1901, he married Miss Blanche Lull Need- 
ham at Newark, N. J. He died June 30, 1912, and was buried 
at Cooperstown, N. Y. 



HARRY OLIVER BROWN, A.B. 

Died March 21, 1904 

Harry Oliver Brown was born July 14, 1869, coming to Prince- 
ton from Irwin, Pa., in September, 1891, and graduating in 1895 
with the degree of A.B. 

He roomed at 7 South Middle Reunion Hall ; played on the 



Princeton University 365 

Freshman Football Team, and later on the Varsity Team, being 
a member of the championship team of 1893. He was a mem- 
ber of Whig Hall and the Ivy Club, and was Class Censor at the 
Cannon exercises at graduation. 

In the fall after leaving college he entered the New York Law 
School, but before the end of the first year he was offered a po- 




1895 

sition in the Right of Way Department of the American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. Later he became a Special 
Agent of the Telephone Company and traveled extensively in the 
Eastern states and in the South in the interests of that organiza- 
tion. His home was in New York City and he was a member of 
the Princeton Club. 

On May 27, 1903, he married Miss Mary Edna Smith of New 
York. He was taken ill with pneumonia while traveling in the 
South and died at Decatur, Ala., March 21, 1904. 

RHODES CLAY, B.S. 

Died July 10, 1902 
Rhodes Clay was born January 19, 1875, in Bolivar County, 
Miss. He was prepared for college at St. James's Military Acad- 
emy, Macon, the Mexico County, (Mo.) High School and the 
Missouri Military Academy, entering Princeton in September, 



3 66 



Class of 1895 



1891, and graduating in June, 1895, with the degree of B.S. He 
roomed at 8 South West College, was a member of the St. Paul's 
Society and Tiger Inn, and was leader of the University Mando- 
lin Club. 

After leaving college he studied law at Washington University, 
St. Louis. He was admitted to the Bar in 1897 at his home town, 
Mexico, Mo., and became a member of the law firm of Fry and 




Clay. In 1900 he was elected a member of the Missouri House 
of Representatives on the Democratic ticket. He was the author 
of the bill in that Legislature separating State and local taxes. 

On July 10, 1902, shortly after his renomination for a second 
term, he was shot and killed in the streets of Mexico, Mo., by an 
Attorney-at-law of that town. He was unmarried. 



HARRY PRESLEY COBB 



Died Nov. 21, 1894 
Harry Presley Cobb entered Princeton from Utica in 1891 in 
the Civil Engineering Department. He roomed at 24 Chambers 
Street and then at 27 Mercer Street; was a member of the St. 



Princeton University 



367 




1893 
Paul's Society and Whig Hall. He died at the beginning of 
Senior Year, on November 21, 1894. 

CHARLES COCHRAN 

Died Feb. 24, 1917 
Charles Cochran was born in Williamsport, Pa., April 3, 1873, 
the son of James Henry Cochran and Avis Ann Rouse Cochran. 





1916 



6 



68 Class of 1895 



He was prepared for college at Lawrenceville School and entered 
Princeton in the Academic Department in September, 1891. He 
roomed at 144 Nassau Street; was a member of the Philadelphian 
Society and played on the Freshman Football Team. He left 
Princeton in 1894 and studied law at Williamsport, Pa. During 
1897 he traveled in South and Central America. In 1898-9, he 
was in the Klondike region of Alaska. In 1900-01 he was As- 
sistant General Manager of the Cresson and Clearfield Coal and 
Coke Company. In 1902 he was Paying Teller for Cochran, 
Payne and McCormick, bankers, of Williamsport. In 1903 he 
became Secretary-Treasurer and Assistant General Manager of 
the Susquehanna, Bloomsburg and Berwick Railroad Company. 
In 1912 he becme Vice-president of the Northern Central Trust 
Company of Williamsport, which position he held until his death 
at Rochester, Minn., on February 24, 1917. 

On April 28, 1903, he married Miss Martha C. Perley, daugh- 
ter of Allan P. Perley of Williamsport, Pa. There are three 
children, Martha Perley Cochran, born March 26, 1904 ; Avis Ann 
Cochran, born April r, 1907; Mary Lovejoy Cochran, born De- 
cember 26, 1910. 

DAVID DUNLOP 

Died Jan. i, 1916 

David Dunlop entered Princeton from Petersburg, Va., in Sep- 
tember, 1 89 1, as a special student; roomed at 80 University Place, 
and left college at the end of Freshman year. 

After leaving college he engaged in tobacco manufacturing 
business with the firm of David Dunlop and Company (his 
father's firm) and became President of the corporation of that 
name in 1903. He was also proprietor of the Ellersley Stock 
Farm in Chesterfield County, Virginia, near Petersburg; where 
he died January 1, 1916. 

On November 21, 1893, he married Miss Lena B. Davis in 
Washington, D. C. There are three sons, David Dunlop, 2nd, 
born December, 21, 1894; John Minge Dunlop, born July 28, 
1896; Compton Dunlop, born January 10, 1899. 

ERNEST DICK EGBERT, A.B. 

Died Feb. i, 1897 
Ernest Dick Egbert entered Princeton from Franklin, Pa., in 
September, 1891, and graduated in June, 1895, with the degree 



Princeton University 369 

of A.B. He roomed at 3 East Brown Hall and was a member 
of Whig Hall. 

In the fall of 1895, after leaving college, he became superin- 




1895 

tendent of the Shenango Mining Company, coal operators, at 
Jackson Centre, Pa. 

He died of pneumonia at his home in Franklin, Pa., after a 
short illness, on February 1, 1897. 

RICHARD MILBURN FARRIES, A.B. 

Died June 30, 1918 

Richard Milburn Farries, the son of Adam Paterson Fames, 
M.D., and Hannah Amelia Milburn Farries, was born at Sugar 
Loaf, Orange County, N. Y., September 10, 1873. He prepared 
for college at Blair Hall, Blairstown, N. J., and the Princeton 
Preparatory School, entering Princeton in September, 1891, and 
graduating in June, 1895, A.B. He roomed at 3 East Brown 
Hall and was a member of Clio Hall. 

After leaving college he entered the New York Law School 
and during his course in the law school was employed in the 
law offices of Rounds and Dillingham, and of Wilmore Amway, 
of New York. In June, 1897, he received the degree of LL.B. 
from the New York Law School. In 1898 he practised law for 



37o 



Class of 1895 



a short time in his former home at Florida, Orange County, N. 
Y. In November, 1898, he formed a law partnership with A. 
Parker Nevin, '95, under the firm name of Farries and Nevin, 
which continued until April, 1900, when for a while he practised 
by himself, and in May, 1901, became a member of the law firm 
of Brewster and Farries, of which he was a member up to the 
time of his death. 

On June 23, 1906, he married Miss Sara Louise Vernon at 
Florida, N. Y. They had two daughters, Helen Lois Farries, 




born February 12, 1908, in New York, and Mary Alice Farries, 
born January 25, 1912, at Florida, N. Y. 

In 1905 he wrote, "I have never been a soldier nor a sailor nor 
an author, but have had some little experience with politics, 
which might be characterized as 'working for the party.' ' : 

He was a member of the Princeton Club of New York and was 
active in Masonic affairs, being a member of Adelphic Lodge No. 
348, New York City. At the time of his death he was one of the 
supervisors of Westchester County, N. Y. 

He died June 30, 1918, at New Rochelle Hospital, New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y., after being injured in an automobile accident near 
his home in Scarsdale. 



Princeton University 371 

EDWARD JEANES FOULKE 

Died Nov. 3, 1905 

Edward Jeanes Foulke prepared for college at the German- 
town Academy, entering Princeton in 1891, and leaving at the 
end of Freshman year. He roomed at 39 Nassau Street; was a 
member of the Philadelphian Society, and played on the Fresh- 
man Banjo Club. 

After leaving college he was employed by the Germantown 




Trust Company, as assistant to the Real Estate Officer, in which 
position he continued until his death on November 3, 1905. 

He was a member of the University Club of Philadelphia, and 
the Germantown and Country Clubs of Germantown, Pa. He 
was unmarried. 



HORATIO WHITRIDGE GARRETT, B.S. 

Died October 2, 1896 

Horatio Whitridge Garrett was born August 1, 1873, the son of 
Thomas Harrison Garrett (Princeton A.B. '68, A.M. '71) and 
Alice Dickenson Whitridge Garrett of Baltimore. He entered 
Princeton in September, 1891, and graduated in June, 1895, with 
the degree of B.S. 

In college he worked hard, and stood far up in his class in 



372 



Class of 1895 



the Scientific School. He played his part in athletics and was 
left guard in our championship class team in Senior year. He 
was a member of Whig Hall; of the Southern Club and Tiger 
Inn, and an editor of the Bric-a-Brac. He went on one of the 
Glee Club trips as a "super" and on one of the Princeton "geo- 
logical" expositions to Wyoming during a summer vacation. 

He decided upon leaving college to enter the banking firm of 
Robert Garrett and Sons, of Baltimore, of which his father had 
been the head up to the time of his death in 1888. On October 
16, 1895 he married Miss Charlotte Doremus Pierson at Summit, 




N. J. Within a few weeks, what seemed at first a rheumatic af- 
fection of his knee, developed so seriously that on November 25th 
his leg had to be amputated. The thing that impressed everyone 
from then until he died less than a year later, was his astounding 
bravery, for although he suffered great agony for long months, 
he never gave up or let anyone know that he was suffering. He 
died at Leamington Spa, England, October 2, 1896. 

Dean Murray, in the course of his sermon in Mar- 
quand Chapel on October 4, 1896, said: "Friday last we heard of 
the death of Horatio Garrett of the Class of '95. When but a 
year ago he was graduated from the college, few men had brighter 
prospects before them. His career here was one of honor. He 



Princeton University 



373 



had gained the esteem and respect of all his teachers, the affection 
of his classmates, and went from us with such a memory of his 
college life as might be envied. A few months later he was at- 
tacked by a painful, threatening disease. The surgical operation 
necessary was, so the hopes of his friends felt, successful, and 
again life assumed for him bright prospects in his newly wedded 
life. Those hopes alas ! were soon dashed. Attacked by the 
same fell disease, it was soon evident that he must die. He had 
sought with his family the benefit of foreign travel, at Leaming- 
ton Spa, England. After prolonged suffering he passed away. 
He will long be remembered not only by his classmates but by 
the college circle for his manly character and for the attractive 
qualities of his heart. I recall him today as the courteous gentle- 
man infusing in college life those finer traits which give to 
Princeton men wherever found, happy recognition in the walks 
of life." 

The very beautiful west window of Marquand Chapel, Prince- 
ton, was given in his memory by his mother. 

JOSEPH DOUGLAS GREEN, C.E. 

Died Dec. 22, 1918 
Joseph Douglas Green was born in Scranton, Pa., February 3, 
1874, the son of Douglas N. Green and Emma C. Green. 

He was prepared for college at the School of the Lackawanna 




ic95 



1918 



374 



Class of 1895 



at Scranton, Pa., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and 
graduating in 1895, C.E. He roomed at 15 Dod Hall. He was 
a member of Whig Hall, Philadelphian Society, and Tiger Inn. 

After leaving college he entered the coal business with his 
father in the firm of Millspaugh and Green, Syracuse, N. Y. In 
1907 he became treasurer of the Millspaugh and Green Company, 
and in 191 2 became President. 

On December 22, 1918, he was instantly killed in an automo- 
bile accident near Syracuse, N. Y. His devotion to Princeton 
was unwavering and whole hearted. It was characteristic of 
him that he should have provided in his will that his estate be- 
queathed in trust for his mother should upon her death go to 
Princeton University. He was unmarried. 



AUGUSTUS FREDERICK HOLLY, Jr. 

Died Dec. 14, 1904 
Augustus Frederick Holly, Jr., was born September 12, 1872. 
He entered Princeton in September, 1891, and left in 1895. He 




1895 

roomed at 4 West Witherspoon Hall. He was a member of the 
St. Paul's Society and the Cottage Club, and played on the Uni- 
versity Football Team. 

In the fall of 1895, after leaving college, he became a mem- 



Princeton University 



375 



ber of the real estate firm of Holly and Porter, New York, his 
partner being his classmate, Clarence Porter. In March, 1896 
he became associated with the real estate firm of Trenholm and 
Simmons, where he remained a little more than a year, when he 
went into business with his father. In 1902 he became ill and 
was forced to give up business. After a long illness extending 
over a period of two years, he died at Lakewood, N. J., on De- 
cember 14, 1904. He was survived by his wife who was Miss 
Mary Hartwell Chittenden of Brooklyn, N. Y., to whom he was 
married November 7, 1901. 

SAMUEL HOWE, A.B. 

Died Dec. 26, 1900 

Samuel Howe was born July 31, 1873, and entered Princeton 

from Chicago in September, 1891, graduating in 1895, A.B. He 

roomed at 1 West Witherspoon Hall; was a member of the Phil- 

adelphian Society, Clio Hall and the Ivy Club, and was an editor 




1895 



of the Tiger. After leaving college he engaged in the grain busi- 
ness with his father in Chicago, in the firm of Charles M. Howe. 
He was a member of the Saddle and Cycle Club of Chicago and 
the Chicago Board of Trade. He died of pneumonia at his home 
in Chicago on December 26, 1900. He was unmarried. 



376 



Class of 1895 



EDWARD FORD JOHNSON, A.B. 

Died Jan. 31, 1916 

Edward Ford Johnson was born in Michigan City, Ind., Aug- 
ust 23, 1872, the son of Henry W. Johnson and Nellie Ford 
Johnson. He was prepared for college by private tutors and 
entered Princeton in September, 1891, graduating in June, 1895, 
A.B. He roomed at 15 North Dod Hall and was a member of 
the Colonial Club. 

After leaving college he studied law in the office of Flower, 




1895 



Smith and Musgrave, Chicago, and at the same time was a stu- 
dent at the Chicago Law School. In 1897 he became associated 
with the firm of W. K. Kenley and Company, Fire Insurance 
brokers of Chicago, the following year becoming a member of 
that firm. He continued in the insurance business up to the time 
of his death, in the later years being a partner in the firm of 
Wiley, Magill and Johnson. He was Vice-president of the Fidu- 
ciary Company of Chicago. He was unmarried. 

On January 31, 1916, he was killed by a fall from a window 
of the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 



Princeton University 377 

FRANCIS KENNEDY 

Died Feb. 19, 1901 

Francis Kennedy was born in Philadelphia, Sept. 7, 1874, the 
son of Francis W. Kennedy. He was prepared for college 
at the Rittenhouse Academy, Philadelphia and entered Princeton 
in September, 1891 and left in 1894 at the end of Junior year. In 
the fall of 1895 he went abroad and studied philosophy at the 
Universities of Heidelberg and Jena and later at Leipsic, where he 
received the degree of Ph.D. in 1897. 

In September, 1897, he became demonstrator in experimental 




1900 



psychology at Princeton. In June, 1898, upon the recommenda- 
tion of President Patton he was appointed Assistant Professor of 
Philosophy at the University of Colorado at Boulder where he 
was advanced to a full professorship in 1899. He remained there 
until he was stricken with typhoid fever and died February 19, 
1 901. He was unmarried. 

EDWARD BOWNE KENYON 

Died Aug. 3, 1894 
Edward Bowne Kenyon entered Princeton in September, 1891, 
and remained with the class until the end of Junior year. He 



378 



Class of 1895 




1894 

roomed at 2 North West College; was a member of the Phila- 
delphian Society and Whig Hall. 

He died August 3, 1894, during the summer vacation between 
Junior and Senior years. 

WILLIAM REMSEN LANE, A.B. 

Died Feb. 15, 1896 





Princeton University 379 

William Remsen Lane was born June 6, 1874, and entered 
Princeton from Orange, N. J., in September, 1891, graduating 
in 1895 A.B. He roomed at 11 South Middle Reunion Hall; 
was a member of the Philadelphian Society and Whig Hall. 
After leaving college he studied medicine for a few months at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, 
New York. 

On Jan. 1, 1896, he became associated with the Hanover Fire 
Insurance Company of New York City, of which his father was 
President. He had only been with the company a few weeks 
when he contracted pneumonia and died February 15, 1896 at 
his home in Orange, N. J. He was unmarried. 

NOAH LODER, JR. 

Died January 6, 19 17 
Noah Loder, Jr., the son of Noah Loder of Port Chester, N. 
Y., was born in New York September 6, 1873. He prepared for 
college at Port Chester (N. Y.) High School and Greenwich 




1916 

(Conn.) Academy, entering Princeton in September, 1891 and 
leaving in June, 1893. He roomed at 24 Middle Dod Hall. 

After leaving college he studied at the New York Law School 
and after his admission to the bar in 1896 was a practising law- 



3 8o 



Class of 1895 



yer for several years, first on his own account, then after 1902 
as a member of the firm of Pelletier and Loder, and later alone. 
He died at Port Chester, N. Y., January 6, 1917, survived by 
his wife, who was Miss Sarah Louisa Purdy, daughter of James 
B. Purdy of Port Chester, and whom he married September 8, 
1897. There are two children, Mary Elizabeth Loder, born 
April 23, 1900, and James Purdy Loder, born October 21, 1901. 

EDWARD McCORMICK, C.E. 

Died September 9, 1903 
Edward McCormick, the son of Edward P. McCormick, a law- 
yer of Philadelphia, Pa., was born January 30, 1873. He pre- 
pared for college at Germantown Academy, Germantown, Pa., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 




1895, C.E. He roomed at 6 West Brown Hall, and was a mem- 
ber of Whig Hall and Cap and Gown Club. 

In September, 1895, he became an assistant in the engineering 
corps of the Pittsburgh Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
In 1899 he was Assistant Supervisor of the Altoona Yards. In 
June 1900 he was transferred to the position of Assistant Super- 
visor in the Middle Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad at 
Harrisburg. In 1901 he was supervisor of the Tyrone and 



Princeton University 381 

Clearfield Divisions with headquarters at Osceola Mills, Pa. 
Later, in 1901, he became supervisor of the Bald Eagle Valley 
R. R. with headquarters at Tyrone, Pa. On March I, 1903, he 
was promoted to the responsible position of supervisor of Di- 
vision No. 1 of the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington 
Railroad, a part of the Pennsylvania System, with headquarters 
at Chester, Pa. 

Shortly after this he contracted sciatic rheumatism which af- 
fected his heart, finally causing his death September 9, 1903. 
He was unmarried. 

EDWARD MUNN, B.S. 

Died July i, 1903 
Edward Munn was born July 27, 1874. He entered Princeton 
in September, 1891, and graduated in June, 1895, B. S. He was 
a member of Clio Hall and the Cottage Club ; played on the 





189S 

Freshman football team, and was president of the Varsity Foot- 
ball Association. 

In October, 1895, he began the study of law in the office of his 
father in Newark, and after admission to the bar was a practising 
attorney in that city up to the time of his death July 1, 1903. 
He was married October 10, 1900, to Miss Katheryn Florence 



382 Class of 1895 

Gillette at East Orange, N. J., who, with their son, Joseph Gil- 
lette Munn, born November 3, 1901, survived him. During the 
Spanish war he served in the First Volunteer Cavalry ("Roose- 
velt's Rough Riders"), was invalided home from Tampa, Fla., 
with typhoid fever August 11, 1898, and was mustered out of 
the service in October, 1898. 

ROBERT LORTON NORTH, A.B. 

Died January 12, 1901 

Robert Lorton North, the son of F. A. North, merchant, of 

Philadelphia, Pa., was born November 19, 1873. He entered 

Princeton from his home in Germantown, Pa., September, 1891, 

graduating in June, 1895, A.B. He roomed at 2 North Dod Hall, 




and was a member of the Freshman Glee Club, the 'Varsity Banjo 
and Mandolin Clubs, and the Cap and Gown Club. 

In September, 1895, he took a position with the Philadelphia 
Milling Company, flour millers, where he remained until Feb- 
ruary, 1898, when he formed the firm of Erric and North, manu- 
facturers of emery and corundum wheels, electro-plating, grind- 
ing and polishing supplies. This business was later incorporated 
as the North Manufacturing Company with offices in Philadelphia 
and Cleveland, of which he was the treasurer. His interest in 
music occupied much of his leisure time. 



Princeton University 



383 



After a very short illness he died January 12, 1901, of typhoid 
fever at his home in Germantown. He was unmarried. 



ANDERSON OFFUTT, B.S. 

Died May 4, 19 19 

Anderson Offutt, the son of Nicholas Dorsey Offutt and Mary 
Anderson Offutt, was born January 1, 1875, at Rockville, Mont- 
gomery County, Md. He entered Princeton in September, 1891, 
and graduated in June, 1895, B.S. He roomed at 5 North West 
College and was a member of the Philadelphian Society. 

After graduation he entered the Princeton Electrical Engi- 
neering School, taking the degree of E.E. in 1897. He then 
formed a partnership with James E. Hayes, '95, and James D. 



r 






1918 

Remsen, '93, under the firm name of Offutt, Remsen and Hayes, 
electrical engineers and contractors. In 1899 he undertook elec- 
trical inspection work for an association of insurance companies, 
traveling for a year through the Southeastern states. 

On December 12, 1900, he married Miss Haydee Druilhet in 
New Orleans, and shortly after opened an inspection agency, mak- 
ing general inspections for insurance companies doing business in 
New Orleans. He later extended this business throughout Louis- 
iana and Mississippi. In 1905 he became an electrical contractor 
and consulting engineer, specializing in the installation of mu- 
nicipal lighting and power plants. 

In 19 1 5 he joined the staff of the New Jersey Zinc Company, 



384 Class of 1895 

of which his former partner, James E. Hayes, is now Vice- 
president and General Manager. He was associated with that 
company as engineer, and as Chief of Service and Maintenance 
at the Palmerton (Pa.) plant until his death, in New York City, 
on May 4, 19 19, after only a few days' illness with pneumonia. 
He was survived by his wife and two sons, Anderson Offutt, 
Jr. (born October 8, 1902) and Joseph Lee Offutt (born July, 
18, 1906). 

JOSEPH W. PARK, A.B. 

Died August 21, 1919 

Joseph W. Park was born October 2, 1871, at Memphis, Tenn., 

son of John S. Park and Mary Steele Park. He prepared for 

Princeton at the College of Emporia, Emporia, Kansas, and the 

University of Kansas ; entered Princeton in Feb. 1894 and grad- 




uated in June, 1895, A.B. He roomed at 4 South West College 
and was a member of Whig Hall. He was Lynde debater, 
Intercollegiate debater, and won First Baird Prize for Dispu- 
tation in Senior year. 

After graduation he spent three years of study in history and 
political and social science at Princeton and the University of 
Chicago, holding Fellowships in both places. He received the 
degree of A.M. from Princeton in 1896. 



Princeton University 385 

For some years afterward he was engaged for the most part 
in business. At intervals, however, he studied at first hand the 
condition of the common people in Europe and Mexico, living in 
their homes as one of them. He also spent much time studying 
the Negro problem as it was affected by the industrial conditions 
of the South; and traveled more than a thousand miles by wagon 
and on horseback investigating the conditions of the backwoods 
"poor white trash," sometimes peddling merchandise to allay 
suspicion. 

From 1900 to 1904 he was engaged in the real estate business 
in Ensley and Wylam, Ala. In 1904 he became professor of 
ethnology and sociology in Owenton College, Birmingham, Ala. ; 
in 1906 Instructor in history in Tulane University, New Orleans ; 
in 1907 teacher of economics in the High School at Los Angeles ; 
in 1910 teacher of history in Throop Polytechnic Institute, Pasa- 
dena, Cal. ; in 1915 he was occupied in developing irrigible farm 
lands in Los Angeles, Cal. 

He died in Los Angeles, August 21, 1919, of heart trouble fol- 
lowing an attack of influenza. He was survived by his wife, who 
was Miss Mary Boone Curlee and whom he married August 25, 
1903, at Corinth, Miss. They had two daughters, Althea Garland 
Park, born June 17, 1904, and Mary Boone Park, born February 
25, 1906. 

WILLIAM WIRT PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Died July 8, 19 17 

William Wirt Phillips, the son of Howard C. Phillips and 
Sarah Bainbridge Hayes Phillips, was born February 23, 1875, 
in New York City. He prepared for college at the private school 
of W. W. Richards in New York, entering Princeton in Septem- 
ber, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. He roomed at 15 
South Edwards Hall and was a member of the Philadelphian 
Society and the Cap and Gown Club. 

For the first two years after leaving college he was First As- 
sistant Cashier, then Cashier of the East River Gas Company of 
New York. In October, 1897, he became Assistant Cashier of 
Strong, Sturgis and Company, bankers, of New York, advanc- 
ing to Cashier in 1910. In 191 5 he became a member of the firm 
of Emanuel, Parker and Company, bankers, New York. His 
death occurred in the city of New York on July 8, 19 17. 

Few men have been more active in alumni affairs than he. He 



3 S6 



Class of 1895 



devoted his best thought and energy to the promotion of the Uni- 
versity's interests during the twenty-two years since he was grad- 
uated from college. He served faithfully as a member of the 
Class Executive Committee, and as Chairman of its Reunion 
Committee ; as a member of the Graduate Council and a Gover- 
nor of the Cap and Gown Club. He held successively the Offices 




of Secretary, Treasurer and Vice President of the Princeton Club 
of New York, and was one of the active and influential men who 
organized the first club house in 1899. For a period of nine years 
he served as one of the Princeton representatives on the Com- 
mittee on Admissions of the University Club of New York. He 
became recognized among college men in New York as a leader 
in university affairs. His interest in student activities, his fre- 
quent visits to Princeton, and his wide acquaintance among 
Alumni kept his enthusiasm fresh and his sympathies keen. 

On March 26, 1913, he married Mrs. Jessie Maxwell Brins- 
made, daughter of Frederick William Jones. 



JOHN PRENTISS POE, JR. 



Died September 25, 191 5 
John Prentiss Poe, Jr., the son of John Prentiss Poe and Ann 
Johnson Hough Poe was born in Baltimore, Md., Feb. 26, 1872. 
He prepared for college at the Carey School of Baltimore and at 



Princeton University 



387 



the Princeton Preparatory School, entering Princeton in Septem- 
ber, 1 89 1, and leaving in May, 1893. 

He was killed in action at the Battle of Loos in Northern 
France Sept. 25, 191 5, while serving as a private with the famous 
Scotch Regiment known as the Black Watch. He was the only 



L . 




1902 



member of the Class to lose his life in the war, and, so far as 
known, he was the second Princeton man to make the supreme 
sacrifice. His biography, written by Edwin M. Norris, '95, re- 
printed from the Princeton Alumni Weekly, appears elsewhere 
in this book. 



CLARENCE PORTER 

Died March i, 1917 

Clarence Porter, the son of General Horace Porter, former 
United States Ambassador to France, was born in 1872. He en- 
tered Princeton in September, 1891, and left in June, 1895. He 
roomed at 8 West Middle Witherspoon Hall and was a member 
of the Cottage Club. 

After leaving college in 1895 he entered the real estate 
business in New York, and was for a time associated with his 
classmate, Augustus F. Holly, Jr., in the firm of Holly and 
Porter. He was married on April 8, 1896, in the city of New 



388 Class of 1895 

York, to Miss Mary S. Bird (who died in November, 1918). For 
a number of years he was a member of the real estate firm of 
Whitehouse and Porter, at 573 Ffth Avenue, New York City, 





but ill health prevented him from engaging in active business for 
some time prior to his death, which occurred on March 1, 19 17, 
at his home in New York. 

ARCHER WHITNEY SEAVER, B.S. 

Died October 25, 1901 

Archer Whitney Seaver was born December 3, 1874. He en- 
tered Princeton from Philadelphia, Pa., in September, 1891, grad- 
uating in 1895, B.S. He roomed at 2 West Brown Hall and was 
a member of the Philadelphian Society, Clio Hall, and Cap and 
Gown Club. 

In the fall of 1895 he took a position with the Warner H. Jen- 
kins Company, engineers and contractors for road building, pav- 
ing and roofing. His headquarters were in Philadelphia but dur- 
ing the greater part of 1896 he represented his firm in Boston. 
During 1897 he superintended construction work at Sandy Hook, 
N. Y. 

In 1898 and 1899 he was engaged in mining at Waynesville, 
N. C. In January 1900 he became general manager and treasurer 



Princeton University 



339 



of the Gray Iron Casting Company of Springfield, Ohio. He was 
married April 10, 1900, at Kattawa, Ky., to Miss Marion Catlett 
Skinner of Waynesville, N. C. In 1901 he removed to Coving- 




1895 

ton, Va., and there engaged in the iron business where he re- 
mained until he died October 25, 1901, of typhoid fever. He 
was survived by his wife and a son, Archer Whitney Seaver, 
Jr., born in Waynesville, N. C, January 31, 1901. 



WARREN ILSLEY SEYMOUR, A3. 

Died February 16, 1914 

Warren Ilsley Seymour, the son of Samuel L. Seymour, As- 
sistant Freight Traffic Manager of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, and Henrietta I. Merrick Seymour, was born August 
27, 1873, at Buffalo, N. Y. He prepared for college at Shady- 
side Academy, Pittsburgh, Pa., entering Princeton in September, 
1891, and graduating cum laude in June, 1895, A.B. He roomed 
at 16 South East College and was a member of the Philadelphian 
Society and of Whig Hall. 

After leaving college he entered the Harvard Law School, 
where he was a member of the Story Law Club and the Pi Eta 
Society. He graduated in 1898 and was admitted to the bar of 
Allegheny County, Pa. on December 1 of the same year. For 



39o 



Class of 1895 



ten years he returned to Princeton each summer and conducted 
a school for entering students in which he was very successful. 
He was appointed Assistant District Attorney of Allegheny 
County, but after holding this office for a time he retired to be- 
come a partner of the law firm of Seymour, Patterson and Sieben- 
eck. He was distinguished as a trial lawyer. When the council- 
manic graft cases were tried in Pittsburgh he took an active in- 
terest in them. He was special counsel for the Voters' League, 



*•• •*. 





and his work there led to his appointment in 1910 as First As- 
sistant District Attorney. In this office he had entire charge of 
the graft cases, carrying them through the various stages from 
the Grand Jury up to the appellate division of the Supreme Court 
of Pennsylvania. His public service in these cases received the 
highest commendation. In 191 2 he resigned his office and re- 
turned to the general practice of law, in which he had marked 
success. 

He served as President of the Pittsburgh Law Club, and as 
President of the Princeton Alumni Association of Western Penn- 
sylvania. He was also a member of the Duquesne, University, 
Oakmont Country and Pittsburgh Press Clubs, and the Pitts- 
burgh Athletic Association. 

He died February 16, 1914, of pneumonia after an illness of 
a few days. He was survived by his widow who was Miss Emily 



Princeton University 



39i 



M. Sproul, and whom he married June 27, 1901 ; and by two 
daughters, Emily Sproul Seymour, born January 10, 1906, and 
Henrietta Lansing Seymour, born July 24, 1907. 

CHARLES FRANCIS SMITH 

Died April 28, 1912 

Charles Francis Smith, the son of Amos Smith and Henrietta 
Renick Smith, was born February 12, 1871, at Chillicothe, O. 
He prepared for college in the public schools of Chillicothe, O., 
entering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving in 1894. He 
roomed at 5 South Reunion Hall and was a member of St. Paul 
Society and the Triangle Club. 

After leaving college he became associated with his brother, 




George H. Smith, in various business enterprises in Chillicothe, 
O., devoting much of his time to the management of his farm of 
1500 acres in Pickaway County. He was a director of the First 
National Bank and the Valley Savings Bank and Treasurer of 
the Logan Construction Company ; and was interested in various 
coal and lumber operations in Ohio and West Virginia. 

He died April 28, 1912, of malarial fever, after an illness of 
two weeks following his return from Europe where he had spent 
the winter. He was unmarried. 



392 Class of 1895 

CLEMENT MOORE SUMMERS, A.B. 

Died January 8, 1919 

Clement Moore Summers, the son of Colonel Samuel William 
Summers and Marian McCalla Sheffield Summers, was born Jan- 
uary 20, 1 87 1, at Ottumwa, Iowa. He prepared for college at 
Ottumwa, la. High School and Oberlin, O. Preparatory School, 
and spent one year at the University of Virginia, entering Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, and graduating in June, 1895, A.B. He 
roomed at 10 East Brown Hall and was a member of Clio Hall 
and the Varsity football squad ; he played guard in several games 
in 1893 and 1894. 

For nearly three years after leaving college he studied law and 




political science in Ottumwa, la., and Chicago, and was about to 
devote a year to further study at a German University when, at 
the suggestion of his brother, then in the Klondyke, he removed 
in the fall of 1898 to Juneau, Alaska, and became Cashier of the 
First National Bank. In 1900 he became Vice-president of the 
Bank of Alaska at Skagway ; and in 1904 returned to Juneau as 
President of the First National Bank. In 191 1 he removed to 
Ashland, Ore., and became Vice-president and Treasurer of the 
Ketchepan Power Company, manufacturers of lumber and mill 
products. He later entered the steel business in San Francisco, 



Princeton University 393 

and at the time of his death, January 8, 1919, he was assistant to 
the President of the Judson Steel Manufacturing Company. 

He had married, July 1, 1898, at Ottumwa, la., Miss Harriet 
Holt. They had five children, Clement Moore Summers, Jr., 
born April 15, 1899, at Juneau, Alaska; Marian Frances Sum- 
mers, born June 21, 1900, at Tacoma, Wash.; Harriet Virginia 
Summers, born September 5, 1907, at Juneau; Patricia Summers, 
born January 31, 1910, at Seattle, Wash. ; and Lewis Shackelford 
Summers, born in 1912 at Ashland, Ore. 

When the United States entered the war, Ex-President Roose- 
velt, when he was planning to head a division of troops for ser- 
vice in France, commissioned Summers to recruit men for the 
division in Oregon, and he was accepted as a prospective officer 
in the event the organization was formed. 

His son, Clement M. Summers, Jr., left the Agricultural Col- 
lege at Corvallis, Ore., at the entry of the United States into 
the war, to volunteer his services, and enlisted in Co. D., 117th 
Engineers, which regiment was a part of the 42nd Division. 
Clement, Jr., was killed in action on July 15, 1918, in a sector 
east of Rheims, following the darkest and most critical days of 
the war. He was the first boy from his home town to make the 
great sacrifice for his country, and the only son of a member of 
the class to lose his life in the war. 



FRANK REED THOMPSON 

Died October i, 1907 

Frank Reed Thompson, the son of George H. Thompson and 
Anna Wood Thompson, was born March 4, 1873, at Cincinnati, 
O. He prepared for college at Woodward High School, Cin- 
cinnati, O., entering Princeton in September, 1891, and leaving 
in June, 1893. He roomed at 7 North West College. 

After leaving college he became associated with the Howell 
Manufacturing Company of Cincinnati, manufacturers of baking 
powder and grocers' supplies, and remained in the same business 
until his death at which time he was treasurer of the company. 
On October 9, 1902, he married Miss Sarah Mclntyre at Glen- 
dale, O., who died in January, 1903. On April 19, 1906, he mar- 
ried Miss Juanita Wilson, daughter of James B. Wilson of Cin- 
cinnati. He died suddenly on October 1, 1907, while on vaca- 



594 Class of 1895 




1907 



tion at Kelley's Island, Lake Erie. He was survived by his wife 
and a daughter, Desha Thompson, born in 1907. 



ARTHUR LEDLIE WHEELER, B.S. 

Died December 20, 1917 

Arthur Ledlie Wheeler, the son of Andrew Wheeler, Steel 
Manufacturer and Merchant, and Sarah Caroline Carpenter 
Wheeler, was born in Philadelphia, May 12, 1872. He prepared 
for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and entered 
Princeton in September 1891 with the Class of '95, and gradu- 
ated in June, 1896 with a degree of B.S. He was elected Vice 
President of the Class in Freshman Year. He played through- 
out his course on the University Football Team and was a mem- 
ber of the Ivy Club. He roomed at 7 South Dod Hall. 

After leaving college in 1896, he entered the office of Morris 
Tasker & Co., Bankers and Brokers of Philadelphia. In 1898 
he was employed in the Philadelphia office of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Co. In 1900 he became a member of the firm of Win- 
throp, Smith & Co., Bankers and Brokers of Philadelphia. In 
1913, he became a partner in the banking house of Butcher,. 
Sherrerd & Hansell of Philadelphia. A year later he became 
Vice President of J. D. Este & Co., of Philadelphia, Manufac- 



Princeton University 



395 



turers, and remained in that position until his death, which oc- 
curred on December 20, 1917, after a long illness. 

He had been a member of the Racquet Club and the Princeton 
Club of Princeton and the Princeton Club of New York. Short- 
ly after the outbreak of the War he went through the first Platts- 




burg Camp, but his illness prevented his taking further active 
part in the war. He was unmarried. 

Since his death his many Princeton friends have joined in the 
establishment of the "Arthur L. Wheeler Scholarship Fund" in 
memory of a man whose lifelong devotion to his University was 
his outstanding characteristic. 



ROBERT RALPH WHERRY, A.B. 

Died December ii, 1910 

Robert Ralph Wnerry, the son of the Reverend John W. 
Wherry, D.D., who had been a missionary in China for over 
forty years, was born December 27, 1873, at Peking, China. He 
entered Princeton in September, 1891, and graduated in June, 
1895, A.B. He roomed at 1 South East College and was a mem- 
ber of Whig Hall. 

After leaving college he studied at the New York LaAv School, 
receiving the degree of LL.B. in June, 1897. In February, 1898, 



396 



Class of 1895 



he was admitted to the New Jersey Bar and in the following Oc- 
tober entered the law office of Ex-Senator William A. Stuhr of 
Hoboken, where he remained until 1900 when he formed a part- 
nership with his brother, J. Frederick Wherry, '93. Very shortly 
thereafter he suffered a complete breakdown in health and re- 
moved to Claremont in Southern California and devoted him- 
self largely to outdoor work as a fruit grower. He named his 
orange ranch "Nassau" — "with fitting ceremonies," he wrote. 
Though admitted to practise law in California, he did little pro- 






1895 



1910 



fessional work there. He was interested and active in many 
local enterprises. In 1905 he was elected President of the Clare- 
mont Co-operative Water Company ; and in 1906 Vice-president 
of the Golden Gate Portland Cement Company. 

On September 30, 1902, he married at Claremont Miss Helen 
B. Warren, daughter of Colonel E. W. Warren. They had two 
children, Helen Roberta Wherry, born July 2, 1904, and Edgar 
Warren Wherry, born June 27, 1908. 

His failing health brought discouragement, and on the night of 
December 11, 1910, his body was found at the foot of Mount 
Wilson trail at Sierra Madre, where he had shot himself. In 
one of his last letters to the Class Secretary, he wrote: "Prince- 
ton has done much for me and I love her passionately as every 
true son of hers should." 



Princeton University 397 

MAURICE JOHNSON WINFIELD 

Died May 12, 191 1 

Maurice Johnson Winfield, the son of Morris Wintield, was 
born in 1873, at Logansport, Ind. He prepared for college at the 
Howe Grammar School, Lima, Ind., entering Princeton in 1891 
and leaving in 1895. He roomed at 16 North West College. 

After leaving college he studied law in his father's office at 
Logansport, Ind., and was admitted to the Indiana bar in 1896. 




He continued in the practice of law in Logansport for ten or 
twelve years thereafter. In 1910 he engaged in the real estate 
business, specializing in Indiana farm mortgages. 

On June 1, 1897 he married Miss Abby R. Rogers. They had 
three children ; Margaret Rogers Winfield, born August 19, 1904 ; 
Maurice J. Winfield, Jr., born February 2, 1906 ; Jane Winfield, 
born October 19, 1907. He died at Logansport May 12, 191 1. 

FRANCIS NICOLL ZABRISKIE, A.B. 

Died March 31, 1901. 
Francis Nicoll Zabriskie was born in 1873, and entered Prince- 
ton in September, 1891, graduating in 1895 with the degree of 
A.B. He lived at 52 Mercer Street, was a member of Whig 
Hall and the Philadelphian Society 



393 



Class of 1895 



After leaving college he studied medicine at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. At the outbreak 
of the Spanish war he enlisted on May 1, 1898, as a private in 
Company A of the 22nd New York Volunteer Infantry, then 
stationed at Camp Black at Hempstead, Long Island. His regi- 




ment did garrison duty at the forts at the mouth of Long Island 
Sound— Fort Slocum, Willets Point, and Fort Schuyler. He was 
mustered out of the service November 23, 1898. Thereafter he 
lived part of the time in New York City and part of the time at 
Claverack, N. Y., where he had a summer home. He died in 
New York March 31, 1901, having shot himself for reasons 
which have never been known. 



Some Recollections of Johnny Poe 

Killed in Action in Northern France, September 25, 191 5 

By Edwin M. Norris 
[In The Princeton Alumni Weekly of October, ipi 5] 

One spring day nearly twenty-four years ago word flew around 
the campus from Freshman to Freshman that their Class Presi- 
dent was leaving college that afternoon. By spontaneous impulse 
the whole Class flocked to the station to cheer him off, and when 
the train was about to start we all piled into the cars and went 
to the Junction with him. We did not say much on that trip 
down to the Junction. Our usual exuberance was lacking, for 
we were all feeling pretty blue. We put him on the train from 
New York and gave him cheer after cheer. The passengers 
raised the windows and looked out, wondering what it was all 
about. As the train started to move our President leaned out 
of the window and waved good-bye, calling back to us, "So-long, 
fellows, I'll be back next fall." And we all came back to college 
that afternoon feeling bluer than ever. No more genuine trib- 
ute of affection was ever given a man than that spontaneous 
send-off his entire Class gave Johnny Poe on that spring afternoon. 

The day after we had entered college the preceding September, 
at our first class meeting in the Old Chapel we had elected John 
Prentiss Poe, Jr., of Baltimore, our Class President. Upon his 
election he had taken the platform amid great cheering, and his 
first speech to the Class was characteristic : ''Fellows, I am proud 
of the honor you have bestowed upon me. My face can't be 
ruined much, so I'll go in all the battles with you head first." 

That was all, but it was enough. As soon as the meeting was 
over our President demonstrated his speech, which was the key- 
note of his leadership as long as he remained with us, — as indeed 
it has been of all the twenty-four years of his adventurous life 
since that September afternoon. The Sophomores were waiting 
for us outside the Old Chapel, and under the leadership of Johnny 
Poe and Arthur Wheeler, our Vice-President, we went through 
that encircling ring of Sophomores "like a bull through a 
bramble," and the following night under the same magnetic 



4<x> Class of 1895 

leadership we captured the cannon. That was the beginning of 
the class unity which took us through freshman and sophomore 
years with more than our share of victories. 

Johnny also demonstrated the other part of his speech, — that 
he was proud of being our President ; for he made a personal call 
on every man in the Class. 

Johnny had been at the Princeton Prep, the year before and had 
played on the Princeton scrub, and there was no question what- 
ever of his "making" the varsity the minute he got into college. 
For two years thereafter he played in nearly every game, some- 
times at quarterback, sometimes at fullback, but more often at 
halfback. He was famous for his end runs, his dives through 
the line, and his remarkable defensive playing. "Johnny Poe 
had the best 'straight arm' I have ever seen," remarked an old 
player the other day. In fundamentals he had few equals, if 
any. He was always on the ball, he was a sure punt catcher, and 
no surer tackier ever played football. It used to be said that 
during the two years he was on the Princeton team he missed only 
one tackle. He was so distressed over that missed tackle that he 
was on the point of turning in his uniform. And who will ever 
forget that fierce game on November 2, 1892, with the Chicago 
Athletic Club ! The Chicago team was made up of men recently 
graduated from several colleges and included such famous players 
as Heffelfinger, Woodruff and Hart well of Yale and Donnelly 
and Ames of Princeton. Against this veteran team Johnny Poe 
made two touchdowns and his deadly tackling was a big factor in 
holding the veterans scoreless. 

No fiercer battle was ever fought on the Princeton campus than 
the snowball fight of the winter of 1892. It was so bloody that 
the Faculty immediately abolished that particular old custom. 
This snow fight was organized on our side by Johnny Poe, who 
divided the Class in battalions led by our strong men, under 
whom we went into battle, in a united and irresistible charge. 

Johnny's career at Princeton was a harbinger of his subsequent 
life. On the football field as well as in his leadership of our 
Class he showed those qualities of good sportsmanship, of loyalty, 
of self-effacing modesty, of transparent genuineness, of the warm 
heart, the impulsively generous nature, the clean life, the optimistic 
spirit, the love of humor, the sheer joy of living, and above all 
the reckless courage, which marked his romantic career in all his 



Princeton University 401 

remaining years. With singular persistence he was always trying 
to make himself a better football player, just as in after years he 
was always trying to make himself a better soldier. When the 
long practice was over at the field he used to go to his room in 
Witherspoon and spend hours passing a football into a bunch of 
sofa pillows. He had no time for carousing. He was always in 
training then, as he had always been since then. 

After leaving college Johnny coached the football teams of the 
University of Virginia for two years and Annapolis for one year. 
He wrote a book on how to play halfback. Meantime he tried 
business and was with a Baltimore steamboat company, and then 
with his cousin he embarked in the real estate field in Baltimore. 
The firm was Poe & Poe and Johnny used to say that he didn't 
know whether he was Poe or Poe. But the beaten path was not 
for him. "This scramble for the almighty dollar does not appeal 
to me," he said. His restless spirit craved adventure. As he 
later wrote to a Princeton friend, "I must confess that my am- 
bition is to see wars in new countries," and he added, "my Hon- 
duras experience caused me to go to work in the mines here in 
order to get some money ahead, so that I shall be prepared for 
the next one." He was in Nevada at the time and was pulling at 
the leash, eager to go to war ; "no matter where or on which side 
— they are both usually wrong, so it doesn't make much difference 
which one chooses." Such a life, he wrote, "though rough in 
spots and monotonous as a Quaker meeting for long stretches at 
a time," appealed to him far more than "the usual round of clubs, 
theatres, dances, card parties, summer resorts, and all that the 
conventional rich man does." He wanted a companion to go 
with him to the next war. "There must be some such man who, 
disgusted with the awful sameness of things, would enjoy observ- 
ing how the grandest game on earth is conducted in China, Arabia, 
Central America, Formosa, Borneo, or the Congo." 

When the Spanish war broke out in 1898 Johnny got his first 
chance to be a real soldier. He had been in the Fifth Maryland 
for three years and was a corporal. With his regiment he went 
into camp near Baltimore and they were mustered into the service 
three weeks later. They were sent to Chickamaugua and thence 
to Tampa and finally to Huntsville, Ala., but to Johnny's chagrin 
they never got into action. Writing to the Class Secretary from 
Chickamaugua in May he said, "I am having a corking fine time 



402 Class of 1895 

and don't care how long this unpleasantness between the two 
countries keeps up. All this fuss about the hardships of a sol- 
dier's life makes me tired. Of course if a fellow gets plugged or 
is sick it is hard, but as long as he keeps well and doesn't get 
wounded it's a cinch. Just think of my getting $21.60 a month 
for a little bit of drilling, and the rest of the time lying under 
the trees reading the newspapers, as we do at Princeton." 

Corporal Poe could have had a commission in the United 
States Army after the Spanish war, but he did not crave an 
officer's life. Garrison duty did not appeal to him. He wanted 
to fight and he knew there was a better chance of fighting if he 
remained a free lance. And he wanted to take the hard knocks 
that come to the private in the ranks. 

He got his chance again when the Filipino insurrection broke 
out in 1899. He enlisted in the regular army. He was made 
a corporal in the 23d Infantry and went with his regiment to 
the Philippines. It was while he was in service on the Island of 
Job that his brother Arthur won the game with Yale by kicking 
a goal from the field in the last minute of play. One day while 
Johnny was on patrol duty, an officer hailed him: 

"Corporal Poe, are you any relation to Arthur Poe ?" 

"Yes, sir, — brother." 

"Brother ! Well, Poe won the football game." 

And Corporal Poe had to remain on patrol duty four hours 
longer before he could go to the company post office to get the 
letters and papers that told how his brother kicked that famous 
goal. 

Though so far away from Princeton he always kept tab on the 
football season. He didn't get the news very promptly but it 
was news to him. He knew the names of all the players on the 
other side of the world and what they were doing. 

As in the Spanish war so in that with the Filipinos, Johnny had 
hard luck. In the latter, he got to the front, but he never had the 
joy of being under fire. And as the garrison service dragged on 
and his chance of smelling burning powder grew more remote, he 
began planning to get back to Princeton. So he saved up his pay 
from the Government and bought his way out of the army. He 
was back for the next Commencement, and his return brought 
us all great joy. He was as boyish, as full of fun, as modest as 
ever. We made him tell us of his experiences in all the tents, 



Princeton University 403 

and with what an utter lack of self-consciousness he did it! Who 
of us who heard his stories in the reunions and yelled for more 
will ever forget the unquenchable humor with which he recounted 
his trip around the world as a soldier ! — "Seeing the world through 
a port-hole," as he called it. 

After the Spanish war Johnny had tried "cowpunching" on the 
ranch of his classmates Hugh Hodge and Wilfrid Hager in New 
Mexico, and the summer after his return from the Philippines he 
was with them again, but he was back in Princeton for the autumn. 
That was the fall of the inauguration of President Wilson and 
Johnny Poe was invited to be one of the marshals at the cere- 
monies, but he modestly declined. He helped in the football 
coaching, as he did the following autumn, and was one of the 
coaches who turned out the championship eleven of 1903. 

Then he heard there was a chance of a fight in Kentucky. One 
of the periodical feuds among the mountaineers had broken out 
and the state guard had been ordered on duty to quell the dis- 
turbance. Johnny dashed to Kentucky, enlisted in the guard and 
went with it to the mountains. That excitement didn't last long, 
but trouble was brewing in Panama and Johnny was soon a ser- 
geant in the United States Marine Corps on the Isthmus. But 
that, too, did not bring much action, and by the following autumn 
Johnny was back in the mining district of Nevada. One of his 
exploits at this time was to go through "Death Valley," which 
had suddenly got on the map by the reported discovery of a gold 
mine by a prospector named Walter Scott. Johnny had or- 
ganized a prospecting expedition to another strike, a sixty mile 
trip across the desert, and they looked up "Scotty's mine" on the 
way. Three big money chests were found empty, the kind of 
chests used by express companies, which presumably had been the 
source of "Scotty's gold mine." 

Writing from Bull Frog, Nev., about this trip, Johnny said: 
"I am getting to believe 'the kingdom of heaven is within you,' 
and so I manage to get more than my share of contentment in 
this desert country. Work and dreams is the best combination I 
know. I do not think most eastern college men would like the 
life here, but I have been through a peculiar preliminary training 
which makes it about as pleasant as any I have lived for some 
time. Went to a place called Echo Canyon Mining District the 
other dav, which is sixtv miles from Bull Frog, and to get there 



404 Class of 1895 

we went through Death Valley, Cal., for twenty-five miles. 
Thought I was not bringing any superfluous baggage, only having 
a toothbrush, comb, soap-box and towel. When I reached the 
mine, I placed the silver soap-box on a rock near the basin. Old 
man Hicks, who is a very quiet and polite old fellow, but who 
served thirteen years in the Idaho Penitentiary for killing a man 
in a saloon brawl, and while there wounded three of the guards 
and escaped, only to be captured and brought back and have ball 
and chain placed upon him, saw the soap box and in a quizzical 
way said, — as if like some of the British officers in South Africa 
who brought organs, beds and foot-tubs along, I had too much 
baggage : 

" 'Who brought his trunk ? Is it non-explosive ?' 

"The next time I go I shall pull two-thirds of the bristles of 
the toothbrush out and break the comb in half, and wipe my face 
on the horses' manes." 

In 1907 Johnny heard of trouble in Central America and with a 
chance for fighting again in prospect the mining camp was too 
slow. He hurried to San Francisco and took the first steamer 
south. He had intended to join the Nicaraguan army, but the 
boat stopped at Honduras and lest she might never reach Nicara- 
gua he made sure of getting into the fighting by leaving her then 
and there. He joined the Honduran army, was appointed a cap- 
tain and commanded a gun at the siege of Amapalo. Nothing in 
his diversified career added more to Johnny's fund of stories 
than this opera bouffe war of a few weeks. In the reunion tents 
afterward he used to tell us about the idiosyncracies of that gun 
and the wonder and awe it inspired in the quaking natives ; and 
how on every Saturday night the entire army never failed to 
report on the dot to get their meagre pay, — every officer and 
private being in constant alarm lest there would be nothing to pay 
them with if a day were allowed to go by. It was in this momen- 
tous war that Johnny acquired the title, "El Capitan Poey." 

In making his way out of Honduras Johnny was captured in 
Nicaragua and was held on a charge of being a spy. One of the 
many stories about him was that he was rescued from this situa- 
tion by the U. S. gunboat "Princeton." Johnny is said to have 
asked the commander of the "Princeton" if he could come aboard, 
to which he received a ready affirmative. The captain told him to 
bring his baggage along, whereupon Johnny said : 



Princeton University 405 

"Thank you, I'll sure do that. I have only fifty-four pieces." 

"What!" exclaimed the commander, springing from his chair. 
"I am not running a freighter." 

"Well, don't get excited," returned Johnny, "my fifty-four 
pieces consist of one pair of socks and a pack of playing cards." 

When Johnny came back for Commencement that year he was 
a veteran of five wars. The newspapers were printing many 
stories about him and the following year it was reported all over 
the country that his body had been found in the mountains thirty- 
five miles from Montezuma, Mexico. As a matter of fact, he 
had spent that summer in Baltimore and in the autumn he was 
back in Princeton assisting in the coaching. That winter he re- 
turned to Nevada and resumed gold digging. There he remained 
a year till Thomas Riggs '94 organized an expedition for the 
United States Government to survey the boundary line between 
Alaska and Canada. This offered new experiences and Johnny 
joined the expedition, along with his old Baltimore friend "Mac" 
Pope '96 and William B. Gilmore '02. The expedition took 
them two hundred miles north of the Klondike. There they 
worked for nearly two years, surveying the most northern boun- 
dary of the United States. 

In 19 1 2 Johnny was back in Nevada where he remained, with 
the exception of a trip east, until 1914, when the rumor of the 
European war again brought him east. With the greatest war 
of modern times coming on, nothing could keep Johnny out of it. 
In September he sailed for England and upon landing lost no time 
enlisting in the British army. For a few weeks he was stationed 
at the training camp at Woolwich near London. But he needed 
little training. He was a seasoned soldier and always in con- 
dition. We soon heard of his crossing the Channel to join in 
the fighting about Ostend. He was now living the life he dearly 
loved, — and yet he was not close enough to the actual fighting. 
He was in the heavy artillery, and he wrote home, "The heavy 
artillery does most of its fighting from five to eight or nine thous- 
and yards and one never sees the enemy." So he applied for a 
transfer to the infantry. It is significant of his qualities as a sol- 
dier that he was assigned to the Black Watch, one of the most 
famous military organizations in the British army, with a record 
of nearly two hundred years. 

One of Johnny's latest letters was written to Scott Bullitt '98 



406 Class of 1895 

of Louisville. It is a characteristically cheerful letter, and stirs 
many old memories. He spoke of his new service as follows : 

"I did not care for the heavy artillery but do like the Black 
Watch, though I find the broad Scotch difficult to understand. 
The Black Watch made a fine charge on May 9, carrying a trench 
after several other regiments had failed to do so. The pipers 
played the 'Highland Laddie.' I was not in the battalion then, 
so what Ahab, King of Israel, said unto Ben Hadad, King of 
Assyria, applies in my case. 

"My part in this war has been to listen to the German heavy 
shells coming toward me like an express train, and hoping they 
would not get me. Last October and November, at Ypres, is 
where they came the most frequent. Shrapnel breaking near one 
is damned unpleasant, with the bullets and pieces of shell dropping 
through the limbs and leaves of trees. One good thing shrapnel 
did for me, however, was to kill a horse I hated so that I could 
almost have killed him myself several times. I was not riding 
him at the time, but had him tied to a tree, while I was in a Bel- 
gian garden searching for vegetables with which to make a stew. 
I did not even have to help bury him, as we put him in a large hole 
made by a German shell. 

"Enough of war, and rumors of war, except to say that I am 
well enough satisfied, and would not go back to the strong-arm 
work again, which makes one as broad as two pick handles 
across the shoulders, but as narrow as an eye of a needle between 
the eyes. 

"Blair has closed down, but Goldfield is still running, so pos- 
sibly I may still have to strike them for a job in the mine at $4 per. 

"At reveille the pipers often play 'Johnny Cope.' Wasn't that 
the tune the Highlanders charged to at Killiecrankie in 171 5 when 
they overwhelmed the English? The Scotch regiments are great 
chargers even today. 

" 'When I was young I used to be 
The smartest man in all Dundee. 
The Prince of Wales, he wanted me 
To come and join his armee.' 

"Some day I hope to sing you this verse. 

" 'Tohn Peel' is one of the most glorious marching tunes I have 
ever heard. I have felt for years that the pipers playing when 



Princeton University 407 

the men charged was an enormous help and very often the differ- 
ence between carrying, and not carrying, a position. 

"The prevailing type of man in the Black Watch is short and 
stocky. There are many shorter even than I am. 

"We are not in the trenches all of the time, and only stay in 
for three or four days at a time." 

And so closes the record of the twenty-four years since that 
spring afternoon when the Class of '95 as Freshmen went down 
to the Junction with heavy hearts to cheer off their Class Presi- 
dent. Nearly all of those Freshmen have followed the beaten path, 
but Johnny Poe was different. And perhaps more than any of 
us, he has realized his ambition. To him war was "the greatest 
game on earth," and he crowned his chosen career as a good sol- 
dier in a headlong charge with one of the world's most famous 
fighting regiments, in the greatest war the world has ever known. 
In his jocular moments he had said that it made no difference 
which side one fought for, as they were both usually wrong. But 
those of us who have read his letters from the trenches can never 
doubt that in his last fight he fought not so much for the love of 
the fighting, as for the cause in which his whole heart and soul 
were enlisted. 

Anyone who has read Johnny Poe's letters must have been 
struck by his remarkable literary gift. He inherited it. Un- 
questionably he could have achieved success as a writer. He had 
unparalleled material in his varied experiences, he had facility 
in expression, and he had an amazing and vivid memory. Though 
he saw his Princeton friends but infrequently, he knew us all by 
our nicknames, hundreds of us. In his letters, written from min- 
ing or military camps, or trenches, where of course there were 
no books for reference, he constantly quoted prose or poetry with 
equal facility, — sometimes obscure passages, that might baffle the 
practiced literary historian. Sometime, somewhere, he must have 
done a lot of reading. 

At the decennial reunion of the Class of '95 a cup was offered 
for the best letter for the Class Record. The judges were secre- 
taries of three other classes. Johnny Poe won the trophy. The 
prize letter, written to the Class Secretary, was in part as follows : 

"I suppose I must talk about myself, but that is preferable, from 
a Christian standpoint, to talking of one's neighbors. 

"After trying three or four different businesses — real estate; 



408 Class of 1895 

steamshipping ; coal ; soldiering in the Regular Army in the Philip- 
pines, a Volunteer in the Spanish American War, a Marine in 
Panama, a Militiaman in the Feud District of Kentucky, a cow- 
puncher in New Mexico — I finally find myself in the Desert of 
Nevada in a mining camp. Read the prologue to The Spenders 
for a glorious tribute to the West : 

' 'The wanderers of the earth turned towards her outcasts of the 

older lands 
With a promise and hope in their pleading, and she reached them 

pitying hands ; 
And she cried to the old world cities that drowse by the eastern 

main : 
Send me your weary house-worn broods and I'll send you men 

again.' 

"I sometimes feel as if Kipling's poem The Lost Legion might 
apply to me: 

" 'Our Fathers they gave us their blessing; 

They taught us, they groomed us, they crammed ; 
But we've cut the clubs and the messes 
For to go and find out and be damned.' 

"Though living side by side with wife-deserters, crooks, a child- 
murderer, and some of the scum of the earth, I think the fact of 
being a Princeton man was as a pillar of cloud by day and fire by 
night in keeping me from sinking to their level, and the knowledge 
that Old Mother Princeton wishes to believe of her sons as Isa- 
bella of Croix did of Quentin Durward, Tf I hear not of you soon, 
and that by the trumpet of fame, I'll conclude you dead, but not 
unworthy.' I suspect some of the '95 men have feared I have 
taken as awkward a way of gratifying this wish as did the recruit 
when he loaded his rifle by shoving the cartridge down the muzzle, 
and when reproved by his sergeant replied : 'There is more than 
one way of loading a rifle.' 

"In some of my jobs I have not had much more than enough 
clothes to pad a crutch, or flag a hand-car. I have told my exper- 
iences in the Philippines in our tent in '02, and the stories I picked 
up in the Army, Marine Corps, and on ranches, are too Balzacian 
for publication. 'The wearing, tearing, always swearing regular 
army man' uses strong language in barracks, camp and guard 
house ; and his 'brother with the bark on' — cowloop and marine — 
is not more refined. He certainly would not be at home in Sun- 
day School or at a social tea, for 'on the day he gets his pay he 
likes to spend it free', and he believes, as did that French writer. 
'there is no wit without coarseness.' 

"I was fortunate enough to travel around the world on trans- 



Princeton University 409 

ports, though while doing so we were not particularly enthusiastic 
about it. Yet it is an interesting thing to think of, as are the 
'rush,' snowball fight, and our other tea-parties with the Soph- 
omores — after they are over! 

"You ask: 'What is my greatest mistake?' If a rapidly re- 
volving buzz saw were to hit me, could I swear which tooth hurt 
the most? 

"My only political work was to cry out at Tonopah, Nevada: 
'Lie down, you fat-head,' to a democrat who was interrupting a 
republican meeting. In regard to speeches, I have made quite a 
number in Princeton. ... I fear my audience did not have a 
clear idea of my speech. ... I wrote an article once for the 
Baltimore Herald on 'Fourth of July in the Philippines.' I re- 
ceived three dollars and a half for it and hadn't the heart to try 
and live it down ; so lit out to New Mexico. I felt almost as 
cheap over this as when called down by a Kentucky militiaman. 
He has asked if I were related to Edgar Allan Poe, and when I 
(with a tone of pride in my voice, which he doubtless resented) 
said : 'Why, he is my grandfather's first cousin; he replied : 
'Hell, man, you've got a swell chance!' 

"I wonder if I shall get back to Princeton this spring. It is 
over three thousand miles, and though the walking is not crowded, 
still it has its thorny side. I certainly hope I shall be there to 
see the fellows and join in the wild excitement which takes place 
on the varsity field during the Yale game and hear the speeches 
in our tent from McCready Sykes, Scott Bullitt, 'Lady Jayne,' Phil 
Walker, Walter Lord and others, and join in the wild bacchanalian 
cake-walk to the accompaniment of the band. 

"We are six thousand feet high here, and in the midst of a 
desert. No trees or grass ! Water costs one dollar per barrel. 
The scenery reminds me a good deal of the Red Sea shores with 
Mt. Sinai looming up, where, as a tough soldier once said, 'Col. 
Moses went up to get them ten general orders.' Some people 
would think this the place where 'nobody don't live and dogs bark 
at strangers' ; but I like it. There are no Princeton men here 
except my brother Neilson. 

"I was on a ranch in '02 and '03 with Dutch Hager and Hugh 
Hodge. Dutch had a disagreement once with a 'badman' about 
the ownership of a cow. 'Hage' said it was his and he intended 
to take it and if the man didn't like it he could help himself. Dutch 
and he were both armed, but if the other fellow had started any- 
thing I'll bet Dutch would have sent him winging his way over 
the great divide so soon that he would have still had a surprised 
look on his face when he grabbed a harp and caused an all-around 
discord in the heavenly choir. Hugh was a fearless rider and I 
believe he could have ridden the cow when she jumped over the 
moon. 

"I was so sorrv to hear of Harry Brown's and Gus Hollv's 



410 Class of 1895 

death. I can close my eyes and see Harry and Gus as they fought 
so splendidly for Princeton in Manhattan Field on Thanksgiving 
Day '93 ; how Harry would follow the ball, and how finely he 
shoved 'Beef Wheeler through the Yale line for yard after yard; 
and I see Gus standing on the defensive at left tackle, legs planted 
firmly and arms swinging fiercely, as he awaited the bull-like 
rushes of Butterworth, who had heretofore not known what it 
was to be held, any more than did the Old Guard up to the day at 
Waterloo. I reckon the feeling with which we waited to find 
out whether he could be stopped was akin to that of the Union 
forces awaiting at Gettysburg the rush of Pickett's Virginians as 
they swept magnificently up the slope, only to be driven back, 
decimated and broken. Gus held him, however, so well that 'all 
Rome sent forth a rapturous cry and even the ranks of Tuscany 
could scarce forbear to cheer.' Well have they earned their seats 
in Valhalla's lofty halls along with the old Norse Vikings. 

"Now, Andy, some will consider this letter of mine too mushy, 
maybe ; but we do not have a Decennial every year, and I feel 
very strongly what I have written. Besides, they do not have 
to read it and I have enjoyed writing it. Blame it on the altitude 
if you wish. 

"I must close now, or you fellows will wish the same fate for 
me as did Col. Waller of the Marine Corps, who is a corker, for 
a private in Panama. The private was up for trial and, seeing 
he was to be convicted, said: 'Colonel, before sentencing me 
you should consider my good record. Why, / was blown up in 
the Maine!' The Colonel, after a few minutes of deep thought, 
replied : 'Is that so ! Well, I wish you had staid up.' 

"Well, Andy, when we take the trail where there are not any 
outfits coming back, may we all exclaim as did the Roman 
Gladiators to Caesar : 'About to die, O '95 and Princeton, we 
salute thee !" 

"Very sincerely, 

"John P. Poe, Jr." 

"Tonopah, Nev., Feb. 21, 1905." 

Last June when the Class of '95 held its twentieth anniversary 
reunion the absence of Johnny Poe was deeply regretted. His 
brother Neilson of '97 was our guest at the class dinner and 
through his kindness we were privileged to hear some of the 
letters Johnny had written home from northern France. He was 
constantly in our thoughts and at the suggestion of Arthur 
Wheeler we all sent him a picture postal of Princeton, with a 
personal message from each of us. It is a consoling memory to 
his classmates to know that Johnny, while fighting in the trenches, 



Princeton University 411 

received those messages of affection from the Princeton men he 
loved so devotedly. Through the Class Secretary he wrote to 
us all the following cheerful letter : 

"Northern France, July 24, 191 5. 
"Dear Andy, 

"I want to write thanking you in the name of the Class for the 
postals the fellows sent me. 

"So far about 130 have arrived and as I read the sincere wishes 
of the fellows, many an incident, unrecalled for years at least, 
comes back at seeing the well-remembered names. 

"I have transferred from the heavy artillery to the infantry — 
the famous Black Watch, 'than whom there is none such,' who for 
over one hundred and fifty years have shoved the British flag into 
many quarters of the globe, and kept it there, until now, as 
Kipling said : 

" 'Never a sea so distant, never an isle so lone 
But over the sand and the palm trees, the British flag has 
flown.' 

"I am beginning to feel more at home in a kilt; and while they 
are cool, the legs get dirty for quite a way above the knees. 

"You all must have had a great reunion, and I often thought 
of you during the four days in June, and wished I could drop in 
on you. 

"Am glad Net was there to tell the fellows where I was. I 
should have dearly liked to have seen the enlarged kodaks taken 
years ago. 

"There is no use in my telling you about the war as you doubt- 
less know much more than I do ; and besides, our letters are cen- 
sored. 

"Of course, we are going to win; but the 'Limburgers' are 
putting up a great fight. What business have the 'Square Heads' 
to start on the downward course the Empire which weathered the 
Spanish Armada, the Dutch under De Ruyter and Von Trump, 
the 'Grand Monarch' and Napoleon? 

"Aren't you sorry I am such a shark on history? 

"The Black Watch carried a German trench on May 9th after 
several regiments had tried and failed. It was taken with the 
piper playing the 'Hieland Laddie.' 

"The heavy artillery does most of its firing from five to eight or 
nine thousand yards and one never sees the enemy. 

"There is no use in writing why I transferred or I would only 
be misunderstood — or else suspected of 'bumming my chat' 
(praising myself). 

"I hope you will thank all the fellows you see who took the 
trouble to write (and it was trouble too). I had no right to 



412 Class of 1895 

expect them to do so. I trust that I shall be on hand at the next 
roundup to tell you 'how the play came up,' or in other words 
how me and K. of K. made the 'Sauerkrauts' wish that war had 
never been invented. 

"And now in the stately language of the rancher and miner 
'I looks towards you all, and also bows. I hope I catches your 
eye?' 

"As ever, while water runs and grass grows — 

"J. P. Poe." 

"Thus speaking, and illustrating the hardships in France, 
Private Poe took a long siesta. 

"My address is A Company, 3rd Platoon, 1st Black Watch, 
British Expeditionary Force, care of War Office, London, Eng- 
land." 



Just three months after this letter was written Johnny was 
killed in action on Sept. 25th, 191 5, at the Battle of Loos, where 
the Black Watch made a famous charge. One of his fellow 
soldiers, writing in December to a friend in London, describes 
briefly the circumstances of his death : 

"Just before the 25th, Private Poe transferred into 'A' Com- 
pany's Bombers' Section, and as a Bomber he went into action. 
The Brigade Staff had made arrangements for all Bombers in 
the various regiments forming the Brigade to form a sort of 
Brigade Company, quite independent of their Regiments, which 
Company was again divided into different parties performing 
various duties during the advance. Private Poe was with me, 
carrying bombs. We were half-way across the open when he 
was hit in the stomach, and told us 'never to mind him but to 
go ahead with our boxes.' On our return for more bombs we 
found him lying dead. Shortly after he was buried at a place 
between the British and German lines." 

On the campus of Princeton University Johnny's friends have 
built and dedicated to his memory, an athletic field which bears 
his name. The contributors to this memorial are members of 
nearly every living class graduated from Princeton. Thus 
Poe Field is a permanent memorial of a man whose friends ex- 
tended far beyond his own Class and whose unique personality 
was admired wherever Princeton men gathered. The friends 
who built the field sought to make the memorial such as Johnny 
Poe himself would have wished; something that would provide 
Princeton students with the opportunity to obtain recreation in 



Princeton University 413 

healthful outdoor sport ; something that would encourage man- 
liness and fair play in the entire body of undergraduates, not 
merely the few who gain positions upon the 'varsity teams. 

The memorial tablet set in a boulder in the corner of the field 
bears the following inscription : 

POE FIELD 

THIS ATHLETIC FIELD 

FOR THE COMMON USE OF ALL PRINCETON STUDENTS 

WAS GIVEN BY THE FRIENDS OF 

JOHN PRENTISS POE JR 

OF THE CLASS OF 1895 

A SOLDIER OF THE BLACK WATCH 

KILLED IN ACTION IN NORTHERN FRANCE 

SEPTEMBER 25 1915 



The Golden Nineties 

By Booth Tarkington '93 

[In The Princeton Alumni Weekly of June 7, 1916] 

Young Professor Hibben and Mrs. Hibben looked just about 
as they do now ; and we met them, together, crossing the campus, 
just about as luckily often as the boys do now; and after meeting 
them we felt just about as we do now when we go back there and 
encounter that same sunny fortune. 

Professor Marquand also looked just a trifle more sedate then, 
for he was still a bachelor, at Guernsey Hall; but Professor Hunt 
has changed, for when our class was in college we (being chil- 
dren) considered him quite decidedly an elderly man, while now- 
adays we think of him as beginning to be comfortably middle- 
aged — though he hardly looks that far along. And the Dean 
of the Graduate College, that imperishable man : Where, oh 
where, is there anything different in him or upon his squirely 
surface? 




Our Prexy 

When we came from Dr. Pattons lectures upon Ethics — lec- 
tures which blasted all theories of evolution and our intellects 
simultaneously, leaving us fragmentary and wan, but convinced 



Princeton University 



415 



that there was a real Bible hell 'twere well to avoid when we got 
a little older — we passed to the Biological Laboratory, there to 
learn the processes of that evolution we had just denied. He who 
guided our reluctant fingers through the innards of long-since 
starfish and pigeons, he who compelled us to explore each cranny 
and recess of dogfish too, too much preserved in jars of alcohol — 
he, that new, young Professor McClure, neither has he changed, 
though there was a time when you could never be certain whether 
or no he was wearing a beard. His assistant of those days, now 
late Mayor of Princeton — this one shows somewhat portly and 
ducal, but is the same. Professor Harper seemed to us a serious 




Our Dean 



man of middle life; perhaps he was serious, but we must have 
been remarkably mistaken about his age! 

Of course among ourselves we spoke of most of the members 
of the faculty as "old" ; but there were others with whom we 
feared to be so familiar — even in a mental soliloquy! Of Doctor 
Patton, for revered example, I doubt if one of us could have 
imagined his mother addressing him with any assurance, even 
in his childhood, by his first name. 



416 



Class of 1895 



General Karge ! 

In the early years of the Golden Nineties we had the rollicking 
luck to read "Faust'' and "Herman and Dorothea" under that 
bravest and kindest and old-worldliest of Generals. I see him 
now, lifting his high hat and bowing, in the sunshine of a May 
afternoon, on the steps of Dickinson, to a Kentuckian of our 
class, likewise encourtiered. This amateur Colonel had made a 
thoroughly unjustified request for leave of absence, but he had 
made it in an elaborate, old-fashioned Kentucky way. 

"I never refuse anys'mg to a gentleman, sir !" said the General. 

Sabers flashed over "Faust" and ammunition trains wandered 
among the carts of "Herman and Dorothea," in the General's 
classes ; and the sly students learned ways of evasion that in the 
end gained them more perhaps than they knew at the time. Sor- 
rowful that day when the General quietly left a Jersey City ferry- 
boat for a longer ferrying! It was the day when the '93 Glee 




Professor Woodrozv Wilson 



Club upset splendidly en masse into a four-foot snow-drift, out- 
side of Omaha; and the news of the General's passing troubled 
and somewhat hushed even that uproarious assembly. 

For Dean, in those days, we had the truest possible portrait of 
a Dean and right old-fashioned gentleman : Dean Murray. 
There was the finest dryness about him — most evident, perhaps, 



Princeton University 



417 



when he would allude to the railway time-table in answer to 
painstaking orations upon the desirability of averting dangerous 
parental shock in distant cities. But how just he was — and how 
absorbing we found his English lectures ! In those days of care- 
less "cutting," we never cut the Dean! Nor Prof. Scott, nor 
Prof. "Maggie," nor Woodrow Wilson either ! The President 
of the United States had the darkest and thickest hair (except 
Jesse Williams's) on the whole campus, in those days; and that 
has changed comprehensibly. We crowded his lectures, both 
kinds of us ; the idle apprentice as eagerly as the industrious. 

How the figures come to mind ! Again we see them crossing 
the campus, books under arm: Duffield, Orris, Ormond, and a 
kindly, absent pedestrian "wearing a Cameron plaid" — and you 
see the fine white face of Dr. Shields as he drives out Nassau 
Street in his victoria. New ivies grow on Nassau Hall, but the 
older vines cling to it even more strongly, and so do the older 
memories. Most august, and, in its gentle way, ghostliest of 
these, is that of the delicate and tremulous figure, so very, very 
old and fragile, taking the air and slowly shuffling homeward in 




"Under the groinings of McCosh Walk — his own Walk 



4i8 



Class of 1895 



the late afternoon under the groinings of McCosh Walk — his 
own Walk. We used to slow our steps to a creep and go with 
him part of the way, until we feared that the questions he asked 
us over and over might be tiring him. 

There was another old Jimmie, a humble and swart merchant 
with his wheelbarrow of indigestibles — but Lord ! we could digest 
anything then — usually to be found near "old chapel." "Ye-ye- 
yes, suh," he stuttered, when we asked him if the rumor was 
true. "I g-got mai'ed ag-g-ag'in. I'm a-lookin f-fer t'trou'ble, 
suh!" Poor old black Jimmie Odor! Some comedian in '94 
dressed him in a silk hat, a long coat, tweed knickerbockers and 




Old Dennis and Johnnie Degnan 



woolen stockings; and Jimmie wore the things patiently, or, it 
may be, proudly. 

Nowadays, the boys have their Stadium, and a most compen- 
dious and overpowering contrapshun it is ; but they don't know 
what it means to take coach, on the morning of Thanksgiving 
Day, at the stunning new Holland House, and go careening the 
length of orange-and-black and blue-and-white bannered Fifth 
Avenue to the Game, outcheering and passing the Yale four-in- 
hands all the way ! The game itself has changed — for the better, 
of course, and even we can see how much more scientific and in- 



Princeton University 



419 



comprehensible it has become; how much less bitter; how much 
less visibly heroic. Never again shall we behold that catapulting 
awfulness with the "sulphurous name," that hurtling devastation 
called Heffelfinger — never again shall we see Heffelfinger, single- 
handed, destroy the Princeton wedge ! Against that sudden 
leviathan we sent, year after year, our own Jesse Riggs, and, 
when the line "played low," the two agile colossi would lie down 
in mud inimically, while we wondered profoundly what they 
were grunting to each other; — but when the last game between 
them was over they embraced, not as so often, in battle, but to 
express their mighty esteem. 




"Skinny" McWilliams '94 as Caesar and Booth Tarkington '93 as Cassius 
in "The Honorable Julius Caesar" 



It was in our senior year that we had our first football shock, 
our first real disaster. Gen. Sir Redvers Buller, defeated by the 
Boers, could perhaps have understood us. Pennsylvania in- 
solently beat us 6 to 4. Two or three years earlier I think our 
score had been something like 96 to o. Princeton found 6 to 4 
quite unbearable; we took it as injury to our honor, and when 
Dean Murray, in Chapel next day, began to speak of the calamity 
which had befallen the college, we hung our heads and thought, 
'"Calamity!' Oh, calamity indeed!" A few minutes later, when 



420 



Class of 1895 



we discovered that he was alluding to the death of a Freshman, 
caused by typhoid fever, we decided that the Dean's sense of pro- 
portion was gravely lacking. Didn't the man realize that Prince- 
ton had been beaten by U. of P.? And thenceforth we had hate 
by water and hate by land, hate of the heart and hate of the 
hand : we had one hate and one alone : 

''Pennsylvania !" 

We didn't get along very well with Harvard, either : Yale was 
our only enemy to be a friend and there were times when we 
needed her — and she was always there for us. 

... In our ease we read the writers who will never fail 
youth : Stevenson and Kipling. And we read the new novels : 
"The Little Minister," "Peter Ibbetson," "Trilby"— and all that 
Richard Harding Davis wrote. We took our "literary opinions" 
from "Droch's" reviews in Life, and were far from foolish 
therein, especially since "Droch" was not only a man wise in 
letters but a graduated Princetonian, to our continuing pride, 
then and subsequently. We founded the Tiger on Life, of course, 
and felt very knowing and intimate when Charles Dana Gibson 
drew a picture of Jimmie Barnes '91 for the "outside page" of 
the letter. 

. . . There was old-fashioned hazing, in the Nineties, some- 
times too rough and it was not unfashionable to carouse on trips 
to New York and Philadelphia — though Washington Irving, had 
he come our way, would have found little occasion for his 
"drunken students" . . . "more drunken students." I wonder, 




Coaching to the Thanksgivina Day Games in the Nineties 



Princeton University 



421 



sometimes, if he was not mistaken; there are so many occasions 
when it is impossible to tell drunken students from sober ones. 
I have known strangers, in Paris, on the night of the Fourteenth 
of July, who thought the whole city was drunk, when nobody 
was. Certainly we were far from "dissipated" in the 'Nineties — 
and our class gave Princeton the Honor System. We can rest 
our case on that. 

"Looking back," what we see is boys singing. Did those slim 
boys, so long since lost beneath our flesh, those boys who had 
black hair where ours is grizzled or is not anything — did those 
singing, slouching boys in their care-free heaven ever think of us? 
Did they think of the men that they Would be ? No oftener than 
we think of them, certainly, yet they did know that we were in- 
evitable. 

"Oh, these things that are ours now!" We wrote in the Lit 
of June, '92. "These things that some day we shall look back 
to ! . . . Pictures will come to us, too, and fragmentary airs 
of the old songs of the Seniors on the Steps, and we shall see 
again the white-clad loungers under the elms, listening and 
sprawling in the grass ... a multitude of shadowy forms, dear 
and well-beloved!" 

"Dear and well-beloved," yes, though sometimes more than 
half-forgotten, with the moonlight of those nights and the sun- 
shine of those days. It was never rainy then. How strange that 
is ! The elms thrived ; the grass before Old North was always 
crisp and green ; and the gardens at Prospect and through all of 
Princeton town were rich with flowers abloom, never a blowsy or 
dried or faded one among them. Yet it never rained! It was 
always sunshine — then ! 







*— \S3H7Vli\ & 









- ^^^g^ ^wgR^ ^WTOf -^gg 









: :<ry._ 



M35WTi!- 






W DA 



XAH<33l t£m$$i— &>*J^mo^£±i 



rpuicS^ga 



T 2f$&£i 



, ^G.KLots^4 






A famous Table Top of the Nineties 



The Ninety-Five March 



Composed and written for the Quinquennial Reunion, June 8-13, 1900 



Fac-Simile of the Original Music by L. F. Pease '95, and 
words by H. E. White '95 




Princeton University 



423 




H4UU-^-^ li 




Occupational Classification in 1920 

MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS (63) 



Agens 


Harris 


Nixon 


Auchincloss 


Hartzler 


F. A. Norris 


Barr 


J. E. Hayes 


Murphy 


Brady 


Hencken 


Parker 


Brown 


Hirshfield 


Pogue 


Canby 


Hoagland 


J. W. Paxton 


Chapman 


S. A. Hodge 


Reynolds 


J. T. Davis 


Illingworth 


Richards 


Dechant 


Imbrie 


Schumacher 


Deford 


James 


Scovill 


Dexter 


Jessup 


Sloane 


Dilley 


Kellermann 


D. Speer 


Edwards 


Koch 


F. C. Speer 


Egbert 


Kumler 


Taylor 


Frj- 


Leeds 


Trenchard 


Fulper 


Libby 


Upson 


Furness 


Logan 


Warren 


Gould 


H. F. McCormick 


W. H. Wells 


Hall 


McNitt 


G. White 


C. L. Hamilton 


Minott 


A. McC. Wilson 


C. M. Hamilton 


Mitchell 

LAWYERS (43) 


Wood 


Andrews 


Inch 


Sawyer 


Arnold 


Janvier 


Sinnickson 


Corwin 


R. L. Kennedy 


Snyder 


J. S. Crawford 


Leggate 


Stewart 


Dixon 


Leidy 


Thacher 


Dray 


Lord 


Van Sellar 


Fisher 


McCammon 


Waldo 


Frame 


McGee 


Walker 


Harvey 


H. Nelson 


Weiss 


A. Hayes 


Nevin 


A. R. Wells 


Hendrickson 


Otheman 


H. E. White 


Hoos 


Payne 


A. D. Williams 


Hudson 


R. E. Ross 


E. K. Wilson 


Hunt 


T. Ross 




Hurst 


Rutter 





Princeton University 



425 





CLERGYMEN (21) 




Bone 


Cooke 




Haynes 


Butler 


Craig 




Koehler 


Candee 


Fisk 




Lukens 


Carter 


Furnajieff 




Master 


Caton 


Hardin 




McNulty 


Condit 


Harrison 




Sherman 


Conrow 


Hatch 




Smead 




PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS (21) 


T. Bailey 


Foster 




Otto 


Beveridge 


Harlow 




Robertson 


Bradner 


Holden 




Shaw 


Cramer 


L. C. Kennedy 




Stone 


W. Davis 


Loughran 




Wadhams 


Elmer 


Love 




Ward 


Ewing 


W. H. Morse 




L. R. Williams 




BANKERS AND BROKERS (16) 


Blair 


H. L. Crawford 




Newbold 


Borie 


Decker 




Piatt 


Brooks 


Dunn 




Post 


Buckingham 


Garrett 




Roberts 


Bunting 


Hager 
Huntington 




Roe 




TEACHERS 


(11) 




Cook 


Huston 




Smith 


J. F. Crawford 


Irvine 




Urban 


deForest 


LaFetra 




Woodruff 


Flint 


MacColl 








ENGINEERS (8) 




Barton 


Herrick 




Pierson 


Carpenter 


A. H. Nelson 




Poole 


Gibbs 


J. D. Paxton 







IN UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT SERVICE (7) 

Belden (Treasury Department) C. B. Lewis (U. S. Army) 
Burns (U. S. Army) Francis (U. S. Army) 

Cresson (U. S. Army) Paterson (U. S. Army) 

Flemming (U. S. Army) 



AUTHORS AND JOURNALISTS (7) 

Dale Polcar 

Faris Sutton 

F. B. Morse I. L. White 

E. M. Norris 



426 Class of 1895 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE MEN (6) 

Carroll Moses 

Davey Vaughn 

Harding Westcott 

FARMERS (5) 
Drake Stockton 

H. L. Hodge Valliant 

Miller 

ACCOUNTANTS (4) 

Bowman Marsh 

Darby Wyman 

COLLEGE ADMINISTRATORS (2) 

F. W. Lewis R. L. Zabriskie 

MUSICIANS (2) 
Baird Pease 

CHEMIST (1) 
R. W. Bailey 

NO OCCUPATION [when last reported] (8) 

Biddle Neill 

Colby Perkins 

Curtis Slidell 

S. McCormick Weeks 





UNKNOWN (1) 






Teal 






SUMMARY 




I. 


Manufacturers and Merchants 


63 


2. 


Lawyers 


43 


3- 


Clergymen 


21 


A- 


Physicians and Surgeons 


21 


5- 


Bankers and Brokers 


16 


6. 


Teachers 


11 


7- 


Engineers 


8 


8. 


United States Government 


7 


9- 


Authors and Journalists 


7 


10. 


Real Estate and Insurance Men 


6 


11. 


Farmers 


5 


12. 


Accountants 


4 


13. 


College Administrators 


2 


14. 


Musicians 


2 


15. 


Chemist 


I 


16. 


No occupation [when last reported] 


8 


17. 


Unknown 


1 




Living Members 


226 




Deceased Members 


37 



263 



Geographical Distribution in 1920 

Note: — An asterisk (*) following a name indicates that the man's res- 
dence is not in the same city or town as his business. Such names are 
listed under both places. 



ALABAMA 


Walling ford 


Lake Forest 


Montgomery 


Huston* 


Chapman* 


H. Nelson 




Rutter* 




DELAWARE 


Morgan Park 


CALIFORNIA 


New Castle 


Carpenter 


Los Angeles 


Janvier* 


Paris 


Neill 


Wilmington 


Van Sellar 


Pasadena 


Canby 


Springfield 


Kumler 


Candee 


Carroll 


Sloane 


Janvier* 




San Francisco 


Logan 


IOWA 


F. B. Morse 




Greenfield 




DIST. OF COLUMBIA Reynolds 


COLORADO 


Washington 




Boulder 


Burns 


KANSAS 


Buckingham 


La Fetra 


Emporia 


Colorado Springs 


McCammon* 


F. W. Lewis 


Hager 


Walker 




CONNECTICUT 




MAINE 


Berlin 


FLORIDA 


Bath 


Huston* 


Ocala 


Hardin 


Bridgeport 


Drake 




Marsh* 




MARYLAND 


Glenbrook 


ILLINOIS 


Baltimore 


Leeds* 


Chicago 


Deford 


Greenwich 


Chapman* 


Garrett 


Hencken* 


deForest 


Hurst 


Hartford 


Dray 


Lord 


Butler 


Harding* 


E. K. Wilson 


Urban 


Hoagland 


Chevy Chase 


New Haven 


H. F. McCormick 


McCammon* 


Flint 


S. McCormick 


Perkins 


Marsh* 


R. E. Ross 


Towson 


Southport 


Rutter* 


Cook 


Hatch 


Warren 




Stamford 


Evanston 


MASSACHUSETTS 


Leeds* 


Harding* 


Boston 


Sawyer* 


Galesburg 


Gould* 


Scovill* 


Dexter 


Hall* 



428 



Class of 1895 



Cambridge 

Hall* 
Dedham 

Gould* 
St ought on 

Ewing 

MISSOURI 

Kansas City 

Thacher 
St. Louis 

Wyman 

MINNESOTA 
St. Paul 

R. L. Kennedy 

MISSISSIPPI 
Leota 
Valliant 

NEBRASKA 
Omaha 
Polcar 
A. R. Wells 

NEW JERSEY 
Asbury Park 

Beveridge 
Atlantic City 

A. H. Nelson 
Camden 

Cramer 

Westcott 
East Orange 

Davey* 
Elisabeth 

R. W. Bailey* 
Englewood 

Bradner 

Piatt* 
Flemington 

Fulper 
Freehold 

McGee* 
High Bridge 

Taylor 



Hoboken 

Caton 

Francis 
Jersey City 

Hendrickson* 

Hoos 

W. H. Wells 
Long Branch 

Shaw 
Madison 

F. C. Speer 
Montclair 

Love 
Newark 

Agens 

Condit 

Hartzler* 

Holden 

Jessup* 

Murphy 

I. L. White* 
Nutley 

Hartzler* 
Paterson 

Bowman* 
Princeton 

E. M. Norris 

Stockton 
Red Bank 

Hendrickson* 
Ridgewood 

Jessup* 
Summit 

Libby 

I. L. White* 
Trenton 

Dale 

Darby* 

Dixon 

Hunt 

McGee* 
Westfield 

Darby* 

NEW MEXICO 
Silver City 
H. L. Hodge 



NEW YORK 
Albany 

Paterson 
Aurora 

Zabriskie 
Buffalo 

Nixon 

Otto 

Smead 
Flushing 

Andrews* 

Arnold* 
Hewlett 

C. M. Hamilton* 

F. A. Norris* 
Larchmont Manor 

Dunn* 
Lawrence 

Pierson* 
Middletown 

Corwin 
Montour Falls 

Barton 
Mount Vernon 

Robertson 
New York City 

Andrews* 

Arnold* 

Auchincloss 

R. W. Bailey* 

T. Bailey 

/Belden 

Bowman* 

Brown 

Bunting 

Colby 

H. L. Crawford 

Cresson 

Curtis 

Davey* 

Decker 

Dunn* 

Edwards 

C. M. Hamilton* 

Harlow 

Harvey 

A. Hayes 

J. E. Hayes 



Princeton University 



429 



Hencken* 


Cleveland 


Carter 


Herrick 


Fisk 


Cooke 


Imbrie 


Parker 


Dilley 


Inch 


Upson 


Elmer 


James 


Columbus 


Faris 


Koch 


Huntington 


Furness* 


Libby* 


Marietta 


Haynes* 


Loughran 


G. White 


C. B. Lewis* 


Minott* 




Newbold 


Nevin 


PENNSYLVANIA 


Lukens 


F. A. Norris* 


Allcntown 


Master 


Otheman 


Barr* 


Moses* 


Pease 


At glen 


J. D. Paxton* 


Pierson* 


Koehler 


Roberts* 


Piatt* 


Belief onte 


Sinnickson* 


Post 


McNitt 


Snyder* 


Roe 


Butler 


Pittsburgh 


Sawyer* 


Irvine 


J. S. Crawford 5 


Schumacher 


Chestnut Hill 


Egbert 


Scovill* 


Biddle 


Fisher 


Slidell 


Snyder* 


Foster 


Smith 


Cynwyd 


Gibbs 


Stone 


Barr* 


C. L. Hamilton 


Sutton 


Doylestown 


Hirshfield 


Waldo 


T. Ross 


Leggate* 


H. E. White 


Fox Chase 


Payne* 


Wood 


Illingworth* 


D. Speer 


Woodruff 


Frank ford 


Reading 


Rochester 


Illingworth* 


Leidy 


Poole 


Germantown 


Rosemont 


Ward 


Moses* 


Sinnickson* 


Skaneateles 


Greencastle 


Rochester 


Weeks 


Conrow 


Fry 




Harrisburg 


Saint Davids 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Weiss 


Craig 


Asheville 


Indiana 


J. D. Paxton* 


Harris 


Stewart 


Saltsburg 


Charlotte 


Kingston 


MacColl 


Dechant 


Vaughn 


Scranton 




Media 


Blair 


NORTH DAKOTA 


Furness* 


Brady 


Fargo 


Merion 


Brooks 


Frame 


Haynes* 


L. C. Kennedy 




Milford 


Sewickley 


OHIO 


Mitchell 


Leggate* 


Akron 


Newtown 


Payne* 


J. W. Paxton 


Bone 


Uniontown 


Cincinnati 


Philadelphia 


Hudson 


Pogue 


Baird 


A. D. Williams 



43Q 


Class of 1895 




Wayne 


VIRGINIA 


BULGARIA 


Roberts* 


Norfolk 


Sofia 


Wilkes-Barre 


Flemming 


Furnajieff 


W. Davis 






S. A. Hodge 


WASHINGTON 


CHINA 


Wadhams 


Seattle 


Soochow 


Wilkinsburg 


Harrison 


McNulty 


J. S. Crawford'' 


W. H. Morse 


Wuchang 
Sherman 


SOUTH CAROLINA WEST VIRGINIA 




Charleston 


Elkins 


ENGLAND 


C. B. Lewis* 


J. T. Davis 


London 


Lake City 


Inwood 


Richards 


Trenchard 


Miller 


FRANCE 


TENNESSEE 


WISCONSIN 


Paris 


South Pittsburg 


Beloit 


L. R. Williams 


Kellermann 


J. F. Crawford 





Vital Statistics 

I. MARRIAGES 

First Second 

Year Marriages Marriages 

1893 1 — 

1894 1 — 

1895 6 — 

1896 6 — 

1897 11 — 

1898 14 — 

1899 19 — 

1900 13 — 

1901 16 — 

1902 21 — 

1903 19 1 

1904 14 1 

1905 9 — 

1906 9 2 

1907 II I 

1908 13 I 

1909 4 — 

1910 3 — 

1911 1 — 

1912 4 — 

1913 4 — 

1914 2 2 

1915 — — 

1916 2 — 

191/ — — 

1918 2 I 

1919 4 2 

1920 2 — 

Total 211 11 

Married Single Total 

Living Members of the Class 192 34 226 

Deceased Members of the Class 19 18 37 

Total 211 52 263 



Third 
Marriages' 



Percent 
Married 

85% 

So% 

80% 



432 Class of 1895 

II. CHILDREN 

Boys Girls Total 

Living Children 189 197 386 

Deceased Children 17 15 32 

Total 206 212 418 

Percentage of children to marriages [418: 2ii]=iox>%; or an average 
of 2 children to each marriage. 

III. SIZE OF FAMILIES 
In 7 families there have been 6 children = 42 children 

» 8 " " " 5 " = 40 

" 19 " " " 4 " = 76 " 

" 36 " " " 3 " =108 " 

" 58 " " " 2 " =116 

" 36 " " has been 1 child = 36 " 

" 47 " " have been no children = o 

Total 211 " 418