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Brandeis University -^ 
Library 




u4s for the wise, their 
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this world — Rashi 



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in 2010 with funding from 

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http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolof6566bran 



Brandeis University 



The 

Graduate School 

of Arts and 

Sciences 

1965/1966 



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The 

Graduate 

School 

of Arts 

and 

Sciences 




Brandeis University 
Library 



As for the wise^ their 
body alone perishes in 
this world — Rashi 



\i Brandeis on the Brandeis 
t Berks under a commission 
V York. Dedicated by Chief 
anniversary of the birth of 
Brandeis, November, 1956. 

cted as of June 1, 1965. 



Vol. XV No. 2 August, 1965 

Brandeis University Bulletin, published six times a year; 

three times in August; one each in October, February and 

May, at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, 02154. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office 

at Boston, Massachusetts. 



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"It must always he rich in goals and ideals, seemingly attainable 
hut heyond im,mediate reach. . . . 

"It must become truly a seat of learning where research is pursued, 
books written, and the creative instinct is aroused, encouraged, 
and developed in its faculty and students. 

"It must ever be mindful that education is a precious treasure 

transmitted— a sacred trust to he held, used, and enjoyed, and if 

possible strengthened, then passed on to others upon the same 

trust." 

—from the writings of 
Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856-1941) 
on the goals of a university. 



348219 



"Brandeis will be an institution of quality, where the integrity of- 
learning, of research, of writing, of teaching, will not be compro- 
mised. An institution bearing the name of Justice Brandeis must 
be dedicated to conscientiousness in research and to honesty in 
the exploration of truth to its innermost parts. 

"Brandeis University will be a school of the spirit— a school in 
which the temper and climate of the mind will take precedence 
over the acquisition of skills, and the development of techniques. 

"Brandeis will be a dwelling place of permanent values— those few 
unchanging values of beauty, of righteousness, of freedom, which 
man has ever sought to attain. 

"Brandeis will offer its opportunities of learning to all. Neither 
student body nor faculty will ever be chosen on the basis of popu- 
lation proportions, whether ethnic or religious or economic." 

—President Abram L. Sachar, at the ceremonies inaugurating 
Brandeis University, October 8, 1948 



i 




Table of Contents 



Academic Calendar 




8 


Brandeis University 




11 


The Graduate School of Arts 


and Sciences 


39 


General Information 


39 




Academic Regulations 


48 




Degree Requirements 


54 




Fees 


59 




Areas of Study and Courses 


67 




Fellowships 


169 




Directories 




181 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Academic Calendar 1965-1966 



Fall Term 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Wednesday 

Friday 



Friday 
Monday 



Friday 



Monday 
Tuesday 

Friday 



September 15 and 
September 16 
September 17 

September 20 and 
September 21 
September 27 and 
September 28 
October 6 
October 7 
October 1 1 
October 13 

October 18 
October 20 
November 11 
November 25 and 
November 26 
December 1 
December 3 



December 17 
January 3 



January 7 



January 10 and 
January 1 1 

January 14 



Monday 


January 17 


Tuesday 


January 18 through 


Friday 


January 28 


Thursday 


January 27 and 


Friday 


January 28 


Friday 


January 28 



Registration, including payment of fees. 
Students who register later will be fined $10.00. 
Medical examinations for new students. Failure 
to keep appointment results in $5.00 fine. 
Opening days of instruction in all courses. 

No University Exercises. 

No University Exercises. 

Final date for registration. 

No University Exercises. 

Final date for changing program without 

$10.00 fine. 

No University Exercises. 

Final date for adding courses with $10.00 fee. 

No University Exercises. 

No University Exercises. 

Final date for dropping courses with $10.00 fee. 

Final date for February degree candidates to 

submit final drafts of dissertations to 

department chairmen. Final date for February 

degree candidates to submit "Application for 

Degree" to Graduate School Office. 

Winter Recess begins after last class. 

Classes resume. Final date for February degree 

candidates to submit Master's theses to 

department chairmen. 

Final date for faculty certification that 

February M.A. candidates have satisfactorily 

completed degree requirements. Final date for 

faculty certification that February Ph.D. 

candidates have satisfactorily completed and 

defended dissertations. 

Registration for Spring Term for all students 

in residence. Resident students will be fined 

$10.00 for later registration. 

Final date for February degree candidates to 

discharge all financial indebtedness to the 

University. 

No University Exercises. 

Midyear examinations. 

Registration for students entering in the 
Spring Term. New students who register at a 
later date will be fined $10.00. 
Final date for admission to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. and completion of residence and 
language requirements for all students 
expecting to have the Ph.D. conferred in June 
1966. Final date for deposit of Ph.D. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Friday 



February 4 



Spring Term 

Wednesday February 2 and 
Thursday February 3 

Monday February 14 



Tuesday 
Wednesday 

Tuesday 



Friday 



Monday 



Friday 



Saturday 
Sunday 



February 22 
February 23 

March 1 



April 1 



Wednesday April 13 
Friday April 15 



May 16 



Friday 


May 20 through 


Friday 


Junes 


Wednesday 


May 25 and 


Thursday 


May 26 


Monday 


May 30 


Monday 


June 6 



June 10 



June 11 
June 12 



dissertations by February degree candidates 
with the Dean of the Graduate School. Final 
date for reporting incomplete grades for Spring 
Term 1964-65. 
Grades due for all Fall Term courses. 



Opening days of instruction in all courses. 

Final date for changing program without 

$10.00 fine. 

No University Exercises. 

Final date for adding courses for credit with 

$10.00 fee. 

Final date for registered students to file 

"Application for Financial Assistance" for 1966- 

67. 

Final date for dropping courses with $10.00 fee. 

Spring Recess begins after last class. Final date 

for June Ph.D. candidates to submit final 

drafts of dissertations to department chairmen. 

Final date for all June degree candidates to file 

"Application for Degree" with Graduate School 

Office. 

Classes resume. 

Final date for faculty certification that M.A. 

and M.F.A. candidates have completed 

language requirements. 

Final date for faculty certification that June 

Ph.D. candidates have satisfactorily completed 

and defended dissertations. Final date for 

faculty certification of Master's theses. Final 

date for certification that June M.A. candidates 

have passed qualifying examinations. 

Final examinations. 

No University Exercises. 

No University Exercises. 

Grades due for June degree candidates. Final 

date for deposit of Ph.D. dissertations with the 

Dean of the Graduate School. Final date for 

reporting incomplete grades for Fall Term 

1965-66. Final date for June degree candidates 

to discharge all financial indebtedness to the 

University. 

Grades due for all Spring Term and full year 

courses. Final date for admission to candidacy 

for the Ph.D. and completion of residence and 

language requirements for students expecting 

to have the Ph.D. degree conferred in February 

1967. 

Baccalaureate. 

Commencement. 



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Brandeis 
University 







Brandeis University has set itself to develop the whole man, the sensitive, 
cultured, open-minded citizen who grounds his thinking in facts, who is 
intellectually and spiritually aware, who believes that life is significant, and 
who is concerned about society and the role he will play in it. 

The University will not give priority to the molding of vocational 
skills, nor to developing specialized interests at the expense of a solid gen- 
eral background. This does not mean that what is termed practical or useful 
is to be ignored; Brandeis merely seeks to avoid specialization unrelated to 
our basic heritage— its humanities, its social sciences, its sciences and its cre- 
ative arts. For otherwise, fragmentized men, with the compartmentalized 
point of view that has been the bane of contemporary life, are created. 

A realistic educational system must offer adequate opportunity for per- 
sonal fulfillment. Education at Brandeis encourages this drive for personal 
fulfillment, but only within the framework of social responsibility. Thus 
Brandeis seeks to educate men and women who will be practical enough to 
cope with the problems of a technological civilization, yet mellowed by the 
values of a long historical heritage; self-sufficient to the point of intellectual 
independence, yet fully prepared to assume the responsibilities society im- 
poses. 

Brandeis University came into being because of the desire of American 
Jewry to make a corporate contribution to higher education in the tradition 
of the great American secular universities that have stemmed from denomi- 
national generosity. By choosing its faculty on the basis of capacity and 
creativity, and its students according to the criteria of academic merit and 
promise, the University hopes to create an environment which may cause 
the pursuit of learning to issue in wisdom. 




The Famed Three Chapels 

This initial and unwavering commitment to excellence has earned early 
acceptance for the University within academic circles. Full accreditation 
came to Brandeis at the earliest possible moment. In 1961, Phi Beta Kappa 
granted permission for a chapter (Mu of Massachusetts) to be formed on 
its campus. Most recently the Ford Foundation assessed the record and 
potential of the University and buttressed their belief in its future with 
two major challenge grants to Brandeis, an accolade accorded to only five 
universities in the nation. 



University Organization 



Brandeis is one of the few small universities in the United States. The aca- 
demic programs, described below, are each limited in size to encourage 
quality and integrity of intellectual achievement. There is constant inter- 
action between college, graduate and professional schools, and institutes. 
The accomplishments of one set automatic pace for the others, and the 
interchange benefits all, creating an intellectual environment of decided 
vitality. Additionally, the organic richness of the extensive research activity 
fertilizes the undergraduate root of the institution no less than the graduate 
and professional programs. 

The College of Arts and Sciences 

In keeping with its general objectives, Brandeis attaches the greatest of im- 
portance to the liberal arts curriculum. It is designed to offer full academic 
opportunities for those students planning to pursue graduate or professional 
studies as well as those whose educational objective is the baccalaureate 
degree. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 13 



The College of Arts and Sciences offers instruction in the Schools of 
Creative Arts, Humanities, Social Science and Science. Regularly matricu- 
lated students pursuing courses of instruction under the Faculty of Arts 
and Sciences may, upon satisfactory completion of the first year, continue 
as candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Established in 1948, full accreditation was received by Brandeis' College 
of Arts and Sciences from the New England Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools in 1953. 

(Full information is available in the catalog of the College of Arts and 

Sciences). 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

The Graduate School is designed to educate broadly as it trains profession- 
ally. It is sensitive to the fact that as specialization increases within society, 
the traditional boundaries between the Ph.D. and advanced professional 
degrees are gradually losing their distinctions. It seeks to achieve a spirit of 
informality, without sacrificing work disciplines. 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences offers courses of study lead- 
ing to the master's and doctor's degrees. Graduate areas include Anthro- 
pology, Astro-Physics, Biochemistry, Biology, Biophysics, Chemistry, Con- 
temporary Jewish Studies, English and American Literature, History of 
American Civilization, History of Ideas, Mathematics, Mediterranean Stud- 
ies, Music, Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, Philosophy, Physics, Psychol- 
ogy and Sociology. Theatre Arts and Politics will be added as graduate areas 
in the academic year, 1966-67. 

The Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare 

The Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Wel- 
fare, made possible through the generous grant of Mrs. Florence Heller of 
Chicago, was established at Brandeis University in 1959. Applicants are 
required to have earned the degree of Master of Social Work at an accred- 
ited school and, preferably, to have had experience on a professional level. 
The program of study leads to the doctorate and is designed to quaHfy 
graduates for administrative and consultative roles in established areas of 
social work, as well as newly emergent areas such as international social 
work, inter-group organization, labor, industry and government. Emphasis 
is placed upon community organization, social work administration, and 
research, making full use of the social sciences. 

(Full information is available in the catalog of the Heller Graduate 

School), 



14 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Related Academic Programs 

Wien International Scholarship and Felloxvship Program 

The Wien International Scholarship Program, created in 1958 by the 
Lawrence A. and Mae Wien Fund, is designed to further international un- 
derstanding, to provide foreign students with opportunities for study in the 
United States, and to enrich the intellectual and cultural life of the Bran- 
deis campus. 

The Program permits the University to offer scholarships and fellow- 
ships covering tuition, room, board and, in rare instances, travel costs, to 
students from foreign nations. Awards, made for the academic year, may be 
renewed for a subsequent year. All applicants must possess a thorough 
knowledge of the English language. 

All Wien Scholars study within the regularly organized curriculum, 
which is supplemented by special seminars, conferences and field trips, 
planned to provide a broad understanding of many facets of American 
society. 

The Wien Program endorses the participation .of accepted students 
in accredited summer orientation programs, especially in the Boston Area 
International Seminar, a cooperative effort by Boston College, Brandeis, 
Boston University, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. Wien Scholars are also encouraged to participate in the Home- 
stay Program of the Experiment in International Living and in similar 
authorized programs designed to make the foreign student at home in his 
new environment. 

In 1963 the Wien Program was expanded to include graduate stu- 
dents. A limited number of Wien Fellowships are available to highly quali- 
fied advanced degree candidates. Inquiries should be addressed to the Dean 
of the Graduate School or to the Director of the Wien Program, stating 
specifically interest in a particular field of graduate study. 

Jacob Hiatt Institute in Israel 

The University conducts, with the co-operation and support of the 
United States Department of State, an annual semester Institute in Israel. 
Open to college and university juniors and selected seniors who have com- 
pleted introductory courses in political science, sociology, or social psy- 
chology, the Institute offers instruction in modern Jewish and Israel his- 
tory; Israel political and social institutions and the Hebrew language. 

The Institute, which is located in Jerusalem and directed by Brandeis 
faculty, is unique in that it emphasizes first-hand investigation. Formal 
classroom work is supplemented by seminars with persons prominent in 
Israel's political and economic life, and fieldwork is conducted at on-the- 
spot locations such as factories, seaports, labor councils, agricultural settle- 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



15 



ments, Arab and Christian communities, army training centers and miner- 
alogical exploration points in the Negev Desert. 

Enrollment in the Hiatt Institute is also open to a limited number ot 
qualified students from other colleges and universities. 

The Sarah and Gersh Lemberg Nursery School 

The Lemberg Laboratory-Nursery School was established, as a unit of 
the Psychology department, in the fall of 1961 through the generosity of 
Samuel and Lucille Lemberg. Both indoor and outdoor facilities and equip- 
ment accommodate some 30 youngsters. Brandeis students enrolled in the 
education sequence, and students from Tufts University and Wheelock Col- 
lege, serve as practice teachers. 

Rubin Anthropology Program 

A grant from the Samuel Rubin Foundation led to an intensive and 
diversified program of training and field work in foreign lands, and also pro- 
vided for an undergraduate program which included summer field work 
training for honors candidates and a fully subsidized scholarship program. 

Rosenstiel Biochemistry Program 

The graduate and research program in biochemistry is supported by a 
grant from the Dorothy H. and Lewis Rosenstiel Foundation made "in 
support of research in the natural sciences with primary emphasis in bio- 
chemistry." 

The Rosenstiel Biochemistry Program, established in 1957, includes 
more than 70 graduate and postgraduate research fellows. Among the 
agencies co-operating in sponsoring research are the National Science Foun- 



A classroom session in the nursery school 




16 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



dation, National Institutes of Health, Office of Naval Research, American 
Cancer Society, Atomic Energy Commission, the Eli Lilly Company, Howard 
Hughes Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, National Dental Institute, and 
the Damon Runyon Memorial Fund. 

Professorships and Lectureships 

Jacob Ziskind Professorships 

To implement its philosophy of education, the University brings to 
the campus distinguished academic figures from sister universities both in 
the United States and abroad who serve as Ziskind Visiting Professors. This 
program, made possible by the Jacob Ziskind Endowment Fund, enables 
the University to supplement its regular teaching staff with the presence of 
academicians drawn from other major streams of educational thought. In- 
clusion of distinguished foreign academicians serves to challenge and stimu- 
late faculty and students with the introduction of new concepts and new 
educational viewpoints, thus strengthening the entire educational process. 

Harry B. Helmsley Lecture Series 

Established to reduce barriers that separate different races, creeds and 
nationalities, this annual public lecture series has, since its inauguration, 
featured leading philosophers, educators, government officials and religious 
leaders in discussions and seminars that relate to intergroup understanding. 

The Martin Weiner Distinguished Lectureships 

The income from this endowment fund permits the designation of sev- 
eral Weiner Distinguished Lecturers each year. Lecturers receiving these 
appointments are selected not only from the academic world, but also in- 
clude figures drawn from the fields of religion, government, international 
affairs, letters, science, and the business world. The Weiner Distinguished 
Lecturers enrich the University's curriculum by participating in regular 
academic seminars and symposia and, in addition, University convocations 
and public events. 

Stephen S. Wise Memorial Lecture 

This annual lecture was established by the late Nathan Straus to bring 
to the University each year a distinguished representative of the liberalism 
that was basic to the outlook of Dr. Wise. 

Abba Eban Lectureship 

Also through the generosity of Nathan Straus this endowment permits 
an annual lecture by a statesman or scholar on some phase of Middle 
Eastern affairs. 




Art Exhibit in Slosberg Music Center 

Ludwig Lewisohn Memorial Lectures 

Sponsored by the students of the University in tribute to their late 
teacher, this annual series presents noted literary figures drawn from the 
fields of criticism and creative writing. 

George and Charlotte Fine Endowment Fund 

Created to supplement chamber music programs given under the aus- 
pices and direction of the Department of Music, the Fine Endowment Fund 
makes possible the engaging of visiting artists to perform with members of 
the Brandeis faculty. 



Special Academic Programs 

Poses Institute of Fine Arts 

Established by Jack I. and Lillian Poses, to supplement the University's 
curriculum program in the Fine Arts, by: 

1) Exhibiting paintings, sculpture, artifacts and other expressions of con- 
temporary and traditional art in the University's museum and many gallery 



18 



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halls; 2) Sponsoring lecture series and symposia with notable art historians, 
critics and practitioners of the Fine Arts, for the widest possible benefit of 
the community; 3) Establishing annual institutes, organized around basic 
issues in the arts and contemporary life; 4) Providing funds for commis- 
sions and grants-in-aid for young artists of talent who have completed the 
formal years of their education and are seeking to establish themselves as 
practicing artists. 

Philip W. Lown Institute of Contemporary Jewish Studies 
A grant from Philip W. Lown has established a center for training 
men and women who are concerned with contemporary Jewish scholarship 
or with a career in institutional Jewish service. The Institute cooperates 
with the regular departments of the University and with the Florence 
Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. It is ad- 
ministered by a director and an interdisciplinary faculty committee. A 
limited number of fellowships are available to help subsidize these studies. 
An additional grant has established a research center as an adjunct to 
the Lown Institute. It will examine the problems of contemporary Jewish 
life and intensify the Institute's lecture series. Initial effort for the research 
center is a program, beginning in September, 1965, to explore the status of 
Soviet Jewry. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



19 



The Morse Communication Research Center 

The Communication Research Center of the University is engaged in 
a program of sponsored research studies, institutes and publications which 
explore and evaluate many aspects of communications in our society. Es- 
sential to these ongoing programs is the simultaneous development of basic 
resource material. This involves the study of the impact of communications 
upon many aspects of contemporary life— social structures, political organi- 
zations, international relations, education and the formation of individual 
and group attitudes. 

Among the programs undertaken have been annual quantitative stud- 
ies of the programming content of educational television stations in the 
United States; a multi-national mass communication study program for 
representatives of newly emerging nations in cooperation with the United 
States Department of State; and a national conference on the role and eco- 
nomics of educational television in cooperation with the American Acad- 
emy of Arts and Sciences, with the support of the United States Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare. 

The Center is primarily underwritten by a major grant from Lester S. 
and Alfred L. Morse of Boston. 

Peace Corps Training Program 

Under contracts with the United States Peace Corps, Brandeis Univer- 
sity has served for several years as a training center for Peace Corps volun- 
teers. Training on the Brandeis campus has included preparation for work 
in areas of public health, community development, university education 
and secondary schools. 




20 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 




Schwartz Hall 



Community Services 

Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting Council 

Brandeis University is a member of the Lowell Institute Cooperative 
Broadcasting Council, which sponsors the educational radio station WGBH- 
FM and Boston's educational TV station WGBH-TV, Channel 2. Bran- 
deis, along with Boston College, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston 
University, Harvard University, Lowell Institute, MIT, the Museum of 
Fine Arts, the New England Conservatory of Music, Northeastern Univer- 
sity, and Tufts University, makes its teaching facilities available for use by 
WGBH-FM and its television affiliate, WGBH-TV. One of the significant 
programs of the University's educational broadcasting was "The Prospects 
of Mankind," organized by the late Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, which ap- 
peared on both educational and commercial TV stations, in the United 
States and abroad. This program was sponsored by the National Educa- 
tional Television Center, and was produced by WGBH-TV, in cooperation 
with Brandeis University. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 21 



Brandeis University Creative Arts Awards 

The establishment of the Brandeis University Creative Arts Awards 
was announced by the University during 1956. Awards are presented an- 
nually in the areas of Theatre Arts, Music, Poetry or Fiction and Painting 
or Sculpture. In each of these fields of the arts, two types of awards are 
bestowed. Achievement medals are conferred upon successful artists for 
outstanding accomplishments during the year; and grants-in-aid are 
awarded to young talented persons, in recognition of their creative ability 
and encouragement for future study and training. Special juries are ap- 
pointed annually in each of the fields to judge the competition. 

Office of Adult Education 

To provide adults with the opportunity to pursue courses of instruc- 
tion in areas of particular interest to them, the Office of Adult Education 
sponsors daytime seminars, and evening and Sunday-morning lecture 
courses, all directed by members of the Brandeis faculty, and all consistent 
with the quality of Brandeis academic offerings. In addition, the office 
plans and presents a variety of special public lecture programs throughout 
the academic year. 

Summer Institutes for Adults 

The Summer Institutes for Adults seek to broaden the University's aca- 
demic scope by offering a unique residence program to adults from all sec- 
tions of the country. Participants may spend either one or two weeks of in- 
tensive, uninterrupted study, directed by Brandeis faculty members and sup- 
plemented by guest lecturers, on topics broadly concerned with the prob- 
lems and trends of contemporary civilization. 

Themis House 

Through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Boice Gross of San Francisco, 
Brandeis has acquired the use of a large estate— within a few minutes drive 
of the campus— consisting of nine acres of land and an attractive English 
Tudor mansion where it is possible to house, feed and accommodate 30-40 
persons. "Themis House" is the setting for significant academic institutes, 
conferences and training programs sponsored by the University. In excep- 
tional instances, it is made available to cooperating educational or civic 
agencies. 

The Computer Center 

Established under an initial grant from the National Science Founda- 
tion, the University's computer center employs an IBM 1620 machine in 
work supporting research in the social and life sciences. Plans are presently 
underway for substantial expansion of equipment and facilities. 



22 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



General Description 



Brandeis University, on the southwest outskirts of Waltham, Massachusetts, 
is ten miles west of Boston, adjacent to Wellesley and near historic Lexing- 
ton and Concord. 

From the eastern Charles River boundary, University grounds sweep 
upward to New England's famed Boston Rock, where Governor Winthrop 
and his Massachusetts Colony explorers first surveyed the region that is 
today Greater Boston. 

By automobile, the campus may be reached as follows: From the south 
and west take Exit 14 of the Massachusetts Turnpike and follow signs to 
Route 128 North, then Exit 51, left turn at end of exit ramp and follow 
signs to Brandeis. From the north: Route 128 south to Exit 51, then follow 
signs. From Boston: Massachusetts Turnpike Extension to Exit 15, follow 
signs towards Route 30 and Weston, right turn at Route 30, left turn at 
traffic light; or, follow Commonwealth Avenue (Route 30), until the inter- 
section just west of the Route 128 overpass; follow signs to Brandeis. 

By public transportation: The campus is adjacent to the Roberts Sta- 
tion of the Boston and Maine Railroad (West Concord Line), from which 
trains run on a frequent schedule to and from downtown Boston (North 
Station) and Cambridge. Rapid Transit facilities terminate at the River- 
side Station of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), 3 
miles from campus. Public bus and taxi service operate between Riverside 
and Brandeis. 



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BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



23 




Center for the University's Administrative Offices 



Long distance bus travellers will find that it is much easier to alight at 
Riverside rather than Park Square, Boston. All Trailways and Greyhound 
through and express buses stop there. Train travellers from the South 
should de-train at Boston, but train travellers from the west should get off 
at Newtonville, a 20-minute ride from campus on the Roberts bus. From 
Logan Airport, the easiest route is by taxi to North Station and from there 
to the Roberts stop (check train schedule first). Rapid Transit is also 
available from Logan to North Station. 

Academic and Administrative Buildings 

Abelson Physics Building 
Completed in 1965, the Abelson Physics Building houses teaching and 
research laboratories of the Physics Department. It also includes a major 
physics lecture and demonstration hall. 

Administration Center 
Overlooking the main entrance to the campus, the Brandeis University 
Administration Center houses the offices of the president, deans, student 
administration, university administration and the National Women's Com- 
mittee. Conference room facilities serve the Board of Trustees, faculty 
and administrative staff. The Center comprises Bernstein-Marcus Adminis- 
tration Center, Gryzmish Academic Center and the Julius and Matilda 
Irving Presidential Enclave. 



24 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Bass Physics Building 
A unit of the newly completed Science Quadrangle, the Bass Physics Build- 
ing includes research facilities for the Physics Department as well as de- 
partmental offices. 

Bassine Biology Center 
The newly opened Bassine Biology Center houses all of the research activi- 
ties of the Biology Department. It includes environmental growth cham- 
bers and greenhouses in addition to laboratories, laboratory support areas, 
preparation rooms, and seminar facilities for the use of Biology faculty and 
research personnel. 

Brown Social Science Center 
Adjacent to the library, the Brown Social Science Center includes three 
structures. 

The central building houses the Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology 
and Economics Departments. It contains classrooms, seminar rooms, faculty 
offices, laboratories and a small anthropolog)' museum. Glass walls overlook 
an attractively landscaped quadrangle which the Social Science Center 
encloses. 

Schwartz Hall houses a 300-seat lecture auditorium, classrooms and a 
spacious lounge. Millions of viewers across the nation have watched tele- 
vision programs recorded in the main auditorium, specially equipped for 
use as a television studio. The lounge contains a permanent exhibit of 
Oceanic Art and Ethnographic objects donated to the University by Mrs. 
Helen S. Slosberg. 

The Faculty Center 




The Goldfarb Library 

Lemberg Hall is the home of the Lemberg Laboratory-Nursery School, 
operated by the Department of Psychology. Classrooms with specially con- 
structed walls of one-way glass enable students to observe youngsters in the 
nursery school and to record their development from the observation room. 
Lemberg Hall also houses the Psychological Counseling Center. 

Brown Terrarium 
Brown Terrarium, a completely equipped experimental greenhouse, 
located between the Faculty Center and Sydeman Hall, provides facilities 
for botanical research. 

Harry Edison Chemistry Building 
A new center for research in Chemistry, completed in 1965, the Harry 
Edison Chemistry Building includes laboratories and research offices for 
faculty, postdoctoral research fellows and other research personnel of the 
Chemistry Department. 



26 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 




Goldman-Schwartz Fine Arts Center 



Faculty Center 
On the south campus is the Faculty Center, containing club facilities, 
lounges, the faculty dining room, a private dining room for faculty meet- 
ings, and apartments for visiting faculty and lecturers. 

Ford Hall 
Near the central campus, Ford Hall contains classrooms, laboratories, 
faculty offices and Seifer Hall, an auditorium seating 500, which is used for 
lectures, large student meetings, and major conferences. 

Friedland Research Center 
Joined to Kalman Science Center by an overhead corridor of glass and 
stainless steel, Friedland Research Center provides four stories of modern 
laboratories which house research in biochemistry and related life sciences. 

Gerstenzang Library of Science 
The central structure of the newly completed Science Quadrangle is the 
Gerstenzang Library of Science. This building includes a science library 
and lecture-demonstration auditoria. The library contains stacks for 
250,000 volumes, along with facilities for preparation and use of microfilms, 
a periodical room and journal reading area, office and other library admin- 
istration facilities. The lecture-demonstration halls are constructed as am- 
phitheatres, one seating 300 and the other 100. This unit is connected to 
all other buildings in the University's Science Complex. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



27 



Goldfarb Library Building 
Near the center of the campus, Goldfarb Library Building is a brick, 
limestone and glass structure with an ultimate capacity of 750,000 volumes. 
On the periphery of its open stacks are student study carrels and faculty 
studies. Seminar rooms are provided for those courses requiring intimate 
and immediate access to library resources in specific research and reference 
areas. The library also contains audio-visual aids, specialized reading rooms, 
typing rooms and lounge facilities. Works of art from the University col- 
lection are on constant display in the many galleries of the building. 

Golding Judaic Center 
Overlooking the campus from the northeast corner of the Academic Quad- 
rangle, Golding Judaic Center contains classrooms devoted to the study of 
the Near East, Judaics and related subjects. Classrooms and faculty offices 
ring its large, central lecture hall. 

Goldman-Schwartz Art Studios 
The Goldman-Schwartz Art Studios provide classrooms, faculty offices and 
sculpture areas for the Department of Fine Arts and studios for faculty, ad- 
vanced students and artists-in-residence. Its completion marks a major step in 
fulfilling the master plan for a unified creative arts enclave extending across 
the southwest campus. 

Goldsmith Mathematics Center 
Completed in 1965 as a unit of the newly erected Science Quadrangle, the 
Goldsmith Mathematics Center provides classrooms, seminar rooms, re- 
search offices, faculty offices and a mathematics library for the use of the 
Mathematics Department. 

A Lecture in Rose Art Museum. 




28 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Hayden Science Court 
The Charles and J. Willard Hayden Court, comprising several acres in the 
central campus area, is the site of present and projected science facilities 
of the University. This area has been set aside as a memorial to two gener- 
ous benefactors, whose pioneer gift stimulated the extensive scientific 
programs of the University. 

Kalman Science Center 
The University's first structure devoted entirely to science, Kalman Science 
Center continues to be the key facility in the growth of the University's 
science facilities. This center contains instructional and research labo- 
ratories for the undergraduate School of Science and for the advanced 
work of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. 

Kosow Biochemistry Building 
A unit of the new Biochemistry Research Center located to the east of the 
existing Friedland Research Center and joined to the building on all 
floors, this building provides additional modern laboratories where re- 
search in Biochemistry and related life sciences is conducted. 

Leeks Ciiemistry Building 
Adjoining the existing Kalman Science Center, the Leeks Chemistry Build- 
ing provides new modern laboratories and research spaces for the expand- 
ing chemistry research program of the University. 



Shiffmati Humanities Center 
I 




BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 29 



Olin-Sang American Civilization Center 
On a hillside overlooking the library and Three Chapels Area, the Olin- 
Sang American Civilization Center provides unique seminar-classroom halls 
which include display areas for the placement of original manuscripts and 
source materials relating to the courses offered. Included are the Diplomatic 
Studies, Human Rights, Lincoln, Presidential, Washington, Judicial, Legis- 
lative, Ethnic Studies and Slater Halls. The Shapiro Forum, which is the 
building's lecture auditorium, is patterned after the United Nations Gen- 
eral Assembly hall. 

Rabb Graduate Center 
A circular lounge, walled in glass, is a unique architectural feature of Rabb 
Graduate Center. Its main building contains classrooms and offices for the 
staff of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. 

Rapaporte Treasure Hall 
Adjacent to Goldfarb Library Building, and joined to it by a glass-enclosed 
lobby, Rapaporte Treasure Hall is the repository for rare books, incu- 
nabula and other library treasures. The upper level serves as the main 
exhibition area and the lower level stores the University's growing col- 
lection and includes a specially constructed vault with provision for the 
protection of these rare items against the ravages of time, temperature, 
humidity, fire or theft. 

Rose Art Museum 
Located within the Creative Arts enclave, the Rose Art Museum is the 
focal point for the University's rapidly burgeoning art collection. On 
permanent display are portions of the noted ceramic collection of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Rose. Major loan exhibitions are placed on display during 
the academic year as well as selections from the University's permanent 
collection. The wishing pool on the lower level is both a pleasant setting 
for quiet reverie and the objective of coin-tossing students before exami- 
nations. 

Segal Physics Building 
A unit of the newly completed science research center, the Segal Physics 
Building includes research offices for theoretical physicists, laboratories for 
research in physics, and newly developed research areas for investigations 
in high energy physics. 



30 BRANDEISUNIVERSITY 



Shiftman Humanities Center 
Atop a hillside where its glass walls reveal spectacular views of the campus 
and the country north of Boston, Shiftman Humanities Center employs a 
new acaderiiic concept in educational architecture. Original manuscripts, 
portraits, and source materials related to courses being offered are displayed 
in the seminar rooms. The latest in electronic language teaching facilities 
are employed in the building's language laboratory. Included are the Lan- 
guage and Phonetics, English and American Literature, Classics, Philosophy, 
Renaissance, Germanic and Asian Studies Halls. 

Siosberg Music Center 
Recently completed construction doubles the office, classroom and practice 
room space in Siosberg Music Center at the entrance to campus. It has its 
own library and a recital hall which seats 250 with carefully designed acous- 
tical treatment. Siosberg Recital Hall is the location for the University's rich 
program of chamber music concerts and solo performances. 

Spingold Theatre Arts Center 
The Spingold Theatre Arts Center is a unique and imaginative concept 
translated into exciting design. With a theatre auditorium as its hub, the 
circular Center includes areas for every facet of the teaching and perform- 
ing arts; workshops, design rooms, costume preparation and storage areas, 
rehearsal and dressing rooms, a little theatre and a dance studio. Spacious 
areas are equipped as classrooms and offices, and the great lobby has been 
envisioned for displays of painting, sculpture and other treasures. The 
Center's location on the southwest campus places it at the hub of Brandeis' 
creative arts teaching facilities. 

Sydeman Hall 
This annex to Ford Hall houses laboratories, classrooms and faculty offices. 

Uilman Amphitheatre 
Utilizing a natural bowl below the grape arbor and science buildings, the 
Amphitheatre has a complete stage with full lighting equipment and 
orchestra pit, classrooms and faculty offices. It is the colorful setting for 
University convocations and commencements. 

Wolfson-Rosensweig Biochemistry Building 
A unit of the new Biochemistry Research Center located to the east of the 
existing Friedland Research Center and joined to that building on all 
floors, this building provides additional modern laboratories where re- 
search in Biochemistry and related life sciences is conducted. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



31 



Sherman 
Student Center Sj"^., 




Woodruff Hall 
Situated in the center of the campus, this white brick building temporarily 
houses the Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social 
Welfare. 



Athletic Facilities 

Memphis Tract 
A twenty-six acre area on the east edge of the campus, Memphis Tract 
contains the Shapiro Athletic Center, Marcus Field, Gordon Field and 
Rieger Tennis Courts. 

Gordon Field 
One of the nation's most modern tracks rings Gordon Field where the 
University's track and field squad plays host to teams from throughout the 
east. The central area provides playing fields for the University's intramural 
football teams and specialized accommodations for intercollegiate field 
events. 

Marcus Playing Field 
Brandeis' international student body has won respect for its soccer prowess 
on Marcus Playing Field, which also contains the varsity and practice base- 
ball diamonds and a softball diamond. 



32 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Shapiro Athletic Center 
Throughout the school year the main gymnasium operates day and night 
with varsity and intramural competition as well as physical education 
activities. The gymnasium is also used for public lectures, student dances, 
and major conferences. In addition, classrooms, offices for the physical edu- 
cation faculty, team, and physiotherapy rooms and dressing rooms are in- 
cluded in Shapiro Athletic Center. 

Rieger Tennis Courts 
The Rieger Tennis Courts are the scene of informal as well as intramural 
and intercollegiate tennis competition. They are located to the rear of the 
Shapiro Athletic Center. 

Residence Halls 

Campus living accommodations consist predominantly of double rooms, 
some single rooms and larger quarters. Each residence hall has its own lounge 
or lounges. Modern laundry and other conveniences are available to all 
students. Each resident student should bring blankets, lamps and such rugs 
and decorations as are desired. Arrangements for linen and towel service 
may be made through the University. 



East Quadrangle Residence Halls 




5i^felJ 



111'!! ''!!i!:s!!SS-'.i->...> '* ; 1 i 

A 




Gerstenzang Q_uadra?igle . . . opens September, 1965 

East Quadrangle 
The most recently completed residence halls on campus are those in the 
East Quadrangle. These include Hassenfeld House, Rubenstein Hall, 
Pomerantz Hall, Krivoff House and Shapiro Brothers Hall. A large central 
lounge serves all of these buildings, and the entire area is complemented 
by the Benjamin and Mae Swig Student Center which includes a dining 
hall and lounge facilities. 

Leon Court 
Leon Court, a residence area, has four dormitories and a large student 
center-dining hall grouped around an attractive, wooded quadrangle. Each 
dormitory unit contains fully equipped student rooms, a lounge and large 
recreation room. Dormitories in this quadrangle have been designated the 
Scheffres, Gordon, Cable and Reitman Halls. The student dining hall is Mil- 
ton and Hattie Kutz Hall. 

Massell Quadrangle 
Consisting of Shapiro, DeRoy, Renfield and Usen Residence Halls, and the 
Sherman Student Center, this is a major housing and recreational area. Each 
unit has functionally equipped rooms with maximum living and closet space. 
Ground floor lounges overlook the central quadrangle and the walks encir- 
cling Anne J. Kane Reflecting Pool. 

Ridgewood Quadrangle 
Emerman, Fruchtman, Danciger, Allen and Rosen Residence Halls com- 
prise the University's living areas for students on the south campus. Each 
hall has two lounges opening on the quadrangle. 



34 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



The Castle 
An imposing structure designed after medieval architecture and completed 
a decade before Brandeis was founded, the Castle has been remodelled into 
single, double, and larger rooms for women. Its ground floor houses the 
University Snack Bar and the student-operated coffee shop, Cholmondeley's. 

Schwartz Residence Hall 
This companion structure to the Castle houses women. Its lounge, a retreat 
for reading, relaxation and entertainment, is furnished in contemporary 
style. 

Sherman Student Center 
The glass walls of Sherman Student Center rise from the ground level to 
roof, overlooking Massell Quadrangle and the Kane Reflecting Pool. Its 
ground floor dining hall serves several hundred students daily and is 
frequently utilized as a banquet hall for major University functions. Along 
the upper level are located a large lounge, game room and two smaller 
dining rooms. Bulletin boards of these rooms serve as the major communi- 
cations center for student activities and the walls frequently are hung with 
special art exhibits. Dances, parties and meetings often occupy the entire 
building on busy evenings. 

Spingold Theatre . . . opens September, 1965 




BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 35 



Themis House 
Special seminars, conferences and symposia are housed at Themis House, 
located in Weston, Mass., a few minutes from the campus. Thirty to forty 
participants may be accommodated for food and lodging at this University 
conference site, made available by Mr. and Mrs. Boice Gross. 

Feldberg Lounge 
Spacious and comfortable, this glass and brick walled lounge is used for 
informal discussions, lectures, songfests and conferences and is a favorite 
meeting place between classes. Works of art by student and professional 
artists are on constant exhibit. 

Kutz Hall 
A towering ceiling, attractive furnishings, a site overlooking Greater Bos- 
ton, make Kutz Hall a versatile and popular student dining hall. Banquets 
seating 500 are held on its main floor. An outdoor terrace and commodious 
balcony provide unusual settings for receptions and student social activities. 
Folding walls under the , balcony permit creation of private rooms for 
dinner meetings of student or faculty groups. The towering north wall of 
Kutz Hall mirrors the rest of Leon Court in its more than 8000 square feet 
of glass. 

Swig Student Center 
The attractively furnished Swig Student Center, in the East Quadrangle, 
provides dining facilities for 330 students as well as lounge and terrace for 
student receptions and social activities. It also includes a private dining 
room for dinner meetings of student groups. The Swig Student Center is 
connected to the dormitories of the East Quadrangle by an overhead walk. 

Mailman Hall 
This striking glass, brick and granite structure provides spacious lounges, 
modern recreational rooms and facilities for the display of painting and 
sculpture. A recently completed addition to this building includes student 
publication offices, the campus radio station, offices and meeting rooms for 
the Student Council and other student organizations. Designs are now 
being completed for transforming a substantial portion of this building 
into studios and demonstration classrooms for the University's newly estab- 
lished Learning Resources Program. 

Usen Commons 
Greater Boston spreads out in a panoramic view from the windows of Usen 
Commons, a circular, conservatory style lounge on the second level of the 
Castle. Since the earliest days of the University, this lounge has been 
familiar to Brandeis students as ideal for small dances and social functions. 



36 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Dining Halls 

University dining halls are located in Kutz Hall, Swig Student Center and 
Sherman Student Center. A separate kitchen is maintained in Sherman 
Student Center for those wishing special dietary meals. In addition, light 
refreshments are provided in the Castle Snack Bar and Cholmondeley's. 

Stoneman Infirmary 

On the forward slope of the campus, near the Castle, the Infirmary houses 
a first aid treatment room, lounge, out-patient clinic, four consulting suites, 
and rooms for twenty-four bed patients. A new wing increased patient 
capacity by fifty percent. 

The Three Chapels 

Assuming that worship is a matter of mood and spiritual climate, not 
limited to words or ceremonies, the University's Harlan, Berlin and Bethle- 
hem Chapels serve the Protestant, Jewish and Catholic faiths. A centrally 
located pulpit serves a large outdoor area where shared functions such as 
Baccalaureate are celebrated. Student organizations responsible for services 
are the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Newman Club and Student Chris- 
tian Association. Each has its own chaplain. 

Campus Landscape Architecture 

Under a special grant from David and Irene Schwartz, funds have been 
provided for a systematic landscaping of the campus to achieve a harmony 
between the terrain's natural beauty and the building architecture as 
conceived and executed by some of the nation's noted architectural figures. 

Facilities Under Construction 

Heller School Facilities 
A new structure, the Florence Heller Building, currently under construc- 
tion, will house the administrative, faculty and teaching activities of the 
Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

A major research center, the Ben Brown Building, also under con- 
struction, will provide research offices and work rooms for the multifaceted 
research programs being conducted by the Heller School. 

Projected Facilities 

Llnsey Sports Center 
Planned for construction during 1965-66, The Joseph Linsey Sports Center 
will include an Olympic size swimming pool, squash courts, fencing strips 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



37 



and other athletic teaching facilities. Connected to the Athletic Center, the 
Sports Center will provide facilities for substantial enhancement of the 
University's physical education and intercollegiate athletic programs. 

Student Union 
Now being designed is a Student Union Complex which will consolidate 
student social and recreational facilities in a central location in mid- 
campus within easy distance of major teaching facilities and residence 
halls. The Student Union Complex will consist of a main structure housing 
such facilities as an assembly and banquet hall, the University Bookstore, 
Mailroom, bowling alleys, lounges and food service areas. Other compo- 
nents will house student organizations, student social and recreational areas, 
alumni offices and student service offices. The main building of the Student 
Union has been underwritten by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lemberg of New 
York in honor of their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel H. 
Usdan. Other units have been provided through generous grants from Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Gluck of New York City; Mr. Ben Tobin of Hollywood, 
Florida; Mrs. H. W. Winer of Brookline, Massachusetts, in memory of her 
late husband, Mr. Hy Winer; and the Wuliger Family of Medina, Ohio, in 
memory of their parents, Helen K. and Frank Wuliger. 




The 

Graduate School 
of Arts and 
Sciences 



General Information 




History and Organization 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences was formally established in 1953 
when the University Board of Trustees authorized graduate study in the 
Departments of Chemistry, Music, Psychology, and Near Eastern and Judaic 
Studies. The first Master of Arts degree was conferred in 1954; the first 
Master of Fine Arts degree, in 1954; and the first Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in 1957. 

The general direction of the Graduate School is vested in a Graduate 
Council of the Faculty composed of the President and the Dean of Faculty, 
ex officio; the Dean of the Graduate School; and one representative, usually 
the chairman, of each of the several University departments and committees 
offering graduate instruction. The members of the Graduate Council are 
appointed by the President on the recommendation of the Dean of the 
Graduate School. The functions of the Graduate Council, exercised in con- 
sonance with University policy, are to determine requirements for admis- 
sion; to provide programs of study and examinations; to establish and main- 
tain requirements for graduate degrees; to approve candidacy for degrees; 
to make recommendations for degrees; to make recommendations for new 
areas of graduate study; to lay down such regulations as may be considered 
necessary or expedient for governing the Graduate School; and to exercise 
a general supervision over its affairs. The Dean of the Graduate School is 
the chairman of the Graduate Council and the chief executive officer of 
the Graduate School. 

Objectives 

The underlying ideal of the Graduate School is to assemble a community 
of scholars, scientists and artists, in whose company the student-scholar can 
pursue studies and research as an apprentice. This objective is to be at- 






40 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



tained by individualizing programs of study, restricting the number of 
students accepted, maintaining continual contact between students and 
faculty, and fostering the intellectual potential of each student. 

Degrees will be granted on the evidence of intellectual growth and 
development, rather than solely on the basis of formal course credits. Ful- 
fillment of the minimum requirements set forth below cannot, therefore, 
be regarded as the sole requisite for degrees. 

Areas of Graduate Study 

During the academic year 1965-66, graduate programs will be offered in the 
following areas: 

1. Anthropology 10. Mathematics 

2. Biochemistry 11. Mediterranean Studies 

3. Biology 12. Music 

4. Biophysics 13. Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 

5. Chemistry 14. Philosophy 

6. Contemporary Jewish Studies 15. Physics and Astrophysics 

7. English and American Literature 16. Psychology 

8. History of American Civilization 17. Sociology 

9. History of Ideas 

Details of the programs and courses offered in these areas are given 
below. In succeeding years, the graduate program will be extended to 
cover other areas. 

Graduate study in Social Welfare is offered by the Florence Heller 
Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. For information 
concerning this area of study, see the catalog of that school. 

Graduate School Office 

The Graduate School office is located in the Rabb Graduate Center, room 
104 and rooms 107 to 111. The office is open Monday through Friday from 
9 A.M. to 5 P.M. All requests for information, catalogs and application 
forms should be addressed to the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 02154. 

Housing 

The University does not have on-campus housing for graduate students. 
The Off-Campus Housing Bureau, located in Gryzmish Academic Center, 
attempts to serve as a clearinghouse for rooms, apartments and houses 
available in Waltham and near-by Greater Boston communities. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 41 



Dining Facilities 

Graduate students may sign for the twenty-one meal contract or the fifteen- 
meal contract in either Kutz Hall or the Sherman Student Center Dining 
Hall. Arrangements must be made with the Steward's Office. A separate 
kitchen is maintained in the Sherman Student Center for those wishing 
kosher meals. Individual meals may be purchased at either dining hall. 
Light snacks are served at the Castle Snack Bar. 

Office of Career Planning 

The Office of Career Planning assists undergraduates, seniors, graduate 
students and alumni with their graduate and career plans. Information on 
graduate and professional school fellowships and scholarships; graduate 
and professional catalogs; lists of on- and off-campus part-time employ- 
ment; lists of summer employment, and individual listings of permanent 
positions including academic and research openings; civil service opportu- 
nities and work and travel opportunities abroad are on file for the use of 
all students and alumni. 

The Office of Career Planning will assist any graduate student who 
seriously needs and desires part-time work. Students seeking part-time em- 
ployment should register with this office. New students will not be as- 
signed to part-time positions prior to arrival on campus. Students are cau- 
tioned against working more than eight to ten hours a week. 

No graduate student who receives financial assistance from the Univer- 
sity may accept part-time employment without the prior approval of the 
chairman of his department and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

The on-campus part-time student rate of pay is from $1.20 to |1.70 an 
hour for graduate students depending upon skill, and upon the amount of 
time worked for a department. Students can expect to earn from $200 to 
|500 in the course of a year. Temporary jobs are often available on a day- 
to-day basis. 

The University Health Office 

The Medical Director and his staff are responsible for the physical well- 
being of students, including the establishment and enforcement of infir- 
mary regulations. Payment of the required medical fee entitles students to 
treatment available in the David Stoneman Infirmary and to participate in 
the Student Health Plan. 

New students in the College as well as the Graduate Schools are re- 
sponsible for submission of a health examination report and meeting all 
requirements of the Health Office. These include a certificate of inocula- 
tion against smallpox, evidence of tetanus immunization and, if possible. 



42 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



complete immunization against poliomyelitis. Since students are not per- 
mitted to register until these requirements have been satisfied, it is strongly 
recommended that reports be submitted at least two months before regis- 
tration. All new students must report for physical examinations at the 
beginning of each academic year. This is in addition to the pre-entrance 
physical examination by the student's family physician or physician of his 
choice. 

The health insurance program helps defray expenses for a period of 
one year, commencing September 1, 1965, for treatment beyond the scope 
of the Health Office. A brochure outlining the details of this program is 
distributed to each student at registration and copies are mailed to parents. 
Students and parents are urgently requested to read this brochure and 
keep it for reference. It should be noted here, however, that coverage is 
not provided for pre-existing conditions, optical and dental services or 
special drugs. 

Within the limitations of the insurance coverage, fees of outside doc- 
tors, laboratories, and hospitals will be processed for payment only when 
consultations, laboratory or x-ray studies or hospitalization have been au- 
thorized by the University Health Office in advance on a form provided for 
this purpose. The University is not responsible for off-campus medical and 
hospital care sought by students or their parents on their own initiative, or 
for outside care or consultation which has not previously been authorized 
by the Health Office. The only exception to this is in case of real emer- 
gency, or illnesses or injuries occurring while away from the university, 
when such prior authorization is not feasible. 

Admission 

As a general rule only well-qualified men and women who have completed 
the normal four-year program leading to the Bachelor's degree will be 
considered for admission to the Graduate School. Graduates of foreign 
schools and others who have completed the equivalent of a Bachelor's 
degree program may apply, describing the educational program they have 
completed. 

Testing 

Applicants for admission to the graduate areas in biochemistry, biophysics, 
chemistry, history of American civilization and psychology are required to 
take the Graduate Record Examination, including the aptitude test por- 
tion, and preferably one advanced test in a field related to the proposed 
area of graduate study. Applicants for admission to the graduate area in 



GENERALINFORMATION 43 



psychology must also take the Miller Analogies Test. All other applicants 
for admission are urged to take the Graduate Record Examination. Infor- 
mation concerning the Graduate Record Examination is available from 
the Educational Testing Service, 200 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey, 
or 1947 Center Street, Berkeley 4, California. 

Foreign students, regardless of graduate area of study, are required to 
take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) unless English is 
their first language. This includes comprehensive testing in auditory com- 
prehension, reading comprehension, writing, vocabulary, and grammar. 
Applications for admission to the test should be made to TOEFL, Educa- 
tional Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A. The test is adminis- 
tered at various established centers abroad. 

Application 

Specific requirements established by each area of study are to be found 
below. Each applicant should consult these requirements prior to filing an 
application. One who seeks admission to the Graduate School should write 
to the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, stating which 
area of study he or she wishes to pursue. A catalog and appropriate forms 
will be forwarded to the applicant. The "Application for Admission" and, 
if needed, the "Application for Financial Aid" should be completed and 
returned in duplicate as soon as possible. The closing date for receipt of 
applications for admission is the first business day in March, though excep- 
tions may be made. Applicants requesting financial aid should file as early 
as possible. Applications for admission for the Spring Term must be filed 
by December 15. Students are not usually admitted at midyear, and those 
who do gain admission are not normally eligible for financial aid. 

The applicant is required to arrange for forwarding official transcripts, 
in duplicate, of all undergraduate work and graduate work, if any. In 
addition, he must have forwarded, on forms provided by the Graduate 
School, two letters of recommendation, preferably from professors with 
whom the applicant has studied in the field of his proposed area of study. 
An applicant who has engaged in graduate study elsewhere should request 
at least one of the recommendations from a professor with whom he has 
done graduate work. 

Applicants for admission to the Graduate Department of Music in the 
field of composition and to the graduate Department of English and Ameri- 
can Literature must also submit samples of their written work. 

All applications for admission must be accompanied by an application 
fee of 110.00, payable by check or money order to Brandeis University. No 
application will be processed until this fee is paid. 



44 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Admission Procedure 

All applications are considered on a competitive basis. The number of stu- 
dents who are admitted each year in each department is limited so that 
the Graduate School may operate effectively under its distinctive principles 
of individualized study and apprenticeship. Consequently, admission may 
sometimes be denied to qualified persons. The minimum standards of ad- 
mission merely determine whether the applicant will qualify for a place in 
the group from which final selections will be made. Selections are based on 
the applicant's ability to do graduate work of high quality, as shown by the 
distinction of his previous record, particularly in his proposed area of study; 
by the confidential letters of recommendation submitted in support of his 
application; and by his adaptability to the particular graduate programs 
offered by Brandeis University. In addition, knowledge of foreign languages, 
relevant practical experience in the field, samples of work, the results of the 
Graduate Record Examination, and indications of character are considered. 
In order for the results of the Graduate Record Examination to be consid- 
ered, the applicant should take the examination no later than January, 
1966. 

Each application for admission with all supporting records is first 
examined by the department or committee responsible for the graduate 
area to which the applicant seeks admittance. The department or commit- 
tee recommends to the Dean of the Graduate School which applicants 
should be selected for admission and for financial aid. The Dean, in 
association with the Faculty Committee on Admissions and Awards, reviews 
all applications in the light of departmental recommendations, and, on 
behalf of the Committee on Admissions and Awards, informs each applicant 
of the results of the competition. Applicants for admission will be notified 
usually by April 1. 

Acceptance 

A student who has been accepted for admission to the Graduate School 
will be notified by a letter specifying the date by which he must accept the 
offer of admission and awards, if any. If a student selected for admission 
indicates that he does not intend to accept the offer, or if he fails to reply 
by the date specified, his admission offer becomes void and another appli- 
cant may be accepted in his place. 

Brandeis University subscribes to the "Resolution Regarding Scholars, 
Fellows, and Graduate Assistants" of the Association of Graduate Schools 
of North America. The resolution states: 

"In every case in which a graduate assistantship, scholarship, or fellow- 
ship for the next academic year is offered to an actual or prospective 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45 



graduate student, the student, if he indicates his acceptance before 
April 15, will have complete freedom through April 15 to submit in 
writing a resignation of his appointment in order to accept another 
graduate assistantship, scholarship, or fellowship. However, an accept- 
ance given or left in force after April 15 commits him not to accept an- 
other appointment without first obtaining formal release for the pur- 
pose." 

Students who are accepted must provide the Graduate School Office 
with an official final transcript of their undergraduate record and of any 
graduate work in progress at the time of acceptance. In addition, students 
who are accepted are required to complete and return a Medical Question- 
naire and a health insurance form, which will be sent with notification of 
acceptance. All acceptances are conditioned on subsequent approval by 
the University Health Office. All persons admitted to the Graduate School 
must give evidence of their physical and psychological capacity to carry on 
their studies. 

If, after having been admitted, a student cannot attend, he should 
notify the Dean of the Graduate School as soon as possible. If such a student 
wishes to be admitted for a subsequent academic year, he must request 
reactivation of his application at the appropriate time, and bring it up to 
date. 

An applicant who has been denied admission may reapply in a later 
year, particularly if he has had further training which would strengthen 
his application or if he can submit additional letters of recommendation. 
Admission to the Graduate School does not imply that the successful 
applicant has been accepted as a candidate for a graduate degree. Superior 
performance at Brandeis University is essential. Admission to candidacy 
for the M.A. or M.F.A. is granted by the graduate department or committee 
administering the program of study. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. 
is granted by the Graduate Council on the recommendation of the Depart- 
ment or Committee administering the program of study. 

Readmission 

Admission is valid only for one academic year. A student's record is re- 
viewed annually, and he may be denied readmission. Students completing 
the requirements for the M.A. or M.F.A., and students who already hold a 
Master's degree but who have not yet been admitted to candidacy for the 
doctorate, must make formal application for readmission by the first busi- 
ness day in April of each year if not requesting financial aid, or by the first 
business day in March if requesting financial aid. The application for re- 
admission must be filed with the Graduate School Office. 



46 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Foreign Students 



Graduates of foreign colleges and universities who have completed the 
equivalent of an American bachelor's degree may apply for admission and 
for financial assistance. Foreign applicants should enclose with the official 
"Application for Admission" original documents or official certified copies 
indicating the nature and scope of their formal educational background. 

A student whose native language is not English should not apply 
unless he can read, write, and understand English with enough competence 
to pursue a regular program of graduate study at an American university. 
Evidence of such competency is required through submission to the Gradu- 
ate School the results of the TOEFL examination. Nor should a foreign 
student apply for admission unless he has the financial ability to support 
himself in the United States. For this purpose the sum of at least $2,500 
will be necessary for the nine-month academic year, exclusive of expenses 
for travel, summer, or vacation. 

Of the large number of foreign applicants who apply annually, finan- 
cial assistance is available to only a few of the outstanding. Scholarships 
cover only tuition costs. Fellowships and teaching assistantships are helpful 
in meeting subsistence expenses. The total assistance offered, however, is 
usually sufficient to cover only a portion of the student's total expenses. A 
foreign applicant who has not had training in an American institution of 
higher learning will be at a disadvantage in competing for scholarships 
and fellowships. Teaching assistantships are rarely awarded to foreign 
applicants in their first year of graduate study. 

A limited number of foreign applicants are accepted through the Wien 
International Scholarship Program, which provides financial assistance to 
highly qualified graduate degree candidates. A complete description of this 
program may be found on page 14 of this catalog. 

It would be wise for foreign applicants who are not in the United 
States at the time of application to seek the assistance of the Institute of 
International Education. The Institute has access to funds for the aid of 
foreign students and helps place them at suitable universities. For infor- 
mation write to the Institute of International Education, 809 United Na- 
tions Plaza, New York, New York 10017. Students from Great Britain may 
apply through the English Speaking Union, whose central office is in Lon- 
don. The Fellowship Commission of the United States Information Service 
and the local American Embassy have information on travel grants for 
foreign students. In any case, foreign applicants are advised to apply to 
several American universities. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



47 



An application fee of $10.00 should accompany the foreign student's 
"Application for Admission." No application will be processed until the 
application fee is paid. A foreign student who is registering in the Graduate 
School for the first time or reregistering after a leave of absence must see the 
adviser for foreign students before registration and must present to her for 
inspection his passport and visa. The adviser will assist in all matters 
connected with U.S. immigration regulations. 

The office of the adviser for foreign students is located in Gryzmish 
Academic Center, Room 106. 

A foreign student who enters the United States on a student "¥" visa 
is expected to register at the college or university which admitted him and 
is the destination for which his visa was obtained. Should a foreign student 
be admitted to the Graduate School of Brandeis University from another 
American university, he must visit the District Immigration Office in the 
area of the school from which he is transferring and present a letter from 
that school stating that he has been successfully pursuing a full course of 
study and that there is no objection to the transfer. He must also present 
his acceptance letter from the Graduate School of Brandeis University. 

Employment may be granted to an "¥" visa student during the school 
year in three situations: (1) if he has been granted permission for on-cam- 
pus employment as a condition of admission, as indicated on the original 
Form I 20A provided by the University; (2) if his employment consists of 
practical training in his field of study; or (3) if his financial situation has 
changed since his admission, and he has been granted permission for em- 
ployment, with the approval of the University, by the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service. Each year the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service delegates to the University the privilege of granting permission, on 
the basis of economic necessity, to "F" visa students for employment during 
the summer vacations. Permission for employment cannot be granted to 
Exchange Visitor "J" visa students, unless the employment is practical train- 
ing that is part of the program of instruction. 



-"qEBSSros^^rr 




48 BRANDEISUNIVERSITY 



Academic Regulations 

Registration 

Every resident student must register in person at the beginning of each 
semester, whether the student is attending regular courses of study, carrying 
on research or independent reading, writing a thesis or dissertation, or 
utilizing any academic service or facility of the University. Students who 
have completed their residence requirements and who wish to utilize any 
academic service or facility of the University must also register. 

There is a charge of $10.00 if registration is not completed at the time 
specified in the Academic Calendar for the Graduate School. 

Registration consists of payment of all fees for the semester and filing 
a program card and other required forms duly completed. 

Program of Study 

Before filing his Program Card, the student should plan his program of 
study in consultation with the chairman of his department. All courses for 
which the student registers for credit must be listed on the Program Card. 

Audited courses must also be listed, noted as "audit," and the Program 
Card must be signed by instructors of such courses. 

A graduate student may not normally register for an undergraduate 
course (numbered below 100) in his own area for degree or residence credit 
unless he secures the signed approval of both the instructor of that course 
and his department chairman. The student must then petition the Dean of 
the Graduate School for the desired credit, and must receive his approval 
before or at the time of registration. Credit will not be given for undergrad- 
uate courses taken to make up deficiencies in the student's preparation for 
a graduate program of studies, nor will credit ordinarily be given for lan- 
guage courses that are not part of the student's program of studies. Under 
no circumstances may a student receive credit toward completion of degree 
or residence requirements for courses undertaken to aid in the completion 
of language requirements. Scholarship students may not apply their scholar- 
ships toward the remission of tuition for undergraduate courses taken to 
remedy deficiences. The completed Program Card must be signed by the de- 
partment chairman before submission at registration, and the department 
chairman will certify whether the program of study is full-time or part-time 
and, if part-time, whether one-quarter, one-half, or three-quarters time. Full- 
year courses must be re-entered on the program card at Spring Registration, 
and ordinarily they may not be dropped at midyear. A student wishing to 
drop a full-year course at midyear must petition the Dean of the Graduate 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 49 



School for permission, after receiving the written approval of the instructor 
of the course and of the chairman of his department. No student may register 
at midyear for a full-year course without the written approval of the in- 
structor of the course and his department chairman. 

Auditing Courses 

The privilege of auditing courses without fee is extended to all regularly 
enrolled graduate students except those classified as special students. Special 
students may audit courses by paying for them at the same rate as those 
taken for credit. No course may be audited without the permission of the 
instructor. An auditor is merely a listener. He may not participate in any 
class work, nor take examinations, nor receive evaluation from the instruc- 
tor; no credit is granted for an audited course. 

Change of Program 

A registered student who wishes to drop or add a course or alter his pro- 
gram of study must obtain a Course Change Card from the Graduate School 
Office and return it when properly filled out. Credit will not otherwise be 
given for the courses changed. In addition, a student must change his pro- 
gram within the specified time limits stated in the current academic calen- 
dar, or he will be subject to a $10.00 fine. 

Students may not drop courses after December 1 in the first term or 
after April 1 in the second term of the academic year. 

Registration in Terms of Time 

An advanced student— one who has completed one full year of residence, 
either by graduate work at Brandeis or by receiving credit for graduate 
work done elsewhere— may register in terms of time, subject to the signed 
approval of his department chairman. His Program Card must indicate that 
he is registering full-time or a specific fraction thereof (one-quarter, one- 
half, or three-quarters). 

Registration in terms of time is a device that helps to individualize 
programs of study and permits increased freedom for independent research 
for the advanced graduate student. Registration in terms of time frees the 
student to pursue a program of study that partially accepts or bypasses 
altogether the system of formal courses, although a student registering in 
terms of time will usually register for an advanced research or dissertation 
course. His time will be spent in such research and reading as will be most 
beneficial to his development as a scholar. 



50 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Absence from Examinations 

A student who is absent from a midyear or final examination without an 
accepted e^xcuse will receive a failing grade for that examination. No stu- 
dent may be excused from such examination unless for emergency or 
medical reasons, nor may he be excused if he was able to notify the instruc- 
tor in advance and failed to do so. Cases involving absence are referred to 
the chairman of the department. The department will decide whether a 
make-up examination shall be allowed. If a make-up examination is al- 
lowed, the instructor will notify the Dean of the Graduate School, who will 
arrange for its administration. 

Grades and Course Standards 

Graduate students are expected to maintain records of distinction in all 
courses. Letter grades will be used in all courses in which grading is possi- 
ble. In thesis or research courses, if a letter grade cannot be given at the 
end of every semester or academic year, "Credit" or "No Credit" may be 
used. "No Credit" and any letter grade below "B-minus" are unsatisfactory 
grades in the Graduate School. A course in which the student receives an 
unsatisfactory grade will not be counted toward graduate credit. Courses 
graded "Non-credit" are those which carry no credit but are required of 
the student. At the end of each academic year the Graduate School will 
issue to all registered students a report of their grades and of degree re- 
quirements that have been satisfactorily completed. 

Incompletes 

A student who has not completed the research or written work for any 
course may receive a grade of "Inc." (incomplete) or a grade of failure at 
the discretion of the instructor in the course. A student who receives a 
grade of "Inc." must satisfactorily complete the work of the course in 
which the "Inc." was given in order to receive credit for the course and a 
letter grade. An "Inc.," unless given by reason of the student's failure to 
attend a final examination, must be made up no later than the end of the 
term following the term in which it was received. When failure to take a 
final examination has resulted in an "Inc.," resolution of that grade to a 
letter grade must occur within six weeks of the beginning of the next aca- 
demic semester or the potential course credit will be lost. If a student re- 
quires additional time to settle an incomplete grade, he may petition the 
Dean of the Graduate School for an extension of time, provided the 
petition is signed by the instructor of the course and by the department 
chairman. Such a petition must be filed prior to the expiration of the dead- 
line for making up an incomplete. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 51 



Credit for Work Done Elsewhere 

Graduate work taken elsewhere may not be counted toward fulfillment o£ 
the residence requirement at Brandeis University for the degree of Master 
of Arts, although a department may accept work taken elsewhere in partial 
fulfillment of specific course requirements for the degree. Not more than 
one semester of residence credit for work taken elsewhere may be counted 
toward fulfillment of the residence requirement for the degree of Master of 
Fine Arts. Not more than one year of residence credit for work taken else- 
where may be counted toward fulfillment of the residence requirement for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

A student admitted to a Ph.D. program at Brandeis University who 
has done graduate work elsewhere may file an application to have his work 
at that institution counted toward fulfillment of residence requirements. 
However, language requirements, qualifying and comprehensive examina- 
tions, the dissertation and the final oral examination, and other such 
requirements, must be fulfilled while enrolled at Brandeis. 

To be eligible to receive credit toward fulfillment of residence require- 
ments for work taken elsewhere, a student must complete at least one 
semester's residence at Brandeis as a full-time student. He may then file an 
"Application for Credit for Graduate Work Done Elsewhere." The com- 
pleted application should be submitted to the Graduate School Office, 
which will advise the student of the action taken on his application. An 
applicant will not necessarily be given the credit he requests. Each depart- 
ment reserves the right to require of any student work in excess of its 
minimum standards to assure thorough mastery of his area of study. In any 
case, every candidate for the Ph.D. degree must complete at least one year 
in residence at Brandeis as a full-time student, or the equivalent thereof in 
part-time study. 

Residence Requirements 

Residence requirements for all graduate degrees are computed by deter- 
mining the amount of registration for credit and the tuition charges. Part- 
time students and teaching assistants pursuing part-time programs of study 
for credit complete their residence requirement when their fractional pro- 
grams (one-quarter, one-half, three-quarters) total the amount required of 
a full-time student for any given degree. 

Master of Arts 

The minimum residence requirement for all students is one academic year 
on a full-time graduate credit program at the full tuition rate, or the equiva- 
lent thereof in part-time study. 



52 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Master of Fine Arts 

The minimum residence requirement for all students is three academic 
semesters on a full-time graduate credit program for each semester, at the 
full tuition rate for each semester, or the equivalent thereof in part-time 
study. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The minimum residence requirement for all students is two academic years 
on a full-time graduate credit program for each year, at the full-tuition 
rate for each year, or the equivalent thereof in part-time study. 

Full-Time Resident Students 

A full-time student is one who devotes his entire time, during the course of 
the academic year, to a program of graduate work at Brandeis University, 
to the exclusion of any occupation or employment. In exceptional cases, 
however, a student may accept outside employment with the approval of 
his department chairman. 

A full-time program may include a combination of teaching and re- 
search assistance, work leading to the fulfillment of degree requirements, 
such as preparation for qualifying, comprehensive, and final examinations, 
or supervised reading and research, or the writing of M.A. theses and Ph.D. 
dissertations, as well as regular course work. 

A full-time resident student may take as many courses for credit in 
any semester as are approved by his department chairman, but no student 
may receive credit for, nor be charged for, more than a full-time program 
in any semester. Thus the minimum residence requirement for any degree 
may not be satisfied by an accelerated program of study nor by payment of 
more than the full-time tuition rate. 

Ph.D. candidates and students for whom the M.A. and M.F.A. degrees 
are terminal degrees may continue as full-time students on completion of 
their residence requirements by registering at the post-residence fee (see 
p. 59). 

Part-Time Resident Students 

A part-time student is one who devotes less than his entire time to a pro- 
gram of graduate work at Brandeis University. He may register for a credit 
program of one-quarter, one-half, or three-quarters time. A part-time stu- 
dent may engage in outside employment with the permission of his depart- 
ment chairman, who may restrict the time permitted for such employment. 
Students wishing to pursue part-time resident study leading to a gradu- 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 53 



ate degree must explain in writing, at the time they seek admission, why 
full-time study is not possible. An enrolled student receiving financial aid 
from the University, who wishes to change his status from a full-time to a 
part-time resident, must file with the Graduate School Office an explanation 
of why full-time study is no longer possible. 

Post-Resident Students 

A graduate student who has completed residence requirements and who 
registers in order to utilize academic services or University facilities while 
completing degree requirements is a post-resident student. 

Special Students 

On occasion, properly qualified persons who wish to audit or to take courses 
without working for a degree will be admitted. Special students are not 
eligible for University loans, scholarships, fellowships, teaching or research 
assistantships, nor will they be considered for resident counsellorships. A 
special student who later wishes to change his status to that of a part-time 
or full-time student working for a degree must apply for admission as a 
resident student. He must also file a special petition if he wishes credit to 
be accepted for any courses taken at Brandeis as a special student. Credit 
for such course work may be granted in exceptional cases. 

Leave of Absence 

Students who have not completed their residence requirements may peti- 
tion for leave of absence. The petition must have the approval of both the 
chairman of the department and the Dean of the Graduate School. Leave 
of absence up to one year will normally be granted to students in good 
academic standing who present compelling personal reasons or need to do 
work off campus in connection with their graduate studies. 

If for any reason a student must extend a leave of absence, he must 
request such extension in writing before his leave of absence expires. 
Failure to do so will result in being automatically dropped from the 
Graduate School roster. 

Continuation 

A graduate student who has completed residence requirements and who is 
not registered during the period in which he is completing degree require- 
ments is considered a Continuation Student. A student in this category is 
not eligible for a leave of absence. 



54 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Withdrawal 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the Graduate School at any time 
before the end of the academic year must give immediate written notice to 
his department chairman and to the Dean of the Graduate School. Failure 
to comply with this procedure for withdrawing may subject the student to 
dishonorable discharge, refusal of readmission, cancellation of the privilege 
of securing an official transcript of his record, and, in the case of a student 
withdrawing within 30 days of the beginning of classes, loss of eligibility for 
partial refund of tuition. Such a student must pay tuition for the full 
semester. Permission to withdraw will not be granted if the student has not 
discharged all financial indebtedness to the University or has not made 
arrangements for subsequent payment to the satisfaction of the Office of 
University Finance. 

Exclusion, Dismissal or Expulsion 

The University reserves the right to dismiss or exclude at any time any 
student whose character, conduct, academic standing or financial indebted- 
ness it regards as undesirable, and without assigning any further reason 
therefor; neither the University nor any of its Trustees or officers shall be 
under any liability whatsoever for its disciplinary action, exclusion or 
dismissal. 

The University also reserves the right to revoke, cancel or reduce at 
any time any financial or honorific award made to any graduate student, 
for character, conduct, academic standing or financial indebtedness re- 
garded by the University as undesirable, and without assigning any further 
reason therefor; neither the University nor any of its Trustees or officers 
shall be under any liability whatsoever for cancelling, revoking or reducing 
any award. 



General Degree Requirements 



The following general requirements apply to the awarding of graduate 
degrees in all areas of study. For the specific requirements of each area of 
study, students should consult the appropriate section of this catalog. 

Master of Arts 

In order to qualify for a Master's degree, the student must complete the 
equivalent of one full year of graduate study at Brandeis University, ordi- 
narily computed at a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of approved 
study. Each course meeting three hours per week grants three credits per 
semester. Certain departments may at their option require more than 



GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 55 



twenty-four hours of graduate study. All departments offering Master's 
programs require that the candidate demonstrate a reading knowledge of 
at least one foreign language and pass satisfactorily a general or qualifying 
examination which, at the department's discretion, may be in one or more 
parts and may be written, oral, or both. Where a thesis is required for the 
Master's degree, two copies must be submitted to the department chairman 
in final form no later than January 7 for a February degree or May 1 for a 
June degree. 

The Master's degree must be earned within four years from the in- 
ception of graduate study at Brandeis University. 

Master of Fine Arts 

In order to qualify for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Music, the 
candidate must complete with distinction thirty-six semester hours of work 
at the graduate leve}, and must meet the language and other requirements 
for the degree outlined on pages 127-130. Two copies of the thesis must be 
submitted to the department chairman in final form no later than January 
7 for a February degree or May 1 for a June degree. 

The Master of Fine Arts degree must be earned within five years from 
the inception of graduate study at Brandeis University. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

In order to qualify for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, a student must 
ordinarily complete a minimum of three years of graduate study, including 
two full years of residence and a third year devoted to the preparation of a 
doctoral dissertation. Under certain conditions credit for advanced standing 
will be granted for work taken in residence in graduate schools of other 
universities. Each Department or Committee reserves the right to require 
prospective candidates for the degree to perform work in excess of its 
minimum standards to assure thorough mastery of the area. 

Prospective candidates, except in American Civilization, Philosophy and 
Psychology, must demonstrate proficiency in at least two foreign languages. 
In all areas of study the student must satisfactorily pass a general or qualify- 
ing examination which, at the department's discretion, may be in one or 
more parts and may be written, oral, or both. In addition, all prospective 
candidates must write a doctorial dissertation and defend it in a final oral 
examination. 

To be eligible for the receipt of the Ph.D. degree in any given year, 
the student must have (1) been admitted to candidacy for the doctorate, 
(2) completed all residence requirements, and (3) passed all language and 
qualifying examinations, by the close of the semester preceding the semester 
in which the degree will be conferred. Doctoral dissertations must be sub- 



56 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



mitted to department chairmen by December 3 for February degrees, and 
April 1 for June degrees. In addition, notification that the doctoral dis- 
sertation has been approved and that the dissertation examination has been 
passed must have been communicated to the Dean of the Graduate School 
no later than January 7 in the case of February degrees or May 15 in the 
case of June degrees. 

Students entering Brandeis University with no previous graduate work 
must earn the Doctor's degree within eight years from the inception of 
study. Students who enter Brandeis University with a Master's degree shall 
be required to complete the Ph.D. in seven years. 

Language Requirements 

A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required of all 
students engaged in programs of study leading to the M.A. degree. A read- 
ing knowledge of at least two foreign languages is required of all students 
engaged in programs of study leading to the M.F.A. A reading knowledge 
of at least two foreign languages except in History of American Civiliza- 
tion, Philosophy and Psychology, is required of all students engaged in 
programs of study leading to the Ph.D. degree. Candidates for the Ph.D. 
degree in Music are required to have a reading knowledge of three foreign 
languages. Graduate departments may require degree candidates to demon- 
strate proficiency in additional languages. Each department determines 
which languages are acceptable as satisfying the foreign language require- 
ments. 

Students are expected to satisfy the language requirements as soon as 
possible. The completion of the language requirements at another univer- 
sity does not exempt the candidate from the Brandeis requirements. The 
student should present himself for at least one language examination during 
his first year of residence. 

A student who has not passed an examination in at least one foreign 
language by the end of his first year of study will not be eligible for financial 
aid from the University for the second year. 

All Ph.D. candidates must pass their second language examination no 
later than the semester preceding the semester in which the degree is to be 
conferred. 

Many departments require that language examinations be passed at an 
earlier time than specified in these provisions. Special requirements will be 
found in the departmental statements included in this catalog. 

Admission to Candidacy 

A student who (a) has demonstrated a knowledge and mastery of the J 
subject matter of his field at a level satisfactory to his Department or " 



GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 57 



Committee; (b) has passed all departmental qualifying examinations; (c) 
has indicated a capacity for independent research of high quality; and (d) 
has satisfactorily completed all specific Department or Committee require- 
ments for admission to candidacy may, at the recommendation of the 
Department or Committee, be admitted by the Graduate Council to candi- 
dacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In order to be eligible for the 
award of the degree, the student must be admitted to candidacy at least one 
semester before the degree is awarded. 

Application for Graduate Degrees 

Candidates for the M.A., M.F.A., and Ph.D. degrees must file with the 
Graduate School Office an application for the degree no later than Decem- 
ber 3 for a February degree and no later than April 1 for a June degree of 
the academic year in which the degree is to be conferred. Upon the written 
recommendation by a candidate's Department or Committee that his ap- 
plication be approved, his record will be reviewed by the Graduate Coun- 
cil which recommends him to the University's Board of Trustees for the 
degree. In case of failure or withdrawal from candidacy in any year, the 
student must reapply by filing a new application in a later year. 

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination 

Two, copies of the doctoral dissertation, as well as an abstract of the 
dissertation not to exceed six hundred words in length, should be submitted 
to the department or committee chairman no later than December 4 for a 
February degree and April 1 for a June degree of the academic year in which 
the Ph.D. degree is to be conferred. The style and format of all dissertations 
are determined by the respective departments. The chairman will then 
appoint two or more readers, besides the principal supervisor, to read the 
candidate's dissertation. Certification of the approval of the dissertation by 
these readers will be communicated to the Dean of the Graduate School 
and to the chairman of the Department or Committee. The chairman will 
then schedule a final oral examination and notify both the Dean of the 
Graduate School and the candidate of the time and place of the exami- 
nation at least three weeks prior to the scheduled date of the dissertation 
defense. 

The dissertation, when approved by the readers, must then be de- 
posited in the Office of the Graduate School, where it will be available to 
all interested members of the faculty for at least two weeks prior to the final 
oral examination. 

The Dean of the Graduate School will publish in the University 
Gazette the time and place of a candidate's final oral examination and the 




title of his doctoral dissertation. The final oral examination will be open to 
any member of the faculty engaged in graduate instruction and to invited 
faculty members of other institutions. 

The Examining Committee, recommended by the department chair- 
man and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School must be composed 
of at least three members of the faculty. At least one member of the ex- 
amining committee shall be from a graduate area outside the student's own, 
though preferably from a related area. 

The examination may be restricted to a defense of the dissertation, or 
may cover the whole field of the dissertation. The candidate will be notified 
by his Department or Committee of his responsibility for coverage at the 
examination. 

A report, signed by the Examining Committee, certifying the candi- 
date's successful performance on the final oral examination, will be sub- 
mitted to the Dean of the Graduate School no later than January 7 for a 
February degree or May 16 for a June degree of the year in which the 
degree is to be conferred. 



Deposit and Publication of Dissertation 

By January 28 for February degree candidates, or June 6 for June degree 
candidates, the candidate must deposit two copies of his finished dissertation, 
including the original typescript, in a state suitable for microfilm and Xerox 
publication. Both copies of the dissertation must have the signed approval 
of the dissertation supervisor and readers. One copy will be retained by the 
library, the other by the department, both in bound form. The candidate 
must also submit two copies of an abstract of the dissertation, not exceeding 
600 words, which has been approved by the dissertation supervisor. 

A detailed statement of the Graduate School publication regulations 
is available from the Graduate School Office. See also the statement in this 
catalog, under Fees, on the Final Doctoral Fee. 



FEES 59 



Fees 

All fees are payable on the dates they are due. In exceptional cases, students 
may make prior arrangements with the Office of University Finance for 
installment payments. A candidate for a June degree must pay any out- 
standing indebtedness to the University by June 1, just prior to Commence- 
ment, or his name will be stricken from the rolls of degree candidates. Can- 
didates for February degrees must pay any outstanding indebtedness by 
January 15 of the year in which the degree is conferred. 

Payment of tuition and other fees due on the day of registration is a 
part of the registration procedure. A student who is not prepared to pay 
such fees on the day of registration and who has not made alternative 
arrangements for payment with the Office of University Finance will be 
refused the privilege of registration. A registered student who defaults in the 
payment of indebtedness to the University shall be subject to suspension, 
dismissal and refusal of a transfer of credits or issuance of a transcript. A 
student who has been suspended or dismissed for nonpayment of indebted- 
ness to the University may not be reinstated until such indebtedness is paid 
in full. 

Application Fee: $10.00. Payable by all applicants for admission at the 
time the application for admission is submitted and is not refundable. 
Checks and money orders should be made payable to the order of Brandeis 
University. No application for admission will be processed until this fee is 
paid. This fee is not required of Brandeis graduates. 

Tuition Fee: The fees for tuition in the Graduate School for 1965-66 
are as follows: 

Full-time resident students: $1,650 per year, or $825 per semester. 

Part-time resident students: 

Per Semester Per Year Fraction Program of Study 

$618.75 $1,237.50 Three-quarters 

$412.50 $ 825.00 One-half 

$206.25 $ 412.50 One-quarter 

Special Students: $206.25 per course per semester. 

Post-Residence Fee: Students who have completed their residence re- 
quirements and who wish to continue in residence to utilize any academic 
service or University facility must register at the usual tuition rates. Grad- 
uate students whose tuition is not being paid from scholarship or fellow- 
ship funds awarded by the University or other sources may petition the 
Dean of the Graduate School for a reduction of the post-residence fee to 

). Students who continue to utilize any academic service or University 



60 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



facility after having completed residence, but who have failed to register, 
are subject to disciplinary action by the Dean of the Graduate School. A 
student who is eligible for registration on the post-residence basis may file a 
program card for full-time study, in terms of courses or in terms of time or 
any combination thereof, provided his department chairman approves of 
the program of study as being a full-time program and signs the program 
card. 

Mixed Tuition Fee: In the event that a student needs to register for 
only a part-time program (one-quarter, one-half, or three-quarters) in order 
to complete his residence requirements, but wishes to register for additional 
courses or take a fuller program of study, he shall be charged for the part- 
time program needed to complete his residence, plus the post-residence fee. 

Summer Tuition Fee: Brandeis University does not conduct a regular 
summer school session, however, special courses of study on an individual 
basis may be arranged for regular students. The tuition for graduate stu- 
dents who remain in residence for special summer programs of a twelve 
week duration is $500.00, and of an eight week duration, $350.00. 

Late Registration Fee: $10.00. Payable for failure to complete registra- 
tion at the time announced by the Graduate School Office. (Consult the 
Academic Calendar.) 

Change-of -Program Fee: $10.00. Payable by any graduate student who 
wishes to change his program of study later than two weeks after the first 
meeting of classes in each semester. 

Continuation Fee: $10.00. Payable annually by graduate students who 
have completed residence requirements and who are not registered during 
the period in which they are preparing for the completion of degree re- 
quirements. Students in this category are not eligible for leave of absence. 

Master's Fee: $30.00. A candidate for the M.A. or the M.F.A. who is 
subject to the Continuation Fee and who submits a Master's thesis or takes 
a qualifying examination in any semester following one in which he has 
not been in residence, shall pay the Master's Fee. The fee is chargeable 
only once. The Continuation Fee will be applied toward payment of the 
Master's Fee. 

Final Doctoral Fee: $250. This fee covers all costs for the year in which 
the Ph.D. degree will be conferred, including the costs for the microfilm 
publication of the doctoral dissertation, the publication of the abstract of 
the dissertation in Dissertation Abstracts, copyright protection for the 
author if desired, issuance of a Library of Congress number and appropriate 
library cards, binding two copies of the dissertation for use in the Univer 
sity Library, and the Xerox-printed copies in book form for the author 



J 



FEES 61 



The Final Doctoral Fee also covers the rental expenses for academic robes 
for the candidates at graduation gnd the cost of the diploma. Students who 
have been in residence in their final year may deduct any tuition charges 
which they may have paid to the University in that final year. Students who 
have paid the Continuation Fee in the final year may deduct that fee from 
the Final Doctoral Fee. 

NOTE: All candidates for the Ph.D. degree must pay the $250 Final 
Doctoral Fee prior to the receipt of their degrees. A candidate may, how- 
ever, elect not to contract for the Xerox publication of his dissertation, 
and in lieu thereof may separately arrange for its publication either as a 
book or as articles in scholarly journals within twenty-four months follow- 
ing the award of the degree. On due evidence that the work has been 
published or is scheduled for publication within the required time, a rebate 
of $150 of the Final Doctoral Fee may be authorized. 

Reinstatement Fee: $10.00. Payable by a student who, after suspension 
or dismissal, has been reinstated with the consent of the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Transcript Fee: $1.00. Students, former students and graduates who 
request official transcripts of their records in the Graduate School are 
charged $1.00 for each copy issued after the first one, which is issued free of 
charge. Requests by mail for transcripts must, be accompanied by a check 
in the correct amount, payable to Brandeis University. 

Diploma Fee: $10.00. Payable by candidates for the M.A. and M.F.A. 
degrees. 

Student Health Plan Fee: $55.00. Payment of the mandatory Health 
Plan Fee entitles the graduate student to utilize the facilities of the Health 
Office during the academic year and to participate in the benefits of the 
Health Insurance Program. The fee is payable at registration and no por- 
tion is refundable. 

Waiver of Fee: A waiver of the insurance coverage only and a rebate 
of $25.00 may be granted upon presentation by the student of a statement 
from his insurance company, which certifies that similar coverage is in 
effect. This statement must be presented at the time of registration or the 
student will be included automatically under the University Student Health 
Plan and will be billed $55.00. Request for such waiver should be made by 
the student on the "Student Health Insurance" form mailed by the Univer- 
sity with each notification of admission and readmission. 

Exceptions: The University Student Health Plan is optional for special 
students. 



62 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Dependent Coverage: Although the health services offered at Stone- 
man Infirmary are not extended to dependents of students, insurance cov- 
erage is available for the following additional fees: 
Dependent spouse of insured student: $52.00 
One or more dependent children of insured student: 1 15.00 
Special students are not eligible for coverage for dependents. 

Refunds 

The only fee which may be refundable, in part, is the tuition fee. No re- 
fund of the tuition fee will be made because of illness, absence or dismissal 
during the academic year. If a student withdraws within 30 days from the 
beginning of classes, he may petition the Office of University Finance for a 
partial refund of tuition. A refund may be denied without any reason for 
such denial being stated. 




J 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 63 



Financial Assistance 

To help students whose records indicate scholarly promise, the University 
makes available a variety of awards and work opportunities. No student is 
eligible for aid unless he files with the Graduate School Office an "Appli- 
cation for Financial Assistance" by the first business day in March. In ex- 
ceptional circumstances applications received from prospective students 
later than this date may be given consideration. All scholarships and fellow- 
ships are granted for one academic year; therefore, a registered student who 
holds a scholarship or fellowship must apply for a renewal by filing the 
"Application for Financial Assistance" by the first business day in March. 

Applicants for Jack Cohn Memorial Science Fellowships and for 
Charles Revson Science Fellowships must file their "Applications for Finan- 
cial Assistance" by the first business day in February. 

All awards are granted and accepted with the understanding that they 
may be revoked or reduced at any time for conduct or academic standing 
that may be regarded as undesirable. 

No student may hold a fellowship, scholarship, or teaching assistant- 
ship for more than two years of study for the M.A. degree, for more than 
three years of study for the M.F.A. degree, or for more than four years of 
study for the Ph.D. degree. No student may receive a scholarship, fellow- 
ship, or teaching assistantship after one year of study at the post-residence 
fee. Part-time students are ineligible for fellowship awards, and are not 
ordinarily considered for scholarship awards. Teaching assistants who are 
part-time students may apply for scholarships. Priority in making awards is 
given to full-time students and teaching assistants. 

Scholarships 

A scholarship is an award, on grounds of scholarly ability and need, of 
financial credit that may be used exclusively for remission of tuition fees. 
Full scholarships in the value of $1,650 and partial scholarships are availa- 
ble. Scholarship students are liable for all fees, but tuition fees in the 
amount of a scholarship award shall not be charged. 

Fellowships 

A fellowship is an academic award of honor to outstanding students of 
good character to help them in furthering advanced study and research. 
Fellowships carry stipends ranging up to $2,000 in the graduate programs 
in the humanities and social sciences and up to $4,000 in the graduate 
science programs. The amount of the stipend depends on the quality of 



64 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



the student's record and performance; need is also considered in most cases. 
A fellowship recipient must pay tuition fees unless he is also awarded a 
scholarship in an amount covering tuition. No services are required of 
students for fellowship or scholarship awards. 

Jack Cohn Memorial Science Fellowships 

Jack Cohn Fellowships, established in the memory of the founder of Colum- 
bia Pictures Corporation, provide full tuition and fees (excluding the 
Health Insurance and Infirmary fees), and a twelve month stipend up to 
$3,000 for graduate students in the life sciences. 

Annual awards will be made to science applicants with outstanding 
academic records and unusual promise of achievement in research con- 
nected with the life sciences. Jack Cohn Fellows will be selected by the 
President of the University and the Dean of the Graduate School from 
nominees recommended by a committee of distinguished scientists from the 
Brandeis faculty. 

Special application forms are not necessary; only the regular Graduate 
School application for admission and financial aid need be filed. 

Charles Revson Science Fellowships 

Charles Revson Fellowships, established by the founder and president of 
Revlon, Inc., range in value from $12,550 to $15,550 over a three year 
period of graduate study. In addition to full tuition and fees (excluding the 
Health Insurance and Infirmary fees), annual stipends of $3,000 for a 
twelve month tenure will be awarded to unmarried Revson Fellows and up 
to $4,000 for married Fellows with children. Fellows will be appointed by 
the President of the University and the Dean of the Graduate School from 
nominees recommended by screening panels of outstanding scientists on 
the Brandeis faculty and at other institutions. Only students of the highest 
rank and greatest potential will be eligible for selection. Revson Fellow- 
ships will be awarded in the following areas of graduate study: biochemis- 
try, biology, biophysics, chemistry, mathematics, physics and psychology. 
Normally three year appointments will be made for students beginning 
graduate study, although every Fellow's performance will be evaluated 
annually to determine whether his award shall be renewed. In exceptional 
cases, fellowships may be renewed for a fourth year of study. Graduate 
students who were not awarded Revson Fellowships at the time of matricu- 
lation at Brandeis may earn appointment. All students being considered 
for appointment will be interviewed. Special application forms are not 
necessary; only the regular Graduate School application for admission and 
financial aid need be filed. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 65 



Teaching Assistantships 

Teaching assistants are resident students in the Graduate School who do 
part-time teaching as part of their training and are paid a stipend in 
return for services rendered. The University has established teaching as- 
sistantships to enable distinguished graduate students to gain teaching 
experience while continuing their studies. Stipends, which vary with the 
hours of teaching and degree of responsibility, may reach a maximum of 
$2,750. Teaching assistants are eligible for other awards, including scholar- 
ships and fellowships. 

A full-time student who is a teaching assistant receives residence credit 
for, and is charged tuition for, that fraction of his program spent as a 
student in fulfillment of degree and residence requirements. No teaching 
assistant may carry more than a one-half time teaching assignment. A one- 
quarter time teaching assignment consists of about six hours of laboratory 
supervision per week or three hours of classroom instruction per week, or 
the equivalent. A graduate student who has not completed his residence 
requirement and is assigned to a one-quarter time teaching assignment 
must register for at least a three-quarter program of study for credit in 
order to be considered a full-time student. A student who has not completed 
his residence requirement and is assigned less than a one-quarter time 
teaching assignment must register for a full-time program of study to be 
considered a full-time student. A one-half time teaching assignment requires 
that the student who has not completed his residence requirement must 
register for a one-half time program of study for credit in order to be 
considered a full-time student. Ordinarily, only graduate students who have 
completed their residence requirement will be considered eligible for one- 
half time teaching assignments. A student who needs to register for only a 
partial program of study to complete his residence requirement and who 
is assigned a teaching assistantship is regarded as a full-time student. A 
teaching assistant who has completed his residence requirement may regis- 
ter as a full-time student and may pursue whatever program of study and 
research seems necessary and desirable, subject to the signed approval of 
his department chairman, without payment of tuition fees. 

First-year graduate students are eligible for appointment as teaching 
assistants in the sciences. In other areas, however, first-year students are 
rarely appointed. Foreign students are not normally eligible for appoint- 
ment as teaching assistants in their first year of graduate work unless they 
have had training at another American university. 

Teaching assistantship appointments are made by the President of the 
University on the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School 
who, in turn, acts on the recommendation of a student's department chair- 



66 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



man. A graduate student who is interested in being appointed as a teach- 
ing assistant should write or see his chairman. Appointments are made for 
periods of one year or one semester, but are renewable. All awards of 
teaching assistantships to incoming students are conditioned on an inter- 
view Avith a University representative, prior to registration. The University 
reserves the right to terminate any appointment at any time for due cause. 
Conduct, character or academic standing that is regarded as undesirable 
may constitute cause, but the University need not assign any reason for the 
termination of an appointment at any time. All teaching assistantship ap- 
pointments are made and accepted with this understanding, and neither 
the University nor any of its Trustees or officers shall be under any liability 
whatsoever for the summary termination of a teaching assistantship. 

In the case of a student receiving financial aid from Brandeis Uni- 
versity, whether in the form of a teaching assistantship, scholarship or 
fellowship, the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School is required, in 
addition to the approval of the department chairman, before the student 
may engage in outside employment. Approval is not normally granted in 
the case of full-time students receiving financial aid from the University. 

Research Assistantships 

Research assistantships, which sometimes carry stipends in excess of $4,000, 
are available in the science areas, though first-year graduate students are 
not normally eligible for appointment. Application should be made to the 
chairman of the Department or Committee administering the graduate 
program. 

Loan Funds 

Applications for University loans may be made to the Office of University 
Finance, with the prior approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Brandeis University participates in the National Defense Education 
Act Student Loan Fund. Application for N.D.E.A. loans are made in the 
same manner as University loans. 

Normally, graduate students are ineligible for loan funds until they 
have completed one semester in residence. Part-time and special students 
are not eligible for loan funds. 

Resident Counsellorships 

Resident counsellorships, providing room, board and remission of tuition 
are available to both men and women. Interested applicants should apply 
to the Office of the Dean of Students, Gryzmish Academic Center, no later 
than the first business day in March. Appointments are made by the Dean 
of Students on the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 67 



Employment 

On occasion the University offers part-time employment to specially trained 
persons. Inquiries should be addressed to the Office of Career Planning, 
Gryzmish Academic Center. 



Areas of Study and Courses 



All courses meet for three hours a week unless the course description 
indicates otherwise. The presence of "a" in the course number indicates a 
half course given in the Fall Term; "b" indicates a half course given in the 
Spring Term; "aR" indicates a course given in the Spring Term, "bR," 
courses given in the Fall Term which is identical with "a" or "b" courses 
of the same number given in the Fall and Spring Terms respectively; the 
use of "c" after a course number indicates that the course is given as a half 
course but meets throughout the year. 

Half courses normally carry three credits and full courses six. Excep- 
tions are noted under the individual course descriptions. Additional credits 
are given for laboratory hours, as indicated in the course descriptions. 

The University reserves the right to make any necessary changes in the 
offerings without prior notice. 

American Civilization 

See History of American Civilization (page 104). 

Anthropology 
Objectives 

The graduate program in anthropology is designed primarily to train 
students at the doctoral level. The objective is to provide the student with 
a broad understanding of the four major fields of anthropology, with par- 
ticular stress on ethnology and social anthropology, and to prepare the 
student for independent research and scholarship. Accordingly, there is a 
strong emphasis on training in comparative work and fieldwork, which are 
integral parts of the doctoral program. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
area of study. Students need not have an undergraduate major in anthro- 
pology or sociology-anthropology. If admitted, however, the student with- 
out previous training in anthropology may be required to take additional 
courses, as determined by the department, to complete his residence require- 
ments. Students should have a reading knowledge of one foreign language. 



68 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Faculty 

Professor Robert A. Manners, Chairman: Africa. The Caribbean. Modern 
cultures. 

Professor Helen Codere: North America. Africa. Political systems. Method 
and theory. 

Associate Professor Joel M. Halpern: Eastern Europe. Southeast Asia. De- 
veloping areas. 

Assistant Professor George L. Cowgill: New World archaeology. Physical 
anthropology. Statistics. 

Assistant Professor Richard Fox: India. Markets and marketing. Immi- 
grant enclaves. 

Assistant Professor David Kaplan: Mexico. Economics. Method and theory. 

Assistant Professor Karl Reisman: Linguistics. Caribbean. Folk literature. 

Assistant Professor Marguerite Robinson: Social organization. South Asia. 
Oceania. 

Assistant Professor Benson Saler: Middle America. Culture and person- 
ality. Primitive philosophies and religion. Formal analysis. 

Assistant Professor Alex Weingrod: Social organization. Community de- 
velopment. Culture change. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 
Students are required to complete a minimum of twenty-four course credits 
and to demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language and in the following 
subject areas: archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistics, statistics. All 
first year students will be expected to pass a written qualifying examination 
in archaeology and cultural anthropology upon completion of one year in 
residence. Proficiency in the remaining subject areas may be demonstrated 
by passing the required courses with a grade of "B" or better or by passing 
a special qualifying examination in these areas which may be taken at the 
student's option either at the end of the first or second year in residence. A 
research paper based on the summer field training exercise or, for those 
students who have been excused from the summer program, a paper based 
on a subject chosen by the student in consultation with his adviser will be 
required. 

The M.A. degree will be conferred upon statisfactory completion of 
these requirements. Students will be required to take for credit or audit An- 
thropology 300 for at least two semesters; the choice of credit or auditing 
and of timing is made by the department. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 69 



Doctor of Philosophy 

Admission to the Program. Students who complete the M.A. require- 
ments at Brandeis at a high level will be admitted to the Ph.D. program. 
Students with an M.A. in anthropology from other institutions, or with a 
minimum of a full academic year of graduate course work in anthropology 
from other institutions, may come to Brandeis as prospective candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree. After a minimum of one semester's work, the depart- 
ment may, at its discretion, grant the student transfer credit of up to one 
year toward the Ph.D. residence requirements. In most instances, transfer 
students will be required to meet the departmental requirements described 
for the Master's program, but at the discretion of the department these 
may be waived. 

Program of Study. Ph.D. candidates must complete two years of resi- 
dence at Brandeis, and a minimum of forty-eight hours of credits. Work 
toward the M.A. at Brandeis may be counted as a part of residence, as may 
work done elsewhere, as stipulated above and in the general rules of the 
Graduate School. At least thirty-six course credits must be in anthropology. 
Students will be required to take for credit or audit Anthropology 202 for 
at least two semesters, the choice of credit or audit, timing, and number of 
semesters is made by the Department. 

Language Requirements. A reading knowledge of two acceptable for- 
eign languages is required of all Ph.D. candidates. Proficiency in at least 
one of these languages must be demonstrated in the first year of residence. 
At its discretion the department may require proficiency in two languages 
prior to beginning dissertation research. 

Summer Training Program. Students are required to participate in a 
summer field training program under the direction of a faculty member. 
Students will not be admitted to the summer program until they have 
passed those parts of the qualifying examination dealing with cultural 
anthropology and archaeology. The materials from the field trip will be 
submitted as a written report satisfactory to the department. This training 
program may be waived, at the discretion of the department, if there is 
evidence of satisfactory field training prior to the student's coming to 
Brandeis. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student is admitted to candidacy on satis- 
factory completion of the following: the general qualifying examination 
(where required); the summer field training session; the written report on 
the summer fieldwork; an examination in at least one foreign language; 
forty-eight hours of course credits; and a predoctoral examination which 
may cover any aspects of anthropology and will test the scope of the stu- 
dent's knowledge and his ability to integrate that knowledge. 



70 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Field Work for the Dissertation. As soon as possible after qualifying 
for candidacy for the Ph.D., the candidate will be expected to begin a full 
year of field research, which will ordinarily form the basis of his dissertation. 

Dissertation and Defense. The degree of Ph.D. will be awarded only 
after successful defense of the dissertation. 

Courses of Instruction 
ANTHROPOLOGY 102a. Anthropological Linguistics I 

Training in the recording and analysis of spoken languages. Consideration of 
some major theories of language. Role of language in nature and culture. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 102b. Anthropological Linguistics II ^''' ^^"'"''" 

Historical relations among languages. Linguistic evidence in the study of 
prehistory. Language contact. Study of speech communities and ethnography of 
speaking. Semantic analysis. Expressive language, paralinguistics, kinetics, speech 
surrogates. Mr. Reisman 

ANTHROPOLOGY 103b. Language and Culture 

Language and thought; speech differences within societies; processes of 
change; expressive language and poetics; problems of translation; extension of 
linguistic methods to other modes of communication. No previous training in 
linguistics is necessary. Mr. Reisman 

ANTHROPOLOGY 110b. Physical Anthropology 

An introduction to the major fields of physical anthropology; human evolu- 
tion, genetics, anatomy, and modern views of race. Mr. Cowgill 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 112a. Culture and Biology 

A bio-cultural exploration of population genetics and human evolution. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 121a. Quantitative Techniques in Anthropology 

An introduction to the use of statistics and related techniques in anthropolog- 
ical research, emphasizing non-parametric methods and cross-cultural sampling. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 122a. Archaeological Methods ^''' ^'"^'^'" 

An introduction to archaeological methods, including field and laboratory 
procedures; scientific apparatus useful in detection, dating, and analysis of prehis- 
toric materials; problems in the processing and presentation of archaeological 
data; and the nature of archaeological theory. Mr. Cowgill 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 125a. Old World Archaeology 

Development of prehistoric cultures of Eurasia, Africa and Oceania from 
Pleistocene hunting and gathering cultures to the emergence of Bronze Age civili- 
zation. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 126b. New World Archaeology 

A survey of prehistoric and early historic native cultures of North, Middle and 
South America. The content and development of these cultures will be presented 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 71 



both in time-space perspective and from the point of view of their relevance to 
culture theory. Mr. Cowgill 

ANTHROPOLOGY 127b. Origins of Early Civilizations of the World 

The development of the earliest food-producing communities and the rise of 
the earliest civilizations of the Old and New World, based on archaeological data. 
The emphasis is comparative and theoretical. Mr. Cowgill 

^ANTHROPOLOGY 128b. Civilizations of Middle America 

Development of Prehispanic cultures of Middle America from the earliest 
agricultural settlements through Olmec, Teotihuacan and Classic Maya to the 
Aztec state. 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 129a. Civilizations of South America 

Development of Prehispanic cultures of the Andes from the first agricultural 
settlements to the Inca Empire. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 133b. Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

An examination of the indigenous organization of representative African soci- 
eties in their ecological and historical settings. Mr. Manners 

^ANTHROPOLOGY 134b. Tribe and Nation-State in Africa 

Seminar on the background and problems of independence in selected African 
areas. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 135a. Peoples and Cultures of India 

An examination of institutions of representative Indian peoples and their 
relationship to the wider Indian society. Mrs. Robinson 

ANTHROPOLOGY 136b. Cultures of the Far East 

China, Japan, and Korea. Problems of evolution and development in a con- 
text of diverse influences. Mrs. Robinson 

ANTHROPOLOGY 137a. Cultures of Southeast Asia 

Survey of civilizations and tribal peoples in the area between India and 
China. Emphasis on cultural interrelationships in the framework of both historical 
and contemporary problems. Mr. Halpern 

ANTHROPOLOGY 138b. Cultures of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union 

Social organization, religion, class structure and other topics dealing with the 
various ethnic groups in Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R., both past and present. 
Agricultural, nomadic and urban societies in this area, including central Asia, will 
be studied. Mr. Halpern 

ANTHROPOLOGY 139b. Peoples and Cultures of the Mediterranean 

A comparative analysis of contemporary rural peoples in the Mediterranean 
region (Europe, North Africa, Middle East) and their relationships to urban 
settings. Mr. Weingrod 

ANTHROPOLOGY 141b. The American Indian 

A survey of the peoples and cultures of aboriginal North America. Miss Codere 
•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



72 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



*ANTHROPOLOGY 142b. Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean 

History, ecology, and culture of the Circum-Caribbean from earliest European 
contact to the present. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 143b. Modern Cultures of Middle America 

Contemporary Indian and Ladino societies. Mr. Saler 

ANTHROPOLOGY 151a. Social Organization 

Theories of social organization, the interrelations of social institutions, current 
anthropological methods of interpretation and analysis. Mr. Weingrod 

ANTHROPOLOGY 151b. Social Organization 

A continuation of 151 a. This course will emphasize structural analysis. De- 
signed primarily for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Mrs. Robinson 

ANTHROPOLOGY 152a. Economic Anthropology 

Economic institutions of non-industrial societies. Miss Codere 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 153b. Primitive Art 

An introduction to art forms and their social meaning in pre-literate societies. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 154a. Primitive Religion 

An exploration of belief and behavior in societies of non-literate peoples with 
reference to theories concerning the origins and functions of religion. Mr. Saler 

ANTHROPOLOGY 155b. Culture and Personality 

An examination of the relationships between sociocultural systems and indi- 
vidual psychological processes with a critical evaluation of selected theories and 
studies bearing on this problem. Mr. Saler 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 156a. Political Anthropology 

Politics, government, law, crime and warfare in primitive societies. 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 157b. Cultural Evolution 

The general evolution of culture and its technological bases; the adaptations 
of cultures to particular natural and cultural environments. 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 158b. Folk Literature 

Geographical and structural analysis of forms of verbal art: proverb, myth, 
folktale, etc. Discussion of their role in specific social institutions and in everyday 
speech behavior. Problems of literature in colonial areas and emerging nations. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 159b. Cultural Ecology 

An analysis and criticism of various theories of cultural ecology, and the 
application of cultural ecological concepts to specific research problems. Mr. Fox 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 160a. Applied Anthropology 

An examination of the theory and practice of directed social change. Case 
material will be drawn from technical assistance, village development, mental 
health and other programs. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 73 



ANTHROPOLOGY 161b. Culture and Cognition 

An exploration of formal techniques utilized by anthropologists in the at- 
tempt to discover and analyze systems of meaning and categorization. Mr. Saler 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 162b. infra-human Sociai Beiiavior 

An exploration of social behavior in phylogenetic perspective. 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 163a. Community Studies in Anthropology 

Seminar on problems and limitations of anthropological analysis of modern 
communities. Intensive study of cases from contemporary anthropological materials. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 164b. Nationality and Culture Change 

Exploration of the relationship between the cultural concept of nationality 
and the processes of economic development in communist and other societies. 

Mr. Halpern 

ANTHROPOLOGY 165a. Social Stratification in Pre-lndustrial Societies 

The nature and function of inequalities of status and/or wealth, and the 
relation of these factors to other aspects of the culture. Mr. Fox 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 166b. Social and Cultural Change 

Selected case studies and theories bearing on the problem of change in culture 
and society. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 167b. Modernization and Modernization Movements 

A comparative analysis of programs of economic, political and social reforms. 
Emphasis is placed upon national government-sponsored modernization programs, 
particularly as they become articulated within local village communities. Materials 
will be drawn from Asia, India, the Middle East and Latin America. Mr. Weingrod 

ANTHROPOLOGY 175a. Pro-Seminar in Anthropological Method and Theory: I 

Analysis of representative classics in anthropology. 

Miss Codere and Mr. Reisman 

ANTHROPOLOGY 175b. Pro-Seminar in Method and Theory in Cultural Anthropology: II 

The development of anthropological theory, major present-day trends and 
their relation to problems of research. Mr. Kaplan 

Primarily for Graduate Students 
ANTHROPOLOGY 205a. Comparative Agrarian Societies 

Representative agrarian cultures will be dealt with in detail, with particular 
emphasis on the interrelationship between the city, the rural community and the 
state. Messrs. Kaplan and Weingrod 

ANTHROPOLOGY 226. Readings and Research in Archaeology Mr. Cowgill 

ANTHROPOLOGY 227. Readings and Research in Linguistics Mr. Reisman 

ANTHROPOLOGY 228. Advanced Readings in Method and Theory Mr. Kaplan 

ANTHROPOLOGY 229. Guided Comparative and Historical Research Mr. Weingrod 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



74 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



ANTHROPOLOGY 230. Readings and Research on Cultures of Hunters and Gatherers 

Mr. Saler 

ANTHROPOLOGY 235. Readings and Research in Oceania Mr. Fox 

ANTHROPOLOGY 236. Readings and Research on East and South Asia Mrs. Robinson 

ANTHROPOLOGY 237. Readings and Research in African Cultures Mr. Manners 

ANTHROPOLOGY 238. Readings and Research in Southeast Asian Cultures 

Mr. Halpern 

ANTHROPOLOGY 239. Readings and Research in North American Indian Cultures 

Miss Codere 

ANTHROPOLOGY 240. Readings and Research in Cultures of the Caribbean 

Mr. Reisman 

ANTHROPOLOGY 241. Readings and Research on European Communities Mr. Halpem 
ANTHROPOLOGY 300a and b. Graduate Seminar in Anthropology 

Consideration of selected field studies. 

Required of all graduate students. Mr. Reisman, 1st sem. 

Mr. Manners, 2nd sem. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 302. Summer Research Training 

Field work for three months during the summer under the supervision of a 
member of the staff. 6 credits. Mr. Manners 

ANTHROPOLOGY 305. Anthropological Colloquium Sta§ 

ANTHROPOLOGY 400-408. Dissertation Research 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 

400. Miss Codere 405. Mr. Reisman 

401. Mr. Cowgill 406. Mrs. Robinson 

402. Mr. Halpern 407. Mr. Saler 

403. Mr. Kaplan 408. Mr. Weingrod 

404. Mr. Manners 



Biochemistry 
Objectives 

The graduate program in biochemistry leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy is designed to equip the student with a broad understanding of 
the chemistry involved in biological processes and to train him to carry out 
independent original research. Although the student will be primarily 
responsible for a comprehensive understanding of biochemical phenomena, 
he will be encouraged to acquaint himself with the disciplines of biology 
and chemistry. Research and experimental projects rather than formal 
course training will be emphasized. The student will, however, be required 
to register for basic biochemistry, biochemical techniques, intermediary 
metabolism, and biochemistry seminars. The choice of advanced biochemis- 
try courses and those of other scientific disciplines (i.e., organic chemistry, 
genetics, embryology, etc.) are subject to the student's particular interests. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 75 



The choice of research programs should be in areas under investigation by 
the facuky; some of these fields include intermediary metabolism in normal 
and also tumor tissues, enzymology, immunochemistry, radiobiology, bio- 
chemical genetics, protein chemistry, plant and virus metabolism, problems 
in growth and differentiation, photobiology, microbial metabolism, and 
organic biochemistry. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of the catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
area of study. Applicants for admission to the Biochemistry Department are 
also required to take the Graduate Record Examination. The student's 
undergraduate curriculum should include some fundamental courses in 
biology and chemistry which will be subject to final staff approval. 

Faculty 

Professor Nathan O. Kaplan, Chairman: Intermediate metabolism. Bio- 
chemical basis of chemotherapy. Anti-enzyme action. Molecular heter- 
ogeneity of enzymes. Changes in structure of enzymes during adapta- 
tion, differentiation, mutation, and development. 

Adjunct Professor Abraham Goldin: Cancer chemotherapy. Synergistic ac- 
tion of drugs. Biochemical effects of transplantable tumors. 

Professor William P. Jencks: Mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by en- 
zymes, coenzymes, and by chemical catalysts. Effects of salts and 
denaturing agents on proteins. Mechanisms, catalysis and equilibria of 
reactions of "energy-rich" compounds of importance in biochemistry 
and chemistry. 

Professor Lawrence Levine: Immunochemistry. Effect of antigenic confor- 
mation on the antigen-anti-body reaction. 

Visiting Professor William F. Loomis:' Biochemistry of differentiation and 
growth with special reference to primitive animal systems. Role of 
pCOo in biological systems. Relationship of hydra to single cell sys- 
tems in tissue culture. 

Associate Professor Robert Abeles: Mechanism of enzyme action, with par- 
ticular reference to the mechanism of action of reactions involving 
derivatives of Vitamin B-12 and the mechanism of isomerizations. 

Associate Professor Gerald D. Fasman: Conformation of biological macro- 
molecules. Protein models, synthesis, conformational studies and bio- 
logical properties of polyamino acids. Polyribonucleic acids conforma- 
tional studies. 



76 BRANDEISUNIVERSITY 



Associate Professor Lawrence Grossman: Nucleic acid metabolism in nor- 
mal, tumor and virus-infected cells. Problems in biochemical replica- 
tion. Action of pyrimidine analogs in chemotherapy. 

Associate Professor Mary Ellen Jones: Biosynthetic mechanisms. Role of 
carbamyl phosphate in microbial and mammalian systems. Metabolic 
pathways in differentiation. 

Associate Professor John M. Lowenstein: Metabolic regulation of carbohy- 
drate utilization and fat synthesis. The interaction of metabolic path- 
ways. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions of nucleoside triphos- 
phates. 

Adjunct Associate Professor Farahe Maloof: Biochemical pharmacology. 
Biochemistry of the thyroid. Effects of I^^^ irradiation on thyroid tissue. 

Associate Professor Gordon H. Sato: Specialized function of cultured mam- 
malian cells. 

Associate Professor Morris Soodak: Aspects of the metabolism of the thy- 
roid gland. Mechanism of iodination and the mode of action of the 
goitrogenic drugs are being investigated in cell-free preparations of 
thyroid tissues. 

Associate Professor Helen Van Vunakis: Protein structure of enzymes and 
viruses. Mechanisms of viral infectivity. Photodynamic action of dyes 
on nucleic acids. Conversion of zymogens to enzymes. 

Assistant Professor Thomas C. Hollocher, Jr.: Free radicals in biological 
systems. Study of model free radical systems related to enzyme reactions. 
Biological oxidation. Nuclear magnetic resonance. 

Assistant Professor William T. Murakami: Biochemistry of virus infection. 
Metabolism of virus-infected cells. Purification and characterization 
of animal viruses. 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. Each doctoral candidate must satisfactorily com- 
plete the following fundamental courses: advanced biochemistry, biochemi- 
cal techniques, history of biochemistry, physical biochemistry and radio- 
biology, biochemical research problems, and at least four of the biochemis- 
try seminars. 

Language Requirements. A reading knowledge of French and German 
is required. One of the language requirements must be satisfactorily com- 
pleted prior to the oral qualifying examination. The second language 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 77 



requirement must be satisfactorily completed before the end of the second 
year of study. 

Qualifying and Cumulative Examination. An oral qualifying exami- 
nation must be taken, generally at the end of the first year. In this exami- 
nation, the student will be asked to defend or refute two propositions. One 
proposition will be related to the research he selects for his dissertation and 
the second will be an assigned proposition concerned with a different area 
of biochemistry. 

A series of one-hour cumulative examinations will be given every 
month and the student is required to pass six such examinations before he 
may present his dissertation. 

Admission to Candidacy. The qualifying examination must be passed 
at a level satisfactory for this degree. Admission to candidacy usually takes 
place at the end of the second year of study. 

Dissertation and Defense. A dissertation will be required which sum- 
marizes the results of an original investigation of an approved subject and 
demonstrates the competence of the candidate in independent research. A 
final oral examination based on the dissertation will be held. 

Courses of Instruction 
BIOCHEMISTRY 100a. Introductory Biochemistry 

Chemistry and metabolism of compounds of biological importance, introduc- 
tion to enzyme reactions, energy metabolism, cellular function and differentiation. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 25a and b. Messrs. Kaplan, Loomis and Soodak 

BIOCHEMISTRY 101. Advanced Biochemistry 

A discussion of enzyme reactions including energetics, kinetics, and reaction 
mechanism. Metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids, vita- 
mins and coenzymes, hormones and inorganic substances. Coupled enzyme reac- 
tions, such as oxidative phosphorylation, and the synthesis of macromolecules such 
as glycogen, protein and the nucleic acids. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 25a and b, Biochemistry 100a or their equivalent. 
Some background in elementary physical chemistry is recommended but not re- 
quired. Miss Jones and Staff 

BIOCHEMISTRY 103. History of Biochemistry 

A discussion of significant discoveries which have led to present-day concepts 
of biochemistry. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a. Mr. Kaplan and Staff 

BIOCHEMISTRY 200a and b. Biochemistry Techniques 

Students registered for this course will participate for a period of approxi- 
mately one month in several research programs being conducted by the staff 
members. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a (may be taken concurrently) and consent of 
the department. Mr. Levine and Staff 



78 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



BIOCHEMISTRY 201. Physical Biochemistry and Radiobiology 

Kinetics of enzyme reactions; measurement of free energy, heat and entropy 
values in biological systems; transition state theor)'; elements of data analysis; 
problems in physical techniques; isotope techniques and radiation effects. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a''(may be taken concurrently). 

Mr. Hollocher and Staff 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 202b. Chemistry of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions 

A discussion of the chemistry of certain enzyme-catalyzed reactions compared 
to the corresponding uncatalyzed or chemically catalyzed reactions. Some consider- 
ation of the mechanisms through which enzymes may exert their catalytic effects. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 131 and Biochemistry 100a, or equivalent, taken 
previously or concurrently. 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 203a. Metabolic Regulation 

Regulation of rates of enzyme reactions, regulation of enzyme levels, rate 
determining steps in metabolic pathways, control phenomena such as the Pasteur 
effect and the regulation of fat synthesis. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 204b. Metabolism in Relation to Function 

This course is to introduce the student to physiology. Circulation, digestion, 
excretion, excitation and homeostatic control mechanisms will be discussed. Where 
possible, physiological function will be related to cellular metabolism. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a. Mrs. Leeman and Messrs. Dawson and Maloof 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 205a. Biochemical Genetics 

Recent advances in the chemistry of inheritance will be discussed with empha- 
sis on recombination, transformation and transduction phenomena in micro- 
organisms. The problem of gene function, and enzyme formation and function, 
will be considered together with the contribution of microbial and animal mutants 
to the study of metabolic pathways. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a (may be taken concurrently). 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 206a. The Nucleic Acids 

Chemical and physical properties of the nucleic acids and monomeric units 
will be examined. Current chemical and enzymatic polymerization pathways and 
the biochemical roles of nucleic acids in protein synthesis, virus replication and 
genetic coding will be discussed. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a, 101a and b. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 207b. Immunochemistry 

Mode and mechanism of antigen-antibody interaction; application of im- 
munochemical methods to the estimation and characterization of proteins, polysac- 
charides, nucleic acids and natural proteins with biological activity such as enzymes 
and hormones. Mr. Levine 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 208a. Comparative Biochemistry 

Differences in metabolites, metabolic intermediates, enzymes and cofactors in 
the various species of plants and animals will be presented. Particular attention 
will be given to the genesis of the more important biosynthetic and metabolic 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 79 



process in the evolutionary scale. Phylogenetic variations will be related, where 
possible, to the environmental requirements of the organism. 
Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a. 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 209b. Physiology of the Mammalian Cell 

Factors influencing the growth, multiplication and metabolism of animal cells 
grown from single cell isolations will be presented. Genetic aspects of these cells 
will be discussed. Studies will be summarized on the infection of these cells by 
animal viruses from both genetic and biochemical viewpoints. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 210a. Protein Chemistry 

The following will be discussed: chemical and physical properties of proteins, 
peptides, and amino acids; methods of determination of molecular weight, purity, 
and structure and isolation techniques. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a and one year of physical chemistry. 

Miss Van Vunakis and Mr. Fasman 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 212a. Neurochemistry 

The special chemistry and biochemistry of nervous tissue, both central and 
peripheral, will be discussed. Carbohydrate, lipid, protein, and nucleic acid 
metabolism of nervous tissue; nerve conduction; vision; the effects of neurotopic 
agents on the enzymatic mechanisms of the brain will be presented. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a (may be taken concurrently). 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 214a. Biochemistry of Viruses 

The course will deal with animal, plant, insect and bacterial viruses with 
emphasis on biochemical mechanisms of virus DNA replication and protein 
synthesis. Physical, chemical, immunochemical and genetic characterization of 
viruses and virus conlponents will be discussed, as will the biochemistry of the 
mammalian tissue cells that support the growth of animal viruses. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a (may be taken concurrently). 

Seminars 

One or two seminars will be given each semester. Each student will present an 
oral and written report on one aspect of the following topics: 

*B10CHEMISTRY 215a. Structure and Functional Specificity of Macromolecules 
BIOCHEMISTRY 216a. Biochemical Aspects of Differentiation and Growth 

*nm/Mtr»/.ioxnv on m i • a -j Messrs. Loomis and Sato 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 217a. Nucleic Acids 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 218a. Biochemical Studies with Mammalian Viruses and Cultured Cells 

BIOCHEMISTRY 219b. Selected Topics on Enzyme Action Messrs. Abeles and jencks 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 220a. Biochemical Basis of Chemotherapy 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 221b. Biochemical Processes Involving Hemes 

BIOCHEMISTRY 222a. Oxidative Phosphorylation Messrs. Hollocher ayid Kaplan 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 223a. Structure, Metabolism, and Function of Hormones 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 225a. Biochemical Genetics 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



80 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



BIOCHEMISTRY 400-413. Biochemical Research Problems 


Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 


400. 


Mr. Kaplan 


401. 


Mr. Jencks 


402. 


Mr. Levine 


403. 


Mr. Loomis 


404. 


Mr. Abeles 


405. 


Mr. Fasman 


406. 


Miss Jones 


407. 


Mr. Lowenstein 


408. 


Mr. M aloof 


409. 


Mr. Sato 


410. 


Mr. Soodak 


411. 


Miss Van Vunakis 


412. 


Mr. Hollocher 


413. 


Mr. Murakami 



Journal Club, Colloquia, and Research Clubs 
In addition to the formal courses announced above, all graduate students 
are encouraged to participate in the department's Journal Club and col- 
loquia. The Journal Club is an informal meeting of the students, staff and 
post-doctoral fellows, where recent publications are discussed. Colloquia 
are general meetings of the department in which both speakers from the 
department and guest speakers will present their current investigations. 
Research clubs are organized by various research groups of the department. 

Biology 
Objectives 

The graduate program in biology is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of the fundamental nature of living processes, and to train him to 
undertake original research. 

The department rarely admits a graduate student who desires a Mas- 
ter's degree. Such candidates may, however, be admitted at the discretion 
of the faculty as exceptional cases. A Master of Arts degree may be granted 
on completion of a designated program to be arrived at after consultation 
with the graduate adviser. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
area of study. The student's undergraduate record should ordinarily include 
courses equivalent to those required of undergraduates concentrating in 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 81 



biology at this institution. These are: general biology, genetics, cell physi- 
ology, developmental biology, and at least two additional elective courses. 
Students who are deficient in some of these subjects, but whose records are 
otherwise superior, may make up their deficiencies while they are enrolled 
as graduate students. In exceptional cases, students may be excused from 
some of these requirements. Students with serious deficiencies must, how- 
ever, expect to add additional time to their graduate program in order to 
satisfy the deficiencies. 

It is strongly recommended that applicants take the Graduate Record 
Examination. 

On being admitted to the Biology Department, each graduate student 
will report to the temporary graduate student adviser who will assist the 
student with his formal entry into the department and later with his pro- 
gram. 

An important part of graduate training consists of laboratory experi- 
ence. Since the summer months provide an opportunity for such work, un- 
broken by courses and other responsibilities, it is customary for graduate 
students to spend their summers doing research. In recognition of this, the 
Biology Department provides summer stipends for its full-time graduate 
students. 

Faculty 

Professor Martin Gibbs, Chairman: Photosynthesis and plant physiology. 

Professor Herman T. Epstein: Radiation biology. Virus genetics. 

Professor Albert Kelner: Genetics. Microbial genetics. Radiation biology. 

Professor Maurice Sussman: Microbiology. Cellular differentiation. Mi- 
crobial genetics. 

Professor Edgar Zwilling: Vertebrate development. Tissue interactions. 

Associate Professor Jerome A. Schiff: Plant biochemistry and physiology. 
Intracellular development. Sulphur metabolism. 

Assistant Professor Chandler Fulton: Invertebrate development. Cellular 
differentiation. 

Assistant Professor Attila O. Klein: Plant physiology and metabolism. 

Assistant Professor Gjerding Olsen: Animal physiology. Endocrinology. 

Assistant Professor Henry E. Schaffer: Population genetics. 

Assistant Professor Miriam F. Schurin: Biochemical cytology. Cytogenetics. 

Assistant Professor Philip A. St. John: Invertebrate physiology. Regenera- 
tion in invertebrates. 



82 BRANDEISUNIVERSITY 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts 

Program of Study. The program leading to the M.A. degree in biology 
focuses primarily on the research capability of the student. Specifically, 
the primary requirement for the degree is the completion of a thesis based 
on original laboratory work which is acceptable to the department. In 
general, the preparation for an original research problem will necessitate 
the enrollment of a student in course work. The specific number and types 
of courses will vary, depending on the ultimate research problem, and will 
be prescribed by the department. The candidate must, however, complete 
the equivalent of one full year of graduate study at Brandeis University, 
ordinarily computed at a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of ap- 
proved study. 

By the end of the first year, each graduate student will choose a specific 
field of interest and will apply to the chairman of the department for a 
permanent adviser to be assigned by the department. This adviser will serve 
as the chairman of a committee of at least three departmental staff mem- 
bers, which will advise the student on courses to be taken and guide him 
throughout the thesis problem. 

The thesis requirement may be waived under exceptional circum- 
stances and only with the approval of the department staff. 

Layiguage requirements. All candidates are required to demonstrate a 
reading knowledge of French or German, or another foreign language ac- 
ceptable to the department. An examination demonstrating reading ability 
in the foreign language must be taken prior to the completion of thesis 
work. 

Qualifying Examiitation. At the discretion of the student's advisory 
committee, a qualifying or comprehensive examination may be required. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. All students will be expected to obtain a knowledge 
of the principles and techniques of the areas of genetics, morphology, 
physiology and development before taking the qualifying examination. 
The background a student is expected to have in these areas is equivalent 
to the course contents of Biology 101a, 101b, 102a, 103b, 104b, and Bio- 
chemistry 100a, 101. The student will be expected also to have additional 
background in his area of specialization as well as experience in seminar and 
research courses to be designated. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 83 



Each student will choose his specific field of interest and will apply to 
the chairman of the department for a permanent adviser to be assigned by 
the department before the end of the second year. The adviser will assist 
the student in planning a well-balanced program in his specific field of 
interest. In addition, the adviser will ordinarily serve as the chairman of 
the student's proposition committee, proposition examining committee and 
dissertation examining committee. 

Language requirement. A reading knowledge of French and German, 
or another language acceptable to the department, is required. At least one 
of these requirements must be met before the student completes the first 
year of graduate study and before he is admitted to candidacy. 

Qualifying Examination. Ordinarily this examination will be taken 
on the recommendation of the student's adviser and should be completed 
before active dissertation work is initiated. The student's major adviser 
will appoint two other faculty members to serve as the student's proposition 
committee. The student will submit seven propositions encompassing the 
four core areas with no more than two propositions in any one area. Each 
proposition should be a proposal or hypothesis subject to debate. The 
proper form in which the propositions are to be submitted will be desig- 
nated by the department. (See department secretary for suggested format 
and instructions.) The student will be examined orally on at least three of 
the seven acceptable propositions by the three members of the propositions 
committee plus two additional faculty members. 

Admission to Candidacy. To be admitted to candidacy, the student 
must have (a) passed at least one foreign language examination, (b) passed 
the qualifying examination, (c) shown a capacity for independent research, 
(d) been accepted by a graduate adviser. 

Dissertation. Each student will conduct an original investigation. It is 
strongly recommended that the dissertation research he deferred until the 
student has fulfilled requirements for admission to candidacy. With the 
approval of the student's adviser, however, research courses may be elected 
at any time. After admission to candidacy, a dissertation committee will be 
appointed by the chairman of the department. It will consist of at least 
three staff members headed by the student's permanent adviser. This com- 
mittee must approve the candidate's subject of research, will guide his 
research activities toward the doctoral dissertation and, in addition, will 
read and evaluate the completed dissertation. After submission of the dis- 
sertation, the candidate will be expected to present the principal results of 
his work and its significance during an examination in defense of the 
dissertation. 



84 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Courses of Instruction 
*BIOLOGY 101a. General and Comparative Physiology of Animals 

After an introduction to acquaint students with current experimental findings 
using animal cells and tissues, the course will turn to an intensive comparison of 
physiological processes operating in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Particular 
emphasis will be placed on co-ordinating and integrating mechanisms. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 25, Biology 31b (may be taken concurrently). 

Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. 

*BIOLOGY 101b. Comparative Physiology of Plants 

A discussion of those areas of physiology and biochemistry to which plants lend 
themselves as experimental objects. Conspicuous examples are photosynthesis, 
photomorphogenesis, nitrogen fixation, and the biosynthesis of natural products 
such as anthocyanins, flavonoids, isoprenoids, phenols, terpenes, etc. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 25, Biology 31b (may be taken concurrently). 

Three classroom hours a week. 3 credits. 

BIOLOGY 103b. Physical Basis of Cell Function 

Implications of the physical parameters of cellular organization in the bio- 
chemical activities of cells. Starting from the properties of elements and water, 
there will be an examination of the interrelations of structure and function at the 
levels of (1) metabolic geography, (2) cellular activity, and (3) genetic control. 

Prerequisites: Biology 30a, 31b; Physics 10 or 11; Chemistry 10 and 25. 

Three classroom hours a week. 3 credits. Mrs. Schurin 

*BIOLOGY 105b. Invertebrate Physiology 

This course will deal with a comparative study of the physiology of receptor- 
effector and regulatory systems in the invertebrate animals. Nervous, digestive, 
endocrine, muscle, osmoregulatory, respiratory and circulatory functions will be 
considered. 

Prerequisites: Biology 21a and Chemistry 25. 

Two lectures and six laboratory hours per week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. 

BIOLOGY 106b. Developmental Plant Biology 

The physiology and biochemistry of morphogenetic events in the life cycle of 
higher plants. Differentiation and growth of organs examined in terms of changing 
metabolic patterns. Results of modern experimental approaches such as cell, tissue 
and organ culture and radiation studies will be evaluated. 

Prerequisites: Biology 31b (may be taken concurrently). Biology 10 and 11. 

Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. Mr. Klein 

BIOLOGY Ilia. Microbial Genetics 

Fundamental principle of genetics as exemplified by modern research with 
microorganisms. Some informal laboratory experiments may be included. 

Prerequisites: Genetics 30a, or its equivalent; some background in microbi- 
ology equivalent to Biology 32a is advisable, but not required. 

Three classroom hours a week. 3 credits. Mr. Kelner 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 85 



*BIOLOGY 120b. Advanced Microbiology 

Enrichment and isolation o£ representative bacteria. Discussion of the biology 
of these forms. 

Prerequisites: Biology 31b, 32a; Chemistry 25. 

Two classroom hours, four laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. 

*BIOLOGY 124a. Virology 

Biology of plant, animal and bacterial viruses. 
Prerequisites: Biology 32a or the equivalent. 
Three classroom hours. 

BIOLOGY 131a. Problems in Animal Morphogenesis 

A discussion of problems concerning mechanisms of development of multicel- 
lular animals. The classical experiments of embryology will be re-evaluated in 
light of recent advances made with modern approaches. 

Three classroom hours. Laboratory to be arranged. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. Mr. Zwilling 

BIOLOGY 141b. Physical Biology 

Physical methods; treatment of experimental data; physical aspects of vision 
and hearing; introduction to radiobiology and theoretical biology; forces involved 
in biological events. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grades in full year courses in biology, chemistry, 
mathematics, and physics. 

Three classroom hours. Mr. Epstein 

*BIOLOGY 145b. Optical Methods in Biology 

Theory of image formation and resolution; lens aberrations; phase contrast, 
interference, polarization, X-ray and electron microscopy; optical rotation; spec- 
trophotometry and related techniques; review of X-ray diffraction methods. 

Prerequisite: Elementary work in physics, mathematics and biology. 

Two hours of lecture and one of demonstration per week. 3 credits. 

BIOLOGY 150 or 150a and b. Physical and Mathematical Bases of Molecular Biology 

The application of principles of physics, physical chemistry and mathematics 
to problems of biological interest including thermodynamics, kinetics, photo- 
chemistry, radiochemistry, statistics and related numerical methods. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics through calculus, some acquaintance with physics 
and physical chemistry. Students are advised to consult the instructor regarding 
prerequisites. 

Three classroom hours each semester. 3 credits each semester. 

*BI0LOGY 200b. Comparative Physiology ""'• ^f"'"" '"" '"■" 

The physiological and biochemical distinctions among living organisms will 
be presented and the origins of these differences will be discussed from the view- 
point of biochemical evolution. An attempt will be made to define basic metabolic 
processes common to all organisms as well as the evolution of special pathways in 
certain groups. 

Three classroom hours. 
•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



86 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



BIOLOGY 202a. Gene Structure and Function 

The development of the gene concept. Contemporary investigations of the 
nature of genetic material and its involvement in cell structure and function. 
Prerequisite: Biology 30a. 
Three classroom hours. 3 credits. Mr. Fulton 

BIOLOGY 204b. The Cellular Basis of Development 

Phenomic variation and interaction at the cellular level will be considered. 
Developmental events in microbial cultures, morphogenetically complex Protista, 
Matazoa and Metaphyta will be analyzed in terms of the cellular mechanisms 
involved. 

Three classroom hours. 3 credits. Mr. Sussinan 

*BIOLOGY 212a. Cytogenetics 

Correlation of genetic data with chromosomal aberration. Study of classical 
methods and recent findings. 

Prerequisites: Biology 102a and 103b. 

Three classroom hours. Laboratory to be arranged. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: |10. 

*BIOLOGY 214b. Experimental Methods in Microbial Genetics 

Introduction to the study of microbial variations, including spontaneous and 
induced mutations; recombination, transduction and other phenomena, using 
bacteria and bacterial viruses. 

Laboratory hours to be arranged. 

Laboratory fee: $20. 

*BIOLOGY 222b. Microbial Metabolism 

Nutrition and intermediary metabolism or microorganisms. 
Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100a or the equivalent. 
Three classroom hours. 

*BIOLOGY 223b. Experimental Methods in Microbial Metabolism 

An introduction to specialized techniques as applied to the study of microbial 
metabolism, including manometry, chromatography, spectrophotometry, tracer 
techniques, etc. 

Laboratory hours to be arranged. 

Laboratory fee: $20. 

BIOLOGY 245a. Selected Topics in Plant Metabolism 

Three classroom hours a week. 2 credits. Mr. Schiff 

BIOLOGY 245b. Selected Topics in Plant Metabolism 

Three classroom hours a week. 2 credits. Mr. Gihbs 

BIOLOGY 400. Research in Genetics and Microbiology 

Laborator)' hours and credits to be arranged. 

Laboratory fee: $25. Mr. Epstein 

BIOLOGY 401. Research in Genetics and Microbiology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 

Laboratory fee: $25. Mr. Kelner 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 



87 



*BIOLOGY 402. Research in Microbiology and Physiology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: S25. 

BIOLOGY 403. Research in Genetics and Cytology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

BIOLOGY 404. Research in Physiology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

BIOLOGY 405. Research in Invertebrate Development 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

BIOLOGY 406. Research in Plant Physiology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

*BIOLOGY 407. Research in Invertebrate Physiology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

BIOLOGY 408. Research in Differentiation and Genetics 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

BIOLOGY 409. Research in Vertebrate Development 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

BIOLOGY 410. Research in Plant Physiology 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

*BIOLOGY 411. Research in Electron IVlicroscopy 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 

Biology 412. Research in Plant Metabolism 

Laboratory hours and credits to be arranged. 
Laboratory fee: $25. 



Mrs. Schurin 



Mr. Olsen 



Mr. Fulton 



Mr. Schiff 



Mr. Suss7nan 



Mr. Ziuilling 



Mr. A. O. Klein 



Mr. Gibbs 



Biology Journal Clubs 

There will be a number of informal Journal Clubs which will deal with 
various topics of concern to the various specialties. These will meet regu- 
larly under the auspices of staff members. Students, depending upon their 
individual needs, may be required to attend. 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Biophysics 
Objectives 

The interdepartmental graduate program in biophysics, leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, is designed to give the student a broad 
understanding of the physico-chemical nature of living processes and to 
train him to carry out independent research. In addition to basic courses in 
cellular biology, the student will be expected to obtain a broad background 
in the supporting disciplines of biochemistry, biology, chemistry, physics, 
and mathematics. After completion of this program, the student's remain- 
ing course work will be in an area of biophysics in which a faculty member 
is doing research. Some areas in which research is now being actively pur- 
sued are photobiology, radiobiology, virus reproduction and muscle con- 
traction. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to applicants for admission to this 
area of study. Applicants are also required to take the Graduate Record 
Examination. The student's undergraduate program should, ideally, in- 
clude organic and physical chemistry, atomic and nuclear physics, differ- 
ential equations, and courses in cellular biology. Inasmuch as most students 
will be deficient in some respects, it is expected that deficiencies may be 
made up by taking the appropriate courses while in Graduate School. If a 
petition is approved, the successful completion of some of these courses may 
be credited as part of the graduate program. On being admitted to study in 
biophysics, the student will be assigned to a member of the Biophysics 
Committee, who will advise the student on a program of courses. This pro- 
gram should be submitted for approval to the committee by the beginning 
of the second term of residence. 

Faculty 

Professor Herman T. Epstein, Chairman; Professors Nathan O. Kaplan 
(Biochemistry), Albert Kelner (Biology); Assistant Professors Thomas 
C. HoLLOCHER, Jr. (Biochemistry), Daniel J. Kleitman (Physics), Ken- 
neth KusTiN (Chemistry). 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. The following are five areas in which competency 
at more than a minimal level is expected of a candidate for a Ph.D. in 
Biophysics: 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 89 



1. Biology— competency to include at least one area of biology in which 
the candidate could be presumed to be capable of doing independent work. 

2. Modern physics through the basic ideas of quantum mechanics. 

3. Physical chemistry including thermodynamics. 

4. Biochemistry. 

5. Mathematics through elementary differential equations. 
Language Requirements. A reading knowledge of German and French 

is required. Russian may be substituted for one of these languages if the 
advisory committee determines that it is useful for a student in his particu- 
lar field of research. 

Qualifying Examination. A student should have completed the pro- 
gram of study not later than the end of his second year in residence so that 
he may be able to take a qualifying examination covering this material. 

Dissertation and Defense. Upon passing this examination, the student 
will select a dissertation supervisor and formally initiate research and course 
study in the research area of his supervisor. An additional twelve credits are 
to be taken from among the courses listed above or from other graduate 
courses and seminars as approved by the student's advisory committee. 
This committee will be appointed by the dissertation supervisor, subject to 
the approval of the Biophysics Committee. When the student and the dis- 
sertation supervisor have agreed on the research project, a brief description 
of the project must be filed with each of the members of the advisory com- 
mittee. 

After completing the research and the dissertation, the candidate will 
present and discuss the results and significance of his work during an 
examination in defense of his dissertation. 

Courses of Instruction 
BIOPHYSICS 300a and b. Biophysical Techniques 

All entering students normally register for this course and will thereby par- 
ticipate for periods of about six weeks in the research programs of each of the six 
to eight staff members. Staff 

Chemistry 
Objectives 

The graduate program in chemistry is designed to lead to a broad under- 
standing of this subject. All students will be required to demonstrate 
knowledge in advanced modern areas of inorganic, organic and physical 
chemistry. They will be required also to demonstrate proficiency in selected 
experimental techniques which are used in chemical research. Advanced 



90 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



courses are offered, satisfactory completion of which will constitute partial 
fulfillment of these requirements. Members of the chemistry staff are cur- 
rently investigating mechanisms of organic reactions, chemistry of free 
radicals, stereochemistry and molecular geometry, chemistry of organophos- 
phorus compounds, chemotherapy, mechanisms of enzyme reactions, struc- 
ture and biogenesis of natural products, chemical kinetics of elementary 
reactions, statistical theory of atomic and molecidar structure, properties of 
non-aqueous solutions, photochemistry, mechanisms of photosynthesis, 
ultra-fast proton transfer steps in acid base reactions; dispersion forces 
between adjacent molecules in liquids; lifetimes of hydrogen-bonded com- 
plexes in solution, solid state chemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance, 
rapid reactions by relaxation spectrometry, structure of organic and inor- 
ganic compounds by X-ray diffraction, kinetics of reactions in the gas 
phase. 

To avoid excessive specialization, related advanced work in mathe- 
matics, physics, and biology may be offered to fulfill degree requirements. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
area of study. In addition, the undergraduate curriculum of applicants 
should include courses in physics and mathematics (differential and inte- 
gral calculus), and courses in general, analytical, organic and physical 
chemistry. 

Admission to advanced courses will be based upon results of a qualify- 
ing examination in each of these areas of chemistry, which will be taken 
upon entrance. These examinations will determine whether the student 
will be required to make up deficiencies in preparation. The qualifying 
examinations will be given three times a year; (1) during the two-week 
period ending with the first week of the Fall Term, (2) in February, and 
(3) in April. The results of the qualifying examinations will be considered 
in the assignment of awards for the subsequent years of graduate study. 

Faculty 

Professor Saul G. Cohen, Chairman: Chemistry of free radicals; organic 
photochemistry; stereospecificity and mechanism of reactions of en- 
zymes. 

Adjunct Professor Orrie M. Friedman: Biorganic chemistry; degradation 
studies of DNA; organic phosphorus cdmpounds; synthesis of anti-tumor 
agents. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 91 



Professor Sidney Golden: Quantum statistical theory of chemical kinet- 
ics; many body problems and atomic and molecular structure; statisti- 
cal mechanics of ion solvation. 

Professor Ernest M. Grunwald: Ultra-fast proton transfer steps in acid 
base reactions; dispersion forces between adjacent molecules in liquids; 
life-times of hydrogen-bonded complexes in solution. 

Professor Henry Linschitz: Reactions of excited molecules; stabiliza- 
tion of free radicals; photo-ionization in solution and properties of 
solvated electrons; physical mechanisms of photosynthesis and vision. 

Associate Professor Paul B. Dorain: Electron paramagnetic resonance 
studies on metastable oxidation states; exchange interactions in crystals; 
crystal field splittings in actinides. 

Associate Professor James B. Hendrickson: Chemistry of natural products, 
particularly alkaloids and sesquiterpenes; chemical plant phylogeny; 
stereochemistry and molecular geometry. 
*Associate Professor Myron Rosenblum: Reaction mechanisms; thermally 
induced rearrangements; the chemistry of ferrocene and related com- 
pounds. 
** Associate Professor Robert Stevenson: Isolation and structure of natural 
products; lignan synthesis; molecular rearrangements in triterpenoids 
and steroids. 

Associate Professor Thomas R. Tuttle, Jr.: Electron distribution in ion 
radicals by electron spin-resonance; molecular motions in solutions; 
properties of metal solutions in ammonia and other solvents. 

Assistant Professor Robert F. Hutton: Chemical models for enzymatic 
reactions; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 

Assistant Professor Peter C. Jordan: Irreversible statistical mechanics 
and quantum chemistry. 

Assistant Professor Kenneth Kustin, (Graduate Student Adviser): Study 
of fast reactions in solution by relaxation techniques; mechanisms of 
inorganic reactions; enzyme kinetics. 

Assistant Professor Thomas N. Margulis: Structure of organic and inor- 
ganic compounds by X-ray diffraction. 

Assistant Professor Colin Steel: Chemistry of excited molecules and 
radicals; the kinetics and mechanisms of photochemical and thermal 
reactions. 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts 

Qualifying Examinations. The qualifying examinations must be passed 
by the end of the first year of graduate study. 

*On Leave, 1965-66 
•*On Leave, Fall Term. 



92 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Program of Study. Each candidate for the Master's degree is required 
to complete satisfactorily: 

1. Not less than eighteen ^semester hours of lecture course work in 
inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. Graduate courses in related fields 
may be offered to fulfill the chemistry requirements on petition to the 
department. The petition must be approved prior to registration for such 
courses. 

2. Six semester hours of advanced laboratory work. This requirement 
may be met by graduate credit in laboratory work in courses numbered 
over 100. 

3. Chemistry 130a— Introduction to Organic Research or Chemistry 
110b— Analytical Chemistry may be offered in partial fulfillment of lecture 
course requirements or of laboratory course requirements for the M.A. de- 
gree. 

Residence Requirement. The minimum residence requirement for this 
degree is one year. While generally this will be fulfilled in two semesters 
and one summer, it may in certain instances be met in two semesters. 

Language Requirements. A reading knowledge of German and an 
elementary knowledge of French or Russian is required. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. Each candidate for the Doctor's degree is required 
to complete satisfactorily: 

1. The qualifying examinations which must be passed at a level satis- 
factory for this degree by the end of the first year of graduate study. 

2. The program of study described for the degree of Master of Arts in 
Chemistry, or its equivalent. 

3. Not less than nine additional semester hours of lecture course work 
in Chemistry selected from those in the 200 series. 

4. Final examinations. After a student has been admitted to the Ph.D. 
program he begins to take final examinations, normally in the second year 
of graduate study, in his major field, organic or physical chemistry. In 
organic chemistry these examinations are administered twice a year, at the 
end of each semester, and are based on assigned readings. Students must 
pass three of these examinations and must maintain satisfactory progress 
toward this end. In physical chemistry, generally during the third semester 
of graduate work, the student is assigned a set of four propositions. On one 
proposition a three-hour examination is written and on the remaining 
three propositions the student is examined orally for a two-hour period by 
faculty members. The student is graded on his overall performance on both 
parts, i.e., written and oral, of the examination. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 93 



Residence Requirements. The minimum residence requirement for 
this degree is two years. Ordinarily, three years of full-time study will be 
necessary for the completion of the course work and the preparation of an 
acceptable thesis. 

Language Requirements. A reading knowledge of German and either 
French or Russian is required. 

Admission to Candidacy. The student may be recommended for ad- 
mission to candidacy upon the recommendation of his dissertation adviser, 
and the completion of the following requirements: the qualifying exami- 
nations, twenty-one hours of graduate lecture course credit, the language 
examinations and one final examination. 

Dissertation and Defense. A thesis is required which summarizes the 
results of an original investigation and which demonstrates the competence 
of the candidate in independent investigation, critical ability, and effective- 
ness of expression. The topic of the thesis must receive approval of the 
department. An oral defense of the dissertation will be held. 

Courses of Instruction 
CHEMISTRY llObR. Analytical Chemistry 

Principles and techniques involved in modern chemical analysis. Application 
of modern instrumental methods to the study of chemical and physical processes. 
Techniques used include polarography, spectroscopy, chromatography. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 41, which may be taken concurrently. 

Two classroom and six laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: .$10. Mr. Steel 

CHEMISTRY 121aR. Inorganic Chemistry 

Introduction to the principles of chemical binding; valence theory, periodic 
properties, molecular structures. Application to the chemistry of the lighter ele- 
ments. 

Inorganic synthesis and analysis; synthetic techniques include vacuum line, 
high temperature, non-aqueous and electrochemical preparations. Instrumental 
methods of analysis. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 41 or consent of the instructor. 

Three classroom hours a week, 3 credits; six laboratory hours a week, 2 
credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Kustin 

CHEMISTRY 130a. Introduction to Organic Research 

Systematic determination of structures of organic molecules utilizing micro- 
techniques and instrumental methods as a preparation for research. Some synthetic 
work in connection with degradations of unknowns will emphasize choice of 
reactions and conditions. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 25. 

Two classroom hours and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory f ee : $ 1 0. Mr. Button 



94 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



CHEMISTRY 131a. Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Stereochemistry, molecular rearrangements, kinetics and mechanisms of organic 
reactions. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 25 and 41 or the equivalent. 
Chemistry 41 may be taken concurrently. Mr. Cohen 

*CHEMISTRY 132b. Synthetic IVIethods 

A survey of several newer organic reactions of theoretical and synthetic interest 
including a discussion of their application, scope, specificity and mechanism. 
Prerequisites: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 131a or the equivalent. 

CHEMISTRY 141a. Advanced Physical Chemistry 

A unified introduction to chemical thermodynamics, statistical mechanics and 
elementary wave mechanics. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 or equivalent. Mr. Tuttle 

CHEMISTRY 141b. Advanced Physical Chemistry 

Continuation of Chemistry 141a. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 141a. Mr. Jordan 

*CHEMISTRY 144a. Chemical Crystallography 

Introduction to chemical crystallography including descriptive crystallography; 
theory of symmetry; structure determination by means of X-ray, neutron and 
electron diffraction. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 41 or the equivalent. 

CHEMISTRY 145b. Chemical Kinetics 

Kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical change. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 41 or equivalent. Mr. Steel 

CHEMISTRY 200. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Stag 

*CHEMISTRY 221b. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I 

Inorganic reaction mechanisms: Substitution, exchange, polymerization, redox, 
hydrolytic and solvolytic reactions; inorganic stereochemistry. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 145b. 

CHEMISTRY 222bR. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II 

Theoretical inorganic chemistry: Atomic structure and the application of 
group theory to inorganic compounds, particularly the transition metals; ligand 
field theory. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 141a; 

Corequisite: Chemistry 141b. Mr. Dorain 

Chemistry 221b and Chemistry 222b are given in alternate years. 

CHEMISTRY 230b. Advanced Organic Chemistry 

A continuation of Chemistry 131a. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 131a. Mr. Cohen 

CHEMISTRY 231c. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 

Required of graduate students in organic chemistry who must audit this 
course each year and may receive three credits after participating for two years 
and presenting two seminar talks. Messrs. Hendrickson and Stevenson 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 95 



*CHEMISTRY 232b. Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds 

A systematic survey of the principal oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur heterocycles 
of five and six membered and fused ring systems, including their synthesis, chemical 
reactions and aromatic character. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 131a. 

*CHEMISTRY 233b. Chemistry of Alkaloids 

Study of principal alkaloids belonging to the pyrrolidine, piperidine, pyr- 
rolizidine, quinolizidine, quinoline, isoquinoline and indole groups, including 
degradation, total synthesis and biogenetic relationships. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 132b. 

^CHEMISTRY 235a. The Chemistry of Natural Products I 

Structure elucidation, synthesis and biogenesis of steroids and triterpenoids. 
Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 131a and 230b or the equivalent. 

CHEMISTRY 236aR. The Chemistry of Natural Products II 

Isolation, structure elucidation, degradation, synthesis and classification of 
selected classes of natural products. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 131a and 230b or the equivalent. 

A/t" Stevenson 

CHEMISTRY 241c. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 

A seminar course. Required of graduate students in physical chemistry who 
must audit this course each year and may receive three credits after participating 
for two years and presenting two seminar talks. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 141a and 121a or 145b or the 
equivalent. Messrs. Golden and Linschitz 

^CHEMISTRY 243b. Statistical Thermodynamics 

Elementary statistical mechanics of systems in equilibrium; Boltzmann, Fermi- 
Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics; microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical 
ensembles; applications to thermodynamic systems. 

CHEMISTRY 244b. Selected Topics in Solvation Theory 

Statistical thermodynamic properties of ionic solutions; ion-solvent interac- 
tions; ion-ion interactions. Mr. Golden 

CHEMISTRY 245bR. Physical Organic Chemistry 

A quantitative discussion of rates and equilibria of organic reactions. 

Mr. Grunwald 

^CHEMISTRY 247a. Quantum Chemistry 

Quantum mechanics and applications to problems in atomic and molecular 
structure and chemical binding. 

*CHEMISTRY 248b. Topics in Quantum Theory 

Courses in Research 
CHEMISTRY 400. Organic Chemistry and Physical Organic Chemistry 

Reaction mechanisms; free radicals; photochemistry; enzyme reactions. 

Mr. Cohen 

CHEMISTRY 401. Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry of natural products; steroids, triterpenoids, lignans. Mr. Stevenson 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



96 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



CHEMISTRY 403. Organic Chemistry 

Non-benzenoid aromatics: molecular rearrangements; reaction mechanisms; or- 
ganometallics. Mr. Rosenhlum 

CHEMISTRY 404. Organic Chemistry 

Chemistr)' of natural products; stereochemistry and molecular geometry; de- 
velopment of new synthetic reactions. Mr. Hendrickson 

CHEMISTRY 405. Physical Chemistry 

Chemical kinetics of elementary reactions; statistical theory of atomic and 
molecular structure; statistical mechanics of electrolytic solutions. Mr. Golden 

CHEMISTRY 406. Physical Chemistry 

Reactions of excited molecules; luminescence; mechanism of photosynthesis; 
heavy-metal complexes. Mr. Linschitz 

CHEMISTRY 407. Physical and Inorganic Chemistry 

Electron paramagnetic resonance; solid state chemistry. Mr. Dorain 

CHEMISTRY 408. Physical Chemistry 

Electron spin resonance; structure of free radicals; diffusion in liquid solutions; 
chemistry of electrolytic solutions. Mr. Tuttle 

CHEMISTRY 409. Physical and Inorganic Chemistry 

Kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic reactions; experimental study of fast 
reactions including enzyme catalysis by the temperature-jump and other relaxation 
techniques. Mr. Kustin 

CHEMISTRY 410. Physical Chemistry 

Structure of organic and inorganic compounds by X-ray diffraction. 

Mr. Mareulis 

CHEMISTRY 411. Physical Chemistry ^ 

Chemistry of excited molecules and radicals; the kinetics and mechanisms of 
photochemical and thermal reactions. Mr. Steel 

CHEMISTRY 412. Physical and Physical Organic Chemistry 

Ultra-fast proton transfer steps in acid base reactions; dispersion forces be- 
tween adjacent molecules in liquids; lifetimes of hydrogen-bonded complexes in 
solution. Mr. Grunwald 

CHEMISTRY 413. Physical Chemistry 

Statistical mechanics; irreversible processes; theory of fluids; quantum chem- 
istry. Mr. Jordan 

Chemistry Colloquium 

Lectures by faculty and invited speakers. Required of all graduate students. 

Non-credit. 

Contemporary Jewish Studies 
Objectives 

The graduate program in Contemporary Jewish Studies offers training on 
the Master of Arts level in various disciplines relating to the history, soci- 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 97 



ology and literature of contemporary Jewry. It is designed both for stu- 
dents who intend to devote themselves to teaching and research in con- 
temporary Jewish studies and for those who plan careers in the field of 
Jewish communal and educational service. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as specified 
in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to the 
Contemporary Jewish Studies program. 

Faculty Executive Committee 

* Associate Professor Harold Weisberg, Chairman: Philosophy. 
*Professor Alexander Altmann: Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. 

Professor Nahum N. Glatzer: Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. 
**Professor Victor Harris: English and American Literature. 

Professor Robert A. Manners: Anthropology. 

Professor Abraham H. Maslow: Psychology. 

Professor Robert Morris: Social Planning. 

Professor Morris S. Schwartz: Sociology. 

Associate Professor Arnold Gurin: Social Administration. 

Associate Professor Benjamin Halpern: Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. 
**Associate Professor Marie Syrkin: English. 

Assistant Professor Bernard S. Sobel: Sociology. 

Mr. Leonard Zion: Lecturer in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 

Program of Study. The program of study leading to the degree of 
Master of Arts will consist of six half-courses (three each term), and one 
Master's paper each term in lieu of a thesis. The six half-courses must in- 
clude Contemporary Jewish Studies 105b, 160a, 160b, and 170b. The re- 
mainder of the course requirements may be fulfilled within the Contem- 
porary Jewish Studies program or, with the approval of the Committee, 
within the Departments of Anthropology, Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, 
Psychology, Sociology, or the Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies 
in Social Welfare. 

*On Leave, Fall Term. 
••On Leave, 1965-66. 



98 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



It is expected that the Master of Arts degree will be earned in one 
year; in exceptional cases two years will be allowed. 

Residence Requirement. The minimum residence requirement for the 
Master of Arts degree is one year. 

Language Requirement. The candidate must demonstrate proficiency 
in one foreign language, ordinarily Hebrew or Yiddish. 

Courses of Instruction 
CJS 103a. The Sociology of Religion 

Sociological analysis of contemporary and historical religious institutions and 
experiences. Religious leaderships and followerships; conversion; sect, denomi- 
nation and church; religion, society and politics; leading contemporary schools of 
theology. Mr. Sobel 

CJS 105b. The Sociology of Modern Anti-Semitism 

Sociological analyses of contemporary forms of anti-Semitism. Various theories, 
both past and present, attempting to explain the phenomenon will be critically 
examined. Mr. Sobel 

CJS 110b. Jewish Education: Applied Theory 

Some of the major problems of teaching in the Jewish school will be con- 
sidered along with an exploration of possible effective and creative approaches to 
them. (N.B. This is a non-credit course.) Mr. Lukinsky 

*CJS 115b. The Sociology of the American Churches 

The major sociological and theological characteristics of the American 
churches; church membership and church organization; the relationship of the 
churches to the power structure and to each other; Catholics and Jews; the "ma- 
jority" churches in a pluralistic society. 

CJS 126b. History of the Jews in Modern Times 

The emancipation of the Jews in western Europe; the Haskalah movement. 
The great migrations to the West. Renaissance of Hebrew culture. Anti-semitism. 
Zionism. Problems of contemporary Jewish life in the United States. Mr. Halpern 

CJS 160a. American Jewish Institutional History 

Social history of American Jewry from colonial times to the Second World 
War. Emphasis on the development of communal institutions. Mr. Halpern 

*CJS 165a. The American Jewish Novel 

Works of fiction dealing explicitly with Jewish themes and characters will be 
studied, beginning with Cahan's The Rise of David Levinsky to the recent work of 
Philip Roth and Bernard Malamud. The course will concentrate on changes in 
theme and literary treatment. 

*CJS 165b. The Jewish Image in World Literature 

Beginning with the Shylock stereotype, the course will concentrate on the 
complex role of Jewish figures in such writers as Joyce, Proust and Thomas Mann. 
Minor writers will also be discussed. 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 99 



*CJS 166a. Modern Jewish Intellectual History to 1870 

Jewish ideologies and movements from the Enlightenment to the rise of 
political anti-semitism. 

*CJS 166b. Modern Jewish Intellectual History Since 1870 

Jewish ideologies and movements from the rise of political anti-semitism to 
the present. 

CJS 167a. Historical Theories in Modern Jewish Thought 

This course surveys the emergence of modern Jewish historiography and its 
relationship to Jewish thought. The works of Krochmal, Zunz, Geiger, Jost, Graetz, 
Hermann Cohen and Franz Rosenzweig will be discussed. Mr. Fleischmann 

CJS 168a. Judaism and Contemporary Social Issues 

An examination of relationships of Jewish ideologies to critical problems with- 
in organized labor and management, work and leisure, community renewal, war 
and peace, church and state, public policy and individual freedom. Mr. Zion 

*CJS 170a. The Contemporary American Jewish Community 

Survey of Jewish organizational activity in the United States and Canada. 
Structure and functions of religious and philanthropic institutions. Patterns of 
co-ordination and community planning. Interrelationship of local, national, and 
international programs. Trends and problem issues in regard to demographic 
changes, Jewish identification, rationale for sectarian services, inter-group relations, 
financing. 

CJS 260b. Topics in American Jewish History 

A research seminar. Mr. Halpern 

English and American Literature 
Objectives 

The graduate program in English and American literature is designed to 
offer training in the interpretation and evaluation of literary texts with 
some attention to the related scholarly disciplines, particularly history and 
linguistics. It also offers for candidates who have some ability in writing an 
opportunity to pursue this interest as a normal part of the graduate pro- 
gram. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission should have a Bachelor's degree, preferably with 
a major in English and American literature, and a reading knowledge of 
French, Italian, German, Greek, or Latin. The general requirements for 
admission to the Graduate School, as specified in an earlier section of this 
catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this area of study. 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



100 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Faculty 

Professor Robert O. Prever, Chairmaji: Victorian literature. 

Visiting Professor Owen Barfield: Romantic and modern criticism. 

Professor J. V. Cunningham: Renaissance literature. Creative writing. 
*Professor Victor Harris: Seventeenth century literature. 

Professor Milton Hindus: American literature. Contemporary literature. 

Professor Graham Hough (as of September 1966): Nineteenth century 
literature. Contemporary literature. 

Professor Louis Kronenberger: Comparative literature. 

Visiting Professor John Lawlor: Medieval literature. Renaissance litera- 
ture. 

Professor Howard Nemerov (as of September 1966): Contemporary liter- 
ature. Creative writing. 

Professor Edwin B. Pettet: Dramatic criticism. 

Professor Philip Rahv: American literature. Criticism. 

Associate Professor Benjamin B. Hoover: Eighteenth century literature. 

Visiting Associate Prof essor John H. Smith: Renaissance literature. 

Associate Professor Peter Swiggart: American literature. 

Associate Professor Aileen Ward: Nineteenth century literature. 

Assistant Professor Barbara Gelpi: Victorian literature. 

Assistant Professor Allen Grossman: Contemporary literature. American 
literature. 

Assistant Professor S. Jay Keyser: Linguistics. Medieval literature. 

Assistant Professor Ira Konigsberg: English novel. Eighteenth century 
literature. 

Assistant Professor Alan Levitan: Renaissance literature. 

Dr. John Burt Wight: Teacher training. 

Mrs. Karen W. Klein: Medieval literature. Linguistics. 

Mr. Richard Onorato: Romantic literature. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 

Program of Study. The program of study leading to the degree of 
Master of Arts will consist of six half-courses (three a semester), and one 
Master's paper each term (290a and b). The six half-courses will normally 
include Introduction to Literary Study; at least one seminar a semester; 
Old English, Middle English, or History and Structure of the English 
Language; and may include a half-course in advanced writing. Students 
who are deficient in training will, however, in most cases need additional 
course work. 



•On Leave, 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 101 



Residence Requirement. The minimum residence requirement is one 
year, though students with inadequate preparation may require more. 

Lcmguage Reqiiirejiients. Each student must have a reading knowledge 
of a major European language, ancient Greek, or Latin. 

Qiialijying Examinations. The student must pass the written part of 
the Ph.D. qualifying examination (see below). 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. The program of study in the second year of gradu- 
ate work will consist of six half-courses. These normally will include at 
least two seminars, the English Seminar (301b), and may include a half- 
course in advanced writing. The program in the third year of doctoral 
study will normally consist of 321a and b, 322a and b, and in most cases 
311. Students who are deficient in training may require more formal course 
work. 

Language Requirements. Each 'Student must have a reading knowledge 
of two languages. He may choose to be examined in any major European 
language, ancient Greek, and Latin. 

Residence Requirement. The minimum residence requirement is one 
year beyond the Master's degree or two years beyond the Bachelor's, but 
students will normally take three or four years. 

Qualifying Examinations. The qualifying examination will consist of 
two parts, written and oral. The written examination will test the student's 
ability to interpret and evaluate a number of major texts distributed over 
the various kinds and periods of English and American literature. This 
examination will be scheduled in September and May. The oral will be 
given within the two week period following the written examination; it 
will test the student on his critical and scholarly competence with three 
major works (e.g., Hamlet, Tristam Shandy and The Prelude) of his own 
selection. During the oral, the student may also be examined on his Mas- 
ter's papers and the first part of his qualifying examination. In his third 
year of graduate study the student must pass examinations in four fields of 
English and American literature (321a and b, 322a and b). Three of these 
will be written examinations on a limited number of major authors in 
fields in which the student's formal training has been deficient. The fourth 
will be an oral on the student's entire field of specialization: the student 
will be writing his dissertation in this field and may specialize in a period 
of English or American literature, or the history of a genre. These exami- 
nations will be given on specified dates during the university examination 
periods in the Fall and Spring Terms. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student may be admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree when he has (1) completed residence requirements, (2) 



102 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



passed the qualifying examinations for the Ph.D. degree, (3) passed one 
foreign language, and (4) presented his public lecture. 

Dissertation and Defense. T^he candidate will explore with a member 
of the faculty a topic for his dissertation. He will then submit a fonnal 
proposal to the chairman of the department, who will appoint a committee 
to confer with the student, and approve, modify, or reject the proposal. 

Finally, the candidate must submit an acceptable monograph or some 
comparable contribution to learning, on a topic and in a form approved by 
the committee at his thesis conference, and must defend it at a final oral 
examination. 

Courses of Instruction 

In addition to the following courses, graduate students in English and 
American Literature, with the permission of the chairman of the depart- 
ment, may take for credit any Humanities and Comparative Literature 
courses in the 100 series. For description of such courses refer to the under- 
graduate catalog. 

ENGLISH 121a and b. Old English 

An introduction to Old English grammar, with special attention to the rapid 
attainment of skill in reading. Texts of prose and the shorter poems will be read 
in the first semester; Beowulf in the second semester. Mrs. Klein 

ENGLISH 122a. The Medieval Lyric 

The development of lyric poetry in England, France and Germany in the 
Middle Ages, with special attention to the Middle English lyric. Mrs. Klein 

*ENGLISH 142b. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama 

A survey of English drama from 1590 to 1640. 

ENGLISH 145b. English Religious Poetry in the Seventeenth Century 

A study of the religious poetry of Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, Traherne, Cra- 
shaw, Marvell, and including the early poems of Milton. Mr. Grossman 

ENGLISH 150b. The Classical Background of English Literature Mr. Mueller 

ENGLISH 155a. Romantic Poetry Mr. Onorato 

ENGLISH 172a. The Nineteenth Century Novel Mr. Preyer 
*ENGLISH 173a. The English Novel, 20th Century: British, 1930-1960 

Waugh, Greene, Powell, Snow, Golding, Murdock, Amis, and others. 

ENGLISH 180b. Continuity and Change in Modern Literature Mr. Rahv 
*ENGLISH 185a. The Literature of Transition: Classical to Romantic 

ENGLISH 187a. History of Criticism: Plato to Dryden Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH 188b. History of English Criticism: Romantic and Modern Mr. Barfield 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 



103 



ENGLISH 192b. History and Structure of the English Language 

A study of the linguistic structure of modern English and of the historical 
processes through which it developed. Mr. Keyser 

ENGLISH 201a. Introduction to Literary Study Mr. Hoover 

Pro-Seminars 

Pro-seminars, numbered between 202 and 210, are courses designed for 
graduate students to enable them to make up deficiencies in various fields 
and subjects, and prepare them for seminar work. 

ENGLISH 204b. Pro-Seminar in Medieval Drama Mr. Lawlor 

ENGLISH 205a. Pro-Seminar in Elizabethan Drama Mr. Levitan 

ENGLISH 206a. Pro-Seminar in Eighteenth Century Poetry Mr. Konigsberg 

ENGLISH 207b. Pro-Seminar in the Nineteenth Century: Romantic Poetry and Criticism 

A survey of the poetry and criticism of the period, focused on the major 
poets. Miss Ward 

ENGLISH 208b. Pro-Seminar in Victorian Prose Mrs. Gelpi 

Seminars 
ENGLISH 212b. Seminar in the Novel 

An investigation qi the theory and technique of the novel 

ENGLISH 213a. Seminar in Criticism 

Literary criticism in America: Poe to Wilson. 

ENGLISH 215a. Seminar in Renaissance Literature 

Tudor prose and poetry, More to Donne and Jonson. 

ENGLISH 215b. Seminar in Renaissance Literature 

ENGLISH 216b. Seminar in the Eighteenth Century Novel 

ENGLISH 217a. Seminar in Romantic Poetry: William Blake 

ENGLISH 217b. Seminar in the Romantic Period 

Coleridge and the Imagination. 

ENGLISH 218a. Seminar in the Victorian Novel 
ENGLISH 219a. Seminar in the American Novel 

Hawthorne, James, and Faulkner. 

ENGLISH 261a. Seminar in Anglo-Irish Literature 

Yeats, Synge, and Joyce. 

ENGLISH 290a and b. Directed Research 

Candidates for the Master's degree will enroll in this course for two semesters. 

Miss Ward and Mr. Konigsberg 



Mr. Konigsberg 

Mr. Rahv 

Mr. Cunningham 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Hoover 

Miss Ward 

Mr. Barfield 
Mr. Preyer 

Mr. Swiggart 
Mr. Grossman 



104 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



ENGLISH 301b. The English Seminar 

Each student will deliver a fifty minute public lecture. 

Required of second year candidates for the doctoral degree. Mr. Hoover 

ENGLISH 311. Seminar in Teaching 

For Teaching Assistants in English. Non-credit. Messrs. Wight and Swiggart 

ENGLISH 321a and b. Earlier English Literature 

Special fields. 

Required of third year candidates for the doctoral degree. 

Messrs. Hoover and Grossman 

ENGLISH 322a and b. Later English Literature and American Literature 

Special fields. 

Required of third year candidates for the doctoral degree. 

Mr. Swiggart and Miss Ward 

ENGLISH 400a and b. Research staff 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 102a and b. Directed Writing: Poetry Mrs. stone 

HUMANITIES 65b. Existentialism and European Fiction 

Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus and Kafka. Mr. Siuiggart 

History of American Civilization 
Objectives 

The graduate program in the History of American Civilization, leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History, has been designed to train 
scholars and teachers with both intensity and breadth. Historical in em- 
phasis and organization, the curriculum will reach out into other disci- 
plines such as political science, economics, philosophy, literature, psychol- 
ogy, and sociology for insights and techniques that illuminate the Ameri- 
can experience. A small, select student body will work in close cooperation 
with the faculty, and a great deal of reliance will be placed on the devel- 
opment of individual programs of study. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of the catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
area of study. Normally, the student's undergraduate curriculum should 
include some fundamental courses in American history, politics, or litera- 
ture, but need not show a concentration ih American studies. Applicants 
are required to take the Graduate Record Examination. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 105 



Faculty 

Executive Committee: Professor Morton Keller, Chairman; Professors 
Raymond S. Ginger, Leonard W. Levy, Marvin Meyers, John P. 
Roche. 
Staff: 

*Professor Lawrence H. Fuchs: Political institutions. Ethnic studies. 
Professor Raymond S. Ginger: Economic and social history. Reform 

movements. 
Professor Everett C. Hughes: Educational sociology. Sociology of occupa- 
tions. Sociology of race relations. 
Professor Morton Keller: Political history. Entrepreneurial history. 
Professor Max Lerner: Social institutions. Political economy. Contem- 
porary history. 
*Professor Leonard W. Levy: Constitutional history, the South. Colonial 
period. 
Professor. Norton Long: Social theory. Urban studies. 
Professor Marvin Meyers: Intellectual history. The early republic. 
Professor Philip Rahv: American and comparative literature. 
*Professor John P. Roche: Political theory. Constitutional history. Con- 
temporary history. 
Associate Professor Peter Swiggart: American literature. 
Assistant Professor Jerold Auerbach: Recent history. Labor history. 
Assistant Professor David H. Fischer: Early American history. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 

No one will be accepted in the program who is not a doctoral candi- 
date. However, the M.A. degree in History may be awarded after comple- 
tion of twenty-four course credits, the oral qualifying examination, and 
demonstration of proficiency in one foreign language. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. Doctoral candidates must complete two years in resi- 
dence at Brandeis, and a minimum of forty-eight course credits. The Com- 
mittee may, at its discretion, grant a student transfer credit of up to one 
year toward the Ph.D. residence requirement for work done elsewhere; 
application for such credit shall be considered only after a student has com- 
pleted one semester's residence in a full-time program. 

Language requirement. A high level of reading proficiency in one 
foreign language is required of all Ph.D. candidates. 

•On Leave, 1965-66. 



106 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Qiialifying Examination. Each doctoral candidate must be prepared 
for examination in the following fields: American history (with specializa- 
tion in one period); an area of modern European history; a related disci- 
pline in the social sciences or the humanities. Programs of study and con- 
centration will be formulated for each student, subject to the approval of 
the Executive Committee. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student may be admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree upon satisfactory completion of the following: course and 
residence requirements, demonstration of a high level of proficiency in one 
foreign language, and a general qualifying examination. 

Dissertation and Defense. The candidate will be required to prepare a 
prospectus for his dissertation to be submitted for approval to the Commit- 
tee. When the dissertation is accepted by the committee, a final oral exami- 
nation will be scheduled at which the candidate must successfully defend 
his dissertation before the Committee and other members of the faculty 
who may participate. After a candidate has successfully defended his dis- 
sertation, he will give a public lecture. 

Courses of Instruction 
*HISTORY 150b. The Age of the Democratic Revolution 1760-1830 
HISTORY 151a. American Colonial and Revolutionary History 

An investigation of three selected topics in early American history; the Puri- 
tans in seventeenth century New England; political, economic, social, religious and 
cultural development in eighteenth century America; the American Revolution. 

Mt FischcT 

HISTORY 151b. The New Republic 

A study of five problems in American history, 1788-1815; the development of 
nationalism and sectionalism; the growth of political democracy; foreign affairs; 
economic expansion; and the transition from the Enlightenment to Romanticism. 

Mr. Fischer 

HISTORY 152b. Jacksonian Democracy 

An examination of the interpretations of democratic society and politics in 
the Jacksonian era, from Tocqueville to the present. Mr. Meyers 

*HISTORY 154a. The Rise of Modern America 
HISTORY 154b. Modern America 

Significant historical developments in the United States since 1914; business 
and economic, political, constitutional, diplomatic, social and intellectual. 

Mr. Ginger 

*HISTORY 156a. History of American Constitutional Law and Theory 
*HISTORY 156b. History of American Constitutional Law and Theory 
*HISTORY 157b. American Industrial Growth 



*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 107 



HISTORY 160. American Education 

Within the Hmits of American history, education is broadly conceived as the 
transmission of culture from Europe to the new world and from an agrarian 
colonial society to urban, industrial America. Emphasis is placed upon the family 
as an educational institution. Mr. Fischer 

HISTORY 164. History of American Political Institutions to 1865 

An examination of American politics that stresses its relationship to the 
culture at large. Mr. Keller 

*AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 170b. Americans Overseas 

^AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 172a. The Presidency and the People 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 200a. Pro-Seminar: An Introduction to the History of 

American Civilization Mr. Fischer 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 252a. Seminar on the Problems in the History of 

American Thought: The Early Republic Mr. Meyers 

*AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 254a. Seminar on the United States in the 
Twentieth Century 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 254b. Seminar on the History of American Institutions: 

The Gilded Age Mr. Keller 

^AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 256a. Seminar on American Constitutional History: 
The Bill of Rights 

*AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 256b. Seminar on American Constitutional History: 
The Fourteenth Amendment 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 258b. Seminar on American Industrial Growth Mr. Ginger 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 300. Readings in the History of American Civilization staff 

Students may also draw from course listings in Anthropology, English and 
American Literature, Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, Philosophy and Sociology. 
Other courses relevant to the program include the following: 

ECONOMICS 170a. Monetary and Fiscal Policy 

The role of monetary and fiscal pohcy in achieving economic goals of the 
United States. Existing institutions and proposed reforms are studied. Mr. Hartman 

FINE ARTS 122. American Painting and Architecture 

An historical, philosophical interpretation of American painting and architec- 
ture from the beginning to the present. Mr. de Leiris 

POLITICS 121a. Problems in Community Government 

An examination of the evolution and problems of state, local, and regional 
governmental units. Mr. Long 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



108 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



POLITICS 121b. Seminar in Community Government 

Prerequisite: Politics 121a. Mr. Long 

POLITICS 128a. Public Administration and Public Policy 

A study of the dynamics and problems of policy formation and administration 
in the Federal government. Mr. Woll 

POLITICS 152a. Political Parties 

The role of political parties in the governmental process. The modern mass 
party contrasted with electoral and legislative parties. Party structure— organiza- 
tion, membership and leadership— will be examined with particular reference to 
social bases. Mr. Nordlinger 

POLITICS 152b. Methodology of Political Science 

The theory and method of political analysis, with special attention to the 
logic of explanation, empirical theories, models, and the role of values. Mr. Meehan 

POLITICS 154b. Seminar in Government Planning 

The theory and practice of modern government planning. The problems of 
planning in a democracy. Democracy and the role of the expert. Mr. Long 

*POLITICS 170a. American Political Thought 
*POLITICS 170b. American Political Thought 
POLITICS 172a. Contemporary Europe: Problems in Politics, Arms, Culture and Society 

Currents and problems of contemporary Europe: the struggle to give political 
direction to Western Europe; movements toward economic, military and political 
integration; the cultural unities in European history and the new European society 
in their bearing on Europe's future; critical evaluation of a "United States of 
Europe," an Atlantic partnership, a "Europe de Patrie," a single Europe based on 
an East-West detente. Mr. Lerner 

POLITICS 197a. Contemporary Political Theory 

A systematic analysis of contemporary problems in political theory. Mr. Meehan 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 400. Dissertation Research ' Mr. Keller and Staff 



History of Ideas 
Objectives 

The program in the History of Ideas, leading to the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in History, aims to prepare historians of 
thought in two areas: (1) the History of Philosophy^ in relation to ideas in 
cognate fields of thought (religion, science, literature); and (2) the History 
of Political and Social Thought, in relation to political and social develop- 
ments. 



•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 109 



The endeavor throughout is to examine the interrelations of ideas in 
various discipHnes, the interconnections between theoretical and practical 
activities, and the reciprocal influence of ideas and historical events. 

A student trained in the program is expected to have a good general 
grasp of the history of philosophy and of the history of political and social 
thought; a special competence in dealing systematically as well as histor- 
ically with major texts and problems in either the history of philosophy or 
the history of political and social thought; and a familiarity with the 
general history of the period in which he is concentrating. 

Admission 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School specified in an earlier section of this catalog, applicants who wish to 
specialize in the History of Philosophy should present an undergraduate 
major in philosophy or classics; applicants who plan to specialize in the 
History of Political and Social Thought should present an undergraduate 
major in political science, sociology, or history. 

Faculty 

Executive Committee: Associate Professor Peter Diamandopoulos, Chair- 
man; Professors Henry David Aiken, Lewis A. Coser, Nahum N. 
Glatzer, Norton Long, Stephen Toulmin; Associate Professors 
Heinz M. Lubasz, Frederic Sommers. 

Staff: 

Professor Henry David Aiken: Ethics. American philosophy. Social phi- 
losophy. 
*Professor Alexander Altmann: History of Jewish philosophy and mysti- 
cism. Medieval philosophy. 
*Professor David Berkowitz: Historiography. 

Professor Lewis A. Coser: Political sociology. Sociological theory. 

Professor Nahum N. Glatzer: Jewish history. Hebrew historiography. 
Eschatology. 

Professor Cyrus H. Gordon: Cuneiform. Egypto-Semitic, and Mediterra- 
nean studies. 

Professor Norton Long: Community government. 

Professor Morris S. Schwartz: Social psychology. Applied sociology. So- 
cial psychiatry. 

Professor Stephen Toulmin: Philosophy of science. History of science. 

Professor John van Heijenoort: Logic. History of logic. 

•On Leave, Fall Term. 



110 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 

Professor Kurt H. Wolff: Sociological theory. Sociology of knowledge. 

Associate Professor Peter Diamandopoulos: History of ancient philoso- 
phy. History of science. 

Associate Professor Heinz M. Lubasz: German intellectual history. 

Associate Professor Ramsay MacMullen: Ancient history. 

Associate Professor Eugene J. Meehan: Political theory. 

Associate Professor David Neiman: Biblical studies. Ancient Near East. 

Associate Professor Frederic Sommers: Philosophy of language. Metaphys- 
ics. History of philosophy. 

Associate Professor Maurice R. Stein: Communities. Sociology of litera- 
ture. Social psychiatry. 

Associate Professor Harold Weisberg: Philosophy of the social sciences. 
Social philosophy. Philosophy of religion. 

Assistant Professor Kenneth Barkin: Modern European history. 
Assistant Professor Daniel C. Bennett: Philosophy of mind. History of 
philosophy. Social philosophy. 

Assistant Professor Thomas Hegarty: Russian history. 

Assistant Professor Aryeh L. Motzkin: Arabic language and literature. 
History of Islam. 

Assistant Professor Gerasimos X. Santas: History of ancient philosophy. 
Ethics. 

Assistant Professor Bernard Z. Sobel: Sociology of religion. Sociology of 
the Jews. 

Dr. Eugene J. Fleischmann: Jewish philosophy. 

Degree Requirements 

All programs of study will be worked out in consultation with the 
student's adviser. 

Master of Arts 

Program of Study. The program for the Master of Arts consists of eight 
half-courses which are to be distributed among the various groups indi- 
cated below as follows: 

1. Introduction to the History of Ideas (Group I) two half-courses. 

2. History of Philosophy or History of Political and Social Thought 
(Group II) three half-courses. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 111 



3. Systematic Analysis (Group III) two half-courses: 

a. For students concentrating in the History of Philosophy, two half- 
courses in Philosophy. 

b. For students concentrating in the History of Political and Social 
Thought, two half-courses in Sociology or Politics. 

4. One half-course in History (Group IV): one half-course in the his- 
tory of the period in which the student is concentrating. This re- 
quirement must be met with a reading course when no formal 
course has been offered. 

Language Requirement. A proficient reading knowledge of either 
French or German is required. The examination must be taken no later 
than the second term of the first year in residence. Students who fail the 
examination may apply for re-examination at the end of the third term in 
residence. Failure to pass the language examination at this time will result 
in severance from the program. 

Qualifying Examinations. To qualify for the Master's degree, the can- 
didate must: 

1. By May 1 of his first year in residence, submit to the chairman a sub- 
stantial paper on a topic upon which he has concentrated during the 
year; 

2. Pass one of the following three qualifying examinations: 

a. A three-hour written examination in general and intellectual his- 
tory of the period in which he is concentrating (ancient, medieval, 
early modern or later modern). 

b. A three-hour written examination in a systematic area within the 
fields of philosophy, political theory, sociology or one of the natural 
sciences. 

c. A three-hour written examination in either the History of Philos- 
ophy or the History of Political and Social Thought or the History 
of Scientific Thought. 

Students whose course work, research paper and qualifying examination 
are considered satisfactory will be recommended for the award of the Mas- 
ter's degree. Only those students whose work is outstanding will be permitted 
to continue toward the Ph.D. degree. 

A candidate who fails the qualifying examination may take it again in 
September of the second year in residence. 

Doctor of Philosophy 
To be eligible to continue study toward the Ph.D. degree, the student must 
complete course work for the Master's degree with distinction (B-|- or 
higher), he must pass the three qualifying examinations listed above with 



112 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



distinction, and, in the judgment of the History of Ideas Executive Com- 
mittee, he must have demonstrated a capacity for independent specialized 
work in the area of his choice. 

Prograrn of Study. The student must complete at least eight half- 
courses beyond the program of study for the Master's degree. They must be 
chosen from the following areas: 

l.Four half-courses in the History of Philosophy or in the History of 
Political and Social Thought (Group II). 

2. One half-course in Systematic Analysis (Philosophy, Politics or Soci- 
ology) (Group III). 

3. One half-course in History (Group IV). 

4. Two half-courses in electives (Group V). 

Language Requirements. Proficiency in reading both French and Ger- 
man is required of all doctoral candidates. Examinations in both languages 
will be given at the beginning of each term. The examination in the stu- 
dent's second language must be taken not later than the beginning of the 
fifth term in residence, however, students are strongly urged to take it at an 
earlier date. Students who fail to pass the examination at a date earlier than 
the fifth term may apply for re-examination at the beginning of the fifth 
term. Failure to pass the second language examination within the pre- 
scribed time limits will render the student ineligible for further study in 
the program. 

Students who intend to do research in a field requiring a language 
other than French or German may, with the approval of the Chairman of 
the Executive Committee, substitute this language for either French or 
German. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student may be admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree when (1) he has passed the Master's qualifying exami- 
nations with distinction, (2) he has satisfactorily completed one year's resi- 
dence beyond the M.A. program, (3) he has completed a second language 
examination, and (4) the subject of his dissertation has been approved by 
the Executive Committee. 

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination. The dissertation will be 
accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in 
consultation with the student's adviser and after a majority approval by a 
committee of readers appointed by the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee. One member of this committee shall be from either the Philosophy 
or Sociology Department. 

An oral defense of the dissertation must be given before an examining 
committee including members from the History of Ideas Program, the De- 
partments of Philosophy, Politics, Sociology, and History. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 113 

Courses of Instruction 

Group I Introduction to the History of Ideas 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 200a. Historical Transformation of Ideas: The Character of 
Intellectual Revolutions 

The internal development of intellectual systems; the dynamics of intellectual 
growth, as reflecting the aims and methods of systematic inquiry. Mr. Toulmin 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 200b. The Historical Interpretation of Ideas: The Idea of 
Nature in Ancient Greece 

An intensive study of selected texts from the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, 
and the early Stoics dealing with the concept of nature. Mr. Diamandopoulos 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 201a. The Role of Ideas in General History: 

Intellectual History of the French Revolution Mr. Lubasz 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 201b. Philosophy and Ideology: Conceptions of Morals, 
Society and the State in the Nineteenth Century 

Special topics to be arranged in consultation with the instructor. Mr. Aiken 

Group II History of Philosophical and Scientific Thought and History of 
Social and Political Thought 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 210a. Pre-Socratic Philosophy 

An intensive study of the fragments of the Pre-Socratics. A study of the transi- 
tion from myth to philosophy. Mr. Diamandopoulos 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 211a. Plato 

An introduction to Plato's thought through an intensive reading of several 
major dialogues. Among the topics discussed will be the Socratic method, Socratic 
and Platonic ethics, Plato's conception of the soul, knowledge and existence. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 212b. Aristotle ^'' ^''"'''' 

Lectures on Aristotle's views on Knowledge, Being, the Cosmos, the Soul, and 
human life. Extensive reading from Organon, Metaphysics, Physics, De Anima, 
Ethics and Politics will be required. Messrs. Diamandopoulos and Sommers 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 216b. Introduction to Islamic Philosophy 

The rise of Greek philosophy among the Arabs. Farabi, Avicenna, Ghazzali, 
Averroes. Selection in translation will be read and discussed. Mr. Motzkin 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 217b. Medieval Jewish Philosophy 

A survey of the various phases of Jewish philosophy from the 10th century 
until the Renaissance. Mr. Altmann 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 218b. Readings in Medieval Jewish Philosophy Mr. Altmann 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 220b. Continental Rationalism: The Philosophy of Descartes 

An intensive study of selected texts from Descartes, Spinoza and Leibnitz. 



•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



114 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



HISTORY OF IDEAS 221a. Spinoza 

A presentation of the major trends in Spinoza's thought, his ethics, pohtics 
and criticism of religion. Mr. Fleischmann 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 222b. British Empiricism 

Intensive study of selected texts from Locke, Berkeley and Hume. Mr. Weisberg 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 223b. Kant 

Intensive study of the basic concepts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and 
their subsequent development in German idealism. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 225a. Seminar in Ancient Philosophy Mr. Santas 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 225b. Seminar in Modern Philosophy 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 226b. Seminar on the History of Logic Mr. van Heijenoort 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 227a. The Idea of Historical Development 

Transformations in ideas about the antiquity, and the patterns of change of 
society and of nature, with special reference to the period 1700-1875. Mr. Toulmin 

^HISTORY OF IDEAS 229a. History of American Philosophy 

An historical survey and analysis of the pragmatic tradition in American 
philosophy. Selected texts of Peirce, James, Dewey and C. I. Lewis will be dis- 
cussed. 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 235a. Problems in Sixteenth Century Political Theory 
*HISTORY OF IDEAS 236a. Classical Political Theory 
HISTORY OF IDEAS 237a. Contemporary Political Theory 

A systematic analysis of contemporary problems in political theory. Mr. Meehan 

^HISTORY OF IDEAS 241a. Social Causation 

The nature and significance of causal inquiry, especially into social phenom- 
ena. Explanation, understanding, interpretation. Case study and generalization. 
Social causation and social change. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 242. Classical Sociological Theory 

Study of major sociologists, such as Comte, Spencer, Marx, Durkheim, Pareto, 
Weber, Simmel, Ward, Ross, Sumner, Park, Mannheim, in their historical setting, 
with special attention to their substantive concerns and methodologies. 

1st sem., Mr. Stein 
2nd sem., Mr. Coser 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 243a. Advanced History of Sociological Theory 

Sociological theory from the late 18th century to the present. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 115 



*HISTORY OF IDEAS 245a. Ideology and Social Movements 

Effect of political events and social processes on political thought and action 
in the twentieth century. Social functions of political ideologies. Structure and 
orientation of organizations intending to cause social change. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 246b. Aspects of Social Control in Religious and Secular 
Utopian Movements 

An analysis of the sociological structure of Utopian communities demonstrat- 
ing similarities and differences between the secular and religious types and their 
relationships to the broader societal contexts from which they emerge. The course 
will emphasize a discussion of the modes and processes of social control developed 
by the various movements. Messrs. Schwartz, Seeley and Stein 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 247b. The Social Context of Natural Science 

The interaction between intellectual systems and the social environment; the 
importance of rational factors on the dynamics of intellectual growth. Mr. Toulmin 

Group III Systematic Courses in Philosophy, Politics, Sociology 
HISTORY OF IDtAS 250b. Intermediate Logic 

Informal and axiomatic development of quantification theory. Notions of 
consequence, theorem, proof. Semantics of quantification, semantical completeness 
of the theory. Naive set theory, the nature of formal systems. Mr. van Heijenoort 

^HISTORY OF IDEAS 251b. Ethical Theory 

An examination of the main types of contemporary ethical theories, including 
naturalism, intuitionism, and emotivism. Analysis of ethical concepts. Elements of 
normative systems. Varieties of relativism. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 252a. Theory of Knowledge 

Such questions as the nature of truth, the reliability of sense perception, and 
the problem of a priori knowledge will be discussed. Mr. Bennett 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 252b. Metaphysics 

An examination of ontological categories, their structure and formation. 

Mr. Sommers 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 253b. Philosophy and the Idea of Nature 

The roots of philosophical problems in natural science, with particular refer- 
ence to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Mr. Toulmin 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 256a. Social and Political Philosophy 

The problem of justifying social and political beliefs, including a critical 
examination of leading attempts to justify such beliefs by appeal to history, 
natural law, human nature and theology. Mr. Bennett 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 256b. Seminar in the Philosophy of History and the Social Sciences 
HISTORY OF IDEAS 257b. Methodology and Political Science 

The theory and method of political analysis, with special attention to the 
logic of explanation, empirical theories, models and the role of values. Mr. Meehan 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



116 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



HISTORY OF IDEAS 258b. Seminar in Problems of Government Planning 

The theory and factors of modern government planning. The problems of the 
organization and the planning process. Mr. Long 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 260a. Sociology of Knowledge 

History and historical interpretation of the sociology of knowledge, with par- 
ticular emphasis on German and recent American literature. Mr. Wolff 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 261b. Sociology of Literature 

The relations between society and literary forms in selected historical periods. 
Emphasis on the relations between problems and methods in inquiry as presented 
by sociological and humanistic students of man. Mr. Stein 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 262a. Sociology of Religion 

Sociological analysis of contemporary and historical religious institutions and 
experiences. Religious leadership and followership; conversion; sect, denomina- 
tion, and church; religion, society and politics; leading contemporary schools of 
theology. Mr. Sobel 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 263b. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 

Sociological aspects of sociology. Relations between philosophical and method- 
ological problems of sociology. Conditions of constructing sociological theory. 

Major background readings for student papers: Maurice Natanson, ed.. Phi- 
losophy of the Social Sciences; Alfred Schutz, Collected Papers, Vols. I and II. 

Mr. Wolff 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 265a or b. Readings in Sociological Theory and History 

Mr. Schwartz and Staff 

Group IV Institutional History 
HISTORY 106a. The Changing Greek City-State 

Reading of sources, especially Thucydides, with modern commentary, covering 
the period 431 to 323 B.C. (Pro-seminar.) Mr. MacMullen 

HISTORY 107b. Studies in the Decline of the Roman Empire 

Intensive study of government, society, and culture of the fourth century. 

Mr. MacMullen 

*HISTORY 123a. Europe in the Early Middle Ages 

*HISTORY 123b. Europe in the Later Middle Ages 

*HISTORY 128. The Renaissance and Reformation in Europe 

HISTORY 129b. The Renaissance and Reformation in Sixteenth Century England 

The development of institutions and outlooks in sixteenth century England 
under the impact of Renaissance and Reformation currents. Mr. Berkowitz 

HISTORY 134a. History of Europe 1789-1848 

This course surveys European history from the French Revolution to the mid- 
nineteenth century. It stresses the changes which followed the revolution and the 
different national forms. Mr. Barkin 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 117 



HISTORY 134b. History of Europe: 1848-1914 

This course surveys European history from 1848 to the first World War and 
emphasizes the quest for political, economic and social stability in the major 
European states. Mr. Barkin 

HISTORY 143a. History of Russia to 1825 

Pro-Slavic developments, the establishment of the Kievan state, invasion and 
internal decline; appanage Russia and the rise of regional centers, Muscovite 
Russia and the growth of the autocracy and Imperial Russia and the impact of 
Western Europe. Mr. Hegarty 

HISTORY 143b. History of Russia: 1825 to the Present 

Russian Rechtstaat at its height. Modernization of Russia; Russian industrial- 
ization under the Romanovs; roots of the Russian revolution; early Bolshevik state; 
NEP and the rise of Stalin; collectivization and industrialization; Soviet foreign 
policy and international Communism; the Khrushchev era and prospects for the 
future. Mr. Hegarty 

*HISTORY 144b. Modern Britain: 1867 to the Present 
HISTORY 145a. History of Germany: 1848-1945 

The economic, political and diplomatic history of Germany inclusive of 
Austria-Hungary from the revolution of 1848 to the collapse of National Socialism 
in 1945. Mr. Barkin 

HISTORY 145b. The Weimar Republic 

A seminar dealing with economic, political and intellectual developments 
between World War I and the assumption of office by Hitler. Mr. Barkin 

Group V General Intellectual History 
HISTORY OF IDEAS 270a. History of the Mediterranean from 3000 to 300 B.C. 

The lectures will follow the sequence of topics in C. H. Gordon's The Ancient 
Near East (1965), with constant reference to the published fascicles of the new 
edition of Cambridge Ancient History. Mr. Gordon 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 271b. The Book of Job and the Problem of Evil 

A reading of the Book of Job (in English translation) and a discussion of the 
role of the book in the literature and thought of the Western world; the problem 
of evil in Judaism and Christianity. Mr. Glatzer 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 273. Intellectual History of Europe 

European thought in its social and political context. Lectures and reading of 
selected texts. Mr. Lubasz 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 277b. Social and Intellectual History of Russia 

The impact of Western European thought on Russian intellectuals including 
Radischchev, Chaadaev, Belinsky, Herzen, Pisarev, Mikhaelovsky and Plekhanov. 

Mr. Hegarty 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 279. Modern Jewish Intellectual History 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



118 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



HISTORY OF IDEAS 280b. History of Historical Literature and Historical Method 

Lectures, readings and reports dealing with the development of the practice of 
historical investigation, the problem of historical method, and the contemporary 
modes of historical expression. Mr. Berkoioitz 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 300. Readings in the History of Ideas staff 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 400. Dissertation Research 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 

400. Mr. Altmann 

401. Mr. Berkowitz 

402. Mr. Coser 

403. Mr. Diamandopoulos 

404. Mr. Lubasz 

405. Mr. Weisherg 



Mathematics 
Objectives 

The graduate program in mathematics is designed primarily to lead to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. The formal course work is devoted to giving 
the student a broad foundation for work in modern pure mathematics. An 
essential part of the program consists of seminars on a variety of topics 
of current interest in which mathematicians from greater Boston often 
participate. In addition, the Brandeis-Harvard-M.I.T. Mathematics Collo- 
quium gives the student an opportunity to hear the current work of emi- 
nent mathematicians from all over the world. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to graduate work in mathematics 
are the same as those for the Graduate School as a whole. The department 
has available a variety of fellowships and scholarships for well qualified 
students. To be considered for such financial support the student should 
submit application by February 1, 1965. 

Faculty 

Professor Joseph J. Kohn, Chairman: Analysis and Differential Geometry. 

Professor Maurice Auslander: Algebra and Homological Algebra. 
*Professor Edgar H. Brown, Jr.: Algebraic Topology. 
*Professor David A. Buchsbaum: Algebra and Homological Algebra. 
** Professor Teruhisa Matsusaka: Algebraic Geometry. 

•On Leave, 1965-66. 
**On Leave, Fall Term, 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 119 



Professor Richard S. Palais: Differential Topology. 
Associate Professor William L. Hoyt: Algebraic Geometry. 
Associate Professor Harold I. Levine: Algebraic Topology. 
* Associate Professor Hugo Rossi: Analysis. 
Associate Professor Robert T. Seeley: Analysis. 
Assistant Professor Alphonse Vasquez: Algebraic Topology. 
Dr. William Hammond: Algebraic Geometry. 

Dr. Thomas Sherman: Topological Groups and Group Representations. 
Dr. Weishu Shih: Differential Topology. 
Dr. Michael Spivak: Algebraic Topology. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 

1. One year's residence as a full-time student. 

2. Successful completion of an approved schedule of courses. 

3. Satisfactory performance on the General Examination which is normally 
taken by all degree students at the beginning of their second year. 

4. Proficiency in reading French or German. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1 . Residence as a full-time student for two years. 

2. Successful completion of an approved schedule of courses. 

3. Superior performance on the General Examination. 

4. Doctoral dissertation approved by the department. 

5. Final examination consisting of the defense of dissertation. 

6. Proficiency in reading both French and German. 

Program of Study. Each student must complete a schedule of courses 
approved by his adviser. The normal first year of study consists of Mathe- 
matics 101, 111, and 121. Students are expected to attend seminars of their 
choice in addition to Mathematics 199 which is required. The first year's 
work should be followed by three courses in the 200 series. After the second 
year, advanced courses, seminars and independent reading are offered to 
prepare the student for work on a dissertation. 

General Examination. After successful completion of his first year 
courses, the student must pass a written examination and participate in a 
seminar in his second year. 

The written examination will be given in October and March. It will 
cover the material of the syllabi; these lists of topics and references in 
algebra, analysis and topology will be distributed to the students at the 
beginning of their first year. 

•On Leave, 1965-66. 



120 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



In the summer after his first year, each student will prepare a topic in 
mathematics, which he will present in a seminar during his second year. 
The topics chosen will be more advanced than those in the syllabi and 
must be approved by the faculty. 

Admission to Candidacy. To be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. 
degree in Mathematics, the student must demonstrate a superior perform- 
ance on the General Examination and must be recommended for candidacy 
by the department. 

Dissertation and Defense. The doctoral degree will be awarded only 
after the submission and acceptance of an approved dissertation and after 
the successful defense of that dissertation. 

Courses of Instruction 

The 100, 200, and 300 courses meet three hours per week for the entire 
year and carry six credits. The seminar courses meet one hour per week 
and are non-credit courses. 

MATHEMATICS 101a and b. Algebra I 

Groups, rings, fields, Galois theory, representations and modules. 

Mr. Auslander 

MATHEMATICS Ilia and b. Analysis I 

Fundamental existence theorems for several real variables, manifolds and 
Riemann surfaces. Mr. Seeley 

MATHEMATICS 121a and b. Point Set Topology 

Set theory, topological spaces, function spaces and covering spaces. 

Mr. Vasquez 

MATHEMATICS 140. Analysis 

Real numbers, metric spaces, Weierstrasse approximation theorem, fundamen- 
tal existence theorems, implicit function theorem, complex variables and Fourier 
theory. To be announced 

MATHEMATICS 199. Problem Seminar 

A seminar required of all first year graduate students. Staff 

MATHEMATICS 201. Algebra 11 

Function fields and commutative rings. Mr. Hoyt 

*MATHEMATICS 202a and b. Algebraic Geometry I 

Introduction to algebraic geometry. 

*MATHEMATICS 203a and b. Algebraic Number Theory I 

Ideal class group, Dirichlet's units theorem, L-function, Galois cohomology, 
local and global class field theory. 

^MATHEMATICS 204a or b. Homological Algebra I 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 



121 



*MATHEMATICS 211. Analysis II 

Singular integral operator on L^ spaces, for Euclidean space and for mani- 
folds, with applications to the study of elliptic partial differential equations on 
manifolds with or without boundary. 

*MATHEMATICS 212a. Functional Analysis 

Topological vector spaces, Banach spaces, compact operators, integral equa- 
tions, distributions. 

*MATHEMATICS 212b. Harmonic Analysis 

Elementary Banach algebras, topological groups, Plancherel theorem, Pontry- 
agin duality, group representations. 

MATHEMATICS 213a and b. Harmonic Integrals 

The purpose of this course is to study representations of various cohomology 
theories by solutions of systems of partial differential equations. The course pre- 
supposes only the first year courses. It will contain an introduction to elliptic 
systems, calculus of variations, boundary value problems and related topics. 

Mr. Kohn 

MATHEMATICS 221a and b. Algebraic Topology I 

Sheaves, homology theory, and homotopy theory. Mr. Shih 

*MATHEMATICS 222. Differential Geometry 

Introduction to differentiable manifolds. 



MATHEMATICS 291. Algebra Seminar 

MATHEMATICS 292. Analysis Seminar 

MATHEMATICS 293. Topology Seminar 

MATHEMATICS 301a. Homological Algebra 

*MATHEMATICS 302a and b. Algebraic Geometry II 

^MATHEMATICS 303a and b. Algebraic Number Theory II 

*MATHEMATICS 311a or b. Fourier Analysis 

*MATHEMATICS 312a. Selected Topics in Complex Variables 

*MATHEMATICS 312b. Selected Topics in Complex Variables 

*MATHEMATICS 313. Group Representation and Analysis of Groups 

^MATHEMATICS 321a or b. Algebraic Topology II 

MATHEMATICS 322a and b. Differential Topology 

*MATHEMATICS 323a or b. Lie Algebras 

MATHEMATICS 324a. Lie Groups 

^MATHEMATICS 325a or b. Complex Manifolds 

MATHEMATICS 332. Differential Topology and Non-linear Analysis 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



Messrs. Auslander and Rim 

Messrs. Kohn, Rossi and Seeley 

Messrs. Palais and Vasquez 

Mr. Auslander 



Mr. Levine 



Mr. Sherman 



Mr. Palais 



122 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



MATHEMATICS 401-411. Research 


Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 


401. 


Mr. Auslander 


402. 


Mr. Broiun 


403. 


Mr. Buchshaum 


404. 


Mr. Hoyt 


405. 


Mr. Kohn 


406. 


Mr. Levine 


407. 


Mr. Matsusaka 


408. 


Mr. Palais 


409. 


Mr. Rim 


410. 


Mr. Rossi 


411. 


Mr. Seeley 



Mediterranean Studies 
Objectives 

The graduate program in Mediterranean Studies aims at inducting the 
student into the investigation of major problems involving the meeting of 
different peoples in and around the Mediterranean Sea, where Western 
civilization was first created and then developed. The instruction will train 
the student to master the primary sources as he learns the broad synthesis. 
Master of Arts as well as Doctor of Philosophy candidates are expected to 
show a grasp of the problem as a whole, as well as the ability to work in a 
variety of different sources. Doctor of Philosophy candidates will be re- 
quired to demonstrate also a capacity for original research. 

The scope of the department embraces Mediterranean developments 
from Antiquity and down to, but not including Modern Times. Students 
will be trained in history and archaeology as well as in the languages and 
literatures. 

Courses will normally involve two or more interrelated sources. While 
it is desirable for the student to know as many of the sources as possible in 
advance, no student is expected to come ideally equipped with complete 
linguistic preparation. If a course requires the use of a source that the 
student has not already studied, he will ordinarily be permitted to enroll, 
provided that he is concurrently taking a basic language course to make up 
the deficiency. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given 
in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to 
this area. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 123 



Students planning to enter this department should take as much 
Hebrew, Greek and Latin as possible during their undergraduate course of 
study. 

Faculty 

Professor Cyrus H. Gordon, Chairman: Cuneiform, Egypto-Semitic, and 

Mediterranean studies. 
Visiting Professor Prophyrios Dikaios: Mediterranean archaeology. 
Associate Professor Dwight W. Young: Egypto-Semitic and Cuneiform 

studies. 
Assistant Professor Harry A. Hoffner, Jr.: Hittite, Helleno-Semitic studies. 
Dr. Andras Hamori: Semitic linguistics. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 

Program of Study. Each candidate for the Master's degree is required 
to complete satisfactorily not less than twenty-four semester hours of course 
work in the department, plus any courses outside the department that the 
major professor may prescribe. The candidate must also show a command 
of either Latin or Greek, and of Hebrew or Arabic, plus at least one other 
Oriental language (such as Akkadian, Ugaritic, or Egyptian). 

Language Requirement. A reading knowledge of one modern foreign 
language (ordinarily French or German) is required. 

Qualifying Examinations. The student must demonstrate, in written 
and oral examinations, proficiency in the sources of two major areas of the 
program and an ability to synthesize them. A broad grasp of the Mediter- 
ranean origins of Western Civilization will be required of all candidates, 
beyond the specific topics covered in courses. 

Doctor of Philosophy 
The requirements are the same as for the Master of Arts degree, plus 
twenty-four additional semester hours of course work in the department, a 
reading knowledge of two modern foreign languages (ordinarily French 
and German), and a doctoral dissertation. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student shall be eligible for admission to 
candidacy upon completing his language requirements and satisfactorily 
passing his written and oral examinations. Proficiency in those examina- 
tions must be demonstrated in three major areas of the program; e.g., 
Assyrian, Greek, and Hebrew (texts and history), or Egyptian, Ugaritic, and 
Arabic. 



124 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Dissertation and Defense. The dissertation should be a significant and 
original contribution to scholarship and should demonstrate a capacity for 
independent research based on primary sources. After submission of the 
dissertation, the candidate will be expected to defend it in a final oral 
examination. 

Courses of Instruction 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 100a. History of the Mediterranean from 3000-300 B.C. 

The lectures will follow the sequence of topics in C. H. Gordon's The An- 
cient Near East (1965), with constant reference to the published fascicles of the 
new edition of Cambridge Ancient History. Mr. Gordon 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 101a. History of the Mediterranean in the 
Early Bronze Age 

To be given in 1966-67. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 102b. History of the Mediterranean in the 
Second Millennium B.C. 

To be given in 1966-67. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 103a. History of the Mediterranean in the 
First Millennium B.C. 

To be given in 1967-68. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 103b. History of the Mediterranean in the 
First Millennium A.D. 

To be given in 1967-68. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 110. Archaeology of the East Mediterranean 

A survey of metliods, discoveries and interpretation. Mr. Dikaios 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES Ilia. Archaeology of the West Mediterranean 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 112b. Archaeology of Canaan 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 113a. Archaeology of Egypt 

To be given in 1967-68. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 114b. Archaeology of Mesopotamia 

To be given in 1967-68. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 115a. Archaeology of Anatolia 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 122a. Prophetic Books of the Bible 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 125 



MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 127. Biblical Books of the Heroic Age 

In 1965-66, selections from the Pentateuch will be read with constant reference 
to the Heroic Age of Greece. 

Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of Hebrew. Mr. Hamori 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 130. Elementary Akkadian 

A study of Ungnad's Grammar and readings in the Annals of the Sargonid 
Kings. Mr. Hoffner 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 138. Elementary Ugaritic 

Grammar and poetic texts. C. H. Gordon's Ugaritic Textbook, 1965, will be 
used. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of biblical Hebrew. Mr. Hamori 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 140. Elementary Middle Egyptian 

Gardiner's Egyptian Grammar supplemented with reading simple narratives 
such as The Shipwrecked Sailor. Mr. Young 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 150. Homeric Epic 

To be given in 1966-67. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of Attic or N. T. Greek. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 151. Hesiod and the Epic Cycle 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 152. Greek Historiography 

To be given in 1967-68. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 153. Mycenean Greek Tablets in Linear B. 

To be given in 1966-67. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 154. The Septuagint 

To be given in 1967-68. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 160. The Aeneid with Reference to its Homeric, Punic 
and Other Backgrounds 

To be given in 1966-67. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 161a. The Poenulus of Plautus 

To be given in 1967-68. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 162b. The Vulgate 
To be given in 1967-68. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 216. Archaeological Pro-Seminar 

In 1965-66, Neolithic and Bronze Age Cyprus will be studied intensively. 

Mr. Diknios 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 221b. Historical Books of the Bible 

In 1965, Chronicles will be examined in Hebrew, Greek and Latin with 
special attention to the pronunciation of Hebrew names in Greek and Latin 
transliteration. All of the Minoan texts, and all of the Phoenician and Punic texts 
in Greek and Latin letters, will be read and correlated. 

Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of Hebrew, Latin and Greek. Mr. Gordon 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



126 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 223b. Old Testament Hagiographs 

To be given in 1966-67. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 224a. Semitic Inscriptions of the Mediterranean 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 231. Intermediate Akkadian 

To be given in 1966-67. 

Prerequisite: Mediterranean Studies 130. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 232. Akkadian Poetry 

To be given in 1966-67. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 233. Akkadian Texts from the West 

To be given in 1966-67. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 234. Akkadian Letters and Diplomatic Texts 

In 1965-66, tablets from Mari will be read. 

Prerequisite: Mediterranean Studies 231. Mr. Hoffner 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 235. Sumerian 

To be given in 1966-67. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 236. Elementary Hittite 

A study of the grammar along with readings in prose cuneiform texts. 
Prerequisite: Students must have completed, or be taking concurrently, Medi- 
terranean Studies 130. Mr. Hoffner 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 237. Advanced Hittite 

To be given in 1966-67. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 238a. Ugaritic 

A study of the newly published texts (Nos. 2001-2123). C. H. Gordon's Uga- 
ritic Textbook, 1965, will be used. 

Prerequisites: A knowledge of Hebrew and one other Semitic language. 

Mr. Gordon 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 241a. Middle Egyptian Romances 

Rapid reading of texts such as The Romance of Sinuhe and The Eloquent 
Peasant. 

Prerequisite: Mediterranean Studies 140. Mr. Young 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 242b. Late Egyptian Stories 

Rapid reading in texts such as The Two Brothers, The Misadventures of 
Wenamon, The Taking of Joppa and Horus and Seth. 

Prerequisite: Mediterranean Studies 140. Mr. Young 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 243. The Pyramid Texts 

To be given in 1966-67. 

Prerequisite: Mediterranean Studies 241a find 242b. 
•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 127 



MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 244. Coptic 

In 1965-66, Saidic and the other Coptic dialects will be studied comparatively, 
with readings in the Apophthegmata Patrum and various Gnostic texts. 

Prerequisite: Students must have completed, or be taking concurrently, Medi- 
terranean Studies 140. Mr. Young 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 263. Pro-Seminar on Roman Historiography 

To be given in 1966-67. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 270. Linguistic Pro-Seminar 

In 1965-66, South Semitic will be investigated. Mr. Hamori 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 325b. West Semitic Seminar 

To be given in 1967-68. 

*MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 339. Cuneiform Seminar 

To be given in 1966-67. 

^MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 345. Egyptian Seminar 

To be given in 1967-68. 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 371b. Egypto-Semitic Seminar 

In 1965-66, the relation between Akkadian and Egyptian will be examined. 
Texts in both languages will be read and used as the basis for linguistic analysis 
and comparison. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of Akkadian and Middle Egyptian. Mr. Gordon 

MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES 400-403. Dissertation Research 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 

400. Mr. Gordon 

401. Mr. Young 

402. Mr. Hoffner 

403. Mr. Dikaios 

Music 

Objectives 

The graduate program in Music, leading to the degrees o£ Master of Fine 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, is designed to provide a command of the 
craft of composition and an understanding of the nature, structural basis, 
and historical development of music. 

Three general fields of study are offered in music: 

1. Music Composition. This program leads to the degree of Master 
of Fine Arts. 

2. Music Composition and Theory. This program leads to the degrees 
of Master of Fine Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

3. History of Music. This program leads to the degrees of Master of 
Fine Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Students must specialize in one of these areas but are expected to 
acquire a background in all three. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



128 BRAN DEIS UNIVERSITY 

Admission 

Only a limited number of students will be accepted. The general require- 
ments for admission to the Graduate School, as specified in an earlier 
section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this area of 
study. 

Applicants for study in Musical Composition or Music Theory are 
required to submit, in addition to a transcript of their undergraduate 
records, evidence of qualification in the form of examples of original work 
in musical composition and advanced work in musical theory. Applicants 
for admission in the History of Music should submit examples of their 
prose writing on music as evidence of their ability to handle the language 
and specialized vocabulary. Undergraduate theses or term papers will be 
satisfactory. This work should be submitted together with the formal Appli- 
cation for Admission. 

All applicants are expected to have some proficiency at the piano or 
on an orchestral instrument. Information about this should be furnished 
when making formal application. 

Admission is granted for one academic year at a time. Students in 
residence must make formal application for readmission to the department 
between March 1 and March 15. Readmission will be refused in cases where 
students have not demonstrated a capacity for acceptable graduate work. 

Faculty 

Professor Harold Shapero, Chairman; Professors Arthur Berger, Kenneth 
J. Levy (Student Adviser); Visiting Professor Alexei Haieff (Fall 
Term); Associate Professors Paul H. Brainard, Robert L. Koff, Cald- 
well Titcomb; Assistant Professor Martin Boykan; Miss Madeline 
Foley; Messrs. Eugene Lehner, Alvin Lucier, Joel Spiegelman. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Fine Arts 
Language Requirements. 

Group A: French, German, Italian. 

Group B: Spanish, Latin, Hebrew, Greek (and other languages at the 
discretion of the Music faculty). 

A reading knowledge of a language from Group A is normally required 
of all applicants for admission to a graduate program in music. 

Candidates for the Master's degree specializing in Musical Composition 
must possess a reading knowledge of two of the above languages, of which 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 129 



at least one must be from Group A. (The combination of Italian and 
Spanish will not be approved). 

Candidates for the Master's degree specializing in Music Theory or 
in History of Music must possess a reading knowledge of two languages in 
Group A. 

Foreign language course credits will not in themselves constitute fulfill- 
ment of the language requirements for advanced degrees. All candidates 
must pass language examinations set by the Music faculty and offered peri- 
odically during the academic year. Students are urged to take these exami- 
nations at the earliest feasible date. In case of failure, an examination may 
be taken more than once. 

The language examinations are designed to test the students' ability 
to make ready and accurate use of critical and literary works. Normally 
each examination will contain three passages for written translation into 
idiomatic English: (1) classical or modern prose; (2) classical or modern 
poetry, often poetry that has been set to music; and (3) critical prose deal- 
ing with music. Dictionaries may be used in these examinations. 

Instrumental Proficiency. At least moderate proficiency at the piano is 
required of all candidates for advanced degrees. 

Residence Requirements. Six full courses or the equivalent in half- 
courses at the graduate level, completed with distinction, and a thesis are 
required of all candidates. 

The department normally allows credit for no more than one full 
course taken at another institution. 

In general, the program is completed in two academic years. Students 
should take no more than four full courses in any one year. It is suggested, 
however, that students pursue no more than three full courses during the 
year in which they take general examinations and submit a thesis. Students 
holding teaching assistantships may reduce their load to two courses. 

Examinations. Early in March of their first year of study, graduate 
students will be expected to pass an examination in the standard literature 
of music from the early eighteenth century to the present. Upon admission, 
each candidate will receive a list of works to guide his listening. 

When their program of study is completed, candidates for the degree 
of Master of Fine Arts must pass with distinction written general exami- 
nations in theory and history, one of which will be their major field, the 
other their minor field. 

Thesis. Candidates for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Music are 
required to submit a thesis. For candidates in Musical composition this will 
consist of a musical composition, its scope to be approved by the Music 
faculty. For candidates in the History of Music or in Music Theory and 



130 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Composition it will be an analytical or historical study on a topic acceptable 
to the Music faculty. Part of this requirement in Music Theory and Com- 
position may be met by an original musical composition. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Residence Requirements. A minimum of eight full courses or the 
equivalent in half-courses at the graduate level, completed with distinction, 
are required of all candidates. 

In general, the program will be completed in three academic years. 

Applicants who have done graduate work elsewhere may apply for 
transfer of credit for such work; a maximum of one year of residence may 
be granted. 

Instrumental Proficiency. At least moderate proficiency at the piano 
is required of all candidates. 

Language Requirements. Candidates for the Doctor's degree in Music 
must possess a reading knowledge of all three languages in Group A. (In 
exceptional cases, the Music faculty may accept a language in Group B in 
lieu of Italian). 

Examinations. Candidates will be expected to pass with unusual dis- 
tinction the written general examination for the M.F.A. After meeting 
their language and residence requirements they must pass the special oral 
qualifying examination. Upon completion of their dissertation they will be 
expected to defend it in an oral examination. 

Admission to Candidacy. Students will be admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree upon successful completion of the written and oral quali- 
fying examinations, fulfillment of the language requirements, and the ap- 
proval of a dissertation topic. 

Dissertation. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the 
History of Music or in Music Theory and Composition must submit an 
acceptable written dissertation on a subject approved by the Music faculty. 
In certain cases, and with the prior approval of the department, qualified 
candidates for the degree in Theory and Composition may meet a part of 
the dissertation requirement with an original composition. 

Written dissertations should demonstrate the competence of the candi- 
date as an independent investigator, his critical ability, and his effectiveness 
of expression. Upon completion of the dissertation the candidate will be 
expected to defend it in an oral examination. 

Courses of Instruction 

Except in the rarest circumstances, graduate credit is not allowed for courses 
numbered below Music 165. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 131 



MUSIC 165aR. Elementary Orchestration 

The instruments of the orchestra; their construction, ranges and playing 
techniques, with a consideration of their use by major composers; the methods of 
writing effectively for present-day instruments, individually and in combination; 
the mechanics of reading and writing a score. 

Written exercises, analysis of scores, study of recorded performances and live 
demonstrations. Mr. Lucier 

MUSIC 166a. Seminar in Advanced Orchestration Mr. Haieff 

*MUSiC 167. Composition in Traditional Forms 

The melodic phrase; types of accompaniment; studies in harmonic rhythm; 
trio forms, rondo forms, sonata forms, variation forms, and free forms. Analysis 
and exercises. 

*MUSIC 171b. History and Practice of Music Criticism 

An examination of music criticism from the Baroque to the present day, with 
special attention to important nineteenth and twentieth century critics. 
Prerequisite: A knowledge of music history and theory. 

MUSIC COLLOQUIUM 

Discussions of special topics led by the faculty and occasional guests. Some of 

the sessions will include performances of new works. Required of all graduate 

students. Non-credit. Staff and Visiting Lecturers 

MUSIC 180. Ethnomusicology Mr. Titcomb 

MUSIC 200. Materials of Research 

This course will acquaint the student with the main tools and materials of 
research, so as to enable him readily to pursue musicological, critical, and analyti- 
cal projects in music both old and new. Mr. Titcomb 

*MUSIC 201. Collegium Musicum 

Studies in music history through coordinated research and performance. Source 
and notational problems of selected historical examples will be treated in detail. 
Course members will be able to participate, together with members of the staff, in 
studio performances. Whenever possible, the course material will be integrated 
with that of one or more concurrent advanced courses in music history. 

MUSIC 203. Advanced Musical Analysis 

Special analytic problems of structural interpretation with emphasis on total 
form and intrinsic relation rather than upon the conventions (sonata, rondo, 
etc.). Intensive and detailed analysis of scores in terms of such considerations as 
the premises of the tonal system. Schenker's concept of musical unity, serial organ- 
ization, and the properties of subcollections of the total available pitch material as 
formal constraints. Questions of methodology and terminology raised by the "new 
theory." Mr. Berger 

*MUSIC 222. Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music 

A comprehensive survey of the history of music from early Christian times 
through the end of the sixteenth century. 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



132 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



*MUSIC 223. Seminar in Baroque Music 

Studies in historical developments in music of the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. Typical full-year projects will include: the cantatas of J. S. Bach; seven- 
teenth century keyboard music; history of cantata and oratorio in the seventeenth 
century; sonata, suite, concerto; Baroque opera. 

MUSIC 224. Seminar in Pre-Classical and Classical Music 

Study of historical problems in the music of the middle and late eighteenth 
century. Sample topics include: transitional sonata forms through early Haydn 
and Mozart; Beethoven's sketch books; stylistic interactions among the Viennese 
Classicists; opera from Pergolesi to Mozart. Mr. Brainard 

*MUSIC 225. Seminar in Romantic Music 

Selected topics in music from Beethoven, Weber, and Schubert to Strauss, 
Mahler, and Sibelius. Some consideration will be given to Impressionism and to 
the relations between music and the other arts. 

MUSIC 228. Seminar in Twentieth Century Techniques 

Exercises in composition employing musical materials and organizational 
methods developed since about 1900, accompanied by analysis of works of com- 
posers from Debussy to the present. Mr. Shapero 

MUSIC 232. Problems in Early Notation 

Trouv^re notation; modal and mensural notations of the thirteenth centur)'; 
French and Italian notations of the ars nova; white notation of the fifteenth 
century; introduction to Byzantine and Gregorian paleography; readings from the 
Medieval theorists. Mr. Levy 

*MUSIC 233b. Problems in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Music 
*MUSIC 238. Studies in Contemporary Music 

Seminars devoted to the intensive study of important twentieth century com- 
positions. Particular attention will be given to systematic approaches to the most 
essential problems of structure. 

*MUSIC 263. Canon and Fugue 

Principles governing the construction of invertible counterpoint, various kinds 
of canon, strict and free fugues. Analysis of classic and modern fugues and detailed 
study of Johann Sebastian Bach's Art of the Fugue. Written exercises. 

MUSIC 292. Seminar in Composition 

Group meetings and individual conferences. Opportunities for the perform- 
ance of student works will be provided. Messrs. Berger, Haieff and Shapero 

*MUSIC 295b. Problems in Electronic Music 
MUSIC 299. Individual Research and Advanced Work 

Individual research and advanced work in musical literature, musical history 
and in special problems of musical analysis, esthetics, theory and criticism. Staff 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 133 



MUSIC 400-405. Dissertation Research 

Required of all doctoral candidates. 



400. 


Mr. Berger 


401. 


Mr. Brainard 


402. 


Mr. Levy 


403. 


Mr. Shapero 


405. 


Mr. Tit comb 



Electronic Music Studio 

The facilities of the studio for electronic music, established in 1961, are 
available to qualified student composers and provide equipment for magnet-tape 
manipulation appropriate to the composition of electronic music and musique- 
concrete. 

Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 
Objectives 

The graduate program in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, leading to the 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, is designed to train 
scholars and teachers in the various cultures of the Near East and of the 
classical and modern Judaic civilization, and to do further research in 
these areas. This work is done mainly through study of the relevant lan- 
guages and literatures and interpretation of historical sources. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as speci- 
fied in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission 
to this department. 

Faculty 

Professor Nahum Norbert Glatzer, Chairman: Jewish history. Literature 

of the Second Commonwealth. Hebrew historiography. Eschatology. 
* Professor Alexander Altmann: History of Jewish philosophy and mysti- 
cism. Medieval philosophy. Classical Bible commentaries. 

Associate Professor Benjamin Halpern: Modern Near East history. Politi- 
cal and social history of Palestine and Israel. Modern Jewish history. 

Associate Professor David Neiman: Biblical studies. Ancient Near East. 

Associate Professor Nahum M. Sarna: Biblical studies. 

Assistant Professor Baruch A. Levine: Semitic languages. Classical He- 
brew literature. Dead Sea Scrolls. 

Assistant Professor Aryeh L. Motzkin: Arabic language and literature. 
History of Islam. 

Visiting Lecturer Eugene J. Fleischmann: Jewish philosophy. 

Dr. Norman Gottwald: Biblical Apocrypha. Biblical archaeology. 

*On Leave. Fall Term. 



134 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Program of Study 

Among the main fields in the area of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies in 
which courses are being given in the Graduate School are: 

Semitic Languages and Literatures (Akkadian, Arabic, Aramaic, Egyp- 
tian, Hebrew, Syriac). 

History of Ancient Near East. 

Islamic Studies. 

Biblical Studies. 

Jewish History. 

Medieval Jewish Philosophy and Mysticism. 

The Modern Near East. 

Contemporary Jewish Studies. 

Fields of study not listed here may be approved. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts 

Residence Requirements. The student is required to complete four full 
courses in the department. Programs of study are kept flexible; the depart- 
ment will consider the needs and interests of each student and advise him 
in outlining a program of study— this program may be modified later by 
the department. Students may be required to take courses given by other 
departments. A student who can, on admission, give evidence of satisfactory 
competence in one Semitic language or in one particular field of Near 
Eastern and Judaic Studies, will be able to complete the program for his 
degree in one year. Additional resident study may be required of less ad- 
vanced students. 

Language Requirements. Every candidate for the Master of Arts degree 
must show proficiency in one Semitic language, and in French or German. 
In special cases, another modern foreign language may be substituted for 
one of the two listed here. The foreign language requirements are to be 
satisfied by examination not later than eight weeks before a candidate is to 
receive his degree. 

Examination. An oral examination is given at the conclusion of the 
student's residence. The examination is organized around two major sub- 
jects chosen from the fields of study undertaken by the student and is 
designed to test the student's knowledge in those subjects as well as his 
ability to relate his information to the large area to which those subjects 
belong. A student who fails to pass the examination, or any part of it, may 
apply for re-examination, which will take place not earlier than one semes- 
ter after the date of the first examination. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 135 



Thesis. In certain cases, the student is advised to write a thesis which 
must be submitted no later than May 1 of the year in which the degree is 
to be conferred. In such cases, the student registers in the Dissertation 
Colloquium (NEJS 400) which then counts as one of the required four 
courses. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Residence Requirement. The residence normally required of a Ph.D. 
student who is the holder of an M.A. degree is one year (four courses); 
a longer residence will be required for part-time students and students 
holding teaching assistantships. The main emphasis, however, is placed on 
the students' individual research. 

Language Requirements. A candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in this area must show proficiency in two Semitic languages and in 
two modern foreign languages, as required by his special field of research. 
The candidate must satisfy his language requirements no later than at the 
completion of his required residence in the Graduate School. 

Examinations. A written or an oral comprehensive examination in 
three areas of study (the scope being determined at a conference with the 
examining board) is given at the conclusion of the student's residence. A 
student who fails to pass the examination, or any part of it, may apply for 
a re-examination, which will take place not earlier than one semester after 
the date of the first examination. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student registered for studies leading to 
the Ph.D. degree becomes a candidate for that degree when he has fulfilled 
his residence requirements, when the subject and synopsis of his dissertation 
have been accepted by the department, when he has passed the comprehen- 
sive examinations, and fulfilled the language requirements. 

Dissertation and Defense. The student will discuss his plans for a 
dissertation with the chairman of the department and the dissertation 
supervisor. The conferences on the planning and the program of the dis- 
sertation take place in the Dissertation Colloquium (NEJS 400), a course 
in which the candidate is to register. Normally, the candidate will continue 
working on his dissertation after the completion of his residence, i.e., as a 
nonresident student. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate's 
thorough knowledge of the field and his competence in independent 
research, and must constitute an original contribution to knowledge. Two 
copies of the dissertation, one of which must be the original typescript, are 
to be deposited in the office of the department chairman not later than 
April 1 of the year in which the candidate plans to take the degree. A defense 
of the dissertation will be held. 



136 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Courses of Instruction 
NEJS 101. Basic Arabic 

An introduction to literary' Arabic (classical and modern). Grammar. Reading 
of graded texts. Drills in pronunciation. 

Open to students who have not previously had instruction in Arabic. 

NEJS 102. Intermediate Arabic Mr. Motzkin 

Advanced grammatical study coupled with selected readings from representa- 
tive classical and modern texts. 

Prerequisite: NEJS 101 or its equivalent. Consent of instructor prior to en- 
rollment. Mr. Motzkin 

NEJS 104a. Aramaic Dialectology 

Texts in Biblical, Elephantine, Galilean, and Jewish Babylonian Aramaic will 
be studied, introducing the student to the Aramaic culture of Antiquity. No 
previous knowledge of Aramaic is required. 

Prerequisite: Competence in Biblical Hebrew. Mr. Levine 

*NEJS105a. Syriac 

Introductory course. Grammar and simple texts. 

NEJS 106. Ugaritic 

See Mediterranean Studies 138. Mr. Hamori 

*NEJS 109a. Archaeology and the Bible 

Palestinian archaeology in the context of Near Eastern archaeology and Isra- 
elite history. Contribution of archaeology to the solution of Biblical problems. 

NEJS Ilia. Biblical Apocrypha 

The non-canonical books of Judaism examined in their historical setting. 
Consideration of their importance to the Dead Sea Sect and early Christianity. 

NEJS 111b. History of the Biblical Text '^'- ^^"^"^^ 

An account of the growth of the Biblical text and the ancient versions of 
the Bible. Mr. Sarna 

*NEJS 112a. Biblical Hebrew: Languages 

A systematic introduction to Biblical grammar (including syntax). A selection 
of pertinent texts will be read. 

*NEJS 112b. Biblical Hebrew: Readings of Texts 

A continuation of NEJS 112a. 

NEJS 115b. The Five Megillot 

The texts will be studied in the original, applying philological and exegetical 
methods of critical analysis. 

Prerequisite: Competence in Biblical Hebrew. Mr. Levine 

NEJS 116b. The Book of Job and the Problem of Evil 

A reading of the Book of Job (in English translation) and a discussion of the 
role of the book in the literature and thought of the Western world; the problem 
of evil in Judaism and Christianity. Mr. Glatzer 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 137 



NEJS 118a. The Priestly Writings of the Pentateuch 

The literary and historical traditions of the priestly writings in Exodus, Levit- 
icus and Numbers will be examined with attention to relevant archaeological 
finds and extra-Biblical sources from the ancient Near East. Mr. Levine 

NEJS 119a. The Prophecies of Ezekiel 

A reading of the Book of Ezekiel. The nature of Israelite prophetic experience. 
Readings in other Biblical books relevant to Ezekiel. Mr. Sarna 

NEJS 119b. The Minor Prophets 

A reading of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah and an examination of the 
concepts underlying their prophecies. Mr. Sarna 

NEJS 120b. Readings in Talmudic Literature 

Selections from the Tractate Gittin studied in the original with emphasis on 
the history of Rabbinic legal institutions. Mr. Levine 

*NEJS 121a. Introduction to Jewish Mysticism 

An analysis of the stages of the. development of Jewish mysticism from the 
Tannaitic period to the appearance of the Zohar and down to Hasidism. 

*NEJS 121b. Selected Texts from Genesis Rabba 

A study of the earliest documents of midrashic speculation on cosmological 
and kindred problems. Tracing of Hellenistic, especially Gnostic sources. The 
origins of Jewish mysticism. 

*NEJS 122a. Classical Bible Commentaries 

Selected texts, primarily from Rashi, ibn Ezra, Nahmanides, and David Kimhi's 
commentaries. Introduction to the history of the medieval interpretation of the 
Bible. A knowledge of Hebrew is required. 

NEJS 126a. History of the Jews in Antiquity and the Middle Ages 

The organization and function of the Jewish community; intellectual develop- 
ments and changes in religious doctrine; mysticism; Messianic movements; the 
Jewish community in European economic life. Mr. Glatzer 

NEJS 126b. History of the Jews in Modern Times 

The emancipation of the Jews in Western Europe; the Haskalah movement. 
The great migrations to the West. Renaissance of Hebrew culture; anti-Semitism, 
Zionism. Problems of contemporary Jewish life in the United States. Mr. Halpern 

*NEJS 135a. Maimonides' Guide to the Perplexed 

A study of selected chapters as focal points in the development of medieval 
Jewish philosophy. A knowledge of Hebrew is required. 

NEJS 135b. Medieval Jewish Philosophy 

A survey of the various phases of Jewish philosophy from the 10th century 
until the Renaissance. Mr. Altmann 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



138 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



NEJS 137a. Spinoza 

A presentation of the major trends in Spinoza's thought, his ethics, politics, 
and criticism of religion. See Philosophy 137a. Mr. Fleischmarin 

*NEJS 138a. Modern Hebrew Poetry 

Extensive readings in the poetry of H. N. Bialik and Saul Tchernichowsky in 
the context of contemporary European literature. 

*NEJS 138b. Modern Hebrew Prose 

An examination of ideological and formal problems of the modern Hebrew 
short story through selected readings. 

NEJS 139a. Ahad Haam and His Time 

Reading and discussion of essays of Ahad Haam, Berdichevsky, Bialik, Bren- 
ner, A. D. Gordon, and Klatzkin. A seminar. 

Reading knowledge of Hebrew is required. Mr. Halpern 

*NEJS 142a. History of Islam 

History of the medieval Islamic World from its inception up to the decline of 
the Mamluks and ascendancy of the Ottoman Turks. The social, economic and 
intellectual development will be outlined with special emphasis on relations with 
the medieval West. 

NEJS 143a. Islamic Institutions 

Basic trends of the religious, political and social developments in classical 
Islam. Qur'an and tradition. Scholastic theology. Mysticism. The legal systems. 
State, cities, religious brotherhoods, guilds. Islam and the modern world. 

Mr. Motzkin 

NEJS 146b. Nationalism in the Near East 

A comparative historical analysis of the theory and practice of nationalism in 
the Ottoman Empire and its successor states from 1800 to 1920. The Balkan, 
North African, Turkish, Egyptian and Arab movements compared with European 
models. Mr. Halpern 

NEJS 151b. Introduction to islamic Philosophy 

The rise of Greek philosophy among the Arabs. Farabi, Avicenna, Ghazzali, 
Averroes. Selections in translation will be read and discussed. Mr. Motzkin 

NEJS 160a. American Jewish Institutional History 

Social history of American Jewry from colonial times to the Second World 
War. Emphasis on the development of communal institutions. Mr. Halpern 

*NEJS 166a. Modem Jewish Intellectual History to 1870 

Jewish ideologies and movements from the Enlightenment to the rise of 
political anti-Semitism. 

*NEJS 166b. Modern Jewish Intellectual History since 1870 

Jewish ideologies and movements from the rise of political anti-Semitism to 
the present. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 139 



NEJS 167a. Historical Theories in Modern Jewish Thought 

This course surveys the emergence of modern Jewish historiography and its 
relationship to Jewish thought. The works of Krochmal, Zunz, Geiger, Jost, Graetz, 
Hermann Cohen, and Franz Rosenzweig will be discussed. Mr. Fleischmann 

*NEJS 225b. North-West Semitic Inscriptions 

Selected readings of inscriptions in their historical context. 

*NEJS 258b. studies in Eschatological Theories 

Messianic and Apocalyptic concepts in the Old Testament prophets. Apocry- 
pha and the Dead Sea writings in post-Biblical Judaism and early Christianity; 
Messianic movements in the Middle Ages. 

NEJS 260b. Topics in American Jewish History 

A research seminar. Mr. Halpern 

*NEJS 263b. Pro-Seminar on the History of Modern Palestine and Israel 

Topics in the diplomatic history of the region. Bibliography, problems, 
methods of research. 

NEJS 320. Readings in Jewish History Mr. Glatzer 

NEJS 321. • Readings in the History of the Ancient Near East Mr. Neiman 

NEJS 322b. Readings in Medieval Jewish Philosophy Mr. Altmann 

NEJS 325. Readings in Biblical Texts Messrs. Levine, Neiman and Sarna 

NEJS 326. Readings in Islamic Civilization Mr. Motzkin 

NEJS 327. Readings in Syriac Literature Mr. Levine 

NEJS 329. Readings in Modern Near East and Modern Jewish History Mr. Halpem 
*NEJS 360a. Source Studies in Jewish History: Second Commonwealth 

Source studies in the history and culture of Palestine from 538 B.C. to 70 
A.D. 

*NEJS 375a. The Zohar: Selected Texts 

*NEJS 380a. Moses Mendelssohn and Beginnings of Modern Jewry 

A seminar studying the transition of Jews from the Ghetto into the European 
world. Analysis of important literary documents of the period. 

NEJS 400-405. Dissertation Colloquium 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 

400. Mr. Altmann 

401. Mr. Glatzer 

402. Mr. Halpern 

403. Mr. Levine 

404. Mr. Neiman 

405. Mr. Sarna 
•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



140 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Philosophy 
Objectives 

The graduate program in philosophy is designed to prepare students for 
careers in philosophy as scholars and teachers. It places traditional em- 
phasis on logic, epistemology, metaphysics, value theory and the history of 
philosophy. The number of students admitted to the program is small and 
the most important part of a student's work is done in small seminars and 
tutorials under close faculty supervision. 

Admission 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School as specified in an earlier section of this catalog, applicants for ad- 
mission to the graduate program in philosophy should have had at least 
one year of history of philosophy and at least one course in logic. 

Faculty 

Associate Professor Frederic Sommers, Chairman: Philosophy of lan- 
guage. Metaphysics. History of philosophy. 
*Professor Nelson Goodman: Cognitive studies. Epistemology. 

Professor Henry DAvm Aiken: Ethics. American philosophy. Social 
philosophy. 

Professor Stephen Toulmin: Philosophy of science. History of science. 

Professor John van Heijenoort: Logic. History of logic. 

Associate Professor Peter Diamandopoulos: History of ancient philoso- 
phy. History of science. 
** Associate Professor Harold Weisberg: Philosophy of the social sciences. 
Social philosophy. Philosophy of religion. 

Assistant Professor Daniel C. Bennett: Philosophy of mind. History of 
philosophy. Social philosophy. 

Assistant Professor Gerasimos X. Santas: History of ancient philosophy. 
Ethics. 

Degree Requirements 

All programs will be worked out in consultation with the student's adviser. 

Master of Arts 

Generally only candidates for the Ph.D. degree are accepted, although 

•On Leave, 1965-66 
**On Leave, Fall Term. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 141 



in some cases an M.A. degree will be awarded upon satisfactory completion 
of the following requirements: 

1 . One year's residence as a full time student. 

2. Successful completion of a prescribed schedule of courses. 

3. Passing qualifying examinations in logic, history of philosophy, and 
a special text examination. 

4. Demonstration of proficiency in either French or German. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The degree requirements for the Ph.D. degree are as follows: 

1. Residence as a full-time student for two years. 

2. Successful completion of a prescribed schedule of courses. 

3. Passing all qualifying examinations with distinction. 

4. Demonstration of proficiency in either French or German. 

5. Admission to candidacy. 

6. Submission of a doctoral dissertation approved by the department. 

7. Successful defense of the dissertation. 

Program of Study. Each student will be assigned a tutor who will 
advise him on his course of study and guide him in his preparation for the 
qualifying examinations. First year students are required to take the pro- 
seminar in philosophy (Philosophy 200) and six additional semester 
courses, four of which must be within the Philosophy Department. Second 
year students are required to take two semester courses from the 200 series 
and six additional semester courses. The student is also encouraged to take 
some work in a field other than philosophy that is related to his area of con- 
centration. Such work may be taken in the first or second year and will count 
toward the fulfillment of the residence and course requirements for the Ph.D. 
It must have the prior approval of the student's adviser and the department 
chairman. A second year student may not take more than two semester read- 
ing courses in the 300 series; these must also be approved by his adviser and 
the department chairman. 

Qualifying Examinations. Qualifying examinations are given each fall 
and spring in logic, epistemology and metaphysics, value theory, history of 
philosophy and on a philosophical text. The title of the text will be an- 
nounced four months before the examination is given. The text examina- 
tion and the examination in logic and epistemology must be taken in the 
spring of the first year of study. All examinations must be passed with dis- 
tinction within thirty months of initial enrollment in order to qualify for 
the Ph.D. degree. No examination may be taken more than twice. 



142 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Language Requirement. A proficient reading knowledge of either 
French or German is required. A student must take an examination in 
either language by the spring term of his first year in residence and must 
meet the language requirement no later than the beginning of his fifth 
term in residence. Language examinations will be given early in the fall 
and spring terms. The department reserves the right to establish additional 
language requirements when necessary for a student's doctoral research. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student may be admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree when he has completed his residence requirement, has 
passed with distinction all of the qualifying examinations, has fulfilled the 
language requirement and when the subject of his dissertation has been 
approved by the department. 

Dissertation Topic Oral Examination. To meet the final requirement 
for admission to candidacy, a student must have departmental approval of 
a thesis prospectus and must pass with distinction an oral examination in 
the general area of his proposed topic. 

Dissertation and Defense. When a student has been admitted to candi- 
dacy, the department chairman will appoint a dissertation adviser and a 
dissertation committee. The dissertation will be written under the supervi- 
sion of this committee and when it has been read and accepted by the 
committee a final oral examination will be scheduled wherein the candi- 
date will defend his dissertation. 

Courses of Instruction 
PHILOSOPHY 104a. Pre-Socratic Philosophy 

An intensive study of the fragments of the Pre-Socratics. A study of the tran- 
sition from myth to philosophy. Mr. Diamandopoulos 

PHILOSOPHY 105a. Plato 

An introduction to Plato's thought through an intensive reading of several 
major dialogues. Among the topics discussed will be the Socratic method, Socratic 
and Platonic ethics, Plato's conception of the soul, knowledge, and existence. 

Mr. Santas 

PHILOSOPHY 105b. Aristotle 

Lectures on Aristotle's views on Knowledge, Being, the Cosmos, the Soul, and 
human life. Extensive reading from Organon, Metaphysics, Physics, De Anima, 
Ethics and Politics will be required. Messrs. Diamandopoulos and Sommers 

PHILOSOPHY 115b. Intermediate Logic 

Informal and axiomatic development of quantification theory. Notions of 
consequence, theorem, proof. Semantics of quantification, semantical completeness 
of the theory. Naive set theory, the nature of formal systems. Mr. van Heijenoort 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 143 



*PHILOSOPHY 117b. Ethical Theory 

An examination of the main types of contemporary ethical theories, including 
naturalism, intuitionism, and emotivism. Analysis of ethical concepts. Elem.ents of 
normative systems. Varieties of relativism. 

PHILOSOPHY 118b. Philosophy and the Idea of Nature 

The roots of philosophical problems in natural science, with particular refer- 
ence to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Mr. Toulmin 

PHILOSOPHY 119a. Theory of Knowledge 

Such questions as the nature of truth, the reliability of sense perception, and 
the problem of a priori knowledge will be discussed. Mr. Bennett 

PHILOSOPHY 121a. Foundations of Mathematics 

Formal systems. Godel's theorems and consequences. Consistency proofs of 
arithmetic. Introduction to the theory of recursive functions. Hilbert's program 
and intuitionism. Mr. van Heijenoort 

*PHILOSOPHY 131a. Theory of Symbols 

Types and functions of symbols and symbolic schemes in perception and cog- 
nition, and in the arts and sciences. Languages and notations; discursive, digital, 
and analog systems. Representation, expression, description. Models and metaphors. 

PHILOSOPHY 133b. Contemporary Philosophy 

A review of recent philosophical thought. Mr. van Heijenoort 

PHILOSOPHY 137a. Spinoza 

A presentation of the major trends in Spinoza's thought, his ethics, politics, 
and criticism of religion. Mr. Fleischmann 

*PHILOSOPHY 143a. Continental Rationalism 

Intensive study of selected texts from Descartes, Spinoza and Leibnitz. 

PHILOSOPHY 143b. British Empiricism 

Intensive study of selected texts from Locke, Berkeley and Hume. Mr. Weisberg 

PHILOSOPHY 144b. Medieval Philosophy 

A survey of the development of philosophy from the Patristic Age to High 
Scholasticism. Mr. Altmann 

*PHILOSOPHY 147a. American Pragmatism 

An historical survey and analysis of the pragmatic tradition in American 
philosophy. Selected texts of Peirce, James, Dewey and C. I. Lewis will be dis- 
cussed. 

PHILOSOPHY 151b. Social and Political Philosophy 

The problem of justifying social and political beliefs, including a critical 
examination of leading attempts to justify such beliefs by appeal to history, 
natural law, human nature and theology. Mr. Bennett 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



144 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



PHILOSOPHY 158b. Metaphysics 

An examination of ontological categories, their structure and formation. 

Mr. Sommers 

*PHILOSOPHY 167b. Kant 
PHILOSOPHY 200. Pro-Seminar 

Required of all first year students. Mr. Sommers and Staff 

*PHILOSOPHY 205a. Seminar in Modern Philosophy 

PHILOSOPHY 205b. Seminar in Ancient Philosophy Mr. Santas 

PHILOSOPHY 215b. Seminar on the History of Logic Mr. van Heijenoort 

PHILOSOPHY 222a. Seminar in Ethics Mr. Aiken 

*PHILOSOPHY 225b. Seminar in the Philosophy of History and the Social Sciences 
PHILOSOPHY 226a. The Idea of Historical Development 

Transformations in ideas about the antiquity, and the patterns of change of 
society and of nature, with special reference to the period 1700-1875. Mr. Toulmin 

*PHILOSOPHY 232b. Logical Structure of Experience 

*PHILOSOPHY 245b. Seminar in the Philosophy of Science 

PHILOSOPHY 256a. Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind Mr. Bennett 

*PHILOSOPHY 257a. Seminar in the Theory of Knowledge 

^PHILOSOPHY 258b. Seminar in Metaphysics 

PHILOSOPHY 300a and b. Readings in Philosophy Staff 

PHILOSOPHY 400-408. Dissertation Research 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 

400. Mr. Sommers 

401. Mr. Aiken 

402. Mr. Weisberg 

403. Mr. Diamandopoulos 

404. Mr. Toulmin 

405. Mr. Bennett 

406. Mr. van Heijenoort 

407. Mr. Santas 

408. Mr. Goodman 

Philosophy Colloquium 

The Philosophy Colloquium meets monthly and attendance is required. Dis- 
tinguished visitors read papers and discuss their current work at these colloquia. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 145 



Physics 
Objectives 

The graduate program in physics is designed to equip the student with a 
broad understanding of all major fields of physics and to train him to carry 
out independent original research. This objective is to be attained by 
formal course work and supervised research projects. As the number of 
students who are accepted is limited, a close contact between students and 
faculty is maintained, permitting close supervision and guidance of each 
student. 

Advanced degrees will be granted upon evidence by the student of 
his knowledge, understanding and proficiency in classical and modern 
physics, and in mathematics. The satisfactory completion of advanced 
courses will constitute partial fulfillment of these requirements. Research 
upon which theses may be based, with residence at Brandeis, can be carried 
out in the following areas: 

Theoretical Physics: Quantum theory of fields; meson theory; quan- 
tum electrodynamics; elementary particle physics; general theory of rela- 
tivity; nuclear physics; quantum statistical mechanics; thermodynamics of 
irreversible processes; quantum theory of the solid state; the many-body 
problem; kinetic theory of ionized gases; plasma physics; theoretical astro- 
physics. 

Astrophysics: Stellar constitution; stellar and galactic evolution; radi- 
ative transfer; cosmology and cosmogony; stellar mechanics. 

Experimental Physics: Nuclear physics; high energy experimental 
physics, primarily work with bubble chambers on the properties of the 
strange particles; atomic and molecular beams; optical pumping; solid 
state physics; nuclear magnetic resonance; phase transition phenomena; 
low temperature physics. 

Admission 

As a rule, only candidates for the Ph.D. degree will be accepted. The general 
requirements for admission to the Graduate School apply to candidates for 
admission to the graduate area in physics. Admission to advanced courses 
in physics will be granted following a conference with the student at en- 
trance. 

Faculty 

Professor Silvan S. Schweber, Chairman: Quantum theory of fields. Ele- 
mentary particle physics. Quantum theory of multiparticle systems. 

Professor Stephan Berko: Atomic physics. Nuclear physics. Properties of 
solids. Magnetism. 



146 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Professor Stanley Deser: Quantum theory of fields. Elementary particles. 
General relativity. 

Professor David L. Falkoff: Classical and quantum statistical mechanics. 
Irreversible processes. Quantum theory of solids. 

Professor Eugene P. Gross: Quantum theoi7 of multiparticle systems. 
Quantum theory of solids. Kinetic theory. Plasma physics. 

Visiting Professor Oskar Klein (Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor): General 
relativity. Cosmology. Elementary particles. 

Professor Edgar Lipworth: Atomic and molecular beams. Optical pump- 
ing. Lasers. 

Professor Raymond A. Lyttleton, F.R.S. (Jacob Ziskind Visiting Processor 
from St. John's College, Cambridge, England): Cosmology. Astrophys- 
ics. Origin of the solar system. 

Associate Professor Max Chretien: Experimental high energy physics. Ele- 
mentary particles. 

Associate Professor of Astrophysics Jack S. Goldstein, Director, Astrophys- 
ics Institute: Astrophysics. Radiative transfer. Stellar interiors. 

Associate Professor Marcus T. Grisaru: Field theory. Mathematical physics. 
Elementary particles. 

Visiting Professor Minoru Nishida (Kyoto University): Astrophysics. Stellar 
evolution. 

Associate Professor Howard Schnitzer: Nuclear theory. Elementary par- 
ticle theory. 

Associate Professor Sanford E. Wolf: High energy experimental physics. 

Visiting Assistant Professor Steve P. Heims: Solid state theory. 

Assistant Professor Peter Heller: Solid state experimental physics. Nu- 
clear magnetic resonance. 

Assistant Professor Christoph Hohenemser: Experimental atomic and nu- 
clear physics. 

Assistant Professor Daniel J. Kleitman: Theory of fields and particles. 

Assistant Professor Hugh N. Pendleton III: Elementary particles. S-matrix 
theory. Quantum theory of atoms, molecules and solids. 

Assistant Professor Marcel Schneeberger: High energy experimental phys- 
ics. 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Astrophysics Mumtaz Zaidi (from University 
of Nebraska): Atomic physics. Many-body problem and statistical 
mechanics. 
Dr. Asher Adler: Experimental atomic and nuclear physics. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 147 



Degree Requirements 

Program of Study. The requirements for advanced degrees in the De- 
partment of Physics are as follows: 

Master of Arts 

1. One year's residence as a full-time student. 

2. Eighteen semester hours of advanced courses in physics. 

A thesis on an approved topic may be accepted in place of a semester 
course. 

3. Reading knowledge of French, German, or Russian. 

4. Satisfactory performance in the General Examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. Two years' residence as a full-time student. 

2. Twenty-seven semester hours of advanced courses in physics. 

3. Reading knowledge of two foreign languages chosen from French, Ger- 
man and Russian. (Italian may be substituted for French.) A knowledge 
of computer programming may be substituted for a second language. 

4. Outstanding performance in the General Examination. 

5. Passing of an Advanced Examination in topics related to the student's 
thesis subject. This examination will normally be taken after preparatory 
studies in the prospective field of research. 

6. Doctoral thesis and final oral examination. 

Program of Study and Course Requirements. Normally, first year grad- 
uate students will elect lecture courses from the 100 series; second year 
students from the 200 series. To obtain credit toward residence for a grad- 
uate course taken at Brandeis, a student must achieve a final grade of "A" 
or "B" in that course. A student who obtains a grade lower than "B" or an 
"Incomplete" in two or more courses in any term will not be allowed to 
continue his studies beyond the end of that academic year. (A course from 
which a student withdraws after midterm will be considered as "Incom- 
plete.") 

A student may obtain credit for advanced courses taken at another 
institution provided their level corresponds to the level of the graduate 
courses at Brandeis and that he obtained an honor grade in these courses. 

Residence Requirements. A student may obtain up to one year's resi- 
dence credit toward the Ph.D. requirements for graduate studies taken at 
another institution. No transfer residence credit will be allowed toward 
fulfillment of the Master's requirements. 

Language Examinations. The language examination consists of a writ- 
ten translation of a scientific text into English. It is arranged informally 



148 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



between the student and the foreign language examiner. The computer 
programming examination consists of three parts: 

In Part 1 a student is given a problem which will require a reasonably 
complete knowledge of Fortran and some non-trivial logic. The student 
will be expected to know how to punch the cards, assemble the program 
("debug" if necessary), check correctness of calculation, etc., and present 
printed results to the examining committee. 

In Part 2 the above procedure is repeated on a different problem; 
however, SPS programming must be used. 

Part 3 consists of an oral examination in which the student should 
demonstrate a general knowledge of computers (their usefulness, logical 
and memory capacity speeds, etc.). 

For further information concerning the computing examination, con- 
sult the Director of the Computer Center. 

General Examination. The General Examination will be given twice a 
year, during the week preceding each semester and should be taken by all 
degree students by the end of their third term. One language examination 
must be taken before the General Examination. 

The General Examination is designed to test whether a student has 
understood and integrated the material of his undergraduate and first year 
graduate studies. It consists of a series of written three-hour examinations 
and of an oral examination. Its contents are not related to particular 
lectures at Brandeis. To prepare for the General Examination the student 
is advised to study the questions asked in previous examinations, copies of 
which are available in the department office. 

The General Examination should be taken before the fourth term of 
study at Brandeis. Qualified students are encouraged to take it earlier. 
Students with a Master's degree from another university must take it 
within a year after entering Brandeis. 

Outstanding performance on the General Examination qualifies a stu- 
dent for a Master's degree and allows him to present himself for the Ad- 
vanced Examinations. Satisfactory but not outstanding performance quali- 
fies a student for the Master's degree. The student may present himself, 
within a year, for re-examination on those parts of the General Examina- 
tion in which his performance was not outstanding. In the case of unsatis- 
factory performance a student may either be asked to withdraw from the 
University or he may be allowed, within a year, to take the General Exam- 
ination again. 

Advanced Examination. The Advanced Examination is designed to 
test the student's knowledge and abilities in his chosen field of research. 
After passing the General Examination, the student begins work with an 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 149 



adviser who guides his research program. The adviser should be a member 
of the Brandeis faculty but in special circumstances may be a physicist 
associated with another research institution. The adviser will work out a 
program of study to familiarize the student with current research in his 
field and to explore possible dissertation topics. The Graduate Committee 
of the Physics Faculty will then appoint a dissertation committee, to which 
the student must submit a written progress report at the end of each term. 
The student's dissertation adviser will be the chairman of the dissertation 
committee. The Advanced Examination will cover the student's field of 
research, as well as closely related topics, and will be taken on a date set by 
the adviser within three terms of passing the General Examination. It will 
be administered by the dissertation committee, which will determine its 
content and form (written or oral). Depending upon the recommendation 
of his adviser and his performance in the Advanced Examination, the 
committee will recommend the student for admission to candidacy for the 
doctorate, allow him a second attempt, or request him to withdraw from 
the University. 

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination. The doctoral dissertation 
must represent a piece of original research of a standard acceptable to a 
faculty committee (dissertation committee) appointed for each Ph.D. can- 
didate. The final oral examination, or defense, is an examination in which 
the student will be asked questions pertaining to his dissertation research. 

Courses of Instruction 
PHYSICS lOOa. Theoretical Mechanics 

Mechanics of point systems. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods. Small 
vibrations. Transformation theory. Integral invariants. Kinematics and dynamics 
of rigid bodies. Perturbation theory. Relativistic mechanics. Mr. Goldstein 

PHYSICS 100b. Continuum Mechanics 

The mechanics of continuous media. Hydrodynamics; non-linear phenomena; 
shock waves. Mr. Golden 

PHYSICS 101a and b. Electromagnetic Theory 

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, boundary value problems. Maxwell's Equations. 
Quasi-stationary phenomena. Radiation. To be announced 

PHYSICS 102a and b. Quantum Mechanics 

A critical review of the experiments leading to the quantum hypothesis. 
Representations, pictures, operator methods. Schrodinger equation and applica- 
tions. Spin. Addition of angular momenta; helium spectrum. PauH Principle. 
Atomic and molecular structure. Elementary scattering theory: atomic and nuclear 
scattering. Mr. Grisaru 



150 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



PHYSICS 103a. Low Energy Nuclear Physics 

Experimental methods. Phenomenology of nuclear properties. Two-nucleon 
problem. Models for nuclear structure. Radioactivity. Mr. Chretien 

PHYSICS 103b. High Energy Nuclear Physics 

High energy accelerators and particle detectors. Relativistic kinematics. Classi- 
fication schemes of elementary particles. Mr. Wolf 

*PHYSiCS 104a. IVIodern Atomic and Molecular Physics 

Microwave spectroscopy, NMR, atomic beams, optical pumping, masers and 
lasers. 

*PHYSICS 104b. Solid State Physics 

Thermal, electric and magnetic properties of solids. Lattice vibrations. Specific 
heat. Band theory of solids. Fermi surface. 

PHYSICS 109a and b. Advanced Laboratory 

2 credits. Air. Hohenemser 

PHYSICS 110a. Mathematical Physics 

Linear vector spaces: matrices, operators, Hilbert spaces. Orthogonal functions. 
Probability theory. Mr. Deser 

PHYSICS 110b. Mathematical Physics 

Complex variables. Differential equations. Boundary value problems. Special 
functions. Integral equations. Numerical methods. To he announced 

PHYSICS 200a. Special Theory of Relativity 

Foundations of the special theory. Lorentz transformations. Four-dimensional 
formulation of physics. Relativistic mechanics. Classical theory of fields. Mr. Klein 

PHYSICS 200b. General Theory of Relativity 

Physical background— the equivalence principle. Mathematical background- 
tensor analysis, affine spaces, Riemann manifolds. The Einstein field equations and 
their physically important special solutions. Experimental verification. The gravi- 
tational field as a dynamical system; application of field theoretical methods. 

Mr. Deser 

*PHYSICS 201a. Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory 

Thermodynamics. Chemical reactions. Irreversible processes. Kinetic theory. 
Diffusion. Boltzmann equation. 

*PHYSICS 201b. Statistical Mechanics 

Ensembles and phase space. Maxwell-Boltmann distribution. Boltzmann's H- 
theorem. Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions. The quantum mechanical 
H-theorem. Statistical explanation of thermodynamics. Applications: theory of con- 
densation, low temperature phenomena. 

PHYSICS 202a and b. Advanced Quantum Mechanics 

Formal theory of scattering. Relativistic one particle equations. Elementary 
quantization of radiation field. Feynman positron theory and applications. 

Messrs. Schnitzer and Schweber 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 151 



*PHYSICS 203a. Nuclear Physics 

Low energy nuclear phenomena. Nuclear forces. Theory of nuclear reactions. 
Beta-decay. Liquid drop model. Shell model, collective model. 

PHYSICS 203b. Elementary Particle Physics 

Pair production. Compton effect, Bremstrahlung. Cosmic ray phenomena. 
High energy meson and nuclear phenomena. Mr. Pendleton 

PHYSICS 204a. Solid State Physics 

Adiabatic approximation. Molecular structure. Electronic structure of solids. 
Specific heats. Theory of electric and thermal conductivity of solids. Electron- 
lattice interactions. Superconductivity. Collective interactions in solids. Mr. Gross 

*PHYSICS 208a. Astrophysics 

Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Classification of stellar systems. Physics of stellar 
interiors. Radiative transfer problems. Abundances of the elements. Magneto 
hydrodynamics. Physics of the interstellar medium. 

*PHYSICS 208b. Gas Dynamics and Magneto Gas Dynamics 
*PHYS1CS 209. Laboratory Seminar 

Analysis of some important recent experiments (such as molecular beams, 
cyclotron, etc.) to understand apparatus and techniques. 1 credit. 

*PHYSICS 302b. Quantum Theory of Fields 

The theory of interacting quantized fields. Quantum electrodynamics. Mesody- 
namics. Field theoretical description of the v^^eak and strong interactions. 

PHYSICS 303b. Quantum Theory of Solids 

The application of the principles of quantum mechanics to the solid state. 

Messrs. Berko and Falkoff 

PHYSICS 310a,b. Group Theory and Applications 

The application of group theory to problems in quantum mechanics and 
elementary particle physics. Messrs. Grisaru and Kleitman 

PHYSICS 321. Seminar in Special and General Relativity Messrs. Klein and Deser 

*PHYSICS 323. Seminar in Quantum Theory of Fields 
*PHYSICS 324a. Seminar in Advanced Statistical Mechanics 
PHYSICS 325a. Seminar in Astrophysics 

Various topics in astrophysics, including theories of formation of the solar 
system. Mr. Lyttleton 

Research Courses 
PHYSICS 401. Experimental Atomic and Molecular Physics Messrs. Berko and Lipworth 
PHYSICS 402. Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics Mr. Pendleton 

PHYSICS 403. Experimental Nuclear Physics Messrs. Berko and Hohenemser 

PHYSICS 404. Theoretical Nuclear Physics Messrs. Gross and Schnitzer 

PHYSICS 405. Experimental Elementary Particle Physics 

Messrs. Chretien, Schneeberger and Wolf 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



152 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



PHYSICS 406. Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics 

Messrs. Deser, Grisani, Pendleton, Schnitzer and Schweber 

PHYSICS 407. Experimental Solid State Physics 

Messrs. Berko, Heller and Hohenemser 

PHYSICS 408. Theoretical Solid State Physics Messrs. Falkoff and Gross 

PHYSICS 409. Relativity Mr. Deser 

PHYSICS 410. Mathematical Physics Messrs. Deser, Grisam, Kleitman, and Schweber 
PHYSICS 411. Statistical Physics Messrs. Falkoff and Gross 

PHYSICS 412. Astrophysics Messrs. Goldstein, Nishida and Zaidi 

Politics 

A new graduate program in Politics, leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy, will begin operation in the academic year 1966-67. 

Detailed information may be had by writing to the Dean, Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 
02154. 

Psychology 
Objectives 

The graduate program in psychology leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy is designed for students of promise in the field of general 
psychology. Theoretical, historical and experimental studies and research 
projects rather than formal course training will be emphasized. Courses 
and seminars in special areas, such as clinical psychology, are offered to all 
graduate students, but no specialized training or special degrees are given. 
Graduate programs will be arranged individually in consultation with fac- 
ulty members. 

All regular graduate students must pursue programs leading to the 
Ph.D. degree. Special students, who are not candidates for a degree, may 
occasionally be admitted; such admissions are for one year at a time. Candi- 
dates for the degree of Master of Arts are not admitted, although that 
degree may be granted when such an action seems in the best interest of 
the student. In these cases, the degree is based on the successful completion 
of a year of regular graduate work, the demonstration of a reading profi- 
ciency in one foreign language, and the completion of a Master's thesis. A 
paper presented before a learned society or one accepted for publication by 
a learned journal may be accepted in lieu of a Master's thesis. A qualifying 
examination may also be required. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 153 



Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as speci- 
fied in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission 
to this area of study. 

An undergraduate major in psychology is not required, although it 
will be favored. Students with inadequate preparation may make up their 
deficiencies during their first year, but without residence credit. Preference 
will be given to students who have completed, in addition to basic courses 
in theoretical and experimental psychology, a broad liberal arts program 
with some training in the natural and social sciences. Students will be 
admitted on a competitive basis which will include evaluation of previous 
academic record and the results of the Graduate Record Examinations 
(Advanced, Aptitude and Profile Tests), and the Miller Analogies Test. 

Faculty 

Professor Ricardo B. Morant, Chairman: Experimental psychology. De- 
velopmental psychology. Perceptual mechanisms. Sensation and per- 
ception. 

Professor Eugenia Hanfmann: Clinical psychology. Personality theory. 

Professor Richard M. Jones: Educational psychology. Social psychology. 
Psychotherapy. 

Professor George A. Kelly: Personality theory. Theory of personal con- 
structs. ClinicaJ psychology. 
*Professor Abraham H. Maslow: Personality theory. Transcendence theory. 
Experiential approaches to personality. 

Professor Harry Rand: Clinical practice and training. 

Associate Professor James B. Klee: Motivation and emotion. Symbolic 

and cognitive processes. Human and animal learning. 
♦Associate Professor Ulric Neisser: Experimental psychology. Human and 
animal learning. Cognitive processes. 

Associate Professor Marianne L. Simmel: Sensory physiology. Cognitive 
processes. Perception. 

Assistant Professor Harvey London: Social psychology. Group dynamics. 

Assistant Professor Melvin Schnall: Child and developmental psychol- 
ogy. 

Assistant Professor Mark Spivak: Social psychology. Group psychodynam- 
ics. Social psychiatry. 

Assistant Professor Jerome Wodinsky: Comparative psychology. Learning 
theory. Sensory physiology. 

Adjunct Lecturer Donald B. Giddon: Physiological psychology. Psycho- 
somatic relations. 



*On Leave, 1965-66. 



154 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Four years of full-time graduate study are usually required for the Ph.D. 
An individual program will be arranged in consultation with each student. 
During the first two years, the student will carry fifteen credit units per 
semester. The ordinary program includes (a) three units in Psychology 300 
(Departmental Colloquium); (b) three units in Psychology 200 (Research); 
(c) Psychology 290-297 (Readings); and (d) three units in each of two other 
seminars or courses at the 100 level or above. In addition, students may audit 
any other courses or seminars with the permission of the instructor. 

Evaluation of Proficiency. A. Students are expected to achieve a thor- 
ough knowledge of fundamentals in certain areas of psychology during 
their first three years. Two general areas and six special areas have been de- 
fined by the faculty as follows: 

a. General Areas: 

1. History and Systems 

2. Statistical Methods 

b. Special Areas: 

Group A : Experimental Areas 

1. Sensation and Perception 

2. Learning and Thinking 

3. Physiological and Comparative Psychology 
Group B: Dynamic Areas 

4. Personality and Motivation 

5. Psychopathology and Clinical Psychology 

6. Child and Social Psychology 

The student's level of proficiency in the two general areas will be 
determined by written examinations. In addition, the student will select 
three areas, two from one of the groups, A or B, listed above and one from 
the other group, B or A, in which he will be examined by a committee of the 
faculty. These latter examinations may be oral or written, at the option of 
the student. 

Some competence is required also in the areas not selected for exami- 
nation. Successful completion of a relevant undergraduate or graduate 
course or seminar will ordinarily satisfy this requirement, but a formal 
paper or examination may be requested. 

Examinations may be taken separately. Written examinations will or- 
dinarily be offered three times a year, in October, January and May. Oral 
examinations will be offered throughout the academic year and summer by 
individual arrangement with the faculty. Students wishing to take oral or 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 155 



written examinations should register with the department secretary three 
weeks before the examination is to be scheduled. 

Examinations will be based on the content covered in the reading lists 
prepared by the faculty each year. A designated faculty member will be 
available for consultation concerning preparation for any given examina- 
tion. This preparation may take the form of a reading course. 

Students are expected to take at least two examinations prior to the 
end of their third term in residence, and to fulfill all requirements described 
in this section by the end of the third year in residence. 

Individual Research. Each student is expected to engage in collabora- 
tive or independent research, with the aim of developing competence in 
the planning, practice, and evaluation of research. Research work should 
begin during the first year of residence. 

Teaching. Each student, whether or not he receives remuneration as a 
teaching assistant, is expected to do some undergraduate teaching to de- 
velop competence in teaching. Psychology 201c is designed to further the 
student's understanding of the teaching process. 

Language Requirement. The demands of the field of the dissertation 
will determine the foreign languages that the student is expected to master. 
Reading proficiency in at least one foreign language is required for the 
Ph.D. degree. This language must be one in which substantial psychological 
literature exists. Language examinations are offered by the department 
four times a year, usually in September, December, February and May. Stu- 
dents are expected to satisfy the language requirement as soon as possible. 
By regulation of the Graduate School, a student who has not passed an 
examination in at least one foreign language by the end of his first year of 
study will not be eligible for financial aid from the university for the second 
year. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student may be admitted to candidacy for 
the doctorate when he has passed all departmental qualifying examinations. 

Dissertation and Defense. Following the completion of all examinations, 
and before the student begins to concentrate on dissertation research, he will 
prepare a prospectus of the proposed study, in consultation with a faculty 
dissertation sponsor. Upon approval by the faculty, a dissertation committee 
of three or more faculty members will be appointed, including the disserta- 
tion adviser. The committee will advise the student in his dissertation work 
and from time to time will report his progress to the faculty. 

The student may, if he wishes, ask the department for formal accept- 
ance of his prospectus. A prospectus that is to be formally accepted must 
provide a detailed outline of the experimental work to be done (if any) 



156 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



and of its theoretical basis. Such a prospectus will be voted upon by all 
members of the department. Once the department has formally accepted a 
prospectus, it will consider itself bound to accept the resulting dissertation 
as well, regardless of the experimental results, provided that the proposed 
work has been carried out. 

When the student has presented a dissertation prospectus, whether or 
not he asks for formal acceptance, his dissertation committee will be re- 
sponsible for evaluating his competence in the field of psychology within 
which the dissertation falls. This field will ordinarily include more than 
one of the areas defined above and may include such related areas as soci- 
ology, linguistics, one or more physical sciences, etc. The committee may, 
at its discretion, require a written examination in the thesis field as a whole 
or in any part of it. 

The dissertation should provide evidence of originality, scholarship 
and research ability. It should be a contribution to knowledge, ordinarily 
an experimental research, but not necessarily so. Upon submission to the 
chairman of the department of a copy of the thesis, signed by all three 
members of the thesis committee, and a successful defense of the thesis 
before all members of the department, the award of the Ph.D. will be 
recommended to the Faculty Council of the Graduate School. 

Courses of Instruction 
*PSYCHOLOGY 115a. Experiential Approaches to Personality 

Self-analyses, dream and symbol psychology, peak and mystic experiences, 
archaic, mythic and pre-rational cognition. 

PSYCHOLOGY 118a. Physiological Psychology 

Those aspects of physiology most relevant to psychological investigation: the 
anatomy and physiology of receptor and effector organs, the neuron and synapse, 
sensory and motor neural pathways, the integrative activity of the central nervous 
system, the autonomic nervous system and the action of hormonal factors. 

Mr. Giddon 

PSYCHOLOGY 119b. Comparative Psychology 

Comparison of the behavior of various species, including man, in an evolu- 
tionary perspective. Mr. Wodinsky 

PSYCHOLOGY 120a. Experimental Psychology 

Individual or group research carried out under supervision. Techniques of 
experimentation, experimental design. 4 credits. Mr. Morant 

*PSYCHOLOGY 121. History of the Concept of Human Nature 

Ideas on the nature of man developed in western society since the end of the 
seventeenth century. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 157 



*PSYCHOLOGY 130a. Psychology of Problem Solving and Learning 

A study of the creative process, its background and consequences and its rela- 
tion to perception and learning theory. 

PSYCHOLOGY 131b. Psychology of Symbolic Processes 

Culture as studied primarily from the frame of reference of psychology. 
Dreams, myths, and art as created, expressed, and as used in language, the humani- 
ties, and sciences will be studied as psychological data. The place of psychology in 
relation to the humanities and the other sciences will be evaluated. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 132b. Psychology of Emotions 

A consideration of the value dimension of the individual's dynamic relation to 
the world about him in both its positive and disruptive aspects. Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 133a. Choice, Will and the Ego 

A revaluation of the "active person." Choice, freedom, and responsibility will 
be considered as psychological problems. A study will be made of the relevance to 
choice and action of hedonics, knowledge, reason, and religion, and of man's 
relation to his perception of good and evil, sickness and health. An assessment of 
the individual's role in disease and conflict. 

Enrollment limited to twenty students. Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 134a. Behavior Pathology 

A socio-psychological and dynamic approach to behavior pathology with em- 
phasis on current theories of pathogenic family structure. Mr. Spivak 

*PSYCHOLOGY 135a. Applications of Psychoanalytic Concepts 

Psychoanalytic theory will be explored in its application to literature, bi- 
ography and the creative process. 

PSYCHOLOGY 137b. Personality 

The study of personality through the combined use of personality scales and 
experiments. Topics emphasized will be Machiavellian authoritarianism and 
sociopathy. Mr. London 

PSYCHOLOGY 138b. Theories of Personality 

A survey of current personality theories and their implications for research, 
for human development and for social institutions. The preliminary formulation of 
the student's own personality theory, both on implicit and explicit levels. Mr. Kelly 

^PSYCHOLOGY 139b. The Self and Identity 
PSYCHOLOGY 140a. Learning and Behavior 

Current theories of learning will be explored in the light of experimental 
evidence derived from human and animal studies. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Mr. Wodinsky 

PSYCHOLOGY 141a. Biological Bases of Motivation 

Topics to be treated include hunger, thirst, migration, sexual behavior and 
parental behavior. Evidence from biology, neurophysiology and endocrinology will 
be evaluated. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Mr. Wodinsky 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



158 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



PSYCHOLOGY 142b. Psychosomatics 

The interrelationships of psychological, social and cultural factors in physical 
disease. Topics include psychophysiological mechanisms in disease, physiological 
correlates of mental disease and "somatopsychic problems." Mr. Giddon 

PSYCHOLOGY 143a. Cognitive Processes 

Experiments in human learning, thinking problem solving. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 50b or permission of the instructor. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Miss Simmel 

PSYCHOLOGY 144b. The Psychology of Language 

Language development; names, concepts and symbols; expressive language; 
metaphor; grammar and syntax; problems of translation; pathology of language. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Miss Simmel 

PSYCHOLOGY 145a. Psychopathology in Childhood 

Theoretical and therapeutic implications of disorders in childhood, focusing 
on mental retardation and childhood psychosis. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Mr. Schnall 

*PSYCHOLOGY 145aR. Psychopathology in Childhood 

See Psychology 145a. 

PSYCHOLOGY 146a. Psychopathology and Cognition 

Alterations of perceptual and conceptual processes in schizophrenia, in brain 
injury, under the influence of drugs, and under conditions of so-called sensory 
isolation. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Miss Simmel 

*PSYCHOLOGY 147b. Systematic Psychology 

A seminar focusing on the validity and purpose of contemporary theoretical 
formulations. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 148a. Advanced Child Psychology 

The dynamic aspects of child behavior and development will be studied, 
discussed and applied in demonstrations. 
Enrollment limited to fifteen students. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 148aR. Advanced Child Psychology 

See Psychology 148a. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 149b. Phenomenological Psychology 

The implications of a phenomenological viewpoint for problems in person- 
ality, perception and cognition. Cassirer's philosophy of symbolic forms will be 
studied to see how a radical phenomenology can be grounded in episteological and 
ontological principles. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 150b. The Psychology of Religious Experience 

A study of selected examples of religious experience, both contemporary and 
historical. 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 159 



*PSYCHOLOGY 151a. Political Behavior 

This seminar will focus on several psychosocial variables related to political 
behavior. An empirical project related to the 1964 presidential election will be 
required of all students. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. 

PSYCHOLOGY 152b. Group Dynamics 

A consideration of classical and current experimental approaches to the study 
of human interaction. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen. Mr. London 

PSYCHOLOGY 153b. Developmental Approaches to Cognition 

Examination of major developmental principles and descriptive systems and 
their utility in the examination of perception, language and thought. Emphasis on 
the work of Werner and Piaget. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen. Mr. Schnall 

PSYCHOLOGY 154a. The Psychology of Personal Constructs 

The structure, development and potentialities of personal construct theory. 
The theory's philosophical substructure. Utilization of the theory in personal 
and social affairs. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. Mr. Kelly 

*PSYCHOLOGY 155b. Advanced Educational Psychology 

Dynamic psychology as applied to educational practice. 

For seniors enrolled in the Education Program or others with the consent of 
the instructor. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 159b. Perception 

Study of the history and implications of selected problems in current research 
in perception. 

Enrollment limited to fifteen students. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 161. Field Work in Clinical Psychology 

PSYCHOLOGY 200a, b, and c. Individual Research Projects Mr. Morant and staff 

"PSYCHOLOGY 201c. Seminar in the Teaching of Psychology 

"PSYCHOLOGY 206a. Seminar in Learning 

PSYCHOLOGY 207b. Seminar in Perception Mr. Morant 

PSYCHOLOGY 208a. Seminar in Cognition Miss Simmel 

"PSYCHOLOGY 209a. Seminar in Physiological and Comparative Psychology 

"PSYCHOLOGY 210a. Advanced Psychological Statistics 

PSYCHOLOGY 212b. Methodology for Research in Personality 

Modes of observation, simple experimental intervention, the basic methods of 
experimental control, the interview, the formulation and testing of hypotheses, 
use of personal experience, the function of prediction and the implications of 
confirmation and disconfirmation. Mr. Kelly 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



160 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



*PSYCHOLOGY 213. Introduction to Projective Techniques 

^PSYCHOLOGY 214a. History of Psychological Thought 

*PSYCHOLOGY 215b. Psychoanalytic Theory 

PSYCHOLOGY 216a. Selected Clinical Topics Miss Hanfmann 

^PSYCHOLOGY 217b. Research Seminar in Clinical Psychology 

PSYCHOLOGY 218a. Seminar in Social Psychology Mr. London 

PSYCHOLOGY 219a. Approaches to Psychotherapy Mr. Jones 

PSYCHOLOGY 220. Supervised Individual Field Work Mr. Jones and staff 

PSYCHOLOGY 221. Clinical Psychopathology Mr. Rand 

PSYCHOLOGY 222a. Seminar in Conflict and Frustration Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 290-297. Readings in Psychological Literature Mr. Morant and Staff 

291-2 Learning and Higher Processes 

291-3 Physiological and Comparative Psychology 

292-1 Personality and Motivation 

292-2 Psychopathology and CHnical Psychology 

293-1 Genetic and Child Psychology 

293-2 Social Psychology and Anthropology 

294 Advanced Readings in Methodology and Systematics 

295 Advanced Readings in Experimental Psychology 

296 Advanced Readings in Dynamic Psychology 

297 Advanced Readings in Psychology and Related Fields 

PSYCHOLOGY 300. Department Colloquium and Research Seminar 

Mr. Maslow and Staff 

*PSYCHOLOGY 301. Seminar in Advanced Psychological Topics I 
PSYCHOLOGY 400-407. Dissertation Research 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 

400. Miss Hanfmann 404. Mr. Maslow 

401. Mr. Jones 405. Mr. Morant 

402. Mr. Kelly 406. Mr. Neisser 

403. Mr. Klee 407. Miss Simmel 

Sociology 
Objectives 

The graduate program in sociology is primarily a doctoral program and is 
designed for students who intend to devote themselves to teaching and re- 
search in sociology. The student may, by satisfying certain requirements, 
receive the M.A. degree during his course of study. The general objective is 
to educate students in the major areas of sociology with specialization in 
several of them. 

*Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 161 



Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as specified 
in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to the 
Sociology Department. 

In addition, all prospective students are encouraged to arrange for an 
interview with a member of the Sociology faculty and to submit written 
material (papers, etc.) representative of their best work, which need not be, 
however, of a sociological nature. 

Faculty 

Professor John R. Seeley, Chairman: Sociological theory. Social psychol- 
ogy. Social research. 

Professor Lewis A. Coser: Sociological theory. Political sociology. 

Professor Everett C. Hughes: Social organization. Race and ethnic rela- 
tions. Occupations and work systems. 

Professor Morris S. Schwartz: Social psychology. Social psychiatry. Ap- 
plied sociology. 

Professor Kurt H. Wolff: Sociological theory. Sociology of knowledge. 
*Associate Professor Philip E. Slater: Family. Small groups. 
** Associate Professor Maurice R. Stein: Communities. Sociology of litera- 
ture. Social psychiatry. 

Associate Professor Robert S. Weiss: Methodology. Sociology of occupa- 
tions. 

Assistant Professor Gordon Fellman: Social psychology. Stratification. 
Comparative sociology. 

Assistant Professor Samuel E. Wallace: Field methods. Violence. 

Assistant Professor Bernard Z. Sobel: Sociology of religion. Sociology of 
the Jews. 

Assistant Professor Irving K. Zola: Deviance. Sociology of health and ill- 
ness. 

Visiting Lecturer Alvin Zalinger: Personality and social structure. Afri- 
can studies. 

In addition to the general fields represented by the above instructors, there 
are two special training programs: one in Field Research and a second in 
the Social Organization of Medical Care. For further information, please 
write to the Sociology Department. 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program of Study. All entering students are expected to enroll in 

*On Leave, Spring Term. 
"On Leave, Fall Term. 



162 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



courses prescribed for the first year. If credit is granted for graduate work 
done at other institutions, nonnally it will be applied to the second year. 
In exceptional circumstances, the student may request departmental ap- 
proval to substitute credit for work done elsewhere for the courses required 
in the first year. Substitution may depend upon examination in the course 
to be waived. 

The program for the Ph.D. degree is ordinarily completed in three 
stages: 

First Year 

Fall Term: Sociology 200a; Sociology 203a; Sociology 125a. 

Spring Term: Sociology 200b; Sociology 203b; Sociology 210b. 

During the first year, the student is allowed, in addition to the above 
program, one elective half-course which may be taken in either term. 

Second Year 

Sociology 300c and six elective half-courses, three of which should be 
seminars or reading courses. 

During the second year, after the student has passed one language 
examination and has completed three terms in residence at full-time, he 
may petition the department chairman for admission to candidacy for the 
M.A. degree. If the department judges that preparation for the degree has 
been sufficient, the student will be invited to submit to the department two 
papers written during this period for approval as Master's papers. 

Third Year 

Sociology 400: Dissertation Research. 

Residence Requirement. The minimum residence requirement for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy is two years. It is expected that the Ph.D. 
will be earned within five years. 

Language Requirements. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must 
demonstrate proficiency in two foreign languages, ordinarily French and 
German. Another language may, upon petition to the department, be sub- 
stituted for either French or German. 

Qualifying Examinations. All graduate students will be required to 
take qualifying examinations during their third year in the program with 
the exception of those students who have received credit for work done 
elsewhere. Those students will take the qualifying examinations during the 
second year in the program. The examinations are designed to test com- 
petence in three broad fields of sociology. The choice of fields will be 
determined by the student in consultation with his advisor and will be 
subject to departmental approval. 

Except in the case of transfer students where a special date may be set, 
the initial choice of fields should be made by March 15 of the second year 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 163 



in residence. After the fields have been approved and an examining com- 
mittee appointed, the student will meet with the committee to determine 
the literature for which he will be held responsible. This initial meeting 
shall take place at least six months prior to the examination. The exami- 
nation itself will be a written one which will be completed on a take-home 
basis. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student shall be eligible for admission to 
candidacy when he has fulfilled his residence requirements, demonstrated 
proficiency in two foreign languages, passed the departmental qualifying 
examination, and had his dissertation proposal approved. 

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination. The candidate will be re- 
quired to prepare a prospectus for his dissertation before he begins con- 
centrated work. This prospectus must be prepared within six months after 
he has passed the qualifying examinations and must be approved by the 
student's advisory committee and by the department. 

When the dissertation is accepted by the department, a final oral 
examination will be scheduled, wherein the candidate must successfully 
defend his dissertation before the department members and at least one 
member of the faculty engaged in graduate instruction outside the depart- 
ment. 

Courses of Instruction 
SOCIOLOGY 100a. Sociology of the Community 

The contrast between the pre-industrial and the modern industrial community. 
The institutional structure of community life, its internal structure and external 
sources of control and domination. Emphasis on the psychological and social foun- 
dations of modern community life. Illustrations from European and American 
communities. Mr. Stein 

*SOCIOLOGY 101a. Sociology of Conflict and War 

The functions of social conflict in difl^erent types of societies and different in- 
stitutional settings, in large social structures and smaller groups. Racial and ethnic 
conflicts, marital conflicts, political conflicts, war. 

^SOCIOLOGY 102a. Social Psychiatry 

The interplay between the social formation of the self and institutional par- 
ticipation. The processes by which the individual incorporates through language 
and action the personal styles available to his experience and assessment; types of 
personal identity and mechanisms of defense in stable and changing societies, with 
emphasis on Western personality. 

SOCIOLOGY 103a. Sociology of Religion 

Sociological analysis of contemporary and historical religious institutions and 
experiences. Religious leadership and followership; conversion; sect, denomination, 
and church; religion, society and politics; leading contemporary schools of theology. 
*Not to be given in 1965-66. ^^- ^^bel 



164 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



*SOCIOLOGY 104b. Sociology of Education 

Functional bases of educational systems; their formal and informal organiza- 
tion; their relations to family, economy, polity, and social classes. 

SOCIOLOGY 105b. Sociology of Modern Anti-Semitism 

Sociological analysis of contemporary forms of anti-Semitism. Various theories, 
both past and present, attempting to explain the phenomenon will be examined 
critically. 

Admission by consent of instructor. Mr. Sobel 

SOCIOLOGY 106b. Sociology of Literature 

The relations between society and literary forms in selected historical periods. 
Emphasis on the relations between problems and methods in inquiry as presented 
by sociological and humanistic students of man. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Mr. Stein 

SOCIOLOGY 107a. Advanced Social Psychology 

Human behavior from a combined psychodynamic and sociological point of 
view, with special emphasis on socialization and the relations between the in- 
dividual and the collectivity. Mr. Schwartz 

*SOCIOLOGY 109a. Social Causation 

The nature and significance of causal inquiry, especially into social phenom- 
ena. Explanation, understanding, interpretation. Case study and generalization. 
Social causation and social change. 

SOCIOLOGY 110a. Sociology of Knowledge 

History and historical interpretation of the sociology of knowledge, with 
particular emphasis on German and recent American literature. Mr. Wolff 

*SOCIOLOGY Ilia. Political Sociology Seminar 

The political community in seventeenth century England; symbolic expres- 
sion; moral and intellectual foundations; social and economic forces; the inter- 
pretation of transition. 

SOCIOLOGY 112b. Social Stratification 

Bases of stratification and types of class systems. Variables which place an 
individual within a class, mobility between classes; influences of class subcultures 
on the personality; the dynamics of change in social-class systems. Mr. Fellman 

*SOCIOLOGY 114a. Modern Bureaucracy 

*SOCIOLOGY 115b. Sociology of the American Churches 

The major sociological and theological characteristics of the American 
churches; church membership and church organization; the relationship of the 
churches to the power structure and to each other; Catholics and Jews; the "ma- 
jority" churches in a pluralistic society. 

SOCIOLOGY 116b. Racial and Cultural Contacts 

Comparative study of multi-racial (cultural, ethnic, religious) societies in 
various parts of the world, but with emphasis on the United States. Their struc- 
tures; problems and conflicts of personal identity; relations among people of vari- 
ous categories; ideologies; conflict, movements and change. Mr. Hughes 
•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



AREASOFSTUDYANDCOURSES 165 



SOCIOLOGY 117a. Sociology of Work and Occupations 

A comparison of work and occupational systems in various cultures. Social 
organization of occupations and the place of work in the life of the individual. 

Mr. Hushes 

^SOCIOLOGY 118a. Social Institutions ^ 

Development and changes of various institutions characteristic of North 
American society, with some attention to other societies. Their origins, the con- 
tingencies to which they are subject, and their interrelations. Field work. 

*SOCIOLOGY 122a. Sociology of Power 

Sociological analysis of power relations and systems, exploring the literature 
on the theory and practice of power, with special attention to statements by the 
major social theorists. 

*SOCIOLOGY 122b. Comparative Political Sociology 

Sociological analysis of power systems and political communities with special 
attention to systems based on violence and organized fear. 

*SOCIOLOGY 123a. Ideology and Social Movements 

Effect of political events and social processes on political thought and action 
in the twentieth century. Social functions of political ideologies. Structure and 
orientation of organizations intending to cause social change. 

SOCIOLOGY 125a. Quantitative Methods in Research 

The uses of statistics in the organization, interpretation, and presentation of 
research data, with emphasis on the ideas underlying the development and use of 
statistical techniques. Mr. Weiss 

*SOCIOLOGY 126a. Sociology of Deviance 

Deviance as a social process, its nature and conception, its functional as well 
as dysfunctional aspects. Survey of theory and research. Concentration on selected 
instances of individual and social pathology. 

*SOCIOLOGY 126b. The Institutions of Social Control 

An examination of the formal and informal control of what society has 
labeled "deviant." Consideration in turn of the law, selected social forms of 
punishment and reward, the caretakers and agents of social control, the treatment 
and custodial organizations. 

SOCIOLOGY 130b. The Family 

The family in relation to its societal context and the personality development 
of the child. Cross-cultural materials will be emphasized. Mr. Slater 

SOCIOLOGY 132a. American Social Patterns 

The general types of role relationships developed in the course of an individ- 
ual's life, including relationships with strangers, work associates, friends, kin will 
be discussed. Attention will be directed to the structures within which these 
relationships take place, their assumptions, and their typical emotional content. 
Also to be discussed will be typical dramas and dilemmas encountered within 
these relationships. Mr. Weiss 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



166 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



SOCIOLOGY 135a. Group Process 

Interpretation of interpersonal behavior and group development, based in 
part on observation of the discussion group itself. Readings v^'ill include material 
from psychology and social anthropology as well as sociology. Mr. Slater 

SOCIOLOGY 135b. Advanced Group Process 

A continuation of Sociology 135a. 

Open to students who have taken Sociology 135a or with permission of the 
instructor. Mr. Slater 

SOCIOLOGY 190b. Social Organization of Medical Settings 

An analysis of the structural arrangements of medical practice and of medical 
settings. Problems of communication and role relationships among professionals 
and between patients and medical personnel will be examined. The impact of 
structures and role relationships on quality and quantity of medical care and on 
use of resources will be analyzed. Mr. Zola and Staff 

SOCIOLOGY 191a. Health, Community, and Society 

All exploration into the interrelationships of the nature of society and societies 
on the existence and treatment of health and illness. Topics include: conceptions of 
health and illness, patient careers, treatment institutions and practices, and the 
place of social science in medicine. Mr. Zola and Staff 

*SOCIOLOGY 192. Sociology of the Medical Professions 

This course will provide an analysis of the key occupational groups in medi- 
cine, as well as of quasi and marginal practitioners. The selection, recruitment and 
training of those groups will be examined and the strategic points in their careers 
will be considered. 

SOCIOLOGY 193b. Demographic, Ecological, and Economic Factors in Medical Care 

Community health programs and the current emphases of public health prac- 
tice will be described. The structure and provision of health services in other cul- 
tures will be considered and compared with those in the United States. 

Mr. Miller and Staff 

*SOCIOLOGY 194. Methods of Social and Economic Research in Medical Care 

The utility and application of sociological, economic and epidemiological 
methods will be discussed. Problems of measurement, design and analysis will be 
examined as well as the practical problems in implementing studies in the field of 
medical care. 

SOCIOLOGY 195. Field Work in Medical Settings 

Credit hours to be arranged. Mr. Zola and Staff 

SOCIOLOGY 200. Classical Sociological Theory 

Study of major sociologists, such as Comte, Spencer, Marx, Durkheim, Pareto, 
Weber, Simmel, Ward, Ross, Sumner, Park, Mannheim, in their historical setting, 
with special attention to their substantive concerns and methodologies. 

1st sem., Mr. Stein 
'^^^to be given in 1965-66. 2nd sem., Mr. Coser 



AREAS OF STUDY AND COURSES 167 



SOCIOLOGY 203. Field Methods in Sociological Research 

Field study with opportunity for individual and group research. Students will 
collect their own data and analyze them. Messrs. Fellman, Hughes, Slater and Zola 

SOCIOLOGY 210b. Survey of Research Methods 

This course will discuss: a philosophy of science useful for understanding 
social research; conceptual models available for organizing data; research strategies, 
including the case study, exploratory approaches, survey research, and possible 
experimental designs. Mr. Weiss 

^SOCIOLOGY 215a. Sociology of the Intellectuals 

Institutional settings for intellectual life since the eighteenth century. The 
salon, the coffeehouse, the scientific society, the reading public, the commercializa- 
tion of writing, bohemia, reviews and little magazines. The men of knowledge and 
the men of power. The modern intellectual in the world of bureaucracy. 

*SOCIOLOGY 223b. Sociology of Poverty 

SOCIOLOGY 224b. Aspects of Social Control in Religious and Secular 
Utopian Communities 

An analysis of the sociological structure of Utopian communities demonstrat- 
ing similarities and differences between the secular and religious types and their 
relationships to the broader societal contexts from which they emerge. The course 
will emphasize a discussion of the modes and processes of social control developed 
by the various movements. Messrs. Coser and Sobel 

SOCIOLOGY 225a. Applied Sociology Seminar 

The application of social science principles to the solution of practical prob- 
lems in such fields as community organization, technological change, urban and 
rural development, industrial relations, mental and public health. 

Admission by consent of instructor. Messrs. Schwartz, Seeley and Stein 

*SOCIOLOGY 226b. Seminar in Social Psychology 

Major problems and issues in the field of social psychology; recent research; 
contemporary theoretical developments. 

SOCIOLOGY 227b. Seminar on Occupations 

Problems in the social organization of work, with emphasis on research on the 
professions in modern society. Messrs. Hughes and Weiss 

SOCIOLOGY 228b. Some Pre-theoretical Problems of Sociology 

Sociological aspects of sociology. Relations between philosophical and 
methodological problems of sociology. Conditions of constructing sociological 
theory. 

Major background readings for student papers: Maurice Natanson, ed.. Philos- 
ophy of the Social Sciences; Alfred Schutz, Collected Papers, Vos. I and II. 

Mr. Wolff 

*SOCIOLOGY 229. Research Seminar: The Social and Personal Determinants of Illness 

Examination of ongoing research stressing the application and integration of 
sociological and psychological levels of analysis. Individual projects utilizing the 
available data on physical and mental illness will be carried out. 

•Not to be given in 1965-66. 



168 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



SOCIOLOGY 230-235. Readings in Sociological Literature Mr. Schwartz and Staff 

230a and b. Theory and History 

231a and b. Methodology 

232a and b. institutions (Political Sociology, Communities, Bureaucracy, Educa- 
tion, Occupations, Religion) 

233a and b. Social Psychology and Psychiatry 

234a and b. Sociology of Intellectual Life (Sociology of Literature, Sociology of 
Knowledge) 

235a and b. Social Processes (Causation, Change, Conflict, Control, Stratifica- 
tion; Racial and Cultural Relations) 

SOCIOLOGY 300c. Colloquium 

The purpose of the colloquium is to give staff members, sociologists from 
other institutions, and post-M.A. students the opportunity to present current re- 
search, tentative hypotheses, and more general ideas and positions concerning the 
study of society. Mr. Schwartz 

SOCIOLOGY 301c. Advanced Field Research 

A second year course in methods of field research. Students will be placed as 
participant observers in a number of different institutions and will be individually 
supervised in their field work. Messrs. Hughes, Slater and Zola 



SOCIOLOGY 400-410. Dissertation Research 


Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. 


400. 


Mr. Coser 


401. 


Mr. Fellman 


402. 


Mr. Hughes 


403. 


Mr. Schwartz 


404. 


Mr. Seeley 


405. 


Mr. Slater 


406. 


Mr. Sobel 


407. 


Mr. Stein 


408. 


Mr. Weiss 


409. 


Mr. Wolff 


410. 


Mr. Zola 


Theatre Arts 



A new graduate program in Theatre Arts, leading to the degrees of Master 
of Fine Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Theatre Arts, will begin opera- 
tion in the academic year 1966-67. 

Detailed information may be had by writing to the Dean, Graduate 
School of Arts And Sciences, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 
02154. 



FELLOWSHIPS 



169 




Fellowships 



Maxwell and Fannie Abbell Teaching Fellowship in Judaic Studies (1954) 
Created by the late Maxwell Abbell of Chicago, Illinois, to support a teaching 
fellowship in the field of Judaic Studies. 

Allied Chemical Foundation Felloivship (1964) Established by the Allied 
Chemical Foundation of New York. This Fellowship will be awarded, at the 
University's discretion, to an outstanding graduate student, a citizen of the United 
States or Canada, who is concentrating in the field of Chemistry, and who has 
demonstrated an aptitude for research in science. 

Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority Foundation Fellowship (1959) Established in 
honorary tribute to the Founders of this Sorority, for fellowship subsidy in the 
School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Jeannette and Louis Altschul Fellowship Fund (1946) Established by the 
late Jeannette and Louis Altschul of New York City to help subsidize the educa- 
tion of gifted students to complete their graduate program. 

Bernard Aronson Teaching Fellowship (1964) Established by Mr. Bernard 
Aronson of New York, New York, to provide teaching fellowships for graduate 
students who are concentrating in the sciences. 

Charles C. Bassine Fellowship (1961) Established in honor of Mr. Charles C. 
Bassine of New York City by the Trustees of the Long Island Jewish Hospital on 
the occasion of his induction as a Fellow of the University, to be used to provide 
fellowship assistance for outstanding graduate students. 

Beatrice Foods Company Fellowship (1962) Established through the gener- 



170 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



osity of the Beatrice Foods Company of Chicago, Illinois, to provide fellowship aid 
for gifted graduate students. 

Beech-Nut Life Savers, Inc. Felloioship (1962) Established to support fellow- 
ship assistance for deserving graduate students through a grant from Beech-Nut 
Life Savers, Inc. of New York City. 

Allan I. Bluestein Fellowship (1960) Established by Allan I. Bluestein 
through the Jacob Bluestein Foundation, Inc. of New York, to assist deserving 
students in the field of the humanities, particularly in literature, history and 
language. 

Jacob and Rachel Bluestein Memorial Fellowship (1960) Established by 
Allan I. Bluestein through the Jacob Bluestein Foundation, Inc. of New York, in 
memory of his parents, to assist gifted students in the field of the humanities. 

David Brenner Fellowship Fund (1961) An annual fellowship for a deserv- 
ing graduate student in the social sciences, preferably from abroad and from a 
newly developing area or country. 

Otto and Mynette Bresky Fellowship Endoioment (1962) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Otto Bresky of Newton, Massachusetts, the income of which will help to 
subsidize the graduate education of a gifted and worthy student. 

Harry and Esther Brown Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Brown of Haverhill, Massachusetts, to provide assistance to a graduate 
student in the Lown Institute for Contemporary Jewish Studies. 

Morris Burg Teaching Fellowship (1957) Established by Mrs. Mildred H. 
Burg of Brookline, Massachusetts, in memorial tribute to her husband, to support 
a teaching fellowship in the area of human relations. 

Campbell Soup Fellowship (1961) Four tuition fellowships established by 
Campbell Soup Co. as part of its Aid to Education Program and assigned to gifted 
students in the Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Sol Cantor Fellowship (1963) Established as a memorial tribute to his 
mother, Mrs. Pearl Cantor, by Sol Cantor of New York. This fund will provide 
assistance to needy and promising graduate students. 

Aida Coburn Fellowship (1964) Established in honor of his wife by the late 
Abbott Coburn of Chicago, Illinois. This fellowship will provide partial assistance 
to a deserving graduate student. 

Dora K. Cohn Fellowship in Social Welfare (1959) Set up as a memorial by 
Mr. Ruby P. Cohn of St. Louis, Missouri, to subsidize graduate study in the School 
for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Jack Cohn Memorial Science Fellowships (1962) Established by the Artists 
Foundation, Inc., of New York City, (Nathan J. Cohn, President) in memory of 
the late Jack Cohn, to provide for the next five years for the annual award of 
three fellowships of $4,500 each on the basis of merit and need to students 
enrolled in the Graduate School in the area of science. 

Combined Jewish Appeal of Greater Boston-Associated Jewish Philanthropies 
Fellowship (1959) A $5,000 fellowship to be awarded to a student pursuing 
graduate work in social welfare. 

Leon J. Coslov Fellowship (1957) Established by Mr. Leon J. Coslov of 
Glassport, Pennsylvania, to support a teaching fellowship. 

Dan Danciger Graduate Fellowship Trust Fund (1958) Established through 
a $250,000 bequest from the estate of the late Dan Danciger of Fort Worth, Texas, 



FELLOWSHIPS 171 



to provide fellowship assistance for graduate students of outstanding academic 
potential to enable them to pursue academic careers regardless of financial 
limitations. 

Diirkee Graduate Fellowship in Biochemistry (1962) A graduate fellowship 
established by the Durkee Famous Foods of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (The Glid- 
den Company), for support of a deserving graduate student in Biochemistry. This 
fellowship will provide a grant to the student, payment of tuition and an allow- 
ance for each dependent. 

Eagle Food Centers Foundation Fellowship (1962) Established through the 
generosity of the Eagle Food Centers Foundation of Rock Island, Illinois, to 
subsidize gifted graduate students. 

Ida and Mark A. Edison Teaching Fellowship (1955) Established as a 
memorial to Ida and Mark A. Edison by the Shapiro brothers of Auburn, Maine, 
to support a teaching fellowship. 

Harry E. Eisenrod and Mel Dorfman Graduate Fellowship (1964) Estab- 
lished by Mr. Harry E. Eisenrod and Mr. Mel Dorfman through the Household 
Manufacturing Company of Los Angeles, California, to provide assistance to de- 
serving graduate students. 

Max and Frances Elkon Fellowship Endowment (1962) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Max Elkon of New York City. The income to be used to provide 
fellowship assistance for gifted graduate students. 

Esso Education Foundation Teaching Fellowship (1956) A grant from the 
Esso Education Foundation of Standard Oil Company (New Jersey), assigned as a 
teaching fellowship, to assist in the undergraduate educational program. 

Meyer Factor Fellowship (1963) Established by Harold E. Factor of Chicago, 
Illinois to provide fellowship assistance to gifted and needy graduate students. 

Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Neio York Fellowship (1962) Estab- 
lished by the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, for the support of 
a deserving student from the New York metropolitan area, at the Florence Heller 
School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Nathan and Vivian Fink Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Nathan Fink of New York, to help subsidize a gifted graduate student in the 
Lown Institute for Contemporary Jewish Affairs. 

Jacob Finkelstein and Sons, Inc. Fellowship (1963) Established by the Fink- 
elstein Family of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, to provide fellowship assistance over 
a three year period for a deserving graduate student. 

M. B. and Fannie Finkelstein Foundation Research Fellowship Grant (1961) 
Established by the trustees of the M. B. and Fannie Finkelstein Foundation of 
Houston, Texas, to help subsidize an outstanding student who wishes to go into 
graduate research work. 

Harry K. and Emma R. Fox Charitable Foundation Fellowship (1962) Es- 
tablished by the Harry K. and Emma R. Fox Charitable Foundation of Cleveland, 
Ohio, to support a partial fellowship for a deserving graduate student who, with- 
out this assistance, would be unable to complete his advanced studies. 

General Foods Fund Fellowship Grant (1961) Established by the General 
Foods Fund Inc. of New York City, for fellowship assistance to outstanding gradu- 
ate students who are concentrating in the area of the life sciences. 



172 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Leo Gerstenzang Science Felloioship Endowment Fund (1962) Established 
by Mrs. Leo Gerstenzang of New York City and Palm Beach, Florida, in memory 
of her late husband. The income will be used for fellowships to subsidize graduate 
education and research for deserving graduate students in the field of science. 

Gillette Graduate Teaching Fellowship (1961) Established by the Gillette 
Company of Boston, Massachusetts, for an annual graduate teaching fellowship. 

Harry and Elka Gitlow Felloiuship Endowment in Humanistic Studies (1959) 
Established by Mr. Albert Gitlow of New York City and members of the family 
as a memorial tribute. 

Albert A. Glassman Fellowship (1962) Established by a bequest of Albert A. 
Glassman, late of Cleveland, Ohio. This fund will be used for research in the field 
of medicine or biochemistry. 

Herman Golanty Memorial Fellowship (1956) Established by Mr. George C. 
Golanty of Detroit, Michigan. 

Beatrice I. and Jacob Goldberg Fellowship Endowment Fund (1962) Estab- 
lished by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Goldberg of Brookline, Massachusetts, in honor of 
their fiftieth wedding anniversary. The income from this fund is to be used to 
support fellowships. 

Mollie Goldberg Memorial Felloiuship Endowment (1963) Established as a 
memorial tribute by Isadore J. Goldberg of Chicago, and Milton D. Goldberg of 
Glencoe, Illinois. The income will be used to provide an annual fellowship for a 
deserving student in the Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in 
Social Welfare. 

Charles Goldman Teaching Fellowship (1963) Established to honor the in- 
duction of Charles Goldman as a Fellow of the University by his friends and 
associates. The income from this fund will provide assistance for a deserving 
graduate student. 

Alexander Goldstein Teaching Fellowship in Social Science (1950) The in- 
come from this $25,000 fund will be used to support a teaching fellowship in the 
field of social science. Established as a memorial to her brother by the late Miss 
Lutie Goldstein of San Francisco, California. 

Edward Goldstein Teaching Fellowship (1954) A grant from Mr. Edward 
Goldstein of Boston, Massachusetts, to support a teaching fellowship. 

Abraham Goocbnan Fellowship Endowment Fund (1962) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Abraham Goodman of Waban, Massachusetts. Temporarily, all income 
will be used to subsidize graduate fellowships. Once a permanent identification has 
been made the capital fund will be transferred for that purpose. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Gordon Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Ben Gordon of Harrison, New Jersey to provide fellowship assistance for deserving 
graduate students. 

Anna C. Greenstone Memorial Fellowship (1952) Established by her children, 
Mr. Charles R. Greenstone of San Francisco, California, the late Mr. Stanford M. 
Green of San Francisco, California, and Mrs. Simon Rubin of New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Gulf Oil Corporation Fellowship (1959) A grant from the Gulf Oil Cor- 
poration's Aid to Education Program, to be assigned for fellowship assistance in 
the School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 



FELLOWSHIPS 173 



Edward Hano Fellowship Endowment (1958) The income from this fund is 
to provide supplementary fellowship assistance to gifted graduate students enrolled 
in the School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. A tribute to the late Edward 
Hano, of Granby, Massachusetts, by his wife and members of the family. 

Louis H. Harris Teaching Fellowship (1955) Established by Mrs. Max S. 
Hillson and the late Mr. Hillson of New York City, in honor of Louis H. Harris, 
to support a teaching fellowship. 

Hartog of California Graduate Fellowship Fund (1961) Established by Har- 
tog of California, to help a graduate student interested in the field of "The 
History of Ideas." 

Dr. Maurice B. Hexter Fellowship (1961) Established as a tribute to Dr. 
Maurice B. Hexter of New York City by his friends. This fellowship is to be given 
to a deserving student at the Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in 
Social Welfare. 

M. Z. and Hannah Holland Fellowship Endowment (1964) Established by 
the family and friends of Mr. and Mrs. M. Z. Holland of Chicago, Illinois, to 
honor their fiftieth wedding anniversary and, also, Mr. Holland's seventy-seventh 
birthday. The income from this fund' will offer assistance to deserving graduate 
students. 

Imperial Oil Graduate Research Fellowships (1963) Established by Imperial 
Oil Limited of Toronto, Canada from a fellowship fund set up by the Company 
in 1946, which provides graduate school opportunities to worthy and deserving 
students from Canadian universities. 

Peter A. Isaacson Fellowship in the Lown Institute for Contemporary Jewish 
Studies (1963) Established by Mr. Peter A. Isaacson of Lewiston, Maine for 
gifted students concentrating in the field of Judaic studies. 

Eddie Jacobson Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1957) Two fellowships in 
the amount of $2,000 each for gifted students from Israel, who are preparing 
themselves at Brandeis University for a more effective career of service in the State 
of Israel. Established by friends of the late Eddie Jacobson of Kansas City, under 
the chairmenship of former President Truman and Mr. George Roth. 

Jewish Community Center of Hunts Point, Bronx, New York (1962) Estab- 
lished by the Trustees of the Jewish Community Center of Hunts Point, New 
York, so that the income may be used for gifted and worthy graduate students who 
are concentrating in the history and literature of traditional Judaism. Preference is 
given to students who come from the metropolitan New York area. 

Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland Fellowship (1962) Established 
by the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland for the support of a deserving 
student from the Cleveland, Ohio area, at the Florence Heller School for Ad- 
vanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Max Kagan Fellowship (1962) Established by Mr. Max Kagan of Bangor, 
Maine, in support of a deserving graduate student at the Philip W. Lown Institute 
of Advanced Judaic Studies. 

Robert E. and Harry A. Kangesser Fellowship Trust (1951) Established by 
Messrs. Robert E. and Harry A. Kangesser of Cleveland, Ohio, the income to be 
used for teaching fellowships. 

Henry Kaufmann Fellowship in Group and Community Development (1964) 
Established by the Henry Kaufmann Foundation, Judge Joseph M. Proskauer, 



174 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Norman S. Goetz, and Samuel Lemberg, all of New York City. The income from 
this endowed fellowship will support the teaching activities of a faculty member 
whose doctoral students are specializing in the problems of small groups, neigh- 
borhood organizations, and group and community development. 

Myer and Ida Kirstein Fellowship Endoiument Fund (1963) Established by 
Mr. and Mrs. Myer Kirstein of Swampscott, Massachusetts, to provide aid to 
worthy graduate students in any field of concentration. 

Richard Kramer Memorial Fellowship (1961) Established in memory of 
their son, Richard, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kramer of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
to help subsidize a graduate student concentrating in the field of biochemistry. 

Lillian Kratter Fellowship (1960) Established in her honor by her husband, 
Mr. Marvin Kratter of New York City, to be assigned to a female student concen- 
trating in the Graduate School of Music. 

Marvin Kratter Fellowship (1960) Established in his honor by his wife, Mrs. 
Lillian Kratter of New York City, to be assigned to a male student concentrating 
in the graduate area of biology. 

Hyman Kuchai Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. Hyman Kuchai of 
Harrison, New York to provide fellowship assistance for deserving graduate 
students. 

William Lakritz Fellowship Endowment in Chemistry (1962) Established by 
the daughters of William Lakritz of New York City and their husbands, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jack N. Friedman of Glencoe, Illinois, and Dr. and Mrs. Henry Graham, Los 
Angeles, California, to be used in partial subsidy of graduate students who concen- 
trate in the field of Chemistry. 

Ida S. Latz Foundation Fellowship (1959) Established by this Foundation to 
make available a fellowship to a disabled veteran for study at the School for 
Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

LCK Fellowship in Social Science (1957) Established by an anonymous 
friend of the University to support a fellowship in the area of the social sciences, 
with preference in the field of economics. 

Mathus Lemberg Fellowship Endowment (1962) Established by Bernard Lem- 
berg of Old Stone Bridge, New Jersey, and Leon Lemberg of Coral Gables, Florida, 
in memory of their beloved father so that the income may serve as tuition sub- 
vention for graduate students. 

Levinson Teaching Fellowship in Biology (1951) Established by the James 
and Rachel Levinson Foundation of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Minnie Lewis Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. George L Lewis of 
Portland, Maine, to provide assistance to a deserving graduate student in the 
Lown Institute for Contemporary Jewish Studies. 

Dr. Meno Lissauer Teaching Fellowship in Natural Science (1957) Set up 
through a major gift by the late Dr. Meno Lissauer of New York City and the 
birthday tributes of his colleagues in the Metals and Mining Industry. 

P. Lorillard and Company Fellowship (1962) Established through P. Loril- 
lard and Company of New York City to help subsidize the education of gifted 
students to complete their graduate program. 

Charles Lubin Fellowship (1963) Established at the annual Chicago dinner 
by a group of his friends to honor Mr. Charles Lubin. This scholarship will 
provide assistance to a deserving student. 



FELLOWSHIPS 175 



Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin Fellowship (1957) Established by friends of 
former Governor McKeldin of Maryland as a tribute to him. To be used to 
subsidize gifted graduate students who plan to concentrate in the areas of political 
science and government. 

Abraham Mendelowitz Fellowship Endoioment Fund (1959) Established by 
the Millinery Workers Health and Welfare Fund in honor of Mr. Abraham 
Mendelowitz of New York City on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday. To 
subsidize outstanding scholars so that they may continue their studies and medical 
research in biochemistry and microbiology. 

Merrill Foundation Fellowships (1961) Established by a gift from the 

Charles E. Merrill Trust of Boston, Massachusetts, to encourage gifted scholars in 

the study of all aspects of Jewish life, and develop Jewish community leadership, 
scholarship and teaching, especially on the university level. 

Morris Messing Fellowship (1964) Established by Mr. Morris Messing of 
Nutley, New Jersey, to provide fellowship assistance for deserving graduate 
students. 

Hyman Miller Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. Hyman Miller of Au- 
burn, Maine, to provide assistance to a graduate student in the Lown Institute for 
Contemporary Jewish Studies. 

Joseph Millman Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1964) Established by the 
Joseph Millman Memorial Foundation of Villas, New Jersey through Mr. Stanley 
Rappaport. This fund will provide fellowship assistance for a gifted graduate 
student. Preference is to be given to applicants who are residents of Cape May 
County, New Jersey. 

National Biscuit Company Fellowship (1962) A grant from the National 
Biscuit Company of New York City to provide fellowship support for deserving 
graduate students. 

New York Raincoat Manufacturers Association Fellowship (1963) Estab- 
lished by the New York Raincoat Manufacturers Association of New York City, 
New York, through Mr. Simon Cohen to provide fellowship assistance for deserv- 
ing graduate students. 

David K. Niles Teaching Fellowship in American Government (1957) To be 
assigned in memory of a Trustee of the University, who served with distinction as 
administrative assistant to President Roosevelt and President Truman, for a 
worthy graduate student who plans for a career in American government service. 

Lillian Persky Palais Endowment (1960) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Abra- 
ham S. Persky of Worcester, Massachusetts, in memory of Mr. Persky's sister, as an 
endowment whose income in perpetuity is to subsidize the tuition of gifted gradu- 
ate students so that they may complete their science training. 

Peace Corps Scholarship-Fellowship Fund (1965) Established by the Uni- 
versity to offer scholarship and fellowship assistance to qualified young men and 
women who have completed their tour of duty with the Peace Corps and are 
seeking to complete their educational training. 

Permanent Charity Fund, Incorporated Fellowships in Social Welfare (1962) 
Graduate fellowships contributed by the Committee of the Permanent Charity 
Fund, Incorporated of Boston, Massachusetts, for financial aid to deserving stu- 
dents at the Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 



176 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Maurice Pollack Foundation Research Fellowship (1956) Established by the 
Maurice Pollack Foundation of Quebec, Canada, to enable gifted graduate stu- 
dents to pursue research programs in the field of Judaic studies. 

Prince Macaroni Manufacturing Company and the Cleghorn Folding Box 
Company Felloivship (1962) Established to provide fellowship assistance to de- 
serving graduate students by the Prince Macaroni Manufacturing Company and its 
subsidiary, the Cleghorn Folding Box Company, of Lowell, Massachusetts. 

Norman S. Rabb Fellowship (1962) Established by business associates of the 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Brandeis University in tribute to him. This 
fellowship is to be granted for the support of a deserving graduate student. 

Louis M. Rabinowitz Foundation, Inc. Fellowship (1962) Established by the 
Louis M. Rabinowitz Foundation, Inc. of New York City for the support of a 
foreign student in the social sciences, preferably from Africa. 

Bertha C. Reiss Memorial Fellowship Endowment Fund (1954) Created by 
the late Dr. Henry Reiss of New York City for the establishment of the Bertha C. 
Reiss Memorial Fellowship or teaching fellowships. Awards to be made to students 
on the basis of their accomplishments in the field of research and/or teaching. 

Harry and Mildred Remis Music Fellowships (1963) Established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Remis of Swampscott, Massachusetts. The income from this fund to 
provide fellowship support for gifted advanced students who are enrolled in the 
graduate music department at the University. 

Charles Revson Fellowship Trust (1962) A capital fund of $1,000,000 estab- 
lished by Charles Revson of New York City, to be assigned to outstanding students 
who wish to pursue their graduate studies in the areas of biochemistry, chemistry, 
physics, biology, biophysics, mathematics or psychology. The fellowships will be 
granted annually in the range of |3000-$4000 and may be renewed for three or 
four years. 

Benjamin Rosenberg Teaching Fellowship Endowment (1959) Established 
as a memorial tribute by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rosenberg of Fox Point, Wisconsin, 
to support a teaching fellowship in the field of Polymer Chemistry. 

Leo L. Rosenhirsch Memorial Fellowship Fund (1961) Established by Mr. 
Alfred E. Rosenhirsch and Mrs. Hilda Nussenfeld of New York City to help cover 
tuition and other expenditures for gifted and needy graduate students. 

Edwin M. Rosenthal Teaching Fellowship in the Life Sciences (1961) Estab- 
lished to honor the eighty-second birthday of Edwin A. Rosenthal of Hollywood, 
Florida, by his daughter, Mrs. Hoke Levin of Detroit, Michigan, to be assigned as 
a teaching fellowship for a graduate student concentrating in the life sciences. 

Julius Rosenwald Teaching Fellowships (1952) A series of teaching fellow- 
ships in memory of the distinguished philanthropist, Julius Rosenwald, established 
by his daughter, the late Mrs. Adele Rosenwald Levy of New York City, to 
subsidize the development and teaching of gifted graduate students. 

Dr. Vera Rubin Fellowship (1960) Established by Dr. Vera Rubin of New 
York City for a fellowship in the field oiF anthropology. 

Abram L. Sachar Fellowship (1961) Established by B'nai B'rith in honor of 
the Honorary Chairman of the National Hillel Commission, to underwrite part of 
the expenses for a gifted student at Brandeis University who joins the Hiatt 
Institute in Israel to strengthen background in Israeli Studies. 



FELLOWSHIPS 177 



Dr. Harry Sagansky Fellowship Trust (1963) Established by Dr. Harry Sa- 
gansky of Brookline, Massachusetts, in the amount of |25,000 annually, to be used 
for subsidies to graduate students so that they may be helped in the completion of 
their specialized training. 

Samuel and Rae Salny Fellowship Endowment in Social Relations (1952) 
Established by Mrs. Samuel M. Salny and the late Mr. Salny of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, to support a fellowship in the field of social relations. 

Shirley and Maurice Saltzman Fellowship Endowment Fund (1961) Estab- 
lished by Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Saltzman of Cleveland, Ohio, so that the income 
may be assigned to gifted and advanced students who are concentrating in human- 
ities. 

David Sarnoff Fellowship (1959) Established by the RCA Education Com- 
mittee to subsidize a gifted and needy student in the graduate program in physics. 

Samuel D. and Goldie Saxe Fellowship in Science (1955) Established by 
Mrs. Goldie Saxe of Brookline, Massachusetts, and children, to support research 
and teacher training in the field of science. 

Edward A. Schaffer Teaching Felloioship Endowment (1959) Established by 
Mrs. Edward A. Schaffer of New York City, in memorial tribute to her husband, to 
support a teaching fellowship in the field of humanistic and social sciences. 

Alice Boughton Schaffner Memorial Fellowship Endowment (1961) Estab- 
lished under the terms of the will of the late Alice Boughton Schaffner by her 
designators, Winifred Raushenbush and James Rorty. The income from this fund 
will be used to provide fellowship support for outstanding women students from 
racially underprivileged families. 

Rabbi Solomon Scheinfeld Fellowship Endowment (1959) Established by 
the Sylvia and Aaron Scheinfeld Foundation of Chicago, Illinois, as a memorial 
tribute to Mr. Scheinfeld's distinguished father. The income to be used for fellow- 
ship assistance to gifted graduate students, preferably from Wisconsin, in the 
School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

S. H. Scheuer Fellowship (1960) Established in the School for Advanced 
Studies in Social Welfare to subsidize the doctoral preparation of a gifted graduate 
student enrolled in the School. 

Ida Hillson Schwartz and Elias Edward Schwartz Memorial Fellowship En- 
dowment Fund (1949) Established as a memorial to Ida Hillson Schwartz of 
Winter Hill, Massachusetts, by her family. The Fund has been augmented by a 
perpetuity as an exchange fellowship, either to bring gifted young people from 
Israel to Brandeis or to send Brandeis University students to the Hebrew Univer- 
sity in Israel. 

Kurt and Hortense Schweitzer Teaching Fellowship in American Civilization 
(1951) A grant from Mrs. Kurt Schweitzer and the late Mr. Schweitzer of Okla- 
homa City, Oklahoma, to support a teaching fellowship in the field of American 
civilization. 

Morris Sepinuck Teaching Fellowship (1954) Created as a memorial to Morris 
Sepinuck by his children, Messrs. Samuel and Nathan Sepinuck, and Mrs. George 
Sorkin of Boston, Massachusetts. 

Fannie and Simon Shamroth Fellowship Endowment (1963) Established by the 
children of Fannie and Simon Shamroth of Lynn, Massachusetts. The income from 
this fund will be used to help subsidize deserving graduate students. 



178 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Leonard Shanhouse Fellowship (1963) Established by Mr. Leonard Shan- 
house of Magnolia, Arkansas, to provide fellowship assistance for deserving gradu- 
ate students. 

Isaiah Leo Sharfman Teaching Felloiuship Endowment (1956) Established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Rosenthal of Highland Park, Illinois, in tribute to 
Professor Sharfman of the University of Michigan, with preference given to teach- 
ing fellows in the area of economics. 

Mona Bronfman Sheckman Memorial Teaching Fellowship (1952) A grant 
from the Mona Bronfman Sheckman Memorial Foundation of New York City, to 
support a teaching fellowship. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Smith Memorial Felloivship (1962) Established by Mr. 
Samuel Smith of Allentown, Pennsylvania, in memory of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Abraham Smith, to provide fellowship assistance for worthy graduate students. 

Jack and Irene Hayes Solomon Foundation Fellowship Endowment (1962) 
Established by the Jack and Irene Hayes Solomon Foundation of New York City, 
the income to be used to support fellowships for gifted graduate students. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stadler Teaching Fellowship in Music (1956) Estab- 
lished by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stadler of Hollywood, Florida, in memory of their 
loving mothers, Sarah Stadler and Etta Berger, to support a teaching fellowship in 
the field of music. 

Joseph F. Stein Foundation, Inc. Fellowship (1959) Established by the 
Joseph F. Stein Foundation, Inc. through Mr. Joseph F. Stein of New York City, 
for fellowship study in the School of Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Dr. and Mrs. Siegfried F. Strauss Fellowship (1961) Established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Siegfried F. Strauss of Chicago, Illinois, to subsidize a gifted graduate student 
working in the field of social welfare. 

Sunshine Biscuits, Incorporated Fellowship (1962) Established through a 
grant from Sunshine Biscuits, Incorporated of Long Island City, New York, to 
provide fellowship assistance for deserving graduate students. 

Gertrude W. and Edward M. Swartz Fellowship Endowment Fund 
(1954) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Swartz of Brookline, Massachu- 
setts, to support a teaching or research fellowship. 

David Tannenbaum Teaching Fellowship in Legal Institutions (1958) An 
endowment to honor the memory of David Tannenbaum of Beverly Hills, Cali- 
fornia, established by his friends and admirers. 

Tanson Enterprises Inc. Fellowship (1961) A fellowship set up by Tanson 
Enterprises, Inc. of New York City, to subsidize the graduate training of an 
outstanding student in the School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. 

Ben Tobin Teaching Fellowship (1955) Established by Mr. Ben Tobin of 
Hollywood, Florida, to support a fellowship in the field of science. 

Universal Match Foundation Fellowship (1957) A stipend of $3600 to be 
awarded to a graduate student, or students, who are concentrating in the fields of 
physics, chemistry, biochemistry or microbiology, set up by the Universal Match 
Foundation of St. Louis, Missouri. 

Harry Uviller Fellowship (1962) Established by friends and associates of 
Harry Uviller, in appreciation for his many years of distinguished service as an 
impartial arbitrator, and his many other contributions to the advancement of the 



FELLOWSHIPS 179 



needle trades industry and the preservation of industrial peace in New York. This 
fellowship will provide assistance to deserving graduate students. 

Rose Mary Waga Fellowship Endowment (1964) Established by Mr. Peter E. 
Klein of Cleveland, Ohio, as Trustee to provide, in perpetuity, assistance to 
talented and needy students in the Graduate School. 

Leo Wasserman Graduate Fellowship (1962) Established through a gift from 
the Leo Wasserman Foundation as a memorial to Leo Wasserman, late of Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; the income to be devoted to the aid of graduate students in 
the humanities, the social sciences, and the field of social work. 

Herman Weisselberg Memorial Fellowship (1957) Established as a memorial 
tribute by Mr. Arnold Weisselberg of Long Island City, New York, to support a 
fellowship. 

Carrie Wiener Teaching Fellowship (1950) The income from this $25,000 
fund is to be used for a fellowship, established by Mr. Herman Wiener of Toledo, 
Ohio, in the name of his wife. 

Leon G. Winkelman Fellowship Endowment Fund (1959) Established by 
the Leon G. and Josephine Winkelman Foundation of Detroit, Michigan, as a 
memorial tribute to Leon G. Winkelman, to subsidize a graduate fellowship in the 
field of gerontology. 

Benjamin Y eager Teaching Fellowship (1952) Established by Mr. Benjamin 
Yeager of Sullivan County, New York, for a teaching fellowship. 

Paul Ziffren Felloiuship (1962) Established by Mr. Paul Ziffren of Los An- 
geles, California, to provide fellowship assistance for worthy and deserving gradu- 
ate students concentrating in the social sciences. 



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Directories 




Board of Trustees 

Norman S. Rabb, A.B., L.H.D., Chairman 
Lawrence A. Wien, LL.B., LL.D., Vice-Chairman 
Jacob A. Goldfarb, L.H.D., Treasurer 
Samuel L. Slosberg, A.B., LL.D., Secretary 



George Alpert, LL.B., LL.D. 

James J. Axelrod, L.H.D. 

William Benton, A.B., LL.D. 

Morris Brown 

Sidney M. Farber, M.D., L.H.D. 

Joseph F. Ford, L.H.D. 

Harry W. Golding 

Reuben B. Gryzmish, LL.B. 

Florence G. Heller 

Maurice B. Hexter, Ph.D., L.H.D. 

Jacob B. Hiatt, M.A. 

Milton Kahn, B.S. 

Irving Kane, LL.B., L.H.D. 

Dudley F. Kimball, M.B.A., LL.D. 

Philip M. Klutznick, D.H.L., LL.D. 

Samuel Lemberg 

President of the University 

Abram L. Sachar, Ph.D., Litt.D. 

• Emeritus 



Joseph M. Linsey, D.Com.Sc. 
Isador Lubin, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Joseph L. Mailman 
Mrs. Leon Margolis, A.B. 
William Mazer, B.S. 
Jack I. Poses, M.B.A. 
Joseph M. Proskauer, LL.B., LL.D. 
Israel Rogosin, D.Sc. 
Edward Rose 
Irving Salomon, L.H.D. 
Louis H. Salvage 
Dore Schary, D.H.L., D.F.A. 
Jacob Shapiro, B.S. 
Isaiah Leo Sharfman, LL.B., LL.D. 
*Simon E. Sobeloff, LL.B., Litt.D. 
Benjamin H. Swig 



182 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Officers of Instruction 

Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

Abram Leon Sachar, Ph.D., Litt.D. 
Leonard W. Levy, A.M., Ph.D.* 



President of the University 

Dean of Faculty and Earl Warren 

Professor of History 

Dean of the Graduate School, Associate 

Dean of Faculty and Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Associate Dean of Faculty and 

Associate Professor of History 

Peter Diamandopoulos, M.A., Ph.D. Acting Associate Dean of Faculty 

and Associate Professor of History of Ideas and Philosophy 



Harold Weisberg, B.A., Ph.D. 
Eugene C. Black, A.M., Ph.D.^ 



Robert H. Abeles, M.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

(on the Rosenstiel Foundation) 
Rose Abendstern, B.A., M.A. Lecturer in French 

Asher Adler, M.Sc. Instructor in Physics 

Henry D. Aiken, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of History of Ideas and Philosophy 



Walter E. Albert, M.A., Ph.D. 
John D. W. Andrews, B.A. 
Horace Armistead 
Alexander Altmann, M.A., Ph.D.** 

Jerold S. Auerbach, M.A., Ph.D. 

Maurice Auslander, B.A., Ph.D. 

A. Owen Barfield, B.A., M.A. 

Kenneth Barkin, B.A. 

Howard Bay 

Saul Benison, B.A., Ph.D. 

Daniel C. Bennett, B.A., Ph.D. 

Arthur Berger, B.S., M.A. 

Robert W. Berger, B.S., M.A. 

Stephan Berko, B.A., Ph.D. 

David Sandler Berkowitz, A.M., Ph.D.** 

Joseph S. Berliner, M.A., Ph.D. 



Assistant Professor of French 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Visiting Professor of Theatre Arts 
Philip W. Lawn Professor of 
Jewish Philosophy 
Assistant Professor of History 
Professor of Mathematics 
Visiting Professor of English 
Assistant Professor of History 
Professor of Theatre Arts 
Adjunct Professor of History 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
Walter W. Naumhurg, Professor of Music 
Assistant Professor of Fine Arts 
Professor of Physics 
Professor of History 
Harold J. Silver Professor of Economics 
Martin Boykan, B.A., M.M. Assistant Professor of Music and Artist-in-Residence 
Paul H. Brainard, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Music 



Leo Bronstein, Ph.D. 

Edgar H. Brown, Jr., M.A., Ph.D.* 

Sheldon R. Brunswick, B.A., M.S. 

David A. Buchsbaum, A.B., Ph.D.* 

Norman F. Cantor, M.A., Ph.D. (beginning 1966-67) 

Morris Carnovsky, A.B. 

Joseph L Cheskis, A.M., Ph.D. 



Max Chretien, Ph.D. 

*On Leave, 1965-66 
**On Leave, Fall Term, 1965-66. 



Professor of Fine Arts 

Professor of Mathematics 

Lecturer in Yiddish 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of History 

Adjunct Professor of Theatre Arts 

Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

and Literature 
Associate Professor of Physics 



DIRECTORIES 



183 



James H. Clay, M.A., Ph.D. 

Helen Codere, B.A., Ph.D. 

H. Daniel Cohen, B.S. (beginning 1966-67) 



Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

Professor of Anthropology 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



Saul G. Cohen, M.A., Ph.D. 
Stephen S. Cohen, B.A. 
Peter Colaclides, Ph.D. 
Andree M. Collard, M.A., Ph.D. 
Lewis A. Coser, Ph.D. 
George L. Cowgill, A.M., Ph.D. 
James V. Cunningham, A.B., Ph.D. 
David M. Dawson, A.B., M.D. 
Stanley Deser, B.S., Ph.D. 
Porphyrios Dikaios, D.Litt. 

Paul B. Dorain, B.S., Ph.D. 
Philip J. Driscoll, B.A., M.A. 
James E. Duffy, A.M., Ph.D.** 
Edward Engelberg, M.A., Ph.D. 
Herman T. Epstein, M.A., Ph.D. 



Helena Rubinstein Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Visiting Associate Professor of Classics 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Harry Coplan Professor of Sociology 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Paul E. Prosswimmer Professor of English 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Professor of Physics 

Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of 

Mediterranean Studies 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Instructor in English 

/ Professor of Spanish 

Associate Professor of Comparative Literature 

Professor of Biophysics 



Mireille Etienne, Agregee de I'Universite Visiting Lecturer in French 

Robert Evans, Jr., S.B., Ph.D. Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics 

David L. Falkoff, B.A., Ph.D. Professor of Physics 

Gerald D. Fasman, B.Sc, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

(Established Investigator of the American Heart Association) 



Gordon A. Fellman, B.A., Ph.D. 
David Hackett Fischer, A.B., Ph.D. 
Eugene J. Fleischmann, M.A., Ph.D. 
Emanuel Flumere, B.S., M.Ed. 
Madeline Foley, B.A., M.S. 
Richard G. Fox, A.B., M.A. 
Michael Freeman, M.S., Ph.D. 
Orrie M. Friedman, B.Sc, Ph.D. 
Lawrence H. Fuchs, B.A., Ph.D.* 
Chandler M. Fulton, A.B., Ph.D. 
Joachim E. Gaehde, M.A., Ph.D. 
Barbara Gelpi, M.A., Ph.D. 
Stephen J. Gendzier, M.A., Ph.D. 
Martin Gibbs, B.S., Ph.D. 
Donald B. Giddon, D.M.D., Ph.D. 
Creighton Gilbert, B.A., Ph.D. 



Associate Professor of Sociology 

Assistant Professor of History 

Visiting Lecturer in Jewish Philosophy 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Lecturer in Music and Artist-in-Residence 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Lecturer in Mathematics 

Adjunct Research Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of American Civilization 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Associate Professor of Fine Arts 

Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of French 

Professor of Biology 

Adjunct Lecturer in Psychology 

Sidney and Ellen Wien 



Professor of the History of Art 
Ira H. Gilbert, A.M., Ph.D. Instructor in Astrophysics and Research Associate 

Raymond S. Ginger, A.M., Ph.D. Professor of History 

Howard M. Gitelman, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Economics 

(on the Atran Foundation) 
Nahum Norbert Glatzer, Ph.D. Michael Tuck Professor of Jewish History 

Sidney Golden, B.S., Ph.D. Henry F. Fischbach Professor of Chemistry 

Erich Goldhagen, B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of Politics 

*On Leave, 1965-66 
•*On Leave, Spring Term, 1965-66. 



184 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Abraham Goldin, M.A., Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry 

William M. Goldsmith, B.A. Assistant Professor of Politics 

Jack S. Goldstein, M.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Astrophysics 

Nelson Goodman, B.S., Ph.D.* Harry A. Wolf son Professor of Philosophy 

Cyrus H. Gordon, M.A., Ph.D. Joseph Foster Professor of Near Eastern Studies 
Norman K. Gottwald, A.B., Ph.D. Visiting Lecturer in Biblical Studies 

(Andover Newton Theological School) 
Charles E. Gribble, B.A., A.M. Lecturer in Russian 

Peter Grippe Professor of Fine Arts 

Marcus T. Grisaru, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics 

Eugene P. Gross, A.M., Ph.D. Professor of Physics 

Allen R. Grossman, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English 

Lawrence Grossman, B.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

(Career Award, National Institutes of Health) 
Ernest Grunwald, B.A., Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry 

Alexei Haieff Visiting Professor of Music 

Benjamin Halpern, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Near Eastern Studies 

(on the Rabbi Abraham Joseph and Leah Factor Foundation) 
Joel M. Halpern, A.B., Ph.D.* Associate Professor of Anthropology 

Martin Halpern, M.A., Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts 

(University of Massachusetts) 
L. Davis Hammond, B.A. Instructor in French 

Andras P. Hamori, A.B., Ph.D. Instructor in Mediterranean Studies 

Eugenia Hanfmann, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology 

Victor Harris, M.S., Ph.D.* Professor of English 

Robert W. Hartman, A.M., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Economics 

Elsie Hasskarl, B.A. Instructor in Biology 

Thomas J. Hegarty, A.M., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History 

Steve P. Heims, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Peter Heller, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics 

James B. Hendrickson, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Donald Hindley, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics 

Milton Hindus, B.A., M.S.** Peter and Elizabeth Wolkenstein 

Professor of English 
Harry A. Hoffner, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Anatolian Studies 

Christoph Hohenemser, B.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Thomas C. Hollocher, Jr., B.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Benjamin B. Hoover, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of English 

Graham Hough, Ph.D. (beginning 1966-67) Professor of English 

Everett C. Hughes, A.B., Ph.D. Professor of Sociology 

John M. Hughes, B.S. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Robert F. Hutton, B.S., A.M. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

William P. Jencks, M.D. Rosenstiel Professor of Biochemistry 

Sheridan W. Johns, III, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics 

Mary Ellen Jones, B.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

(on the Rosenstiel Foundation) 
Richard M. Jones, A.B., Ph.D. Professor of Psychology 

Peter C. Jordan, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

•On Leave, 1965-66. 
*»On Leave, Fall Term, 1965-66. 



DIRECTORIES 185 



Lisel K. Judge Lecturer in Physical Education 

David Kaplan, A.M., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Nathan O. Kaplan, A.B., Ph.D. Rosenstiel Professor of Biochemistry 

Morton Keller, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of History 

George A. Kelly, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Psychology 

Albert Kelner, M.Sc, Ph.D. Abraham S. and Gertrude Burg Professor of Biology 
S. Jay Keyser, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English 

James B. Klee, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology 

Lucille H. Klee, M.A., Ph.D. Lecturer in Chemistry 

Attila O. Klein, B.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

Karen W. Klein, M.A., Ph.D. Instructor in English 

Oskar Klein, M.A., Ph.D. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of Physics 

(University of Stockholm) 
Daniel J. Kleitman, A.M., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Robert Lincoln Koff, B.Mus. Associate Professor of Music and 

Artist-in-Residence 
Joseph J. Kohn, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics 

Ira Konigsberg, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English 

Louis Kronenberger, Litt.D. Professor of Theatre Arts 

Kenneth Kustin, B.Sc, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

(on the Morris Schapiro Foundation) 
Robert V. Lange, A.M., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Joel Larus, LL.B., Ph.D.* Assistant Professor of Politics 

John Lawlor, B.A., M.A. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of English 

(University of Keele) 
Earl E. Lazerson, M.A., Ph.D. Visiting Associate Professor of Mathematics 

(Washington University) 
Eugene Lehner Consultant in Chamber Music 

Max Lerner, A.M., Ph.D.** Max Richter Professor of 

American Civilization and Institutions 
Baruch A. Levine, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Hebrew Literature 

Harold L Levine, M.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Lawrence Levine, M.S., Sc.D. Professor of Biochemistry 

(American Cancer Society Professorship) 
Alan L. Levitan, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English 

Avigdor Levy, B.A., M.A.** Lecturer in Near Eastern Studies 

(on the Pincus Glickman Foundation) 
Kenneth J. Levy, M.F.A., Ph.D. Frederic R. Mann Professor of Music 

Denah Levy Lida, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Spanish 

Henry Linschitz, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry 

Edgar Lipworth, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Physics 

Harvey S. London, A.B., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Norton E. Long, A.M., Ph.D. James Gordon Professor of 

Community Government 
William Farnsworth Loomis, B.S., M.D. Louis I. and Bessie Rosenfield 

Professor of Biochemistry 
John M. Lowenstein, B.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

Heinz M. Lubasz, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of History 

*On Leave, 1965-66. 
••On Leave, Spring Term, 1965-66. 



186 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Alvin Lucier, B.A., M.F.A. Lecturer in Music and Director of 

the University Chorus 
Raymond A. Lyttleton, Ph.D. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of Astrophysics 

(St. John's College, Cambridge) 



Ramsay MacMullen, A.B., Ph.D. 
Roy C. Macridis, M.A., Ph.D. 
Douglas R. Maddox, B.A., M.F.A. 
Farahe Maloof, A.B., M.D. 
Robert A. Manners, M.A., Ph.D. 
Thomas N. Margulis, B.S., Ph.D. 
Abraham H. Maslow, M.A., Ph.D.* 
William H. Matheson, M.A., Ph.D. 
Teruhisa Matsusaka, B.Sc, D.Sc.** 
John F. Matthews, B.A.* 
Carlo Mazzone-Clementi 
Eugene Meehan, Ph.D. 
Mosley A. Meer, B.A., Ph.D. 
Harriet K. Meiss, A.B., Ph.D. 



Joseph V. Messer, A.B., M.D. 
Marvin Meyers, M.A., Ph.D. 
Bruce Jerome Mikel, B.A., M.A. 
Paul H. Monsky, M.S., Ph.D. 
Charles Moore, B.A., M.F.A. 
Ricardo B. Morant, M.A., Ph.D. 
Ruth Schachter Morgenthau, Ph.D. 
Aryeh L. Motzkin, M.A., Ph.D. 
Martin Mueller, M.A. 
William T. Murakami, A.B., Ph.D. 



Associate Professor of History 
Professor of Politics 
Instructor in Theatre Arts 
Adjunct Associate Professor of Biochemistry 
Professor of Anthropology 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Professor of Psychology 
Assistant Professor of French 
Professor of Mathematics 
Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 
Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts 
Visiting Associate Professor of Politics 
Assistant Professor of Physics 
Instructor in Biology 
(Rutgers University) 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Harry S. Truman Professor of History 

Instructor in German 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of Politics 

Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies 

Instructor in English 



Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
(American Cancer Faculty Research Award) 
Joseph S. Murphy, M.A., Ph.D.* Assistant Professor of Politics 

David Neiman, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biblical Studies 

(on the Dora Golding Foundation) 
Ulric Neisser, M.A., Ph.D.* Associate Professor of Psychology 

Howard Nemerov, B.A. (beginning 1966-67) Professor of English 

Anna Catherine Nichols, B.S., M.S. Associate Professor of Physical Education 



Minoru Nishida, Ph.D. 

Eric Nordlinger, A.B. 
Irving Olin, B.S., M.Ed. 
Gjerding Olsen, A.M., Ph.D. 
Richard J. Onorato, A.B., A.M. 
Richard S. Palais, M.A., Ph.D. 
Hugh N. Pendleton, III, M.S., Ph.D 
Frances S. Perkins, B.S.E., M.Ed. 
Edwin Burr Pettet, A.B., Ph.D. 

Michael Phillips, B.A., M.A. 

»On Leave, 1965-66. 
•*On Leave, Fall Term, 1965-66. 



Visiting Associate Professor of Astrophysics 
(Kyoto University) 

Assistant Professor of Politics 

Adjunct Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Instructor in English 

Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Lecturer in Psychology 

Professor of Theatre Arts and 

Director of the Brandeis Theatre 

Instructor in Fine Arts 



DIRECTORIES 187 



Arthur Polonsky Assistant Professor of Fine Arts 

Joshua Prawer, M.A., Ph.D. Visiting Professor of History 

(Hebrew University) 
Robert Otto Preyer, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of English 

David Prill, Sc.B., Ph.D. Lecturer and Research Associate in Mathematics 

Philip Rahv Professor of English 

Harry Rand, M.D. Adjunct Professor of Clinical Psychiatry 

Esther Eugenie Rawidowicz, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of German 

Janine Reisman Lecturer in French 

Karl M. I. Reisman, A.B., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Jack Reitzes, B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor and Director of Education 

Marguerite S. Robinson, B.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Romney Robinson, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics 

(on the James Henry Yalem Foundation) 
John P. Roche, M.A., Ph.D.* Morris Hillquit Professor of Labor 

and Social Thought 
Myron Rosenblum, A.M., Ph.D.* Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Hugo Rossi, M.S., Ph.D.* Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Murray Sachs, A.M., Ph.D. Associate Professor of French 

(on the B. E. and Regine S. Levy Foundation) 
I. Milton Sacks, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Politics 

Benson Saler, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Peter M. Sander, A.B., M.F.A. Instructor in Theatre Arts 

Gerasimos X. Santas, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Nahum M. Sarna, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biblical Studies 

Gordon Hisashi Sato, B.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

(on the Rosenstiel Foundation) 
Henry E. Schaffer, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

Jerome A. Schiff, B.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biology 

Melvyn Schnall, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Marcel Schneeberger, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics and 

Research Associate 
Howard J. Schnitzer, B.S., Ph.D.** Associate Professor of Physics 

Miriam F. Schurin, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

Barney K. Schwalberg, B.Sc, M.A. Assistant Professor of Economics 

Morris S. Schwartz, M.A., Ph.D. Mortimer Gryzmish Professor of 

Human Relations 
Silvan S. Schweber, M.S., Ph.D. Professor of Physics 

John R. Seeley, A.B. Philip M. Klutznick Professor of Sociology 

Robert T. Seeley, S.B., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

William Chapin Seitz, M.F.A., Ph.D. Professor of Fine Arts _ 

John W. Senders, A.B. Lecturer in Psychology 

Harold Shapero, A.B. Professor of Music 

Thomas O. Sherman, B.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Seymour Shifrin, A.B., M.A. (beginning 1966-67) Professor of Music 

Weishu Shih, D.Sc. Lecturer and Research Associate in Mathematics 

Evelyn Singer Simha, B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of French 

•On Leave, 1965-66. 
*'On Leave, Spring Term, 1965-66. 



188 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Marianne L. Simmel, A.M., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology 

Michell Siporin Professor of Fine Arts 

Richard L. Sklar, B.A., Ph.D. Adjunct Associate Professor of Politics 

Philip E. Slater, A.B., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Sociology 

John H. Smith, M.A., Ph.D. Visiting Associate Professor of English 

Lacey T. Smith, B.A., M.P.A. Instructor in Economics 

(Marquette University) 

Bernard Z. Sobel, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Frederic T. Sommers, B.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Morris Soodak, M.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

Joel Warren Spiegelman, B.A., M.F.A.** Lecturer in Music 

Mark Spivak, A.M., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Michael Spivak, M.A., Ph.D. Lecturer and Research Associate in Mathematics 

Philip A. St. John, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

Colin Steel, B.Sc, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

J. Peter Stein, B.A., Ph.D. Instructor in Classics 

Maurice R. Stein, B.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Sociology 

Robert Stevenson, Ph.D., D.Sc.** Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Ruth Stone, B.A. Lecturer in English 

Maurice Sussman, B.S., Ph.D. Professor of Biology 

Peter Swiggart, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of English 

Marie Syrkin, B.A., M.A.* Associate Professor of Humanities 

Robert Szulkin, A.B., M.A. Instructor in Russian 

Ralph Tarica, B.A., M.A. -Lecturer in French 

Caldwell Titcomb, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Music 
Robert C. Tobey, B.A., A.M. Adjunct Lecturer in Computing Sciences 

Stephen E. Toulmin, M.A., Ph.D. Professor of History of Ideas 

and Philosophy 

Thomas R. Tuttle, Jr., M.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Milton I. Vanger, M.A., Ph.D.* Associate Professor of History 

John van Heijenoort, M.S., Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy 

Alphonse T. Vasquez, B.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Helen Van Vunakis, B.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

(on a Research Career Award, National Institutes of Health) 

Gerald C. Volpe, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of French 

Samuel E. Wallace, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Sociolop 

Aileen Ward, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of English 

Richard S. Weckstein, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics 

(on the Carl Marks Foundation) 

Alex Weingrod, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Anthropology 

Robert S. Weiss, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Sociology 

John Burt Wight, Ed.M., Ed.D. Lecturer in English 

William A. Wilson, B.A. Instructor in Theatre Arts 

Jerome Wodinsky, B.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Sanford E. Wolf, S.B., M.A. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Kurt H. Wolff, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology 

Peter Woll, A.B., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Politics 

Luis E. Yglesias, B.A. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

»On Leave, 1965-66. 
•*On Leave, Fall Term, 1965-66. 



DIRECTORIES 189 



Dwight Wayne Young, Th.M., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Semitic Languages 

Mumtaz H. Zaidi, M.Sc, Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Astrophysics 

(University of Nebraska) 

Alvin D. Zalinger, B.S., M.A. Visiting Lecturer in Sociology 

Joseph Zelan, M.A., Ph.D. Lecturer in Sociology 

Eleonore M. Zimmermann, M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of French 

Leonard Zion, M.A. Lecturer in Contemporary Jewish Studies 

Harry Zohn, Ed.M., Ph.D. Associate Professor of German 

Irving K. Zola, B.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Edgar Zwilling, M.A., Ph.D.** Professor of Biology 

Hiatt Institute in Israel 

Yehezkel Dror, LL.M., S.J.D. Visiting Lecturer in Israel Political Institutions 

Avigdor Levy, B.A., M.A. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Hebrew and 

Acting Director of Hiatt Institute for 1965 
Rifka Bar-Yosef, M.A., Ph.D. Visiting Lecturer in Sociology 

Aharon Rosen, B.A. Director of Hebrew Studies 

Baruch Mevorach, B.A., M.A. Visiting Lecturer in Modern Jewish History 

The Graduate Council 

The members of the Graduate Council of the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences are appointed annually by the President of the University. Members of 
the Graduate Council for 1965-66 are: 

The President of the University and The Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

(ex officio) 

The Dean of the Graduate School (Council Chairman) 

Saul G. Cohen, Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

Peter Diamandopoulos, Chairman, Committee on History of Ideas 

Herman T. Epstein, Chairman, Committee on Biophysics 

Martin Gibbs, Chairman, Department of Biology 

Nahum N. Glatzer, Chairman, Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 

Cyrus H. Gordon, Chair7nan, Department of Mediterranean Studies 

Nathan O. Kaplan, Chairman, Department of Biochemistry 

Morton Keller, Chairman, Committee on History of American Civilization 

Joseph J. Kohn, Chairman, Department of Mathematics 

Robert A. Manners, Chairman, Department of Anthropology 

Ricardo B. Morant, Chairman, Department of Psychology 

Robert O. Preyer, Chairman, Department of English and American Literature 

Silvan S. Schweber, Chairman, Department of Physics 

Charles I. Schottland, Dean, Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies 

in Social Welfare 
John R. Seeley, Chairman, Department of Sociology 
Harold Shapero, Chairman, Department of Music 
Frederic T. Sommers, Chairman, Department of Philosophy 

•*On Leave, Spring Term, 1965-66. 



190 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Research Associates and Fellows 



Kozaburo Adachi, Ph.D. 
William S. Allison, Ph.D. 
Rita Arditti, Ph.D. 
Hilary Ashe, Ph.D. 
John M. Ashworth, Ph.D. 
Ronald J. Baumgarten, Ph.D. 
Rene Bensasson, Ph.D. 
Sandra Blethen, Ph.D. 
J. Anthony Burke, Ph.D. 
George Cardinale, Ph.D. 
John Carrico, Ph.D. 
Gary Ceska, Ph.D. 
J. K. Chakrabarti, Ph.D. 
William Cockburn, Ph.D. 
Hayden Coon, Ph.D. 
Leonard Gorman, D.M.D. 
Lucien Cuprak, D.M.D. 
Betty Davidson, Ph.D. 
Samuel Davidson, Ph.D. 
Giovanni Di Sabato, M.D. 
Frank Dolbeare, Ph.D. 
Robert O. Doyle, Ph.D. 
Charles Drake, A.B., B.D. 
Robert A. Ellison, Ph.D. 
Hans Eppenberger, Ph.D. 
Monika Eppenberger, M.D. 
Robert G. Everson, Ph.D. 
Marie Ru-Yu Fang, Ph.D. 
Ronald H. Felton, Ph.D. 
Joan Friedman, Ph.D. 
Erland C. Gjessing, Ph.D. 
Kenneth Golden, Ph.D. 
Michael Greenspan, Ph.D. 
James Griffin, Ph.D. 
J. Stuart Grossert, Ph.D. 
Jon E. Haebig, Ph.D. 
William Hammond, Ph.D. 

Linda Harpring, Ph.D. 
Joseph Herskovits, M.D. 
Annemarie Herzfeld, Ph.D. 
D. G. Hey, Ph.D. 
Daniel Hodgins, Ph.D. 
Robert L. Jaffe, Ph.D. 
Volker Kasche, Ph.D. 
Keitaro Kato, Ph.D. 
Barbara J. King, Ph.D. 
Annette Krebs, M.A. 



Postdoctoral Felloio in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Hardness Fellow in Biology 

Research Fellow in Chemistry 

NATO Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Physics 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Physics 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 

Research Associate in Biology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

American Cancer Society Scholar in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Felloiv in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Physics 

Research Associate in Psychology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Visiting Scientist in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Physics 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

ONR Postdoctoral Research Associate 

in Mathematics 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

NATO Research Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Psychology 



DIRECTORIES 



191 



Nicholas J. Kuhn, Ph.D. 
Erwin Latzko, Ph.D. 
Susan Leeman, Ph.D. 

Shenvin Lehrer, Ph.D. 

Harvey L. Levine, M.D. 

Gustav Lienhard, Ph.D. 

Fang-Jen Lin, M.D. 

Helmut Link, Ph.D. 

William F. Loomis, Jr., Ph.D. 

Evelyne Nahon, M.D. 

Iain MacLean, Ph.D. 

Inga Mahler, Ph.D. 

Chiang H. Mei, Ph.D. 

Leonard Meyers, Ph.D. 

Behzad Mohit, M.D. 

William Murphey, Ph.D. 

Samuel T. Nerenberg, M.D., Ph.D. 

Gerald Porter, Ph.D. 

David Portsmouth, Ph.D. 
Mohindar Puar, Ph.D. 
Julio Pudles, Ph.D. 
Thomas Ragland, Ph.D. 
Earle Ralph, Ph.D. 
G. Caird Ramsay, Ph.D. 
Michael Ramsay, Ph.D. 
Vernon Reinhold, Ph'.D. 
Michael Rosen, Ph.D. 

Raquel Rotman-Sussman, Ph.D. 
Allyn L. H. Rule, Ph.D. 
Thomas St. Pierre, Ph.D. 
Eugene Sander, Ph.D. 
Gottfried Theodore Schoppert, Ph. 
Charlotte Green Schwartz, M.A. 
Edna Seaman, Ph.D. 
John W. Senders, A.B. 
Richard Silverstein, Ph.D. 
Thomas A. Spencer, Ph.D. 
Mark Spivak, Ph.D. 
Norbert I. Swislocki, Ph.D. 
Bronislava Szorenyi, Ph.D. 
Jerome Targovnik, M.D. 
Timothy F. Thomas, Ph.D. 
J. Tyson Tildon, M.D. 
Walter Toman, Ph.D. 
Kiyoshi Ueda, M.D. 
William D. Voiers, Ph.D. 
Martha Wang, Ph.D. 



Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Senior Research Associate in Biology 

National Institutes of Health Research Career 

Development Awardee in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 

Visiting Scientist in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Physics 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Visiting Scientist in Biochemistry 

ONR Postdoctoral Research Associate in 

Mathematics 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Senior Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Felloio in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

ONR Postdoctoral Research Associate in 

Mathematics 

Research Associate in Biology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

D. Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Sociology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Senior Research Associate in Psychology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Visiting Scientist in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Sociology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Senior Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Senior Research Associate in Psychology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Psychology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 



192 



BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Margaret Ward, Ph.D. 
Donald Wilken, Ph.D. 

Frederick Wiseman, LL.B. 
Kaichiro Yanagisawa, Ph.D. 
Jacob Yashphe, Ph.D. 
Yosihiro Yasumura, M.D. 
Michael Zeldin, Ph.D. 
Estelle Zoll, Ph.D. 



Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

National Science Foundation Postdoctoral 

Fellow in Mathematics 

Research Associate in Sociology 

Postdoctoral Fellow (Trainee) in Biology 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Biology 

Research Fellow in Chemistry 



Administration of the University 



Abram Leon Sachar, Ph.D. 

Administrative Council 

Clarence Q. Berger, A.M. 
**Eugene C. Black, Ph.D. 
Peter Diamandopoulos, Ph. 
Philip J. Driscoll, A.M. 
*Leonard W. Levy, Ph.D. 
Lester G. Loomis, M.B.A. 
Kermit C. Morrissey, B.A. 
Charles I. Schottland, A.B. 

**Harold Weisberg, Ph.D. 

Sumner J. Abrams, P.E. 
David L. Rolbein, M.S. 



President of the University 



Dean of University Planning and Development 

Associate Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

D. Acting Associate Dean of Faculty 

Dean of Admissions 

Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

Dean of Financial Affairs 

Dean of Students 

Dean of Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies 

in Social Welfare 

Dean of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and 

Associate Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

Director of Plant Operations 

Director of Business Administration 



Offices of Administration 

Alumni Relations 

Robert F. Kelley, '57, A.B. 

Business Administration 

David L. Rolbein, M.S. 



Director 



Director 



Chaplains 

Richard Troy, Ph.B. 
Paul Lee, Ph.D. 
Albert Axelrod 



Brandeis Newman Club 

Brandeis Student Christian Association 

Brandeis B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation 



University Finance Office 

Lester G. Loomis, M.B.A. Dean 

Charles S. Woodbury, B.S., C.P.A. Chief Accountant and Research Fiscal Officer 

•On Leave, 1965-66. 
**On Leave, Fall Term. 



DIRECTORIES 193 



Library 

Louis Kronenberger, Litt.D. Librarian 

Plant Operations 

Sumner J. Abrams, P.E. Director 

Psychological Counseling Center 

Eugenia Hanfmann, Ph.D. Director 
Stanley S. Kanter, M.D. Psychiatric Consultant 

Elliot Baker, Ph.D. Counselor 

Sarah Evan, M.S.W. Counselor 

Anton G. Hardy, Ph.D. Counselor 

Philip M. Helfaer, M.A. Counselor 

Richard M. Jones, Ph.D. Counselor 

Esther Osborne, A.M. Counselor 

Visiting Committee 

Crete L. Bibring, M.D. 

George E. Gardner, M.D. 

Public Affairs 

Richard E. Gillman Director 

Wien International Scholarship Program 

Kermit C. Morrissey, A.B. Acting Director 

Graduate School Administrative Personnel 

M. Catherine Butler, A.M. Assistant to the Dean 

Philip A. St. John, Ph.D. Assistant to the Dean 

Dorothy H. Roach Executive Secretary 

Elaine P. Bridgett Secretary 

Margaret R. Holland Secretary 

Mary E. O'Neill Secretary 

Diana J. Twomey Secretary 

Marie Anderson (Biology, Biophysics); Elinor Ciftan (Mathematics); June Cush- 
ner (English and American Literature); Rose M. DeSimone (Mediterranean 
Studies); Judith Fleischer (History of American Civilization); Jean Gelhar (Near 
Eastern and Judaic Studies); Jan Gilmore (Anthropology); Sada Gordon (History 
of Ideas); M. Lee Healey (Physics); Lois S. McMullen (Chemistry); M. Rosamonde 
Morrison (Music); M. Verna Regan (Psychology); Edna E. Royal (Biochemistry); 
Dorothea L Smith (Sociology); Bette White (Philosophy). 



194 BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



Index 

Academic Regulations 48 

Administration of the University 192 

Admission 42 

Anthropology 67 

Areas of Study and Courses 67 

Auditing Courses 49 

Biochemistry 74 

Biology 80 

Biophysics 88 

Calendar 8, 9 

Chemistry 89 

Contemporary Jewish Studies 96 

Credit for work done elsewhere 51 

Degree Requirements, General . 54 

Directories 181 

Dismissal 54 

Dissertation 57 

Employment 67 

English and American Literature 99 

Expulsion 54 

Faculty 182 

Fees 59 

Fellowships 169 

Financial Assistance 63 

Foreign Students 46 

Full-Time Resident status 52 

General Description 22 

General Information 39 

Grades 50 

Graduate Council 189 

Health Office 41 

History of American Civilization 104 

History of Ideas 108 

History of the University 39 

Housing 40 

Incompletes 50 

Language Requirements 56 

Leave of Absence 53 

Mathematics 118 

Mediterranean Studies 122 



J 



INDEX 195 



Music 127 

Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 133 

Part-Time Resident status 52 

Philosophy 140 

Physics 145 

Program, change of 49 

Psychology 152 

Registration 48, 49 

Research Assistantships 66 

Research Associates and Fellows 190 

Residence Requirements 51 

Sociology 160 

Special Students 53 

Teaching Assistantships 65 

Theatre Arts 168 

University Organization 12 

Withdrawal 54 



Notes 



Notes 



} 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Correspondence Directory 

Admission to Graduate School: 
Dean of Graduate School 

Admission to The Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in 
Social Welfare: 

Dean of the School for Social Welfare 

Summer Institute: 

Director of Summer Institute. 

Scholarship Applications: 
Dean of Admissions 

Establishment of Grants and Bequests: 
Dean of University Resources 

Alumni Affairs: 

Director of Alumni Relations 

General Information: 

Director of Public Affairs 



mCHIVKS 



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WELLS BllSmiiW INC. 
ALTHAM, MASS. 
Ft-J iii75 



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