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Student Pets F T P p ffi n a s s 

Photo/writing 

Contest winners 

Where to live th^ 

Bummed out 

in Carbondale 



,£> .■»- 



About The Cover 



In 1976, after three years of life without the 
Obelisk yearbook, students decided that the 
need for an SIU yearbook was essential. The 
OBelisk II was the result. 

Since its resurrection, the OBelisk II has 
been scrimping and scraping to rebuild its 
reputation to that of the old Obelisk. In four 
years it has undergone major surgery under 
three student editors; the result has been more 
pages. 60 per cent more readers and a 
transformation from a traditional yearbook to a 
magazine format. 

A mix of in-depth articles, the year in review, 
senior portraits, and organization photos have 
all crept into this year's book. The rebuilding is 
almost over, and students need not worry about 
the existence of the OBelisk II any longer. 

The book you are now holding has been 
submitted for a national yearbook award. In the 
future, national awards could be commonplace 
with a little financial support from Student 
Government. Paid staff and reduced subscrip- 
tion prices would be the outcome. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/obeliskii1980sout 



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his was for the birds. . . . but it's 
done. Against all odds, I think we 
successfully chewed on, tore up, and 
transformed a traditional yearbook 
into a magazine. 

Our attempt is the fourth edition 
of the OBelisk II. 

A lot of missed classes, all- 
nighters, and misunderstandings have 
come between our initial expectations 
and the final product. In our minds it 
was a gem, but on paper it turned out 
to be a $12 magazine format yearbook. 

We followed the magazine format 
because in a survey last year, 53 
percent of the buyers decided that this 
format was "just right." Only 17 
percent found it to be "too unique." 

Changes from last year include an 
emphasis on academics, in-depth 
reporting, ade-emphasis in sports, and 
the use of more pages. Our survey 
dictated these changes and helped us 
concentrate on events directly related 
with SIU. 

Most of the stories in this year's 
book were staff-written which limits 
the input of other journalism students 
at SIU. We tried to change things this 
year by running a photo and feature 
writing contest and accepting 
freelance material from other jour- 
nalists. This was an attempt to give 
college writers a market other than the 
D. E. and to bring fresh ideas into our 
office. 

Hopefully, as years go on, 
students will realize the potential of 
publishing in the OBelisk II. Our 
feature approach can be found 
nowhere else in Carbondale. 

The OBelisk II also branched off 
from its journalistic background this 
year. The First Annual Frisbee Golf 
Open, our successful Halloween photo 
booth, and the OBelisk II scholarship 
are just three ways of servicing the 
students of SIU. 

Enjoy the magazine and send your 
comments. 



The Editors 

©1980,OBeliskll, Volume 4 
All Rights Reserved 
Southern Illinois University 
at Carbondale 



Preface and 
Dedication 



This is a tribute to Maggie 
Mae. She never took her final 
exam in physical therapy, but it 
wasn't her fault. 

Maggie drowned in Crab 
Orchard spillway at a young age, 
yet she did more in 20 years 
than most people do in 60. 
Excelling in art, music, athletics 
and fun, she spent her time 
wisely. Thank God she found 
some of that time to spend with 
me. 

I remember Maggie's voice 
going hoarse from her constant 
chatter on the intramural 
baseball diamond. She always 
made the rounds in Grinnell 
Cafeteria, making sure to share 
a few minutes of gossip with me 
each day. We even compared 




notes of our love lives. 

As a Girl Scout, color 
guard, and church commenta- 
tor, Maggie showed leadership 
in almost everything she did. 
Also, like most college kids, 
Maggie loved her weekends 



She lived her life to 
the fullest, yet her 
death left me feeling 
empty. 



uptown. In fact, she once told a 
friend that she was not afraid to 
die and that her friends should 
have a party when she left, 
because she would be having 
fun. 

Maggie had other goals too. 
She longed for a degree in 
therapeutic recreation, after 
which she would have moved to 
Florida. Her dream to work with 
handicapped children also fell 
short. 

I hadn't seen Maggie for 
about a month before her death, 
and I feel cheated that I didn't 
get to say thanks . . . and 
good-bye. She lived her life to 
the fullest, yet her death left me 
feeling empty. 

This book is my thank-you 
to you, Maggie . . . and to those 
who ever thought of being as 
beautiful as you. 

Joel Wakitsch 



OBdiskn 

11980 Magazine Format Yearbook 
ISouthern Illinois University 

Editor-in-Chief 
Joel M. Wakitsch 

Art Director 

John Ziles 

Assistant Art Director 

Gcnin Behner 

Managing Editor 

Bruce Simmons 
Feature Editor 

Li/ann Griffin 

Photography Editor 

Jim Hunzinger 

Assistant Photo Editor 

Brian Howe 

Promotions Director 

k cith k n\ arik 

Assistant Promotions Director 

Cecilia Pineres (Fall semester) 

Office Manager 

Horry Aldridge 

Seniors and Organizations Editor 

Denise Grandfield 

Assistant Seniors Editor 

Teril Busks 
Subscription Manager 
kclh Wakitsch 

Writers 
Karen Clare, Will Coldstien, Paula Gray, Pete 
knc< i Colleen Moore, Tamara Miner, I Hen Sabie 
/o(7 Wakitsch, Inn Hunzinget 

Photographers 
Chink //()(/< 's. joe Alonzo, Rich Saal, Chuck 
Hnojsky, Rich Hutchcroft, foel Wakitsch 

Contributors 

Maureen keegan, lohn (lark. Thomas Stubbs, 
( han't) Gould. Ia\ Bender, Bill Branson, Marsha 
Mueller 

Secretaries 
Teril Buska, Nam \ Tormeno, -\nn Roytek, Lynn 
< k-ii-i Patr'u /a Headlee 



118 / 



A midyear look 
at varsity sports 



Different types of 
roommates in the form 
of pets 




Dedication 

OBelisk II Salutes 

The OBelisk II awards the people of 1980 

What is an Ombudsman 

Feature contest winner Charity Gould tells us 

The Subtle Seventies 

A pictorial review of the past decade 

Fling 

Results of the first annual Frisbee Golf Tournament 

Bummed Out in Carbondale 

Is what Lynn Emmerman says about Carbondale true? 

A Near Miss 

Shana McNeil tells her story as Miss Illinois 

SIU Police 

SIU Fashion 

WIDB 

Ten years of student operated radio 

Class Clown 

/v-s/( student /orris Barnum and Baile\ 

Fifty-Fifty 

Co habitation has its good points 

Raking in the Dough 

A look at student run businesses in Carbondale 

A Real Bite 

What it's like to eat without Mom's looking 

The Horniest Croup at SIU 



1 

4 

6 

10 

16 

18 

24 
26 
30 

38 

40 

44 

48 

56 
58 





The March- 
ing Salukis 
keep SIU's 
spirits up 





Frieda McCarter: Vintage SIU 

A chat with the oldest full-time student at SIU 

A Students Guide to Morris Library 

How to use Morris Library and not get lost 

Paper Trained Roommates 



A Right to Chews 

Red Man visits the Saluki baseball team 

A Different Kind of Mirror 

A gaze into the crystal ball of "lllona" 

On the Right Track 

The railways of Carbondale get a facelift 

t 

The Way We See It 

A photo essay of SIU today and yesterday 

Arlie Boswell 

The founder of the D.E. reflects on the past 

A Portrait of a Haunted House 

The story behind the "haunted" Hundley House 

Totally Wiped 

Halloween circa 1979 and 1916 

Homecoming 

A look at the floats, kings and queens of 1979 

Job Market 1980 

Who will sink or swim in 1980 

Spinning Your Wheels 

The handicapped have a lot more drive 

Abombinable Snowmen 

A photo essay of the annual East Campus fued 



62 

66 

70 

74 

78 

82 

86 

90 

94 

97 

104 

106 

110 

116 



Does SIU 
conform to 
todav's styles 



Are they worth 

their weight in 

tickets 



Sports Round-Up 

Health Service: Used and Abused 

The Health Service from the inside out 

Shutterbugs 

The results of the OBelisk It's photo contest 

Red Tape Blues 

A ficticious look at a real problem 

Take a Hike 

The greenery of Southern Illinois 

Concerts 

A pictorial of 1979's concerts 




118 
120 
122 
126 
130 
136 



Rainbows are Multi-colored 1AI\ 

English professor Ray Rainbow's views upon life I^IU 



Killer 

Joe "Killer" Barwinski talks football 

Old Volleyballers Don't Die— They Just Smash Harder 

Coach Hunter looks at the volleyball team 



Ahoy There Matie 

SIU's sailing club is still afloat 

The Wizard of Finess 

Golden Cloves Champ talks bout his bouts 

Greek Philosophies of Which Plato Never Heard 

Fraternity and Sorority students speak out 

The OB ll's News and Reviews 
All the news that's fit to print 

The Dorms — A Comparison 

Which is the right dorm for you 



144 
148 
150 
154 
156 
160 
168 



After Chicago Magazine took aim and tired a nasty shot at SI U last 
year, most high-ranking SIi r officials could find nothing good to say 
about SIC in retaliation. 

Well, we thought that SIC needed some good, positive recognition 
for a change . . . something to he proud of. . . so the OBelisk II started 
its first awards program. 

Most of the 1980 awards are just in fun. but in time we hope to 
acknowledge those at SIl' and throughout the world who deserve 
recognition. 

In 1980 . . . 



o o o 



the 





. . .SIU's next president, 
'whomever he may be, with 
THE MOST INTELLI- 
GENT AWARD for being 
smart enough to stay the 
hell away from SIU. 



Pholo by Brian Howe 



. . . Manion Rice, jour- 
nalism faculty member, 
with THE BEST DRESS- 
ED MALE AWARD. (Pre- 
sented by the Blind Peo- 
ple's I Inion.) 




,\nn Em merman 
with THE PEPTO-BIS- 
MOL AWARD for upset- 
ting more people than the 
stock market crash in "29. 



.♦ 



OBelisk II salutes 



o o o 



text by Bruce Simmons 



11 — r::lL 



-aJ^- 



1 



. . . Faner with THE MOST 
USELESS BUILDING 

AWARD for taking up so much 
space and offering so little in 
return. 



. . . Public Works Director Bill 
Boyd with THE SOCIETY FOR 
THE PREVENTION OF 
CRUELTY TO ANIMALS 
AWARD for the production of 
his Beaver City tee-shirts. 



. . .Woody Hall with THE 
SPEEDY GONZALES 
AWARD for coming in 
second in a one-man race. 



' h) 








. . . Ayatollah Khomeini with 
THE BLIND LEADERSHIP 
AWARD for leadership below 
and beneath the call of duty. 



. . . Gale Sayers with THE 
TITANIC AWARD for 
electing water polo as the 
twelfth sport; a sport sure 
to sink. 



. . . dormitory food service 
with THE BOTCHOLISM 
AWARD for all those 
delicious meals they 
prepare day after day . . . 
after day . . . after day 




Feature contest winner Charity Gould answers $25 question . 

"What's an ombudsman?" 



The question, "What's an Om- 
budsman''" was scrawled on a bath- 
room wall in the .Student Center. This 
came as a sad surprise for Ingrid 
Gadway, Ombudsman director. 

"I know the name is foreign to 
most people, but what else can you call 
this office? I think the name fits." 
Gadway looked about at her assistants 
to see if they agreed. They did. 

"Ombuds is a Swedish word 
meaning elected official who solved 
administrative problems. He would 
try to cut down on administrative 
problems," said part-time assistant 
Sue Mansfield, a graduate student in 
law school. 

"That's what this office does 
also," she said. 

Sill's office, located currently in 
Woody Hall, began in 1969. Even 
though the office has been housed in 
several building during its young life. 
it's purpose will always remain the 
same. 

"Our office helps individuals who 
are frustrated with the university 
system and are trying to find a 
solution," Gadway said. 

A petite lady with short, dark hair 



and a pleasant smile, Gadway, 
originally from Germany, gladly 
explains the ombudsman office hoping 
more people will know what it is. 

Sitting with her assistants, 
Mansfield and intern Sharon Brown, 
Gadway stresses that their office is for 
all persons on campus, not only 
students. 

"We are not an advocate for a 
particular group. We don't take sides 
in an issue. We are mediators," she 
said candidly. 

Gadway said out of the estimated 
100 clients they have a month, most of 
these are students. 

According to the director, 
student's problems are usually easier 
to deal with than faculty or adminis- 
tration. 

"The faculty or administrators 
are older. Usually they can work out 
most of their problems. So, when they 
come to us with a problem, it's usually 
a tough one," she said. 

Gadway has lived in Carbondale 
for 10 years. She taught in the Foreign 
Language Department for four and a 
half years before being appointed to 
her current position in July, 1974. 



The office is also staffed with a 
full-time assistant Sharon Void- 
Gregory and a half-time assistant. Lyn 
Connely. Two student workers fill a 
secretary's position. 

The two basic concepts of the 
ombuds program are "absolute 
confidentiality and complete neutrali- 
ty," Gadway said. 

"We can't change rules just to 
appease our clients," Gadway said. 

"Does this sound like we are 
powerless?" Gadway smiles as she 
explained. 

"We aren't. We have open access 
to anyone on campus from the 
Chancellor on down. We also have 
access to records." 

The way the ombudsman office 
handles problems begins with supply- 
ing their clients with ample informa- 
tion. 

"We try to make sure the person 
knows all the facts about the problem. 
Sometimes, it takes only an explana- 
tion of the situation to solve a 
problem," she said. 

"For instance, if a student is 
trying to get out of a housing contract, 
but he finds that he can't, but doesn't 



understand why, then we'll explain it 
to him and clear up the problem," 
Gadway said. 

After explaining all of the facts, 
the office goes to the other side and 
gets their position in the problem. 



"Then we try to find a novel 
approach to the whole problem. It's 
not really a compromise but an answer 
may be neither party involved had 
though of before." 

Gadway picked up a cigarette, put 



it between her lips, and lit it causing 
the smoke to rise in a small stream 
before continuing. 

"Housing has been the biggest 
student complaint. Also, more 
students have not been getting along 



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with their roommates as well," she 
said. 

"We deal on a one-to-one basis. 
We give our clients examples of 
solutions that have worked previously 
and give them advice on how to deal 



with other people," Gadway said. 

Of the different types of cases the 
office deals with including academic, 
financial, housing, university services 
and employment, academic is the most 
difficult according to Gadway. 



"Academic professors don't have 
tight guidelines to follow. Each case 
becomes very individual." 

"When a student comes to us 
saying he deserves a better grade, it is 
hard to find a solution because the 



'•^"T,' 



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teacher decides what is taught," 
Gadway said with a shake of her head. 

But, instructors are eliminating 
this problem. 

"Teachers are laying down 
guidelines for their classes. They tell 
students if they do so much work then 
they will get an 'A.' It's like a 
contract," she said. 

Gadway says the office tries to 
end the conflict informally. 

"Many times when a conflict 
exists, both sides just don't under- 
stand what the other wants," she said. 

If the client can't solve the 
problem informally with the ombuds- 
man office, then formal grievances can 
be filed. 

"This has not happened often, 



but it is on the rise," Gadway said. 
"The departments are stressing 
equality. Now a person can voice his 
dissatisfaction without being pen- 
alized." 

Even if a written grievance is filed 
with a department, the ombudsman 
office will still help their clients if they 
want it. 

Another problem for students is 
financial aid. 

"When the standards change, 
then problems change. The whole area 
of financial aid is a series of hurdles," 
Gadway said sighing. "Every time they 
add a regulation then the whole 
process becomes more complex." 

"It's such a big hurdle," Gadway 
repeated. "There are so many papers 



involved and cross checks — problems 
that are inherent in the system." 

Although the office helps people 
figure out their problems, the ombuds- 
men are having trouble dealing with a 
problem within their own department. 

"There's an ultimate unfairness 
because too many people don't know 
about us, so they can't seek us out for 
help," Gadway said relating back to 
the scrawled statement on the 
bathroom wall. 

"Hopefully, with every article 
that is written about us, or with every 
poster that is put up on campus that 
describes what we do, a few more 
people will become aware of our office 
and our services." 



Following are the results from the 
first OBelisk II feature contest. A total 
of seven entries were turned in prior to 
the November 30 deadline. More are 
anticipated next year. After all, Rome 
wasn't built in a day. 

H. B. Koplowitz, once editor of 
Nonsequiter Magazine and currently a 
feature writer for the Southern 
Illinoisan, was given sole duty of 
judging the seven entries. 

Charity Gould, a senior in 
photojournalism, won the first place 



prize of $25 and publication of her 
story in the book for her feature on the 
ombudsman. 

Koplowitz said of her story, "... 
it had fewer errors of style than the 
other stories, it was about a relevant 
subject and I really liked the lead." 

Second place was taken by Joyce 
Jones, a junior in social welfare, for her 
story concerning Richard Hayes, 
assiciate university affirmative action 
officer at SIU. 

"... also about a relevant 



subject and with a minimum of style 
errors, but the lead definitely needs .to 
be changed," Koplowitz said of Jones' 
story. 

Joseph Agnew, a junior in jour- 
nalism, captured third place with his 
feature about a trip to Chicago. 

"After a lot of thought," Ko- 
plowitz said, "I awarded third place to 
the story about the car ride to Chicago. 
The story is chocked full of errors and 
is boring and goes nowhere, but it is 
reality." 




SEVENTIES 



/Vic photo above shows Ivory 
( 'rockett in 1970, sprinting to defend his 
100 yard dash nth- .it AAV Track and 
/■'/(•/(/ championship. 

The 1970s mm the end of the green 
beanies which were previously required 
attire t<>r all incoming freshmen. A new 
tradition arose m ;/■. place however, 
which is still practiced today passing 
the cheerleader The picture at tar right 
shows ex President Morris labeling one 
ol the rare Ginko trees found on SH "- 
campus 



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The 1970s ga- 
ve th as in the case 
of the sculptures 
located between 
Morris Library 
and Wham, the 
overpass to and 
from East Cam- 
pus, saddle shoes 
and student sen- 
timents. How- 
ever, the 1970s 
also tooketh away 
as in the case of 
Old Main. The 
fire destroyed a 
vast amount of 
books and records 
but the contents 
of the cornerstone 
were salvaged. 






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1971 saw Itchy 
Jones take his 
diamondmen to the 
College World Series 
at Omaha where 
they were defeated 
by the University of 
Southern California 
in the championship 
game, 7-2. Though 
some felt that Carbondale was a rat hole, others 
felt that it deserved the All- American City award, 
which it was given in 1971. The city was given the 
award for co-operation between the people and 
their government. It was also a year which, like 
other years prior to our withdrawal from Viet 
Nam, saw a constant flow in the ROTC program. 




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In 1971. the "Pigs" and the "Hippies" 
took their aggressions to the baseball field 
and fought it out there. It was also the year 
that Shryock received its great instrumental 
organ with pipes of every size imaginable. In 
February of 1971. students marched again, 
but unlike the marches of the year before, 
these were peaceful. The issue was still the 
war. but this time the only ones in outrage 
were the drivers aggravated by the traffic 
slowdown. Protestors only to- 
taled about 700. Lionel Antoine 
received Little Ail-American hon- 
ors for the second year in a row 
in 1971, but more 
importantly, An- 
toine was chosen 
as third pick in the 
first round of the 
NFL players draft 
by the Chicago 
Bears. 




1972 marked the change in the legal 
voting age. (hound was also broken that 
year to begin construction on Faner. 
Ex-President Morris's home had to be 
cleared awav to make room. 




HCUUV C K IN / 





1972 found George 
McGovern running for 
the Presidency of the 
United States, which 
took up a great deal of 
his time. So much in 
fact that he often forgot 
he was double parked, 
as the informant is 
telling him in the pic- 
ture at right. Pat Paul- 
sen also ran that year. 
On a somewhat lesser 
level, David Derge 
found his way into the 
Presidency of SIU. 





In 1973, McAndrew 
Stadium, at left, got a 
face lift when good oV 
terra fir ma was re- 
placed with artificial 
turf. In that same year the jean craze 
swept the nation along with SIU. They 
could stand for conformity with 
the generation wearing them, or 
with a patch or two they could 
express uniqueness that no one 
could ever reproduce no matter how 
hard they may try. Some wore 
them long, some wore them short, 
and some even wore them as 
dresses with a little help from 
some needle and thread. The stu- 
dents loved their versatility. 





In 1974, the Alpha 
Phi Omega time cap- 
sule was unearthed 
and opened up. It had 
been buried in 1949 
with plans of being 
opened for the cen- 
tennial. 



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Hi Wsti&S'SiOil '.rrssi 



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1974 also saw the beginning of self 
awareness. Many people took it upon 
themselves to exercise more and practice 
better eating habits. Jogging began to 
catch on along with many other forms of 
physical fitness, from yoga to bicycling to 
weight training.. 



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1 




The double decker parking complex between the Student 
('enter and Parkinson Laboratory also went up in 1975. 



The Student Recreation Center, which was funded by the 
collection of student tees since 1965. was also built that year. 





In TJ77. the Rec Center 
Was turned over to the State 
which pays tor its operation. 



Dolly Parton, who 
country fans thought 
was the biggest thing, or 
two biggest thm^- to 
come to Sll . appeared 

at the Arena in l!>77. 





The crowd ate up the crazy antics of I 
( 'heech and ( 'hong when the two comedians 
came to Sll in 1977. The pair of hecklers 
had the students rolling in the aisles. 






In 1978, the sports world saw the Womens 
volleyball team from Japan come to play the United 
States team. The southern 
Illinois Whistle also came 
carrying Jim Thompson. 
Garrick - Clinton Matthews 
was impeached that year, 
and all were sad to hear of 
the death of Paul Lambert. 




A metamorphosis has just taken 
place, but unlike the tadpole to the 
frog, unlike the caterpillar to the 
butterfly, it can not be seen so easily. 
Rather it must be felt. The seventies 
are now the eighties. Father Time 
has taken what was once the future 
and transformed it into the past. 
Part of the decades impacts can be 
felt throughout the cities and 
nations. In some extreme instances, 
the decades impacts can even be 
seen if one should take the time to 
look. On the other hand, some of the 
decades impacts have not even made 
themselves known yet. There has, as 
of yet, been no real separation of the 
two decades. You see, minutes are 
separated by the movement of the 
clock. Days are separated by the 
movement of the sun. Decades, 
however, are separated by the 
movement of people, of societies, of 



nations — a transformation much 
harder to see from the inside of the 
circle. For this reason, 1979, the 
caboose of the seventies, has been 
recorded in other pages of this issue 
of the OBelisk II, interwoven with 
the beginning of the eighties. 




Students Predict the 80<s 

Alan Kasper; junior in accounting 

— "The Yankees will take it in '84. Also if we go to war, 
I'll be in Canada." 
Melissa Clow; senior in psychology 

— "There will be an increase in higher education. Baggies 
will be in style in the eighties along with Bo Derek's hair 
style." 
Terry Roedl; junior in business 

— "There will be great strife between nations which could 
possibly lead to World War III." 
Kim Lathrop; senior in dental hygiene 

— "Backgammon will be the game of the century." 
Steve Wille; junior in physiology 

— "Another sexual revolution will start sometime in the 
eighties." 



Tom Janik; junior in business 

— "I think we will go to war with Russia. Also there will 
be another earthquake in California, and the Cubs will 
stink." 
Debi Nerwin; sophomore in electrical engineering 

— "There will be more females in the field of technology, 
and those females will receive higher salaries." 
Mark Gazda; junior in accounting 

— "Aerospace is going to be a big factor in the economy 
around 1988. The price of wood will double, Grain 
alcohol will take the place of gasoline to power our 
vehicles, but most of all, Carlinville II will become a big 
metropolis." 
Ellen DuShane; senior in dental hygiene 

— "I think this is going to be a drunk decade." 




OBelisklls first 
Frisbee-Golf Open was a flying success! 

by Bruce Simmons 



The frisbee gods must have been 
smiling on October 7, for the sun came 
out that day and warmed up the course 
Inr the Kirst Annual OHelisk II and 
W'IDH Frisbee Golf Tournament to a 
pleasant 78 degrees. 

The L8-hole course was a master- 
mind nt doglegs and waterholes, winding 
around the site of Old Main, through 
Faner, next to I'ulliam and on to what 
seemed to be infinity at times. 

Prisbee-golf is played much like 
regular golf. The exception is thai the 
contestants must hit a specified target 



with their frisbee, or throw it into a small 
net, rather than dropping a ball into a 
hole. It is scored like golf where each 
attempt at hitting the target counts as 
one stroke. The player with the lowest 
score is deemed the winner. 

Did the winners exhibit skill that 
day, or was the God of the Ambulatory 
Orb simply playing favorites? 

If it was the influence of the god, 
then Scott Kiriokas has a direct line to 
the man upstairs. Kiriokas, who became 
$25 richer for his efforts, came in first 
with a score of 54; one stroke over par. 




Scott Kiriokas (above) accepts his first place prize as 
place winner Paul Nangler looks on. (ieorne ( hin trig! 



third 
piece winner Paul Nangler looks on. George ( hin (right) 
putts on the 15th hole. Exhausted, Tavi the dog (above right) 
shares /ns lucky frisbee with Hugs Nagwiecki. 




. 




Photo by Brian Howe 




If it was the influence of the god, then Scott Kiriokas 
has a direct line to the man upstairs. Kiriokas, who became 
$25 richer for his efforts, came in first with a score of 54, 
one stroke over par. 

The god was also looking out for Sander Greenberg 
and Mike Sullivan. The pair shared second place honors 
with a score of 57, and were each awarded a 1980 yearbook. 

The god didn't stop yet, though; he was still looking 
out for his flinging friends. Paul Nangler took third place 
in the competition along with Mike Vaughn. The two 
received frisbees for their scores of 58. 

The tournament, which was sponsored by the OBelisk 
II and WIDB, will be repeated every year. Hopefully, the 
annual GOFGO (Greater OBelisk Frisbee-Golf Open) will 
be looked forward to in the following years with as much 
enthusiasm as the homecoming football game. 

The layout for the course went through many changes 
before the staff could come up with a combination of holes 
to please the amatueras well as experienced frisbee golfers. 
The editors made a day of pacing off holes. 



BUMM 




IN 




CARBONDALE 

Managing Editor Bruce Simmons 
attempted to prove Lynn Emmerman 
wrong... but failed. 






I simply had to have it! Out 



"God, I want it!" I thought to myself 
of the 23 stories to be done for the first deadline, this was the only one 
which I would have fought for. I simply had to do the story in response 
to the article in the April 1979 issue of Chicago Magazine by Lynn 
Emmerman entitled, "Burned Out in Carbondale." 

Delusions of grandeur ran rampant through my head. It was me 
versus Lynn Emmerman. I was representing SIU, over 20,000 people. 

"Hell," I thought, "I'm representing SIU and Carbondale as a 
community!" My head swelled with ideas. jl was going to write an article 
which would turn the tables on Lynn Emmerman. Yep, this 
was going to he the article to beat all articles. It was going to be fantastic 
. . . it was going to be stupendous ... it was going toibe . . . T^hat was 
the whole problem, it was going to be. But it never was an never will 




I was foaming at the brain with ideas. There 
were so many angles that my high school 
geometry teacher would have been proud of me. 
(And I didn't even use a protractor). With great 
enthusiasm I planned out my line of attack. I 
thought of every point and tried to pick out the 
best strategies. The article was constantly on my 
mind. With every bite of every meal I pondered 
my theories. I thought of it as I combed my hair 
in the morning. The rush of the water in my daily 
shower only served to drown out the babble of my 
roommates so I could concentrate on the matter 
at hand. 

One day as I was walking home from classes, 
a man confronted me. 

"Is your name Jeff?" he inquired. 

"No," was my response. 

"Well," he began, "the only reason I ask is 
because I found a wallet today and the picture on 
the I.D. looked like you, and you were walking 
around like you were really concentrating on 
something. I thought maybe you were thinking 
about where you lost it." 

I smiled, taking his words as a compliment. 
The story was on my mind. Yep, this was going 
to be a great story. It was . . . 

It was time I took action. One of the first 
things I did was to send mailings to other colleges 
requesting information concerning facts 
Emmerman had stated in her article. These were 
facts about enrollment percentages and ratings 
of academic departments. I was sure Emmerman 
had misconstrued the facts. 

I walked into my office a week later. There 
was mail in my basket with a return address from 
the University of Illinois. 

"This is it!" I thought. This was going to 
crack open a Pandora's box of information. 

The information checked out. Emmerman 
was right this time, but I was going to get her in 
my next battle. 

During the next week I received the 
information I had requested from the other 



schools. They all checked out. 

I was still undaunted. It was Emmerman and 
I in the ropes. I was determined to make her exit 
with a bloody nose. 

My next plan was to interview the students. 

"That's the best representation," I reasoned. 
"Let's hear what they really think." 

The next day I went to the Student Center. 

11 This is it ! . . This was going to crack 
open a Pandora's Box of information." 

I picked people at random, trying to get an even 
mixture of guys and girls. 

All of the students said similar things: they 
didn't like the article. They didn't feel it was an 
accurate account of Carbondale, or of SIU as a 
school. All of the students were willing to talk. I 
could see the dislike in their faces as I brought 
up the subject of Lynn Emmerman and her 
article. 

"I think she took the worst part and built on 
it and didn't look at any of the good aspects of 
the school," said one girl. 

It sounded logical to me. I wanted to use it 
in my article. 

"Could I ask your name?" I questioned. 

"What is this for?" she asked. 

I explained that it was for the yearbook, just 
as I had explained less than five minutes ago. She 
would not relinquish her name. 

That was only one person. Surely the rest 
wouldn't behave this way. 

I saw three girls sitting on a sofa. They 
looked like suitable respondents. 

"What's this going to be in?" one of the three 
asked only seconds after I had explained myself. 

"This will be in the yearbook," I stated for 
the second time. 

"I don't know if I want my name in the 
yearbook," she said. 

She and the rest agreed to talk only after I 



8 




promised not to reveal their names. 

They were all sophomores in dental hygiene. 
They all agreed that the article was inaccurate. 

"... it made Southern sound like it was a 
place for psychos," they said. But there was no 
attribution I thought. The first thing a student 
learns in journalism is about attribution. I felt 
empty. The rest of the conversation was 
meaningless to me. 

There was a girl studying by herself in a 
corner. I approached her with an optimistic 
attitude. 

"Could I have your name please?" I asked. 



She would only talk to me if I would keep her' 
name anonymous. I was becoming disenchanted 
with my "progress." 

All of the students had similar attitudes — 
they didn't like the article. Only three of the nine 
students I talked to would give me their names. 
A mere third. 

During the evening I called numbers from 
the phone book. My intent was to get responses 
from townspeople who were not students. I called 
for three and a half hours. 

I talked to more than 15 people. Three would 
give me their names. One was a student. 



The student, Lula Fragd, a junior in 
journalism, took up a different angle than most 
people I talked to. 

"Everybody's burned out — everybody I 
know," she said. "It's about the same as any other 
college town. Everybody is drug oriented." 

I had to give Lula credit, whomever she was. 
She stuck up for her ideas. She wasn't afraid to 
say what she felt and let people know it. 

Of all the parents I talked to, one knew of the 
article. The rest were oblivious to it. I talked to 
my one respondent for close to one-half hour. 

"I've lived in Carbondale all my life," she 
said. "I think it's a pretty dynamic town." 

I questioned her in relation to the article 
itself. She felt it was inaccurate. 

"You can even misconstrue the Bible," she 
said. 

Her words hit me like a ton of bricks. It was 
great! I asked her name. She would not give it to 
me. 

I could not understand. Here was an issue 
which directly affected any student at SIU and 
any resident of Carbondale. The students and 
the residents would talk, yet they would not back 
their feelings with their names. Were they 
ashamed? I couldn't make sense of the situation. 

My next step was to talk to officials who 
were mentioned in the story. I called George 
Mace, vice president of SIU. He was in a meeting. 
His secretary told me he was leaving town after 
the meeting. My deadline was coming up and it 
appeared that I would not get to talk to him. I 
was a victim oi circumstance. No one could be 
blamed. Then I got lucky: Mace's right hand man 
was going to talk to me. 

I asked the questions I had planned out, and 
he answered them with great cooperation. New 
light was shed upon the situation. 

"Can I quote you on that?" I said upon 
hearing a startling fact from him. 

His response was simple. "No." 

Mv whole attitude towards Carbondale and 



SIU was going through a metamorphosis of a 
sort. Here was a university official that was 
unwilling to stand up for what he said. He was 
doing the same thing as the students and the 
townspeople: he was hiding behind anonymity. 
Anonymity is an excellent mask. Somehow 
anonymity reminds me of the Atlantic Ocean. I 
think it has something to do with all the spineless 
jellyfish. 
I continued with my article research. I called the 



M 



Everybody's burned out --everybody 
I know. . . It's about the same as arty 
other college town. Everybody is 
drug oriented." 



Carbondale Women's Center and asked for 
Kathy Szymoniak. She was president of the 
center at the time Lynn Emmerman published 
her article. I couldn't find Ms. Szymoniak. No 
one I spoke to had even heard of her. Who was 
at fault here? Emmerman or the lady I spoke to 
from the center? Twenty-four hours earlier I 
would have said Emmerman. Now I couldn't 
decide. 

I decided to call Police Chief Hogan. I 
figured that he could verify a lot of the 
information which I questioned in Emmerman's 
article. 

Hogan told me he would be happy to see me 
and to try to help out. All I needed was five 
minutes of his time. I didn't see that it warranted 
an interview. I explained to him that all I needed 
was to have two or three questions answered. He 
refused to talk to me over the phone — it had to 
be in person. 

I'm sure you're a very busy man," I said. "I'm 
very busy too." 

I explained about my deadline which was 
creeping up on me every second. In a father-like 
tone Police Chief Hogan asked me why I had 
waited so long to write the article. 











<~l 'N 










^a 










"Oh, I've just had my finger stuck up my ass 
for the past few weeks," was the first thought 
that came to mind. Reluctantly I settled on 
explaining how busy I had been. 

We said our good-byes, and hung up the 
phones on our respective ends. 

I threw on my coat and walked downtown to 
get some dinner. I decided on Booby's. I ordered 
and took a seat, patiently waiting on my order. 

"Sixty-four!" the man called. I could tell 
that he called the number before by the irritation 
in his voice. I guess I was drifting away with the 
article. 

My whole attitude toward Carbondale and 
SIU had changed in the last 64 hours. I thought 
again of the article I was expected to write. I 
could no longer stick up for the school and the 
town as I would have three days ago. What was 
I going to do? 

I thought back to the first journalism class 



I had at SIU. It had taught us that the reporter 
could be the eyes and ears of the reader, but he 
could not assume the role of the brain. The 
reporter could not process information. 

"That is what I'll do," I thought. 

And that is what I hope I have done with a 
minimal number of emotional upheavals. 

Maybe I should have been born 10 years ago, 
so that I would have been a counter-culturist in 
the last 1960's. Those were the days of political 
and social tension. There was much student 
upheaval, but there was a definite characteristic 
of the students of that era: they weren't afraid to 
speak their minds! They weren't vegetables of 
society! Is that what the student body is 
becoming today? Societal vegetables? No longer 
willing to stand up for what it believes in? 

SIU is what the students make it. What do 
you want to make it? 



N5 

CO 



A 

Near 
Miss... 

Shanna McNeill 

talks about her 

short reign as 

Miss Illinois. 



Text by Lizann Griffin 





Pholo by JlFn Hunzinger 

hanna McNeill, a 20-year-old business graduate at SIU, 
talked from her Carterville living room about her goal 
to become Miss America . . . and the incident that kept 
ler from competing for it. 

"The dream was over for me. It seemed just as far away 
when I was a little girl, but I almost had it," the 
hazel-eyed brunette paused, "and poof it was gone." 

McNeill's dream of glamour and fame turned into a 
nightmare when she broke through an eight-inch square 
window. Tendons in a finger were severed, and her arm was 
so badly cut that it required stitches. 

McNeill said she was sleeping at one of her trainer's 
houses in Yorkville, Illinois, so they could take her to 
Carterville the next morning for her homecoming as Miss 
Southern Illinois. But she awoke feeling very disoriented. 
The red-carpeted bedroom with white furniture, she said, 
was very similar to her bedroom at home. McNeill said she 
wanted to go outside, although she couldn't say why. She 
explained that she couldn't unlock the door from the 
inside, and fumbled with the lock for awhile. Then she 
tried to unlock the door from the outside, but the glass on 
the upper part of the door cut her as she banged her arm 
and hands clear through it. 

She thought she might have been in shock as she was 
being driven to the hospital. Like Dorothy in "The Wizard 
of Oz," all she could think of was "I want to go home." 

The accident made it impossible for her to play the 
piano in the Miss America talent competition. She now has 
an ace bandage decorating her wrist and she toys with it 
nervouslv as she talks. 



"I guess the stress and tension of the two weeks plus 
my bad health contributed to the disorientation," McNeill 
pondered. She worked her injured middle finger by- 
stretching the rubber band attached to her finger nail and 
anchored onto the bandage wrapped around her wrist. 

The young woman, who has dimples that have 
abandoned her cheeks and moved to the tip of her nose, 
said she had a sore throat during training. She suspected 
it to be strep throat, and said it created yet more stress. To 
cure it, one of her trainer's wives (who was a nurse) doubled 
her dosage of the antibiotic tetracycline which a hometown 
doctor had prescribed to clear up acne. 

McNeill said she also felt run-down. 

"I wanted to sleep a lot, but there just wasn't time," 
she said, flipping back some brown, shoulder-length hair. 

McNeill said she thought she won the title "Miss 
Illinois" with her own efforts. 

"No one was trying to change me," she picked up 
Sasha, the siamese cat and looked into her feline's dazzling, 
transparent eyes. 

Yet McNeill suspected the structure of the Miss 
Illinois Pageant Program to be one of the most rigorous in 
the country. 

"They try to mold a woman into someone who looks 
as perfect as possible in two weeks," she said. Her eyebrows 
shifted into a stiff holding pattern over her eyes. 

The five-foot six-inch woman was told she was 
overweight at 113 pounds. They told her she should lose 
eight to ten pounds with their special diet and exercise 
program, she said. 



The diet that the Fox Valley Health Club advised her 
to undergo consisted of 1,200 calories of food per day. 
McNeill said that she was so nervous, often she consumed 
only 500 calories or less per day. 

"I knew I would have to learn how to eat all over 
again," her eyes stared thoughtfully between blackened 
lashes. 

The exercise consisted of work-outs at the health club 
two hours a day. 

Then she moved on to Aurora, Illinois, for her 
modeling. 

"They worked on my walk and they worked on my 
pivots," she explained. "There is a different walk for the 
bathing suit competition than there is for the evening gown 
competition." 

McNeill said her trainers wanted her to return to the 
Chicago area two and one-half weeks before the pageant, 
not only to continue her training, but also to expose herself 
to the midwestern accent. 

"I almost had it and 
poof it was gone ." 

"They wanted me to have an upper-midwestern 
accent, and I have more of a southern-midwestern accent," 
she drawled. 

In suburban Des Plaines, Illinois, she was fitted for 
evening gowns. In Chicago, she was taught how to apply 
cosmetics. And in Hickory Hills, beauticians body-waved 
and wedge -cut her hair. 

She practiced giving interviews in front of a camera, 
answering political questions while trying to maintain 
poise. They had her coming and going (to and from these 
interviews) reading news magazines such as "Money," 
"U.S. News & World Report," and "Forbes." 

During most of her training, McNeill said she was 
under the hot lights and an NBC camera which was filming 
her for a television special on the rigorous training that 
beauty contestants must undergo. 

She said she almost always felt stress when being 
filmed and felt that she was expected to perform 
excellently at all times. 

Following her accident, her luggage and purse were 
searched, she said. The items that were taken included a 
rhinestone crown, trophy, stationery, health club receipts, 
a diamond ring and a swimsuit given to her as a winner of 
the Miss Illinois title. 

The charges by a pageant official of mental illness, the 
claims that she said she heart God's voice over the car radio 
and that she spoke of a premonition in which her father was 
being murdered are false, she said. 

"I don't put myself in the same category of people who 
say they see visions," McNeill said crossing her blue-jeaned 
legs. 

The way I see it was that I'm not mentally ill and never 
have been," she raised her voice. "I think people around 
here (Carterville) know that." 

For her efforts, the former Miss Illinois was awarded 
a duplicate scholarship which she will use towards 
obtaining her master's degree in business at SIU in the 
spring of 1980. She is also paid a fee, "which is not 



exorbitant," for appearing at parades and other events as 
a former Miss Illinois. 

Would the former Miss Illinois advise a sister to 
compete for the title? She has only two brothers who 
probably wouldn't want to compete anyways, but . . . 

"My first tendency would be to say no, I would not 
want her to go through it." she said, "unless there were 
changes in the pageant. I don't know what those changes 
would be. I thing that the Miss America Pageant could be 
good for girls." 

She says that the pageant teaches a woman 
self-confidence and poise. 

"I think simply the exposure ... of people and 
situations . . . you learn a lot from the traveling and 
meeting people," she said. "I certainly changed my outlook 
of myself because I had to deal with all different kinds of 
people which certainly gives you the opportunity to get into 
other fields." 

McNeill said she met many intelligent women who 
were competing for the "Miss America" title. 

"They didn't fall into the brainless blonde category," 
she shook her head. 

"I have to believe that things have a purpose or I'd 
become cynical. I don't want to be like that." 

She said she had been thinking of starting a cosmetic 
business for herself after her master's is completed. 

"I have alife ahead of me," she said planting herself 
firmly on the floor in front of the couch. "I'm not the same 
person, but hopefully it is a change for the better." 




- 




_ J 



§& POLICE 



/ 



• LAMDOfllliCQLH 

U7968 

71 ILLINOIS 7! 






Photos - Brian Howe 
Lizann Griffin-Text 



The SIU Security Police, located at Washing- 
ton Square Building A, differs with the Carbondale 
Police Department, in that it deals more with a 
student population. 

"We're dealing primarily with high-rise 
dormitories and college-level people, but not so 
many residences such as apartments," Virgil 
Trummer, Security Director of the SIU Security 
Police, said recently. 

The officers, who number 47 men and four 
women, patrol the area bounded by Mill St., 
Freeman St., Wall St., and the university-owned 
agricultural areas to the west and south. 

Although its primary area of responsibility is 
to patrol all university-leased or -owned property, 
the SIU Security Police also has responsibility for 
neighboring Union, Jackson, and Williamson 
Counties in cases such as criminal pursuit. 

Trummer said the SIU Security Police, which 
is state-funded, has an interdepartmental 
agreement with the Carbondale Police Depart- 
ment to "provide assistance when they call for it." 

The SIU Security Police has three divisions. 
Most students who own a car are familiar with the 
parking division. That's where parking stickers are 
bought and tickets paid. The key control division 
employs locksmiths to maintain the locks for all 
the residence halls and academic areas on campus. 
The police are employed in the third division. 

The SIU Security Police divides its time 
between providing services (about 80 percent) and 
preventing and solving crimes (about 20 percent), 
Trummer, who has worked with the force since 
1970, said. These figures are close to the national 
average, he added. 



As a part of a community-wide effort, the SIU 
Security Police lectures to student groups and 
classes on rape prevention. High school and 
elementary school students are lectured about 
drugs by a member of the SIU Security Police. 
Crime prevention, bicycle safety, defensive 
driving, and a program that informs people about 
the SIU Security Police, are also a part of the 
services offered. 

Trummer said that the force's officers have 
been encouraged to refer students to the Student 
Life Office for disciplinary action when they have 
committed minor violations. The other options the 
officers may consider are to arrest or to warn. 

The practice of blocking off South Illinois 
Avenue — that area that extends from College St. 
to Walnut St. also known as "the strip" — "is a 
formality more than anything else," said 
Trummer. The "strip" is not the responsibility of 
the SIU Security Police, he added. 

Dan Lane, the administrative assistant to 
Trummer, said that although SIU had the highest 
crime rate of Illinois college campuses in 1978 
behind the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, 
and the University of Illinois at Champaign- 
Urbana, the average increase in crime is much 
smaller than the national figure. The national 
figure shows a 4.7 percent increase in crime on 
college campuses. SIU's increase in crime is 0.9 
percent. 

"Our crime rate is not increasing," Lane said. 
"That (figure) is way below the national average." 



Not a Woman, 
but a Cop 

She said she likes to help people, 
although the woman is not a nurse or 
a school marm. 

Carol Kammerer, 29, wears silver 
badge number P>6 as one of the four 
females on the SIU Security Police. 

The 5'5" brunette has been on the 
force for three years. She operated a 
radio for the first six months on the job 
in 1976, then studied at the Police 
Training Institute at Champaign- 
I'rbana before beginning police work. 

She is not the tough, lollipop- 
sucking type officer, although she does 
pack around 10 points of gear. A Smith 
and Wesson is slung conspicuously 
along one hip. A radio, nightstick, 
handcuff, extra ammunition, mace 
and keys occupy brown packs around 
her waist. 

"I don't think that there that 
many people who are 'troub- 




lemakers,'" Kammerer said. "As a 
police officer . . . you need to put 
yourself in other people's shoes. 
Maybe the violation just showed a lack 
of good judgement for that period of 
time." 

Kammerer, who received her 
bachelor's degree in social welfare in 
197.S from SIU, said she judges each 
trouble situation to determine 
whether the action has hurt other 
people. Then she considers what 



action to take. For instance, an 
intoxicated student may be arrested or 
told to go home. 

She explained that she deals 
mostly with students, which is 
fortunate, because an errant student 
may be referred to the Student Life 
Office for disciplinary action. 

The Student Life Office may issue 
a written reprimand or a formal 
warning not to commit the act again. 
Bill Kehoe, assistant coordinator of 



00 




student life, said this office may also 
place students on probation so that 
they lose their good standing and they 
may not be able to work at certain 
on-campus jobs. The most serious 
action the office can take is to 
permanently or temporarily suspend 
the student. It is only this last act that 
appears on the student's transcripts. 
No other record of disciplinary action 
taken against the student leaves the 
Student Life Office, Kehoe said. 



Besides arresting, warning, or 
referring people to the Student Life 
Office, Kammerer also directs people 
to social services such as alcohol abuse 
counseling. 

"It's all part of my job," she 
proudly stated. 

She added that she sees her 
"clients" as people — not labels. 

"I don't see the students as being 
any different from anyone else," she 
said, pursing her small mouth in 



concentration. "They are younger 
than a lot of people though." 

The civilians she works with 
sometimes have trouble relating to a 
woman with authority, she said. 
Distinguishing what role people 
perceive her in — female or 
policewoman — is hard to tell 
sometimes too. 

Kammerer said that it would not 
make any difference if her husband, a 
detective on the Carbondale Police 
Force, objected to her police work or 
not. 

"I'm not the kind of person that 
lets people tell me what to do," she 
said with simple determination in her 
voice. All jobs have their difficult 
aspects and her job is no exception, 
according to Kammerer. No amount of 
money could have paid her for the first 
time she had to interview her first rape 
victim, who was in shock. 

"You have to ask them, in essence, 
to relive the whole experience. I just 
felt so much for the victim." 



to 
so 



FASHION : 

Does Sill Conform? 




Photo by Jim Hunzingc 




^ . - 




Pnolo by Chuck Hodn 



Keith L. Jackson stmts the look of leisure by means of a brown ensemble. (Una 
Sarin shows off a matching skirt and jacket combination, while Cathy Laird and 
Angela Horras don vests and blazers in a preparation for cooler weather. 



Some people pay flagrant sums of 
money to discover what people are 
wearing today. They wish to find out 
what is fashionable so they attend the 
best fashion shows cooing. "Oh 
Darling, 1 simply must have one of 
those!" despite the fact that the 
desired purchase may consist of 
nothing more than a burlap bag that 
Pierre Cardine has unthought fully 
sewn his name to. 

Others keep close watch on the 
first lady, allowing her to assume the 
role of trend setter; and if Miss Lillian 
is wearing bib overalls with peanuts 
embroidered on them, then they shall 
wear the same. 

However, if one really wishes to 
discover what people are wearing 



today, if they wish to draw the line 
between fad and fashion, the place to 
look is the college campus. 

The college campus draws a 
composit crowd. In one glance a 
person can view people from the 
North, South, East and West, and with 
these people comes fashion. No longer 
does the college campus consist of 
nothing more than blue-jeaned 
bottoms. 

Two major factors govern a 
student's style of dress. The first is 
demography — where the student 
comes from originally. The student 
from the city obviously dresses 
differently than the student who lives 
in one of the outer suburbs or in a 
farming community. 



The other major factor governing 
a student's style of dress is the 
student's finances. No matter how it is 
said, dinero, bread or bucks, no matter 
how is appears, green, silver or bronze, 
money is a necessity to keep pace with 
all of the changing styles. 

Together these factors combine to 
create three categories of student 
fashion: the "fashionable," the 
"pseudo-fashionable," and the "com- 
fortable." Of the "fashionable," 
there are several selections frequently 
seen on campus. The students wearing 
these fashions often are from the 
larger cities or a nearby suburb in 
which fashion is a more prominent 
part of life. Financially, these people 
have the purchasing power which is 




necessary to acquire the fashions and 
looks they desire. 

One of the most common new 
styles to hit nation's campuses is the 
"retro look," reminiscent of the 1940's 
and 1950's. High waisted trousers 
sporting straight legs and above-ankle 
cuffs are characteristic of this fashion. 
Narrow ties are often worn with the 
trousers, occasionally hanging loosely 
about the neck. A hat may top off the 
trouser-tie combination, depending on 
the person's personal preference. The 
most popular hat worn with this 
combination is the "fedora," another 
outcrop of the 1940's. This hat carries 
a crease running the length of it with 
a wide, curved brim sometimes dipped 
down over one eye. 

Airmen's scarves have returned 
also, but this time they are seen 
around the necks of women. These 
scarves have greatly appreciated in 
color, now showing a whole rainbow of 
colors. 

There was a time when people 
wore grubbies to play baseball, 
basketball or tennis. At one time 
jogging involved only a pair of torn 
gym trunks and a vintage pair of 
pro-keds. Recreation styles are now 
running rampant, however. Joggers 
are shedding their ripped jeans and 
torn gym trunks and donning satin 
shorts and terry cloth tops. Grays and 
dark blues no longer dominate the 
athletic scene. A whole new color 
wheel of tones has been introduced to 
the world of physical fitness. Today's 
attitude seems to be the brighter the 
better. 

The current trend is fashionable 
evening wear seems to be whispering 
one theme — soft and sexy. Long 
gowns made of velvety material 
inhabited by shapely legs fill the 
discos and restaurants at night. Silky 
dresses of shiny satin which accent the 



Gina Sarlo poses once again for the 
shutter, demonstrating the eye- 
pleasing effects of the slitted skirt. 



Text by Bruce Simmons 



o 



< 







Photo by Jim Hunzlnger 



Steve Johnson, (far left 
and below), may include 
cross country skiing into his 
renting business 
winter. 



come 




Leslie Perls and Nick Sigrist wheel it as gangsters 
(left). Below, Andy Forrest uses a pillow to cushion his 
unexpected landing. 



Photo by Brian Howe 












I 




/ 




Johnson, who feels that roller skating is not a fad and 
believes thai tin- SIC campus was made for roller skating 
because ol its hilly paths, says he will stay with the store 
through its first year. After that, he's not unite sure. Right 
no« he enjoys what he's doing and know he's getting good 
experience. 

Another new store in town is the Agape Film Co., 
owned by Jim Hair, J9. Agape Film Co. is also located on 
South Illinois Avenue. 

Together, Hair and his wife. Marguerite, operate the 
Store six days a week putting in as much as \'2 hours each 
daj 

Presently. Hair is not enrolled in any courses because 
ol the tremendous amount of time he must devote to the 
Store However, he does plan to finish his remaining eight 
or nine hours in the near future to receive his degree in 
cinema and photography. 

He says he opened the store because of the closing of 



the only two film stores in the area. "Students in the 
department couldn't get the supplies they needed on time 
because they had to order them from Chicago or St. Louis," 
he said. 

Unfortunately. Hair did have some difficulties getting 
his business started. One problem was obtaining 
dealerships because Carbondale is so far from a large city. 
The other problem was getting a loan from a local bank. 

"Carbondale wants to grow." he remarked. "But the 
banks don't want anything to do with you if you want 
money." 

Hair eventually received a loan through a friend at a 
bank which his family had done business with for many 
years. 

Right now. all work brought into the store is sent out 
to a laboratory, but Hair hopes to expand within the next 
sear and do some custom work. 




Jim, Marguerite, and Jacob Bair make 
Agape' Film Company their home during 
working hours. They have tried to supply local 
photo students with photo garb and now have 
included a student photo gallery so customers 
can share their work. Below sits the building 
that was the former location of The Rough 
Edge. That successful student business now 
thrives in Chicago. 




He says there is one big difference in his life since 
opening the store. 

"I can afford to do things I want to do now, I just can't 
afford the time." Yet, he doesn't mind, because to him, this 
is a different kind of work . . . this is fun. 

Mickey Clarey, 33, a sophomore in civil engineering, 
owns apartment houses in Carbondale. He came to SIU two 
years ago from Chicago where he was a carpenter. He 
decided to go to school because he wasn't getting anywhere 
with his job. 

"Carpentry is OK if you don't mind hammering nails 
for the rest of your life," he began. 

Like Bair, Clarey had problems obtaining a loan from 
the local banks but he eventually succeeded. He is now the 
landlord of nine apartments. 

Clarey says he enjoys being his own boss because, "A 
lot of bosses don't know what they're talking about." He 
feels that many of them are too concerned with getting 



things done quickly and aren't concerned with the quality 
of the work. He admits this could possibly happen to him, 
but for now he's working a lot on his apartments and will 
continue to make improvements until he is satisfied. 

Another very common type of student business is one 
based in the home. Bill Griffith, 21, and Andy Maur, 21, 
design majors, have started a bicycle repair and salvage 
service. 

The business is now called "Cyclasts Bike Repairs." 
Its original name, "Wheeler Dealer Bike Salvage" was 
changed because it held some what different connotations 
than intended. The business is good for them because there 
was little investment of time or money involved. 

The only real investment was in tools, according to 
Mauer. Most of the parts are from abandoned bicycles. 
Those that they do need to buy are charged to the 
customer. Because it is just a small operation, all 
advertising is done through word of mouth. 



Bill (iril'tith and Andy Maur find their bike repair shop to 
require very little initial capital. With all of the bike accidents 
on campus, they are sure to stay busy for awhile. 




According to Griffith, together they only spend about 
12 hours each week working on the bikes. They also claim 
that they charge approximately half of what any cyclery in 
town does. 

Griffith says that if they had the money and someone 
to back them up they might open a shop. Yet. that chance 
seems highly unlikely because both seem to be primarily 
involved in their majors and in their plans after graduation. 
Free-lance work is the direction they both are heading 
towards. 

Jay Elmore and his brother Ken, along with Donny 
Cruise and Mark Gazda, set up their own bar in the spring 
of 1979. So what, you may say, there are plenty of bars on 
Illinois Avenue. True. But how many are in Felts Hall? 

The four partners, who shared a suite on the third 
floor, moved all of the beds, desks and chairs into one of 
the rooms making up the suite, leaving the other room 
vacant. This room, later to become affectionately known as 
the Kamikaze Bar and Grill, was filled with two sofas, a 
recliner, a bar seating four, and a television and a stereo. 

Unfortunately, the Kamikaze was soon permanently 
shut down due to a wild party featuring a live band known 
as the Buzz Brothers, which brought the Kamikaze to the 
attention of the head resident and Sam Rinella, director of 
housing. 

"We made $100 that night," Cruise noted. 

"I was giving free drinks away after awhile," Ken said. 
"If we would have really run it tight, we could have made 
a lot more. Possibly as much as $200." 

The ownership of "Mr. Natural," a health food store 
located on East Jackson is quite different than most stores. 
There are ten partners involved with the store, three of 
which are students. 

Lucy Clauter, 24, is one of the student partners. She 





Mr. Natural wouldn't think of 
stocking its shelves with "junk food". 
The munchie island sticks to fresh nuts 
. . . not doritos. 



holds a bachelor's degree in plant and soil science and is 
presently enrolled in one course at SIU. She says of the 
partnership, "It is based on time invested." In other words, 
a partner does not invest money, he invests his time by 
working in the store. Clauter is one of three coordinators, 
which puts her on salary rather than hourly wage. She and 
one other coordinator are responsible for the office work. 

Kristi Arnold, a senior in art education is also a 
student partner. She describes "Mr. Natural" as "truly 
unique." 

Neither of the women were aware of the partnership 
when they started five years ago. Both just wanted a 
part-time job. Since then the store has become a part of 
their lives. 

"Everyone is equal around here," said Arnold. "We all 



share the chores and made decisions." 

Clauter describes the store as " . . . our piece of the 
rock. I don't know what I'd do without it." 

Both women realize that nobody can get rich at "Mr. 
Natural," but then, there are no pressures. Clauter put it, 
"Nobody says, OK quit talking and get to work!" 

Arnold says she has no idea what she's going to do after 
she graduates. "I can't plan that far ahead," she said. 

As for Lucy Clauter, "I plan on hanging around for a 
long time, unless something really exciting comes up." 

All of these student owners have three characteristics 
in common. They all are happy with what they're doing, 
they know they're getting valuable experience and 
hopefully, they're all making money. 






ANOTHER SUCCESS 




Jay Bender drilled the last hole into a chunk of freshly 
(lit cherry wood and inspected it carefully from behind his 
i ild. gray safety glasses. The 26-year-old SIU graduate of 
cinema and photography had finished another of his 4 by 
5 view camera kits. 

Mender has been designing, producing, and selling 
these cherry wood kits for more than a year now. His 
biggest market for the kits is fellow photo majors who have 
more time than money. 

"Photo majors needed a cheap, lightweight, large 
format camera they can carry around without getting a 
hernia." Bender Mattered the dust from his blue-jean 
apron. 



Selling the kit for $75, Bender developed the kit from 
an independent study that he did during his senior year at 
SIU. He definitely knew that there was a market at SIU; 
he has sold close to 80 kits in less than one year of 
operation. 

The kits are made from an array of cherry wood, nuts 
and bolts, springs, black cloth and a monorail. Bender cuts 
the wood to size, and has included an 18-page instruction 
booklet with the kit to help the kit builder through the 
camera making ordeal. 

"It took me five weeks to put my first kit together 
during the evenings . . . and I didn't work too diligently." 
Bender said. 

The kit purchaser will have to drill some holes, 
assemble the bellows, and put a coat of varnish on the 
wood; but Bender feels the effort will be well worth the 
time. 

"I think people will be able to build them with no 
trouble," Bender claims. "It just takes a little patience." 

Jim Hunzinger, a senior in photography, bought a 
Bender View Camera in May of 1979 and didn't finish it 
completely until January of 1980. His reaction to the kit 
and finished product is mixed. 

"It's not as functional as a regular view camera," 
Hunzinger said. "It's a lot cheaper though." 







Story by 
Joel Wakitsch & Bruce Simmons 



Now that we've shown you that money can 
be made in Carbondale, the OBelisk II has 
conjured up a list of ways in which any SIU 
student can make that money. 

Agreed, some of these ways are silly and 
some of these jobs may seem a bit outlandish, 
but in the end it's the old American 
(devaluating) dollar that counts. 

Remember that none of these jobs are 
proven money makers, but maybe that is 
because no one has the guts to try them. Why 
not try one; if you make tons of greenstuff . . . 
great! Then again, if you lose your shorts don't 
come looking for us. 

The first job will take very little initial 
capital. All you'll need is one clothes pin, one 
wash rag, one can of Raid and an abundance of 
elbow grease. When University Housing 
unplugs all the Mini Cool Refrigerators over 
each break period, offer your services to 
fumigate and clean them of all open sardine 
cans, separated dorm ice cream containers and 
mouldy bread. Oh yes, the clothes pin is for 
your nose. 

If you can rent one of the Cushman 
vehicles on campus, try starting a mini- 
ambulance service. With all of the inexper- 
ienced roller skaters, Iranian protesters and 
drunken bike riders on campus, you stand to 
make a killing. (Pardon the pun.) 

Here is a practical one. As the semester 
wears on, most students depend on Morris 
Library as a nightly ritual instead of the strip. 
Start a Rent-a-Pillow shop in the library, 
concentrating most of your efforts to the first 
floor lounge. 

During finals week you can branch off into 
the overflow crowd that uses the Student 
Center for sleeping . . . er . . . studying 
purposes. 



How about selling a Student Government 
Repair Kit, complete with two pints of 
anti-student apathy potion, 10 pills to cure the 
anxiety brought on by the "Matthews 
Syndrome" and and a dash of more presidents 
like Pete Alexander. 

In the publishing field you can recycle old 
Southern Illinoisans to add a bit more 
substance to the D.E., or you can start your 
own underground newspaper, publishing 
everything that the D.E. can't handle as a 
result of the paper shortage. 

Everyone spends their weekends at SIU 
differently. Why not develop three different 
"weekenders kits" for each type of student. 

The first kit would be for the "Nurdly 
"Weekender." It would include your choice of 
calculus, engineering or psychology textbooks; 
one peanut butter cup, one pair of clean socks 
for Sunday, 20c for use in either the library 
copy or pencil machines and one free coffee at 
the Student Center cafe. 

The second kit would be great for the 
"Drunken Weekender." A quart of Wild 
Turkey to start off the evening, complete with 
your choice of mixers. A fifth of Smirnoff 
complete with Playboy mixing rods, a choice of 
sour cream and onion potato chips, Cracker 
Jacks (with prize inside) and St. Joseph 
childrens' aspirins (orange flavored). The real 
selling point would be the customer's choice of 
either a vomit dish or bedpan. 

The "Travolta Weekender" would love to 
get a hold of the contents of the third kit. Two 
disco records, one silk shirt, an enchanting 
chest toupee and a pocket sized blow dryer are 
all possible entries. A bottle of Chianti and a 
six-pack of Trojans could also turn the trick, 
but a pair of velvet, disco roller skates may sell 
even better. 




Hal^B 



01 




After so many years of 
Mom's cooking , college 
eating habits become. 



A Real Bite 



Text by Karen Clare 

To eai nr not to eat? That is the 
question most students ask them- 
selves when dinner time rolls around. 
There are solutions to this ever 
present problem. In Carhondale, the 
vast array of foods from which to 
choose is almost as diverse as each 
individual's eating habits. 

Roaming around the Student 
Center, note pad and pencil in hand, I 
came across Sidney Byas, freshman. 
intent on playing a game of pinball in 
the bowling alley. I assumed my stance 
and popped the question, "What 
restaurants in Carhondale do you go to 
most often?" 

"When I'm hungry I'll stop at the 
first place that suits my appetite." said 
ByaS, looking over my shoulder as 1 
BCribbled down his reply. 

Hyas says he eats about once a 
week at McDonalds. "I usually order a 
fish sandwich. French tries, and a 
shake." he explained. "1 don't eat to 
much hamburger because it mighl be 
bad tor you 

Byas, who lives in Brush Towers. 

eats most of his meals in Cirinnell 
Cafeteria. He said he tries to eat a 
well balanced diet consisting of grain. 

meat, vegetables, Fruil and cereals. 

"I try to eat right but I don't know 
if it's helping." he said with a grin. 

At night when Byas K»'ts a craving, 
he said he'll go to the "junk truck " "I 
eai my share of sweets, but not 



everyday," he explained. Contrary to 
popular opinion, Byas thinks the dorm 
food is OK. 

I thanked him, shouldered my 
back-pack, and moved on. 

Outside the Student Center, 1 
talked with .Jay Kelleher, who gave me 
his opinion on the subject. Kelleher, a 
junior in computer science, strongly 
disagrees with Byas. 

Kelleher said he lived in the 
dorms for two years before moving 
into a trailer. His biggest reason for 
moving out of the dorms was the 
quality of the food in the dorm 
cafeterias. 

"The dorm cafeterias are not 
much better than high school cafeter- 
ias. The only advantage to eating in 
I he cafeteria is that von don't have to 



prepare your own meals or wash up 
afterwards . . . the only advantage." 
he stressed, looking me straight in the 
eyes. 

Kelleher said he eats four times a 
day. He tries to eat greens once a day 
and fruit twice a day. Sometimes he 
will sacrifice taste to save time and 
money, but, "Most of the time I'll fix 
a good meal." He added, "I'm mostly 
into salads and hamburger." 

Kelleher said his favorite food in 
Carhondale are gyros from Kl Greco 
because he can't get them in his 
hometown, Bdwardsville, III. "I 
usually go there or Zantigo's, but I eat 
most at home," he said. 

Where do you eat the most? Patty 
Bozesky. junior, heads to QuatTOS for 
her favorite food in Carhondale. 




Quatros thick sausage pizza. She says 
she spends $5 to $10 a week on beer 
and going out to eat. 

Bozesky describes her eating 
habits as "pretty junky." "I eat one 
meal a day in the summer. In the 
winter, I eat three balanced meals," 
she explained while sitting on the 
steps outside the Student Center, 
soaking up the afternoon sun. 

Her typical grocery list consists of 



fruit, vegetables, bread, and ham- 
burger. 

"Yes, I'm willing to sacrifice taste 
to save time and money," she replied 
laughing, "I eat mainly sandwiches." 

As I continued my search for 
interviews, I bumped into another 
junior in design, Bill Griffith, who 
considers eating a hobby. 

"I spend more on food than on 
beer on Friday nights," he explained. 




Griffith said he will hit three or four 
restaurants on the "strip" in one night 
and totally "munch out." 

However, his favorite restaurant 
is Ahmads Falafil Factory. He likes 
Ahmads because it's nutritional and 
high in protein, two very important 
criteria for the food he eats. "You get 
everything in a falafil for $1.50," he 
explained. 

Griffith won't eat anything out of 
a machine except milk or yogurt. He 
said he tries to stick to the basics. "I 
don't drink soda for breakfast," he 
said jokingly. 

When asked if he takes the time to 
prepare well-balanced meals, Griffith 
replied, "Whatever time permits. 
Every two or three days I eat a really 
good meal." 

Does he sacrifice taste to save 
time or money? "That's why I eat what 
I eat," he replied hurriedly. "Now I've 
got to run or I'll be late for class." 



Ahmed Salameh, pictured above, has 
brought his cuisine from the Mid East 
and opened his own fast food place 
featuring "falafils. " 



Paradise Lost 

"Cheeseburger is paradise, medium rare 
with mustard 'd be nice. Not too particular, not 
too precise, I'm just a cheeseburger in paradise." 

The message inherent in Jimmy Buffett's 
tune cannot be exaggerated. The fact is, the 
hamburger is a symbol of our way of life in the 
U.S., but have you ever thought about just what 
goes into the making of that "big warm bun and 
huge hunk of meat?" 

SIU students interested in finding out the 
answer to this question and more about the 
common student diet were invited to attend 
"Eating for the Health of It," an inside look at 
the great American hamburger, sponsored by 
the Student Wellness Resource Center. 

After watching a brief slide presentation 
which focused on the different industries that 
play a part in the making of the hamburger, 
from bun to sesame bun, Janis Kulp, patient 
activation coordinator, headed a discussion on 
its nutritional value. 

The presentation explained how what goes 
in and on the ail-American hamburger is the 
result of wide pesticide usage, corporate control, 
and industrial mechanization, which has wiped 
out the small American farmer of yesteryear. 

In the question and answer session which 
followed, Kulp clarified many of the statements 
made in the slide presentation. 

"It was a good presentation, but it was 
obviously one-sided," she said. 

As for the nutritional aspects of the 
hamburger, she explained, "Vitamin-wise you" 
aren't getting very much. People who eat at fast 
food restaurants have been found to be deficient 
in vitamins A and C." 



The fast food controversy sparked a lot of 
interest in the group. People are putting a lot of 
money in those places and they are convenient, 
but their sales pitch is the experience of going 
out, not the nutritional value of the food. 

"They don't say a lot about the kind of food, 
they make the pitch to kids," Kulp remarked. 

Kulp cited two interesting surveys: 98 
percent of the children in the U.S. know who 
Ronald McDonald is. He's second only to Santa 
Claus, and, "If all the burgers McDonald ever 
produced were put in Illinois, we'd be standing 
knee-deep in burgers." 

That cheeseburger piled high with lettuce 
and tomatoes sure looks appetizing, but is it 
worth the sacrifice? 

"There are 1,000 calories in a cheeseburger, 
french fries, and milkshake, and in addition to 
the high calorie content, the food is high in salt 
content," Kulp informed the mixed crowd. 

One student in the audience remarked, 
"Ounce for ounce there is more sugar in catsup 
than in ice cream." 

The audience seemed most concerned 
about what kind of foods to eat, more than the 
kinds of foods to avoid. Kulp explained that 
what you eat today has an affect on what kind 
of life you will lead 20 or 30 years from now. 

Kulp gave the students some tips on what 
to eat and what to avoid. 

"Drink low fat, skim milk," she explained. 
"Whole milk clogs up arteries. Sugar has no 
nutritional value, just calories." Kulp said sugar 
is in just about everything we eat — not just 
Coke and candy. 

"Twenty-five percent of our calorie intake 
comes from sugar," she said to the amazed 
audience. 

Ideally, one should eat a big breakfast, 



medium lunch and small dinner. 

"Put more fruits and vegetables into your 
diet," she said, smiling. "It's not a revolutionary 
idea." 

"Be aware of what you're eating and try to 
cut down. 

The students in the audience were given 
this bit of advice: look and choose. 

"Look around with a bright new perspec- 
tive. Test your will power. After all, only you 
decide what you put into your body." 

A couple of the members of the audience 
have found alternatives to shopping in grocery 
stores for food. 

Those concerned with the pesticide residue 
on their vegetables can go to The Farmers' 
Market on Route 51 or the Shawnee Food 
Network on Highway 13. 

The Farmers' Market offers quality food 
and a wide selection from which to choose. 

Also, the farmers who bring their goods to 
market are willing to negotiate prices. 

The Shawnee Food Network, a food co-op, 
offers yet another alternative. For $5 and two 
hours a month of volunteer work in the store, 
you can buy food at only 10 percent above their 
cost, thus eliminating the "middle man." If 
you're not a member, the fee is 25 cents. 

Extending her arms and smiling into the 
audience, Kulp added, "We can't all go back to 
the farm." 

She's right you know. 



en 
-3 



o 

I 




The Marching Snlukis have more spirit than any 
student group on campus. Is this where they get their spirit 
from? 



30 




No other group on the SIU 
campus has done as much to raise 
school spirits and preserve school 
traditions than the SIU Marching 
Salukis. One thing is for certain; no 
football game would ever be complete 
without them. 

"We try to go for gags and 
gimmicks if possible," said Micheal D. 
Hanes as he relaxed for a few minutes 
in his office in Altgeld Hall. Hanes, a 
small man with bright blue eyes, has 
been the band director for the last 12 
years. 

One of the most noticable features 
of the band is its flashy red, black and 
plaid tuxedos and black hamburgs 
which always stand out in a crowd. 

"In 1969, the Salukis were the 
first band to take off the gold braids 



and brass buttons which characterized 
a marching band," Hanes said while 
smoking a cigarette. "The Salukis are 
innovators. The idea of a different 
kind of uniform is now more generally 
accepted." 

'Even their instruments are 
unique. The percussion section is 
mounted on carts because it gives the 
potential for a wide variety of 
instruments and sounds. Also, Hanes 
added, "... it sounds more like a 
concert," 

The Salukis also incorporate a 
rolling baby grand piano on bike 
wheels into their act. 

"An electric piano is built into the 
body," Hanes said. 

Of the 112 members who are in 
the band, only 60 to 70 percent are 



Text by Karen Clare 

music majors. Membership is open to 
anybody and there is no audition. The 
band members receive two hours of 
academic credit for participating, but 
the majority play for the fun of it. 

The highlight of the season for the 
. Marching Salukis is playing in St. 
Louis at the Cardinal games. The 
Salukis have become quite well-known 
in the Midwest and have appeared for 
14 consecutive years at the Cardinal 
games. 

This year the band performed 
before a crowd of 51,000 people and 
cries of "The Marching Salukis are 
here!" could be heard as they 
performed in Busch Stadium. 

There are no SIU emblems on 
their band uniforms, but their distinct 
apparel makes them stand out in a 
crowd. Their uniforms are their 
trademarks. 

Dan Kiser, leader of the trumpet 
section, commented on the experience. 

"We walk up and everyone knows 
us from our uniforms. We've got quite 
a reputation in St. Louis," Kiser 
smiled. 

"If there was one word to sum up 
the band, it would have to be 'crazy,' " 
Kiser laughed. "It's fairly unan- 
imous." 

Their unique, "off-the-wall" style 
is what makes the band so appealing to 
the members as well as the audience. 

"It's a gas!" exclaimed Bruce 
Arnold, a tall, dark-haired alto sax 



en 
CO 



Michael D. Hanes is 
an energetic conduc- 
tor who could also he a 
mimic. His acting 
inspires the Marching 
Salukis to play and 
march their best, 
whether they are 
playing at Busch 
Stadium in St. Louis 
or at McAndrew 
Stadium in Carbon- 
dale. 



player. "If we were doing it for credit 
we'd be crazy." 

When asked what he enjoyed 
most about being in the band, Kiser 
said. "A lot of things. We don't do 
stagnant shows. We put new routines 
together every week. It takes a 
considerable amount of time." 

Every Monday night, the Salukis 
get together to rehearse and work on 
various musical techniques in the huge 
practice room in Altgeld Hall. 

The room, which was once a 
gymnasium, is filled with commotion 
as the band members get organized 
and begin tuning their instruments. 
Microphones hang from the ceiling 
and tiles line the wall to absorb the 
sound. They've got three weeks to 
practice before their next game. 

Section by section the warm-up 
begins. Hanes, or Mike, as the band 
members call him, has great rapport 
with the students. 

Standing before the group, baton 
in hand, Hanes tells a joke and the hall 
is filled with laughter. 

"Let's go for a little tempo . . . ta. 
ta, ta, ta," says Hanes tapping his 
baton against his music stand. 
Suddenly the room is singing as the 
band does a rendition of Chuck 
Mangione's "Children of Sanchez." 

.Jim Beers, at 28, is the oldest 
member of the band. He took the time 
to answer a few of my questions 
between songs. 





"We're a big dance band, a stage 
band on the field." he said while 
another score of music was being 
distributed. "A bigger band couldn't 
handle the music we play." 

Beers, a drummer, is one of 20 
band members who participate in the 
Marching Saluki Pep Band. The pep 
band is the second semester band. 
Beers explained, and is responsible for 
entertaining the crowds at SIl' 
basketball games. "It's a privilege to 
play in it." 

Hanes calls for attention and the 
band begins practicing another song, 
the "Coronation March." 

His energy and enthusiasm in 
conducting stimulates the band and 
the finale is met with shouts of "Yea!" 



Pholo by Rich SmI 



s 







Whether cutting 
up or blowing 
their horns until 
they are red- 
faced, the March- 
ing Salukis dem- 
onstrate that they 
are real "charac- 
ters." Is it their 
laughter or their 
music that hits 
those sweet high 
notes? 



from the band members. 

"He's good — very emotional," 
remarked the drum section leader, 
Christy Dunnigan, as the song ended. 
"His mood infects the band." 

Hanes calls for a break and 
scurries into his office, cigarette in 
hand. Outside, the crisp autumn air is 
refreshing. A few of the band members 
stop outside to talk with friends and 
have a smoke. 

Standing in the doorway, I spoke 
with Phillip Meadows, a two year band 
member. I asked him how the band 
handles fatigue, especially when 
marching in a parade. 

Meadows explained how the band 
"scatters." 



"At the end of the song, the 
percussion keeps playing and everyone 
else runs around," he explained. 
Meadows added that the band will 
often lay down in the streets or thank 
people for coming. 

'He (Hanes) uses a lot of tricks." 

But do some of these tricks ever 
backfire? Hanes spoke of one incident 
in which things just didn't go as 
planned. 

In 1966, SIU played night football 
games. At half time, the Marching 
Salukis arranged a gimmick where 
they would march out onto the field 
with a space in between two members. 
The gimmick was that the head of the 
parachute club dressed in tux and 



carrying a clarinet, would descent 
from the sky and land in the extra 
space playing the "late band member. 
"Well, two minutes before half 
time, the light went out on the field," 
Hanes said with a twinkle in his eye. 
The parachutist calculated his jumps 
on the direction the smoke was 
blowing from the power plant, but he 
couldn't see the smoke that night. 
Hanes assumed the parachutist would 
take the no-jump option. The con- 
fused parachutist decided to take the 
jump anyway. "He landed in Neely 
Hall parking lot," said Hanes smiling. 
Luckily he was unhurt. 



Frieda McCarter 
Vintage SIU 



Text by Bruce Simmons 

Through our phone conversation. 
we arranged to meet on the top of the 
escalator at the south end of the 
Student Center at 2 pm the following 
Monday. 

Monday soon arrived, and I left 
for our rendezvous making sure I had 
the right name and rememhering the 
description she had given me of 
herself. 

"Frieda McCarter . . . Frieda 
McCarter . . . Frieda McCarter . . . 
I'll probably call her McCarthy," I 
mumbled to myself as I rose upward 
mi the escalator. 

I stepped off the meshing stair- 
case and turned a slow 360, absorbing 
.ill of the faces in one glance. All I had 
to go on was the one description she 
had given me: gray hair. There was a 
lady sitting patiently on one of the 
-i.t.is, but surely this wasn't Mrs. 
M. I .irter. She looked toomuch like a 
-Indent' 1 was expecting to see a 
replica of the American Orandmother 
worn, tired eyes, drooping cheeks, 
hands which were designed for baking 
biscuits or oatmeal-raisin cookies. The 
lady did not fit that description. She 
had warm, smiling eyes, an ageless 
figure and didn't even smell of 
biscuits, raisins or oatmeal. I began to 
wish I had told Mrs. McCarter. whom 
BVei -he was. thai I would be the one 
with the white carnation in my left 
lapel. 

A glance a! the clock told me it 
was inn.' tur u- to meet. -I' l decided 

to give the ladv on the sola a try. I 
walked cautious!) inward- her plan- 
ning out my speech 



"Hi," I began. "Are you Mrs. Mc 

I paused in a moment of paranoia, 
"Is it McCarter or McCarthy?" 

But before I could blunder my 
way into the fooldom, the lady rose 




from the sofa and extended her hand 
in welcome. 

"Frieda." the lady said. 

"Mrs. McFrieda?" I thought to 
myself, "Can't be." 

"You can call me Frieda." the 
ladv began again. "All my friends do." 

This was the ladv I was looking for 
all right. This was SIU's oldest, 
non faculty, full-time student; Frieda 
McCarter. 

At til. Frieda \1< I .irter looks the 
part of the typical college student. 



Clad in blue jeans, rust colored 
sweater and blue neck scarf, Frieda 
blends in with the rest of the crowd 
which inhabits SIU's campus Monday 
through Friday. Everywhere people 
call to her, "Frieda, hi Frieda!" Frieda 
responds with a college-toned, "Hi. 
how ya doin"?" 

Frieda McCarter received some 
college level instruction back at a time 
when she was of the college age. 

"When I finished high school." 
Frieda began, "I took a two-year 
business college course because my 
father said every woman had to have 
a way to make a living. On the side I 
went to Maryland Institute which is an 
art College in Baltimore. I took 
pattern drafting there." 

Frieda was raised in Maryland. 
Since then life's road has had many 
turns and long, uphill climbs for 
Frieda. 

Frieda's first husband died of 
cancer. She then remarried and soon 
moved to the Midwest. Her second, 
and present, husband was a major in 
the Marine Corps at that time. 

"The Marine Corps moved us to 
Springfield. III.," Frieda told. "Then 
we came down to Cobden. The state 
moved us on a grant." 

At this time Frieda's husband 
enrolled at SIC and began taking 
classes. One day she accompanied him 
to Woody Hall while he registered. 

"I was up there with him register- 
ing and I said, "I'm going to get a 
listener's permit." Frieda said. 

Frieda sat in on two classes that 
semester. It was the fall of Ui77. 



•M 





In spite of her age, Mrs. McCarter 
must attend all classes and is expected 
to meet all requirements of that 
specific class like any other student. 
She is treated no differently. 

"I found that I was pretty dumb, 
so the next semester I did it again," _ 
she said quizzically. 

This time Frieda sat in on four 
classes. It was the spring of 1977. 

"I was catching on," Frieda spoke 
enthusiastically, "getting the fever I 
guess." 

Frieda didn't go to school for the 
summer semester. Then, in the fall of 
1978, Frieda sat in on 22 hours worth 
of classes. She soon had a thought. 

"After the first week of school I 
thought, 'Gee I think I'll register. I'm 
doing all the work'." Her eyes shone 
with excitement as she spoke. 



io 




Frieda took time out of her 
semester break to go back to the 
Maryland Institute and get her 
transcript. 

"I found out I was pretty smart 
back then," she said, "but I'm having 
a hard time keeping up with it now." 

So, with a little time, and a little 
paper work. Frieda McCarter became 
a full-fledged college student for the 
second time. 

She took on 17 hours of credit 
during the spring semester of 1979, but 
started out the next semester with a 
smaller load: L3 hours. 

Frieda's schedule is similar to any 
other student's schedule. She arrives 
at campus at 7:40 am., and immediate- 
ly picks up a D.E. She goes to class 
from 8 am. to 1 1 am. and 12 pm. to 2 
pm. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays. Tuesday she has free, and on 
Thursday she has a lab from lit am. to 
noon. Frieda usually lunches at the 
Student Center Cafeteria. 

Frieda's 13 hours consists of four 
rlffllBOIT nursery management, short 
hand, an art studio class and her 
Thursday lab. 

Do teachers treat Frieda any 
differently because of her age? She 
dottn'1 seem to think m>. 

"Thej treat mejusl like any other 
Student," Frieda said. "I have the 
same schedule bb most of them, and 

jufll as hard of time with the tests — 

maybe harder.*' 



Ron Morris, an ex-classmate of 
Frieda's, agrees with her. 

"She had to take notes just like 
the rest of us," the senior in plant and 
soil science commented. 

"I've had to learn how to study all 
over again," Frieda said. "I never 
learned how to study when I went to 
school before. I was like most kids — 
if you get the marks you don't worry 
about it. Now things have changed." 

Frieda feels that schooling was 
taken much more seriously at the time 
when she went to the Maryland 
Institute. 

Monday through Friday Mrs. 
McCarter is like everyone else; just 
another student. She is nothing more 
than a series of digits on an IBM 
computer card. But because she leads 
a double life, that of student and 
housekeeper, her weekends differ from 
those of the college students. 

"We have a lot to do around the 
house. We have an acre and a half of 
ground and have a lot to do outside," 
Frieda explained. 

Since Frieda and her husband live 
in Cobden, they seldom come to 
Carbondale for their entertainment. 

"We've come up for a few shows." 
Frieda said. 

The McCarter's major pastime is 
square dancing. They often travel to 
SikeetOB, Mo. for this on Saturday 
nights. 



Students, like the teachers, also 
treat Frieda like any other student. 

"I have lots of friends," Frieda 
claimed, "all your age." 

Overall, Frieda McCarter is very 
happy with SIU and its students. She 
does think it has one downfall though. 

"I don't think they (SIU) should 
concentrate quite so much on all the 
research. I know it brings a lot of 
money into the university, but it 
results in a lot of very poor teachers. 
Some of the teachers are not interest- 
ed in the students." 

But what is a 61 -year-old lady 
going to do with a degree? 

"I'm just taking everything I like 
and hoping it will mesh together. I feel 
like I've got quite a few years ahead of 
me yet." 

With that Frieda McCarter 
departed. It was 3:35 pm. I walked 
with her to the Agriculture Building, 
taking heed of how much trouble I had 
keeping up with her. She was all smiles 
and talk. All I could think of was 
grabbing a burger and then settling 
down to a long, fall slumber. I felt like 
setting my alarm for 1980. 

"I am only 20," 1 thought to 
myself with a chuckle. "Frieda is over 
three times my age. Where does she 
get this energy'.'" 

I was convinced that Frieda 
McCarter ■ starting a life — not 
ending one. 



Photo by Jim Hunzinger 



Steve Johnson, (far left 
and below), may include 
cross country skiing into his 
renting business come 
winter. 




Leslie Perls and Nick Sigrist wheel it as gangsters 
(left). Below, Andy Forrest uses a pillow to cushion his 
unexpected landing. 



Photo by Brian Howe 



CD 







C i 




\ 
■ \ 






r*-< 




/ 




Johnson, who Feels thai roller Bkating is nol a fad and 
believes that the SIU campus was made tor roller skating 
because of its hilly paths, says he will stay with the store 
through its lirst year. Alter that, he's not quite sure. Right 
now he enjoys what he's doing and know he's getting good 
experience. 

Another new store in town is the Agape Film Co., 
owned by -lim Hair. "J9. Agape Film Co. is also located on 

South Illinois Avenue. 

Together, Hair and In- wile. Marguerite, operate the 
Store -i\ days a week putting in as much as 12 hours each 
da\ 

Presently, Hair is not enrolled in any courses because 
oi the tremendous amount of time he must devote to the 
-ton- However, In- dots plan to finish his remaining eight 
or nine hours in the near future to receive his degree in 

cinema and photography. 

He savs he opened I he store because of the closing of 



the only two film stores in the area. "Students in the 
department couldn't get the supplies they needed on time 
because they had to order them from Chicago or St. Louis," 
he said. 

Unfortunately. Hair did have some difficulties getting 
his business started. One problem was obtaining 
dealerships because Carbondale is so far from a large city. 
The other problem was getting a loan from a local bank. 

"Carbondale wants to grow," he remarked. "Hut the 
banks don't want anything to do with you if you want 
money." 

Hair eventually received a loan through a friend at a 
bank which his family had done business with for many 
years. 

Right now, all work brought into the store is sent out 
to a laboratory, but Hair hopes to expand within the next 
year and do some custom work. 







Jim, Marguerite, and Jacob Bair make 
Agape' Film Company their home during 
working hours. They have tried to supply local 
photo students with photo garb and now have 
included a student photo gallery so customers 
can share their work. Below sits the building 
that was the former location of The Rough 
Edge. That successful student business now 
thrives in Chicago. 




He says there is one big difference in his life since 
opening the store. 

"I can afford to do things I want to do now, I just can't 
afford the time." Yet, he doesn't mind, because to him, this 
is a different kind of work . . . this is fun. 

Mickey Clarey, 33, a sophomore in civil engineering, 
owns apartment houses in Carbondale. He came to SIU two 
years ago from Chicago where he was a carpenter. He 
decided to go to school because he wasn't getting anywhere 
with his job. 

"Carpentry is OK if you don't mind hammering nails 
for the rest of your life," he began. 

Like Bair, Clarey had problems obtaining a loan from 
the local banks but he eventually succeeded. He is now the 
landlord of nine apartments. 

Clarey says he enjoys being his own boss because, "A 
lot of bosses don't know what they're talking about." He 
feels that many of them are too concerned with getting 



things done quickly and aren't concerned with the quality 
of the work. He admits this could possibly happen to him, 
but for now he's working a lot on his apartments and will 
continue to make improvements until he is satisfied. 

Another very common type of student business is one 
based in the home. Bill Griffith, 21, and Andy Maur, 21, 
design majors, have started a bicycle repair and salvage 
service. 

The business is now called "Cyclasts Bike Repairs." 
Its original name, "Wheeler Dealer Bike Salvage" was 
changed because it held some what different connotations 
than intended. The business is good for them because there 
was little investment of time or money involved. 

The only real investment was in tools, according to 
Mauer. Most of the parts are from abandoned bicycles. 
Those that they do need to buy are charged to the 
customer. Because it is just a small operation, all 
advertising is done through word of mouth. 



Bill Griffith and Andy Maur find their hike repair shop to 
require very little initial capital. With all of the hike accidents 
on campus, they are sure to stay busy for awhile. 




According to Griffith, together they only spend about 
12 hours each week working on the bikes. They also claim 
that they charge approximately half of what any cyclery in 
town does. 

Griffith says that if they had the money and someone 
to back them up they might open a shop. Yet, that chance 
seems highly unlikely because both seem to be primarily 
involved in their majors and in their plans after graduation. 
Free-lance work is the direction they both are heading 
towards. 

Jay Elmore and his brother Ken, along with Donny 
Cruise and Mark Gazda, set up their own bar in the spring 
of 1979. So what, you may say, there are plenty of bars on 
Illinois Avenue. True. But how many are in Felts Hall? 

The four partners, who shared a suite on the third 
floor, moved all of the beds, desks and chairs into one of 
the rooms making up the suite, leaving the other room 
vacant. This room, later to become affectionately known as 
the Kamikaze Bar and Grill, was filled with two sofas, a 
recliner, a bar seating four, and a television and a stereo. 

Unfortunately, the Kamikaze was soon permanently 
shut down due to a wild party featuring a live band known 
as the Buzz Brothers, which brought the Kamikaze to the 
attention of the head resident and Sam Rinella, director of 
housing. 

"We made $100 that night," Cruise noted. 

"1 was giving free drinks away after awhile," Ken said. 
"If we would have really run it tight, we could have made 
a lot more. Possibly as much as $200." 

The ownership of "Mr. Natural," a health food store 
located on East Jackson is quite different than most stores. 
There are ten partners involved with the store, three of 
which are students. 

Lucy Clauter, 24, is one of the student partners. She 





Mr. Natural wouldn't think of 
stocking its shelves with "junk food". 
The munchie island sticks to fresh nuts 
. . . not doritos. 



holds a bachelor's degree in plant and soil science and is 
presently enrolled in one course at SIU. She says of the 
partnership, "It is based on time invested." In other words, 
a partner does not invest money, he invests his time by 
working in the store. Clauter is one of three coordinators, 
which puts her on salary rather than hourly wage. She and 
one other coordinator are responsible for the office work. 

Kristi Arnold, a senior in art education is also a 
student partner. She describes "Mr. Natural" as "truly 
unique." 

Neither of the women were aware of the partnership 
when they started five years ago. Both just wanted a 
part-time job. Since then the store has become a part of 
their lives. 

"Everyone is equal around here," said Arnold. "We all 



share the chores and made decisions." 

Clauter describes the store as " . . . our piece of the 
rock. I don't know what I'd do without it." 

Both women realize that nobody can get rich at "Mr. 
Natural," but then, there are no pressures. Clauter put it, 
"Nobody says, OK quit talking and get to work!" 

Arnold says she has no idea what she's going to do after 
she graduates. "I can't plan that far ahead," she said. 

As for Lucy Clauter, "I plan on hanging around for a 
long time, unless something really exciting comes up." 

All of these student owners have three characteristics 
in common. They all are happy with what they're doing, 
they know they're getting valuable experience and 
hopefully, they're all making money. 



to 



ANOTHER SUCCESS 




■ lay Bender drilled the last hole into a chunk of freshly 
cut cherry wood and inspected it carefully from behind his 

old. gray safety glasses. The 'Jti-vear-old SIU graduate of 
cinema and photography had finished another of his l by 
.") view camera kits. 

Bender has been designing, producing, and selling 
these cherry wood kits for more than a year now. His 
biggesl market tor the kits is fellow photo majors who have 
mure time than money. 

"Photo majors needed a cheap, lightweight, large 
format camera they can carry around without getting a 
hernia." Bender Mattered the dust from his blue jean 
apron 



Selling the kit for $75, Bender developed the kit from 
an independent study that he did during his senior year at 
SIU. He definitely knew that there was a market at SIU; 
he has sold close to 80 kits in less than one year of 
operation. 

The kits are made from an array of cherry wood, nuts 
and bolts, springs, black cloth and a monorail. Bender cuts 
the wood to size, and has included an 18-page instruction 
booklet with the kit to help the kit builder through the 
camera making ordeal. 

"It took me five weeks to put my first kit together 
during the evenings . . . and I didn't work too diligently," 
Bender said. 

The kit purchaser will have to drill some holes, 
assemble the bellows, and put a coat of varnish on the 
wood; but Bender feels the effort will be well worth the 
time. 

"I think people will be able to build them with no 
trouble," Bender claims. "It just takes a little patience." 

Jim Hunzinger, a senior in photography, bought a 
Bender View Camera in May of 1979 and didn't finish it 
completely until January of 1980. His reaction to the kit 
and finished product is mixed. 

"It's not as functional as a regular view camera," 
Hunzinger said. "It's a lot cheaper though." 




T 






Story by 
Joel Wakitsch & Bruce Simmons 



Now that we've shown you that money can 
be made in Carbondale, the OBelisk II has 
conjured up a list of ways in which any SIU 
student can make that money. 

Agreed, some of these ways are silly and 
some of these jobs may seem a bit outlandish, 
but in the end it's the old American 
(devaluating) dollar that counts. 

Remember that none of these jobs are 
proven money makers, but maybe that is 
because no one has the guts to try them. Why 
not try one; if you make tons of green stuff . . . 
great! Then again, if you lose your shorts don't 
come looking for us. 

The first job will take very little initial 
oital. All you'll need is one clothes pin, one 
sh rag, one can of Raid and an abundance of 
elbow grease. When University Housing 
unplugs all the Mini Cool Refrigerators over 
each break period, offer your services to 
fumigate and clean them of all open sardine 
cans, separated dorm ice cream containers and 
mouldy bread. Oh yes, the clothes pin is for 
your nose. 

If you can rent one of the Cushman 
vehicles on campus, try starting a mini- 
ambulance service. With all of the inexper- 
ienced roller skaters, Iranian protesters and 
drunken bike riders on campus, you stand to 
make a killing. (Pardon the pun.) 

Here is a practical one. As the semester 
wears on, most students depend on Morris 
Library as a nightly ritual instead of the strip. 
Start a Rent-a-Pillow shop in the library, 
concentrating most of your efforts to the first 
floor lounge. 

During finals week you can branch off into 
the overflow crowd that uses the Student 
Center for sleeping . . . er . . . studying 
purposes. 



How about selling a Student Government 
Repair Kit, complete with two pints of 
anti-student apathy potion, 10 pills to cure the 
anxiety brought on by the "Matthews 
Syndrome" and and a dash of more presidents 
like Pete Alexander. 

In the publishing field you can recycle old 
Southern Illinoisans to add a bit more 
substance to the D.E., or you can start your 
own underground newspaper, publishing 
everything that the D.E. can't handle as a 
result of the paper shortage. 

Everyone spends their weekends at SIU 
differently. Why not develop three different 
"weekenders kits" for each type of student. 

The first kit would be for the "Nurdly 
Weekender." It would include your choice of 
calculus, engineering or psychology textbooks; 
one peanut butter cup, one pair of clean socks 
for Sunday, 20c for use in either the library 
copy or pencil machines and one free coffee at 
the Student Center cafe. 

The second kit would be great for the 
"Drunken Weekender." A quart of Wild 
Turkey to start off the evening, complete with 
your choice of mixers. A fifth of Smirnoff 
complete with Playboy mixing rods, a choice of 
sour cream and onion potato chips, Cracker 
Jacks (with prize inside) and St. Joseph 
childrens' aspirins (orange flavored). The real 
selling point would be the customer's choice of 
either a vomit dish or bedpan. 

The "Travolta Weekender" would love to 
get a hold of the contents of the third kit. Two 
disco records, one silk shirt, an enchanting 
chest toupee and a pocket sized blow dryer are 
all possible entries. A bottle of Chianti and a 
six-pack of Trojans could also turn the trick, 
but a pair of velvet, disco roller skates may sell 
even better. 



After so many years of 
Mom's cooking, college 
eating habits become... 



A Real Bite 



Text by Karen Clare 

To eat «>r not Ii> eat? That is the 
question most students ask them- 
selves when dinner time rolls around. 
There are solutions to this ever 
present problem. In Carbondale, the 
vast array of foods from which to 
choose is almost as diverse as each 
individual's eating habits. 

Roaming around the Student 
Center, note pad and pencil in hand, I 
came across Sidney Byas, freshman, 
intent on playing a game of pinball in 
the bowling alley. I assumed my stance 
and popped the question. "What 
restaurants in Carbondale do you go to 
most often?" 

"When I'm hungry I'll stop at the 
first place that suits my appetite." said 
Byas, looking over my shoulder as I 
scribbled down his reply. 

Byas says he eats about once a 
week at McDonalds. "I usually order a 
fish sandwich. French fries, and a 
shake," be explained "I don't eat to 

much hamburger because it might be 
I). id for you. 

Byas, who live-, m Brush Towers, 

c.ils most of his meals in C.rinnell 
Cafeteria. He said he tries to eat a 

well balanced diet consisting of grain, 
meat, vegetables, Fruit and cereals. 

"1 try to eat right but I don't know 
il it's helping," he said with a grin. 

At night when Byas gets a craving, 

he said he'll go to the "junk truck." "I 
e.u mv share of sweets, but not 



everyday," he explained. Contrary to 
popular opinion, Byas thinks the dorm 
food is OK. 

I thanked him, shouldered my 
back-pack, and moved on. 

Outside the Student Center, I 
talked with -lay Kelleher, who gave me 
his opinion on the subject. Kelleher, a 
junior in computer science, strongly 
disagrees with Byas. 

Kelleher said he lived in the 
dorms for two years before moving 
into a trailer. His biggest reason for 
moving out of the dorms was the 
quality of the food in the dorm 
cafeterias. 

"The dorm cafeterias are not 
much better than high school cafeter- 
ias. The. only advantage to eating in 
the cafeteria is that vou don't have to 



prepare your own meals or wash up 
afterwards . . . the only advantage," 
he stressed, looking me straight in the 
eyes. 

Kelleher said he eats four times a 
day. He tries to eat greens once a day 
and fruit twice a day. Sometimes he 
will sacrifice taste to save time and 
money, but, "Most of the time I'll fix 
a good meal." He added, "I'm mostly 
into salads and hamburger." 

Kelleher said his favorite food in 
Carbondale are gyros from El Greco 
because he can't get them in his 
hometown, Edwardsville, III. "I 
usually go there or Zantigo's. but I eat 
most at home," he said. 

Where do you eat the most? Patty 
Bozesky. junior, heads to Quatros for 
her favorite food in Carbondale. 




cc 



Quatros thick sausage pizza. She says 
she spends $5 to $10 a week on beer 
and going out to eat. 

Bozesky describes her eating 
habits as "pretty junky." "I eat one 
meal a day in the summer. In the 
winter, I eat three balanced meals," 
she explained while sitting on the 
steps outside the Student Center, 
soaking up the afternoon sun. 

Her typical grocery list consists of 



fruit, vegetables, bread, and ham- 
burger. 

"Yes, I'm willing to sacrifice taste 
to save time and money," she replied 
laughing, "I eat mainly sandwiches." 

As I continued my search for 
interviews, I bumped into another 
junior in design, Bill Griffith, who 
considers eating a hobby. 

"I spend more on food than on 
beer on Friday nights," he explained. 




Griffith said he will hit three or four 
restaurants on the "strip" in one night 
and totally "munch out." 

However, his favorite restaurant 
is Ahmads Falafil Factory. He likes 
Ahmads because it's nutritional and 
high in protein, two very important 
criteria for the food he eats. "You get 
everything in a falafil for $1.50," he 
explained. 

Griffith won't eat anything out of 
a machine except milk or yogurt. He 
said he tries to stick to the basics. "I 
don't drink soda for breakfast," he 
said jokingly. 

When asked if he takes the time to 
prepare well-balanced meals, Griffith 
replied, "Whatever time permits. 
Every two or three days I eat a really 
good meal." 

Does he sacrifice taste to save 
time or money? "That's why I eat what 
I eat," he replied hurriedly. "Now I've 
got to run or I'll be late for class." 



Ahmed Salameh, pictured above, has 
brought his cuisine from the Mid East 
and opened his own fast food place 
featuring "falafils. " 



Paradise Lost 

"Cheeseburger is paradise, medium rare 
with mustard 'd be nice. Not too particular, not 
too precise, I'm just a cheeseburger in paradise." 

The message inherent in Jimmy Buffett's 
tune cannot be exaggerated. The fact is, the 
hamburger is a symbol of our way of life in the 
U.S., but have you ever thought about just what 
goes into the making of that "big warm bun and 
huge hunk of meat?" 

SIU students interested in finding out the 
answer to this question and more about the 
common student diet were invited to attend 
"Eating for the Health of It," an inside look at 
the great American hamburger, sponsored by 
the Student Wellness Resource Center. 

After watching a brief slide presentation 
which focused on the different industries that 
play a part in the making of the hamburger, 
from bun to sesame bun, Janis Kulp, patient 
activation coordinator, headed a discussion on 
its nutritional value. 

The presentation explained how what goes 
in and on the ail-American hamburger is the 
result of wide pesticide usage, corporate control, 
and industrial mechanization, which has wiped 
out the small American farmer of yesteryear. 

In the question and answer session which 
followed, Kulp clarified many of the statements 
made in the slide presentation. 

"It was a good presentation, but it was 
obviously one-sided," she said. 

As for the nutritional aspects of the 
hamburger, she explained, "Vitamin-wise you" 
aren't getting very much. People who eat at fast 
food restaurants have been found to be deficient 
in vitamins A and C." 



The fast food controversy sparked a lot of 
interest in the group. People are putting a lot of 
money in those places and they are convenient, 
but their sales pitch is the experience of going 
out, not the nutritional value of the food. 

"They don't say a lot about the kind of food, 
they make the pitch to kids," Kulp remarked. 

Kulp cited two interesting surveys: 98 
percent of the children in the U.S. know who 
Ronald McDonald is. He's second only to Santa 
Claus, and, "If all the burgers McDonald ever 
produced were put in Illinois, we'd be standing 
knee-deep in burgers." 

That cheeseburger piled high with lettuce 
and tomatoes sure looks appetizing, but is it 
worth the sacrifice? 

"There are 1,000 calories in a cheeseburger, 
french fries, and milkshake, and in addition to 
the high calorie content, the food is high in salt 
content," Kulp informed the mixed crowd. 

One student in the audience remarked, 
"Ounce for ounce there is more sugar in catsup 
than in ice cream." 

The audience seemed most concerned 
about what kind of foods to eat, more than the 
kinds of foods to avoid. Kulp explained that 
what you eat today has an affect on what kind 
of life you will lead 20 or 30 years from now. 

Kulp gave the students some tips on what 
to eat and what to avoid. 

"Drink low fat, skim milk," she explained. 
"Whole milk clogs up arteries. Sugar has no 
nutritional value, just calories." Kulp said sugar 
is in just about everything we eat — not just 
Coke and candy. 

"Twenty-five percent of our calorie intake 
comes from sugar," she said to the amazed 
audience. 

Ideally, one should eat a big breakfast, 



medium lunch and small dinner. 

"Put more fruits and vegetables into your 
diet," she said, smiling. "It's not a revolutionary 
idea." 

"Be aware of what you're eating and try to 
cut down. 

The students in the audience were given 
this bit of advice: look and choose. 

"Look around with a bright new perspec- 
tive. Test your will power. After all, only you 
decide what you put into your body." 

A couple of the members of the audience 
have found alternatives to shopping in grocery 
stores for food. 

Those concerned with the pesticide residue 
on their vegetables can go to The Farmers' 
Market on Route 51 or the Shawnee Food 
Network on Highway 13. 

The Farmers' Market offers quality food 
and a wide selection from which to choose. 

Also, the farmers who bring their goods to 
market are willing to negotiate prices. 

The Shawnee Food Network, a food co-op, 
offers yet another alternative. For $5 and two 
hours a month of volunteer work in the store, 
you can buy food at only 10 percent above their 
cost, thus eliminating the "middle man." If 
you're not a member, the fee is 25 cents. 

Extending her arms and smiling into the 
audience, Kulp added, "We can't all go back to 
the farm." 

She's right you know. 



-3 



i 




The Marching Salukis have more spirit than any 
student group on campus. Is this where they get their spirit 
t'mm'.' 



oo 




No other group on the SIU 
campus has done as much to raise 
school spirits and preserve school 
traditions than the SIU Marching 
Salukis. One thing is for certain; no 
football game would ever be complete 
without them. 

"We try to go for gags and 
gimmicks if possible," said Micheal D. 
Hanes as he relaxed for a few minutes 
in his office in Altgeld Hall. Hanes, a 
small man with bright blue eyes, has 
been the band director for the last 12 
years. 

One of the most noticable features 
of the band is its flashy red, black and 
plaid tuxedos and black hamburgs 
which always stand out in a crowd. 

"In 1969, the Salukis were the 
first band to take off the gold braids 



and brass buttons which characterized 
a marching band," Hanes said while 
smoking a cigarette. "The Salukis are 
innovators. The idea of a different 
kind of uniform is now more generally 
accepted." 

'Even their instruments are 
unique. The percussion section is 
mounted on carts because it gives the 
potential for a wide variety of 
instruments and sounds. Also, Hanes 
added, "... it sounds more like a 
concert," 

The Salukis also incorporate a 
rolling baby grand piano on bike 
wheels into their act. 

"An electric piano is built into the 
body," Hanes said. 

Of the 112 members who are in 
the band, only 60 to 70 percent are 



Text by Karen Clare 

music majors. Membership is open to 
anybody and there is no audition. The 
band members receive two hours of 
academic credit for participating, but 
the majority play for the fun of it. 

The highlight of the season for the 
. Marching Salukis is playing in St. 
Louis at the Cardinal games. The 
Salukis have become quite well-known 
in the Midwest and have appeared for 
14 consecutive years at the Cardinal 
games. 

This year the band performed 
before a crowd of 51,000 people and 
cries of "The Marching Salukis are 
here!" could be heard as they 
performed in Busch Stadium. 

There are no SIU emblems on 
their band uniforms, but their distinct 
apparel makes them stand out in a 
crowd. Their uniforms are their 
trademarks. 

Dan Kiser, leader of the trumpet 
section, commented on the experience. 

"We walk up and everyone knows 
us from our uniforms. We've got quite 
a reputation in St. Louis," Kiser 
smiled. 

"If there was one word to sum up 
the band, it would have to be 'crazy,' " 
Kiser laughed. "It's fairly unan- 
imous." 

Their unique, "off-the-wall" style 
is what makes the band so appealing to 
the members as well as the audience. 

"It's a gas!" exclaimed Bruce 
Arnold, a tall, dark-haired alto sax 



en 

CO 



Michael D. Hanes is 
an energetic conduc- 
tor who could also he a 
mimic. His acting 
inspires the Marching 
Salukis to play and 
march their best, 
whether they are 
playing at Busch 
Stadium in St. Louis 
or at McAndrew 
Stadium in Carbon - 
dale. 



player. "If we were doing it for credit 
we'd be crazy." 

When asked what he enjoyed 
most about being in the band, Kiser 
said, "A lot of things. We don't do 
stagnant shows. We put new routines 
together every week. It takes a 
considerable amount of time." 

Every Monday night, the Salukis 
get together to rehearse and work on 
various musical techniques in the huge 
practice room in Altgeld Hall. 

The room, which was once a 
gymnasium, is filled with commotion 
as the band members get organized 
and begin tuning their instruments. 
Microphones hang from the ceiling 
and tiles line the wall to absorb the 
sound. They've got three weeks to 
practice before their next game. 

Section by section the warm-up 
begins. Hanes, or Mike, as the band 
members call him, has great rapport 
with the students. 

Standing before the group, baton 
in hand, Hanes tells a joke and the hall 
is filled with laughter. 

"Let's go for a little tempo . . . ta, 
ta. ta, ta," says Hanes tapping his 
baton against his music stand. 
Suddenly the room is singing as the 
band does a rendition of Chuck 
Mangione's "Children of Sanchez." 

Jim Beers, at 28, is the oldest 
member of the band. He took the time 
to answer a few of my questions 
between songs. 





"We're a big dance band, a stage 
band on the field," he said while 
another score of music was being 
distributed. "A bigger band couldn't 
handle the music we play." 

Beers, a drummer, is one of 20 
band members who participate in the 
Marching Saluki I'ep Band. The pep 
band is the second semester band. 
Beers explained, and is responsible for 
entertaining the crowds at Sit 
basketball games. "It's a privilege to 
play in it." 

Hanes calls for attention and the 
band begins practicing another song, 
the "Coronation March." 

His energy and enthusiasm in 
conducting stimulates the band and 
the finale is met with shouts of "Yea!" 



Pholo By Rich Sui 




Whether cutting 
up or blowing 
their horns until 
they are red- 
faced, the March- 
ing Salukis dem- 
onstrate that they 
are real "charac- 
ters." Is it their 
laughter or their 
music that hits 
those sweet high 
notes? 



from the band members. 

"He's good — very emotional," 
remarked the drum section leader, 
Christy Dunnigan, as the song ended. 
"His mood infects the band." 

Hanes calls for a break and 
scurries into his office, cigarette in 
hand. Outside, the crisp autumn air is 
refreshing. A few of the band members 
stop outside to talk with friends and 
have a smoke. 

Standing in the doorway, I spoke 
with Phillip Meadows, a two year band 
member. I asked him how the band 
handles fatigue, especially when 
marching in a parade. 

Meadows explained how the band 
"scatters." 



"At the end of the song, the 
percussion keeps playing and everyone 
else runs around," he explained. 
Meadows added that the band will 
often lay down in the streets or thank 
people for coming. 

'He (Hanes) uses a lot of tricks." 

But do some of these tricks ever 
backfire? Hanes spoke of one incident 
in which things just didn't go as 
planned. 

In 1966, SIU played night football 
games. At half time, the Marching 
Salukis arranged a gimmick where 
they would march out onto the field 
with a space in between two members. 
The gimmick was that the head of the 
parachute club dressed in tux and 



carrying a clarinet, would descent 
from the sky and land in the extra 
space playing the "late band member. 
"Well, two minutes before half 
time, the light went out on the field," 
Hanes said with a twinkle in his eye. 
The parachutist calculated his jumps 
on the direction the smoke was 
blowing from the power plant, but he 
couldn't see the smoke that night. 
Hanes assumed the parachutist would 
take the no-jump option. The con- 
fused parachutist decided to take the 
jump anyway. "He landed in Neely 
Hall parking lot," said Hanes smiling. 
Luckily he was unhurt. 



Frieda McCarter 
Vintage SIU 



Text by Bruce Simmons 

Through our phone conversation, 
we arranged to meet on the top of the 
escalator at the south end of the 
Student (inter at 2 pm the following 
Monday. 

Monday soon arrived, and I left 
tor our rendezvous making sure I had 
the right name and rememhering the 
description she had given me of 
herself. 

"Frieda McCarter . . . Frieda 
McCarter . . . Frieda McCarter . . . 
I'll probably call her McCarthy." I 
mumbled to myself as I rose upward 
on the escalator. 

I stepped off the meshing stair- 
case and turned a slow 360, absorbing 
all of the faces in one glance. All I had 
to go on was the one description she 
had given me: gray hair. There was a 
lady sitting patiently on one of the 
SOfas, but surely this wasn't Mrs. 
McCarter. She looked too much like a 
student! I was expecting to see a 
replica of the American Orandmother 
worn, tired eyes, drooping cheeks, 
hands which were designed for baking 
biscuits or oatmeal-raisin cookies. The 

lady did not tit thai description. She 

had warm, smiling eyes, an ageless 
figure and didn't even smell of 
biscuits, raisins or oatmeal. I began to 
wish I had told Mrs. McCarter, whom 
ever -he was, that I would be the one 
with the white carnation in my left 
I i pel. 

A glance a1 the clock told me it 

w.i- tune for Us to meet, so I decided 

to give the lady on the sofa .1 trv. I 
walked cautiously towards her plan- 
ning out my ipeech. 



"Hi," I began. "Are you Mrs. Mc 

I paused in a moment of paranoia, 
"Is it McCarter or McCarthy?" 

But before I could blunder my 
way into the fooldom, the lady rose 




from the sofa and extended her hand 
in welcome. 

"Frieda," the lady said. 

"Mrs. McFrieda?" I thought to 
myself. "Can't be." 

"You can call me Frieda," the 
lady began again. "All my friends do." 

This was the lady I was looking lor 
all right. This was SIU's oldest, 
nim faculty, full-time student; Frieda 
McCarter. 

At til. Frieda McCarter looks the 
part of the typical college student 



Clad in blue jeans, rust colored 
sweater and blue neck scarf, Frieda 
blends in with the rest of the crowd 
which inhabits SIU's campus Monday 
through Friday. Everywhere people 
call to her, "Frieda, hi Frieda!" Frieda 
responds with a college-toned, "Hi. 
how ya doin'?" 

Frieda McCarter received some 
college level instruction back at a time 
when she was of the college age. 

"When I finished high school.'' 
Frieda began, "I took a two-year 
business college course because my 
father said every woman had to have 
a way to make a living. On the side I 
went to Maryland Institute which is an 
art College in Baltimore. I took 
pattern drafting there." 

Frieda was raised in Maryland. 
Since then life's road has had many 
turns and long, uphill climbs for 
Frieda. 

Frieda's first husband died of 
cancer. She then remarried and soon 
moved to the Midwest. Her second, 
and present, husband was a major in 
the Marine Corps at that time. 

"The Marine Corps moved us to 
Springfield. III.." Frieda told. "Then 
we came down to Cobden. The state 
moved us on a grant." 

At this time Frieda's husband 
enrolled at SIC and began taking 
classes. One day she accompanied him 
to Woody Hall while he registered. 

"I was up there with him register 
ing and 1 said. "I'm going to get a 
listener's permit," Frieda said. 

Frieda sat in on two classes that 
semester. It was the fall of 1977. 



ri 





In spite of her age, Mrs. McCarter 
must attend all classes and is expected 
to meet all requirements of that 
specific class like any other student. 
She is treated no differently. 

"I found that I was pretty dumb, 
so the next semester I did it again,", 
she said quizzically. 

This time Frieda sat in on four 
classes. It was the spring of 1977. 

"I was catching on," Frieda spoke 
enthusiastically, "getting the fever I 
guess." 

Frieda didn't go to school for the 
summer semester. Then, in the fall of 
1978, Frieda sat in on 22 hours worth 
of classes. She soon had a thought. 

"After the first week of school I 
thought, 'Gee I think I'll register. I'm 
doing all the work'." Her eyes shone 
with excitement as she spoke. 







Frieda took time out of her 
semester break to go back to the 
Maryland Institute and get her 
transcript. 

"I found out I was pretty smart 
back then," she said, "but I'm having 
a hard time keeping up with it now." 

So, with a little time, and a little 
paper work, Frieda McCarter became 
a full-fledged college student for the 
second time. 

She took on 17 hours of credit 
during the spring semester of 1979, but 
started out the next semester with a 
smaller load: l.'t hours. 

Frieda's schedule is similar to any 
other student's schedule. She arrives 
at campus at 7:40 am., and immediate- 
ly picks up a O.K. She goes to class 
from 8 am. to 1 1 am. and 12 pm. to 2 
pm. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays. Tuesday she has free, and on 
Thursday she has a lab from 10 am. to 
noon. Frieda usually lunches at the 
Student (enter Cafeteria. 

Frieda's \'.\ hours consists of tour 
rlnnntffl' nursery management, short- 
hand, an art studio class and her 
Thursday lab. 

Do teachen treat Frieda any 
different l\ Ixi ;tilse of her age'' She 
doesn't seem to think so. 

"The\ treat me just like jmy other 
student." Frieda said. "I have the 
- one schedule as most of them, and 
Hist .is hard of time with the tests — 

maybe harder." 



Ron Morris, an ex-classmate of 
Frieda's, agrees with her. 

"She had to take notes just like 
the rest of us," the senior in plant and 
soil science commented. 

"I've had to learn how to study all 
over again," Frieda said. "I never 
learned how to study when I went to 
school before. I was like most kids — 
if you get the marks you don't worry 
about it. Now things have changed." 

Frieda feels that schooling was 
taken much more seriously at the time 
when she went to the Maryland 
Institute. 

Monday through Friday Mrs. 
McCarter is like everyone else; just 
another student. She is nothing more 
than a series of digits on an IBM 
computer card. But because she leads 
a double life, that of student and 
housekeeper, her weekends differ from 
those of the college students. 

"We have a lot to do around the 
house. We have an acre and a halt of 
ground and have a lot to do outside," 
Frieda explained. 

Since Frieda and her husband live 
in Cobden, they seldom come to 
Carbondak for their entertainment. 

"We've come up for a few shows." 
Frieda said. 

The McCarter's major pastime is 
square dancing. They often travel to 
Sikeston. Mo. for this on Saturday 
nights. 



Students, like the teachers, also 
treat Frieda like any other student. 

"I have lots of friends," Frieda 
claimed, "all your age." 

Overall, Frieda McCarter is very 
happy with SIU and its students. She 
does think it has one downfall though. 

"I don't think they (SIU) should 
concentrate quite so much on all the 
research. I know it brings a lot of 
money into the university, but it 
results in a lot of very poor teachers. 
Some of the teachers are not interest 
ed in the students ." 

But what is a 61 -year-old lady 
going to do with a degree? 

"I'm just taking everything I like 
and hoping it will mesh together. I feel 
like I've got quite a few years ahead of 
me yet." 

With that Frieda McCarter 
departed. It was :<:.'<"> pm. I walked 
with her to the Agriculture Building, 
hiking heed of how much trouble I had 
keeping up with her. She was all smiles 
and talk. All I could think of was 
grabbing a burger and then settling 
down to a long, fall slumber. I felt like 
setting my alarm for 1980. 

"I am only '20," I thought to 
myself with a chuckle. '"Frieda is over 
three times my age. Where does she 
gel this energy'.'" 

I was convinced that Frieda 
McCarter is starting a life — not 
ending one. 



- 




'We saved for retirement, but we're spending it on an education. 






students guide 

to Morris Library 1 ^ 



Bruce Simmons *Text 
Photos* Joe Alonso 



Ever want to go to the Caribbean? Or 
climb to the top of Mount Everest? Or dive 
into the bottom of the ocean where Great 
White Sharks cruise effortlessly and 
plankton ride atop seahorses? 

These places aren't as far away as many 
students think. Most can get there within 
hall an hour. How? A simple trip to Morris 
Library. 

Morris Library, named after Delyte W. 
Morris, president of SIU from 1948-1970, is 
a melting pot of information. It bouses over 
1. .".no. ooo volumes, more than 18,000 
periodicals, and literally hundreds of 
thousands of maps, microforms, and 
government documents. 

The firsl floor, which is the Under- 
graduate Library, is a potpourri of subject 
matter. Of the total number of volumes, 
70,000 are located on the first floor alone. 
Five hundred periodicals are housed here. 
Reference books such as dictionaries, 
.-it l.i-i'-. .iikI i-iicsi ln|>rdu- 1 an l»' found here 
also. 

The browsing room is also located on the 
first floor and contains fiction and 
non-fiction books. 

Hooks concerning automobile repair, 
photography or crafts can be found at the 
circulation desk in the locked file. 

The reserve room is a great help to the 
faculty. Here they may keep books on 
reserve of which there are few copies so that 
all students may get a chance to read them. 




Pamphlets regarding a wide variety of 
subject matter can be had at the Under- 
graduate Library Information Desk. 
Handouts, prepared in hopes of helping 
students in their research of assorted topics, 
are also located at this desk. 

The Undergraduate Library is even so 
complete as to provide change machines. 
These are located at the circulation desk. 

Pens and pencils may be purchased 
from a machine on the first floor. 

A suggestion box, in which students may- 
contribute any ideas, compliments, or 
criticisms, is located near the information 
desk. 




Library is so popular in comparison to the 
rest of the library. 

"First, because there are more under- 
graduate students. Secondly, because this is 
the first place people arrive." 

Along with being the most popular floor, 
however, the first floor is also the noisiest. 

"All you have to do i* Mick your head in 
here any night," Scott continued with a 
smile," and you can bear most anything you 
want." 

The second floor of Morris Library 
shelves the humanities and other items not 




found elsewhere in the library. 

Phonograph records of all fields of 
study, with the exception of children's 
records, are located on the second floor. A 
picture file containing pictures of paintings, 
sculptures, ceramics, architecture, painters, 
and authors is also found on the humanities 
floor. 

Dissertation abstracts are on the second 

...the first floor is also 
the noisiest. 

floor also. These are summaries of research 
projects conducted as part of various Ph.D. 
programs in relation to the humanities. 

The third floor shelves the texts on 
social studies, along with related materials. 

Over 300 telephone directories can be 
found on the third floor in addition to 
non-current newspaper editions which are 
kept on microfilm. Annual reports of many 
corporations are located on this floor. 

A major source for ethnographic 
research, the Human Relations Area File, is 
housed on the social studies floor. 

The American Heritage Room, which 
contains examples of early American 
furniture and other artifacts, is located on 
this floor also. This room is open by 
appointment only. 





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Education and psychology are both 
shelved on the fourth floor. This floor 
contains the college categories; a collection 
of catalogs from United States and foreign 
universities in addition to many junior 
colleges, technical schools, and professional 
schools. 

Test samples for these areas of study are 
also found on this floor. 

Eric Microfiche is located on the 
education-psychology floor, the fourth floor. 
Eric Microfiche is an expensive collection of 
documents including reports of federally 
funded projects, conference proceedings, 
bibliographies, and professional papers. 

The Instructional Materials Center 
completes the fourth floor. The IMC is a 
collection of preschool, elementary, and 
junior and senior high school materials. This 




135 




collection includes textbooks, curriculum 
guides, children's literature, records, 
filmstrips, games, and Hash cards. 

All of the fifth and sixth floors are 
devoted to the sciences. The Science Office 
Collection is found on the sixth floor. This is 
a small science collection consisting of items 
relating to Southern Illinois. Rare hooks and 
hooks with slides make up part of the 
collection. The collection can he opened only 
when a librarian is on duty. 

Need a phone number ? 
The third floor has over 
300 phone directories. 

Over 17"), 000 maps including aerial 
photographs are located in the map room on 
the sixth floor. 

The periodicals relating to the sciences 
are located on the fifth floor. 

The basement of Morris Library houses 
an auditorium, often used for classes or 
group meetings. Government documents, a 
collection maintained by the Social Studies 
Library, is located in the basement also. 

Copy machines are located throughout 
the library on every floor. 

Copies of past exams for some classes 
can be found in the reserve room in the 
I ndiTgraduate Library or in the Sell 
Instruction Center. 



', 



Wanna find three mile 
island? The third 
floor has over 
175,000 maps. 

The Self Instruction Center has 
typewriters which may be rented out to 
students. 

Graduate students may rent out lockers 
in the library on a semester basis if they 
wish. 

Zip Code directories are kept at the 
information desks on the first and third 
floor. 

A separate Law Library containing over 
80,000 volumes is located in Small Croup 
Housing. It is open for any student's use. 

Morris Library also has an Interlibrary 
Loan Service. This service is offered to 
faculty, staff, and graduate students at 
SIU-C. Undergraduates may be allowed to 
use the ILL depending on the circumstances. 

Books, articles, microforms, and some 
types of media are available on most any 
subject through the ILL from other libraries. 

Requests for Interlibrary Loans are 
made at the reference desks in the 
Undergraduate Library or the Law Library. 

Morris Library can even help students 
earn credit hours. 

GSD 199A, "The Library as an 
Information Source." is a one-hour, 
one-credit course. Taught by librarians, this 
course will teach students how to find 
information on most any subject. 

Now how else can a person bask in the 
sun in Guadalajara with a dozen lovely ladies 
and a drink at 10 am., and cuddle up by a 
toasty-orange fire, accentuated by a full, 
yellow. Aspen moon by 11 am? Only though 
the library. 





Bad Study Habits 



Everyone knows that Morris Li- 
brary is a great place to study. However, 
few people have yet realized the Morris 
Library is also a great place for thefts. 

One reason that the library provides 
such a handy enrivonment for thefts is 
because of the number of people it 
serves. 

"There are so many people going in 
and out," Joyce Schemonia, statistical 
clerk for SIU Police commented. 

In 1978, there were 70 cases of theft 
reported from Morris Library. In 1979, 
the number of reported thefts decreased 
to 32; and four cases of theft had been 
reported from Morris Library by 
February 21 of 1980. 

Many purses are found later after 
having been abandoned in bathrooms or 
wastepaper baskets. The money, of 
course, if no longer there. 

"A lot of it is, 'Hey, there's an open 
purse — let's see what she's got.' If 
you're going to leave your purse 
unattached, it's going to happen. Let's 
face it," Schemonia concluded. "There 
aren't that many good Samaritans 
around anymore." 

Schemonia said that the thefts from 
Morris Library are not consistent. 

"You might not have one (theft) for 
two or three weeks, then you will have 
some reports. It runs in streaks," she 
noted. "Yet these thefts would not 
constitute a rash. One every day or every 
other day would be a rash." 



SPECIAL 
COLLECTIONS 


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Schemonia went on to say that these 
thefts are not planned out much in advance 
because it would not be very profitable. The 
thefts from Morris Library for 1980 up to 
February 21 only totaled $182; not much for 
two months of work. 

But, according to Schemonia, all of 
these thefts could be eliminated if the 
students would simply exercise a little more 
caution when using the facilities. Students 
should just watch their belongings more 
carefully. 

"It's really just carelessness," Schemon- 
ia said. 







Paper-Trained 

by Pete Knecht 



Roommates 



I thought cats held exclusi%'e rights to litter boxes until 
an eight-pound, Dutch-Belted rabbit named "Pubic Hare" 
came bounding out from her wire cage and headed straight 
into a kitty box in the next room. 

Once relieved. Pube joined its owner, Scott Rohlfing, a 
sophomore in business administration, and myself in the 
living room. Here, Scott explained that he didn't exactly 
train I'ube to use a litter box. 

"I jus! introduced the box to her. From then on, she took 
in il herself." 

However. Scotl said that Pube's preference requires the 
box to be filled with conventional litter material. Shredded 
paper won't do. 

Many students who keep pets at college have been 



forced to abandon the classic "Fido." Regulations prohibit 
animals more obvious than goldfish and tropical fish. 
On-campus students are supervised more closely than those 
off-campus, but still the contents of the popular aquarium 
set-ups vary. Off-campus, where resident assistants are 
scarce, students have worked cages into the rules. 

Christy Boley, manager of "The Fish Net" in 
Carbondale, said that animal sales double at the start of 
every school year. 

she added. "The guys want fish that eat other fish, and the 
girls want Angel fish and ones like that." 

Tarantulas are also huge sellers for aquariums. "The 




Photo by Jo«m WakilK" 



Fish Net," however, sells only the non-poisonous types. 

"See," Ms. Bolen quickly said. "They won't bite as long 
as you don't touch their backs." On her forearm a four-inch 
Red-Legged one rested. At that point I was enjoying the 
interview very much but had no intention of going any 
further with the subject. 

We progressed on to the piranha and oscar fish, both 
meat-eaters and highly-requested "pets." One six-inch 
piranha calmly stared from his tank while ten feet away, a 
baby alligator gently floated and carried a $25 price tag. 

"People buy these?" I asked. Bolen used the word 
"novelty" in answering. 

I did not argue. 

Wagging tails and sweet meows are sacrificed when 
buying these oddities, but loyalty and affection still remain 
characteristic in any pet. In Rohlfing's off-campus 
apartment, Pube held true. She padded over, sniffed my leg, 
decided her master's scent was finer, and took a rest beside 
his crossed legs. 

"I chose Pube because she's an affectionate animal that 
can be caged," Scott said. 

In this case, the wire cage doubled as a coffee table, 
complete with the latest editions of Playboy and Time on 
top. 

In another efficiency apartment, I got a second dose of 
odd loyalty from a five-foot, five-year-old python. Dave 
Epkins, sophomore in computer science and owner of 
"Monty," said he has tried many kinds of pets, but they 
always die too soon. Monty has lasted him four years. 





Photo by Marsha Mueller 



"I just wanted something different," Dave admitted, as 
Monty coiled around two table legs. 

"He knows me by sense of smell," Epkins explained. 
"But he doesn't mind strangers either." 

Monty has never attempted to bite or abuse any visitors, 
but the cold, clammy, and tense body then in my hands still 
made me nervous. 

Dave said "it's kind of wierd. Girls get off on him after 
they find out he can't hurt them. They say he feels neat. But 
the guys usually just shrug him off." 

Odd pets might be a new macho symbol if nothing more. 

"Once," Christy of "The Fish Net" chuckled, "a guy in 
a bar tried to pick up one of my employees by asking her if 
she would like to come home and see his piranha fish." 

Obviously the guy did not know the woman was 
thoroughly seasoned with such creatures. 




Photo by Jim Hunzinger 





ever seen a PET PEEVE? 




Pets come in just about every 
form possible; long and lanky, small 
and soft, and even cute but "crabby, " 
Kathy Hogan, an employee of the 
"Fishnet, " poses in the top, right 
picture with one of her fienaish 
friends. Kathy is the one with the long 
hair. 






"Put your head on my shoulder 
..." is the musical verbiage once 
uttered by lovers on star-studded 
nights. Possibly that is how Christy 
Bolin, manager of the "Fishnet, " 
coaxed her eight-legged friend to its 
present point in the photo at right. 




Lions and tigers and bears . . . 
lions and tigers and bears . . . lions 
and tigers and . . . well, possibly one 
won 't find any lions or tigers or bears 
as student pets, but rabbits and lizards 
are not out of the norm for filling the 
title of "student companions. " 





CO 




nyone got a chew? 

Steve Stieb perched his 
maroon SIU batting helmet atop 
his head and scanned the dugout 
for a response from his team- 
mates. The players along the bench 
nodded in unison, indicating that they 
had no chewing tobacco left. Stieb 
clutched his bat and his eyes opened 
wide. He pointed hesitantly towards 
home plate and glared at the empty 
pouch of Red Man chewing tobacco on 
the cement dugout floor. 

"Heck, I feel naked up there 
without a chew." 

His teammates also chuckled in 
unison. Some offered Stieb a wad of 
juicy tobacco from their own mouths, 
some choked on the oversized wads that 
inflated their cheeks to the size of a 
baseball, and others continued to spit 
their juice into one of the many brown 
puddles of tobacco that decorated the 
dugout pavement. 

Tobacco chewing, like winning, is 
tradition as far as the baseball Salukis 
are concerned. Almost everyone on the 
team chews, and they make sure there is 
ample supply around Abe Martin field 
during home games. 

"Chew is a very important part of 
<>ur budget," Chris Wicks, a Saluki 
outfielder joked. "Seriously, we always 
stop somewhere to get it for our away 
games." 

Wicks said that he smoked in junior 
high school, converted to chewing in 
high school, and continued at SIU while 
playing baseball and majoring in 
Physical Education. 

"I really like chewing," Wicks 
drooled. "It doesn't leave a nasty taste in 
my mouth like smoking." 

Wicks said that chewing gives him 
something to do while sitting on the 
bench, and it relaxes him while playing. 
Other players feel differently about 
chewing. 

"Some of these guys like to chew 



while they play, but I just chew when I'm 
not pitching," Chuck Montgomery, a 
senior from Marion said. "I saw a catcher 
swallow a whole chaw in Florida once; 
nothing serious, but he did get mighty 
sick." 

Montgomery said he's been chewing 
since he was six years old, when his 
grandmother (who also chews) started 
him. 

"She's been chewing ever since I can 
remember," Montgomery dropped his 
head between his legs and planted 
another stream of tobacco sauce into the 
man-made pond between his baseball 
spikes. "I didn't chew much then, but 
you can't help but chew a lot around 
these guys." 

Tim Starinieri, 20, is a coach for the 
junior varsity baseball team and has 
experience with chewing also. He has 
gummed, chewed, sucked, and spit over 
eight different brands of tobacco. He 
said that although he started chewing 
because of his love for baseball, his 
family has a long list of Kentucky 
tobacco chewers. 

"It helps me relax and helps to 
avoid 'cotton mouth' by keeping your 
mouth moist." Starinieri packed his dip 
with his tongue. "It is a disgusting yet 
enjoyable habit, though." 

Salukis who don't chew seem 
unphased by the harsh smell and 
polluted pools that they live with in the 
dugout. Kevin House, who plays football 
in the fall and baseball in the spring. 
gave his reasons for shunning the 
"chaw." 

"After three years you can get use to 
this garbage on the floor." House sipped 
his Pepsi. "I know I couldn't play and 
chew at the same time because I get too 
dizzy." 

House said that he sees more 
chewing on the baseball diamond than 
on the football field, because the coach 
won't let the toot ball players chew 
during a game. 



"There's a lot of contact on the 
football field, so chewing could cause 
quite a problem," House emphasized. 

Bob Doerrer handles second base 
duties for the Salukis and also stays 
away from the chew. He admits that he 
has tried it though. 

"I've tried Red Man before, but I 
just can't get use to it." Doerrer leaned 
on the fence outside the dugout to avoid 
the puddles. "That mess on the floor is 
the hardest thing to get use to, though." 

The Saluki bat girls also stay clear 
of the dugout during games by sitting in 
chairs outside the dugout. 

"I never chewed and never get near 
that stuff, so it never really bothers me." 
Sue Underwood looked over her 
shoulder at the players and shrugged. "I 
sure would mind if my boyfriend 
chewed. I'd make him brush his teeth a 
lot." 

According to the players, girlfriends 
have varying opinions about their 
boyfriends' nasty habit. Mickey Wright 
said his girlfriend doesn't mind a bit. 

"She tried it and got sick, but she 
don't mind," he said. 

Starinieri said his girlfriend thinks 
it's disgusting, gross, and that tobacco 
looks terrible in his mouth; but that 
hasn't stopped him from chewing. 

"Actually, I read in Playboy that 
although chewing makes your gums 
recede, it is good for your teeth because 
it puts a film on your teeth that prevents 
plaque buildup." 

It isn't only recently that people 
have complained about tobacco spitting. 
In 1877, when tobacco chewing was still 
preferred over smoking, Adam Clarke, a 
renowned Methodist clergyman, made a 
plea to his congregation. 

According to a book, "The Mighty 
Leaf" by Jerome E. Brooks. Clarke 
asked his people to desist from tobacco 
chewing for their health and soul's sake. 
He said it was becoming unsafe to kneel 
while praying because "indiscriminant 





CHEW 




Photos and text by Joel Wa kitsch 





Steve Stieb (upper right) chomps on Red Man and studies the opposing pitcher. Batting 
from the right and chewing on the left is common of most players. Chuck Montgomery 
(below) dips between pitching assignments while Chris Wicks adds to the puddle at 
his feet. 




-5 



chewers had made floors unsanitary for 
the knees of the devout." 

Charles Dickens also wrote that in 
hospitals, students of medicine were 
requested by notice upon the walls to 
"eject their tobacco juices into boxes 
provided for that purpose." 

Early United States chewers con- 
sisted mostly of legislators, sailors, and 
farmers before smoking became promin- 
ent in the early 1900's. As smoking took 
over the imagination of the United 
States, there seemed to be less need for 
spittoons: containers that chewers use to 
spit their juices into. 

Spittoons, also called cuspidors, are 
made out of brass or china and resemble 
a flower pot. At one time, they covered 
the United States and were common on 
most households and public places. 
Now, spittoons are almost extinct. 

There is one spittoon for sale in all 
of Carbondale. Jim Walters, owner of 
Leaf and Stem Tobacconists store in 
Carbondale is the proud owner of that 
spittoon. 

"We usually have about five or six 
spittoons in stock," Walters puffed on 
his cigarette. "We're the only place 
where people can find them around 
here." 

Walters said that besides athletes, 
about the only tobacco chewers in 
Southern Illinois are the farmers and 
miners. 

"The miners and farmers chew 
because it would be an occupational 
hazard to smoke in a coal mine or barn," 
Walters said. 

Carbondale is a good market for his 
tobacco store, which stocks pipe tobacco, 
cigars, snuff, but only one brand of 
chewing tobacco. Most chewing tobaccos 
are made from scraps of cigar cuttings, 
according to Walters, but his brand is a 
sweet and semi-sweet tobacco that is cut 
from cigars made for his store. 

"We don't sell commercial brands 
like Red Man here. They're sold at the 
local drug store," Walters took a leaf out 
of the clear gallon jar and dangled it in 
front of himself. "Carbondale is limited 
as far as chewing goes." 




He explained that there are three 
different kinds of chewing tobacco. Leaf 
tobacco is made from moist cigar 
cuttings that are usually sweetened with 
molasses or other flavorings, according 
to Walters. This type is chewed in the 
cheek as a wad. 

A second type is the twist tobacco. 
It is not moist, but rather a fired, dry 
leaf. The leaf is then twisted and cut into 
different chewing lengths. 

Walters said that the third kind of 
chewing tobacco, called snuff, is not 
really a snuff at all. These brands. 






usually for smelling and snorting, have 
been used as dips of fine tobacco that sit 
between the lower lip and lower gum. 

Because the Saluki ball players have 
had trouble getting spittoons and 
tobacco in the past, most of them have 
coped with the problem by using their 
imaginations. 

Chris Wicks says that his roommate 
at Schneider dorm doesn't like the mess 
that Chris creates when chewing in his 
room. 

"I can't afford a good spittoon, so I 
use the dorm garbage can or a cup for my 
juices," Wicks quipped. 

Other makeshift spittoons among 
the ballplayers include coffee cans, 
popcorn jars, and the tops of snuff 
tobacco cans. 

Chuck Montgomery, who lives in 
Lewis Park Apartments, explained that 
his roommate (who also chews) got a free 
case of tobacco by writing to the 
company. 

"He wrote to Red Man telling them 
that he loved their product, but that he 
couldn't afford it as a college kid," 
Montgomery doodled with his spikes in 
a puddle. "He got a free case, plus a few 
free patches and decals for his efforts, 
too." 

Coach Itchy Jones thinks that 
chewing is a nasty habit, but as long as 
his team is hitting the ball well, he's not 
going to complain about his players. The 
reservoirs of tobacco that decorate the 
dugout floor don't seem to bother Jones 
either. 

"I'm surely not going to put 
spittoons in the dugout," Jones vowed. 
"They would get so dizzy that they 
would step right into the spittoons." He 
looked at the puddles once more. 

"My players have trouble hitting 
the ball, so I know they would have 
trouble hitting a spittoon." 





"I'm surely not going to 
put spittoons in the dugout. 
They'd get so dizzy that they 
would step right into the 
spittoons. " 

— Itchy Jones 




-3 

-3 









V 







A DIFFERENT KIND OF 



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11 r< 



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Story by Tamara Miner 



k 



* 




The late afternoon sunlight filtered through the 
curtain, filling Ilona Sevestyen's office with early 
autumn gold. On the bulletin board between the two 
desks in the office, amid the picture postcards of 
ancient stone sculpture, intricate tapestry and a 
"Survival Kit for Overseas Living" were snapshots of 
a baby and a flyer from the Art Institute of Chicago. 



Ilona peered over my upturned palm. 

"Are you religious?" she asked suddenly. Her 
large, almond eyes saw into my soul. 

I had only met her a half hour before, but 
already we were gossiping like two old friends. The 
difference was we were gossiping over my palm, 
instead of coffee, and the subject was me, rather 
than the family down the street. 

Besides palm reading, Ilona is a second year 
graduate student working on her master's degree 
in Knglish as a foreign language. Since August she 
has worked for the International Student 
Relations Program, a co-op of the Student 
Development/International Education Offices. 

Before Ilona read my palm, I had asked her 
how she had gotten started in palm reading. 

Ilona had friends who read palms and they got 
her interested in it. Ilona said it started off as a 
game, but as she was doing it, she started to realize 
many things were . . . "well, there are more 
continuities." 

"There are interesting parallels between some 
aspects of people's personality and characteristics 




1: .Willi III IX. 



and the lines on their palms. There are parallels I 
don't understand." She took her shoes off and sat 
cross-legged in the chair behind her desk. She was 
wearing blue jeans and a yellow gauze blouse. 
Ilona's long brown hair was held back in a large, 
colorful babushka. 

To Ilona, palm reading is "a different kind of 
mirror " 

"I don't make any pretenses," she said. 

Ilona doesn't believe in the bizarre things, the 
mystique of making claims to predict the future. 
When she rends 11 palm. Ilona doesn't go in for the 
"unrealistic specifics" that are a part of the 
built-up mystique which is nothing more than a 
fad. 

I asked Ilona if she ever takes a peek at the 
palms of the people she meets 

"I'm curious bul not thai nosey," she laughed, 

pulling out a leather pouch of tobacco and a 
kitchen match. As she carefully rolled a cigarette. 
slu- said that credibility was a personal 
characteristic. 




^r <JBfV_. 

;I.\U0I Till: HIIUI \i: 




I.A.MAISOMIKMKI 






"Many just ask," she said. Ilona said she 
would be in a restaurant and "all of a sudden, all 
these palms turn over." 

"If they ask, I don't restrict myself. I'll tell 
them what I think is the truth. I'll say whatever I 
see, which is difficult sometimes," Ilona said, 
studying my face. 

I asked Ilona what catches her eye first when 
she reads a palm. 

Ilona carefully explained that sometimes 
there are points of imbalances, obstacles, which 
cause conflicts. "Some of these conflicts and 
imbalances can be seen in the lines of the palm," 
Ilona said. For example, some people are not as 
psychologically and intellectually versatile as they 
are physically and environmentally versatile. Ilona 
said she tries to inform the person and make them 
more aware of the conflicts. 

Palm reading, Ilona said, is the "piecing of 
events that are happening or will happen." Palm 
reading shows a person's tendencies and interests, 
likes and dislikes, abilities and activities he favors. 
When reading a palm, Ilona delves as deep as the 




person would want her to, which varies with the 
individual. 

"I'm no absolute authority," she said. 

Ilona explained her ability to read palms by 
saying the "interest is due to a sensitivity to certain 
colors and aspects of people which complements 
palm reading." 

Besides palm reading, Ilona also figures 
astrology charts and reads tarot cards. 

"I would not call myself a psychic although I 
know psychics," she emphasized. "Palm reading is 
just one of the many things that is beginning to be, 
and should be, taken seriously and researched. 
Anything's possible — there is so much we don't 
know." 

Ilona said it is easier to read the palms of 
strangers. The life lines and the love line were the 
most asked-about lines. 

"Also, it is a terrible idea to read yourself," 
Ilona laughed. "I don't take my own palm 
seriously." 



XIII 




X7v 





00 




TEXT BY RANDY ALLEN 




Designing Carbondale in 1843 was a big job for 
Daniel Brush. But for Mr. Brush, founder and first 
freight agent of Carbondale, the big event was to come 
12 years later. 




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X 







PHOTO 



Photo by Brian Howe 

On July 4, 1855, the town of 
Carbondale celebrated both Indepen- 
dence Day and the arrival of the first 
Illinois Central train coming north from 
Cairo. Families arrived in town by the 
wagon loads; many others arrived on 
foot or by horseback. Most of them had 
never seen a train. 

During the early years of the Illinois 
Central, passengers consisted of General 
Grant's troops and supplies which were 
traveling south, along with grain and 
coal for industry. As time moved on, the 
old freight house and the depot of the 
19th century became history along with 
Mr. Brush and many other historic 
buildings along Illinois Avenue. These 
would be pictured in our minds as the 
memories of yesteryear. 

Carbondale and the SIU-C 
community today are modernizing and 
coping with the problems which go along 
with the privilege of service from the 
Illinois Central railroad and Amtrak. 
The number of industries using the rail 
service in the area continues to increase 
each year. Norge, Allen Industries and 
Tuck Tape are but a few of these 
industries along with the thousands of 



students depending on passenger 
service. 

The highways have cut the use of 
some rail customers, although reports 
from the National Safety Board show 
that 500 lives per year are lost due to 
trucking accidents transporting hazar- 
dous materials. Railroad service, both 
passenger and freight, are proven to be 
safer and more efficient than the 
trucking and busing systems. 

Carbondale, in keeping with the 
safety and concern of its population, has 
made several plans which will be 
completed by 1983. These plans include 
two new overpasses; one located on 
Pleasant Hill Road between Highway 51 
and Wall Street, and the other on the 
north end of Highway 51 just beyond 
Carbondale Mobile Homes. Another 
major change will be the construction of 
a new train depot, one block south of the 
old station. All three projects are 
designed to relieve traffic congestion 
when freight service passes the area, and 
Amtrak is unloading passengers. 

SIU-C will also be making a 
contribution to this major development. 
The university has donated land on the 




JIM HUNZINGER 



One hundred East 
Jackson is now the 
location of a small craft shop 
called the Common Market. 

It's situated among a string 
of building in the "old part of 
town." 

Upon entering the store, 
one can't help but notice a long 
counter holding crafted goods 
where liquor bottles once stood. 

Back in the early 50's this 
was the Long Branch, a place for 
nearby railroad crews to wrap up 
their day. 

Outside the building, faded 
paint still bears the name. 

"The bar got its name after 
a gun went off," C. F. Endicott, 
a former section man for Illinois 




Central Gulf said. 

"Bar patrons saw the Gun 
Smoke with the Long Branch 
Saloon in that Dodge City," 
Endicott said, "so they got to 
callin' it the Long Branch." 

Later in the bar's history, a 
man was shot and killed. An 
arguement between a father and 
son led the father to accidentally 
shoot his son. 

"He didn't aim to do it," 
Endicott said. "After that night 
he never been in a tavern an' 
never looked at a drink again." 

In the early 20's, railroad 
employees from the St. Louis 
Division Office across the street 
used to spend their lunch hours 
there. The owner of the restaur- 
ant used to serve wild rabbits 
and other game. 

"Carbondale used to be a 
big railroad town ... all kinds 
of workers . . . with four or five 
passenger trains lined up 
rtgular," Endicott recalls. 



ltrak 




Photo by Brian Howe 




Pholo by Jim Hunzing»f 




north side of Pleasant Hill Road for part 
of the overpass construction. SIU will 
also build a new overpass in the area 
from Wright Hall to the Physical Plant 
and McAndrew Stadium where there 
now exists a path developed by students 
as a short cut. This overpass will be 
multi-purpose and will allow for 
pedestrians use as well as light hauling. 

In 1982, the railroad will begin the 
depression project which will lay the 
tracks underground. This project will 
cost an estimated $50 million. 

Many companies, homes and 
families will begin relocation in the 
spring to make room for this futuristic 
decision, designed with safety and 
comfort in mind. 

So, look out world. Carbondale may 
be small, but it will be modern and 
keeping with the time. 

And besides, maybe Daniel Brush 
would have wanted it this way to better 
serve the city he envisioned to last 
forever. 



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Pholo by Brian How* 



Photo by Brian How* 



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Pictured above and below is an iron 
horse still utilized today along with 
others by the Crab Orchard and 
Egyptian Railroad. The railroad is 
operated by a father and son team who 
continue to perform all repairs by 
themselves. The Crab Orchard and 
Egyptian Railroad operates in a small 
radius around Marion. 



Photo by Jim Hunzinger 



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The Way We 
See It 

SIU hasn't changedmurJ 
or has it? 




The picture here is from the early 
fifties. Since then, many changes have 
taken place on the SIU campus, both in 
relation to policies and physical make up 
of the campus. The building standing in 
the background is Altgeld Hall. 



T 






At the top left is Mc Andrew 
Stadium as it was in the early fifties. At 
the top right is McAndrew Stadium as of 
1979. To the extreme left is Old Main as 
it appeared some 25 years ago. Un- 
fortunately it was destroyed in a 
tremendous fire on June 8, 1969 during 
the student uprisings. At the immediate 
left is the site where Old Main once 
stood in all her glory. Parkinson lies in 
the background, with Allen partially 
exposed on the right. 



Above is Davies Gymnasium as it was in the 
early fifties. At right it is pictured as it still stands 
today. The building remains basically unchanged, 
yet the landscaping differs drastically within the 25 
year span. Notice the absence of the driveway and 
most trees in the current rendition. 





At left is Pullian Hall as 
it can presently be seen on 
campus. Below is a photo 
from the early fifties of the 
same location. Note the 
construction of the lower 
extremities of the older 
building. 



The picture at bottom 
left shows the location at 
which Faner now stands. At 
that time it was nothing more 
than a row of barracks. The 
picture at bottom right shows 
the current site including 
Faner, massive monster that 
it is. 



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8 




The picture at right 
shows Morris Library today, 
peeking through all the trees. 
Below it can be seen in the 
fifties at which time it was a 
mere two stories tall. 



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T7ja£ is Aow ft was £Ae«, 
and you Atjow now it is now. 
//as it changed much? Has it 
changed for the better . . . 
the worse? Has the introduc- 
tion of new methods of 
architecture enhanced or 
spoiled the beauty of this 
campus. And what about 
Naomi? 








ARLIE BOSWELD the founder 
of the D.E. reflects on its beginning 



The feisty white-haired gentleman chomped on a cigar and talked in 
a gruff voice, as he sat in his fourth floor office in the Harrishurg Bank 
Building. 

You might not guess it by looking at him — hut this 82-year-old man 
is the founder of the Daily Egyptian, was the athletic editor of the old 
OBelisk Yearbook, served as Illinois States Attorney, and served two years 
in prison for violation of the National Prohibition Law. 

Boswell's colorful career began in 1917. when he volunteered for work 
at the OBelisk. At that time, staff members worked in a second floor room 
of Wheeler Librarv, now known as Wheeler Hall. 





Above, Arlie Boswell relives the past. On the opposite page 
is the first Egyptian, dated October, 1916. 



Arlie Boswell said he soon saw the need for more, so 
he formed and published the Egyptian, predecessor to 
today's D.E. 

"I felt the kids there would want a little memorial to 
their school days," he said tapping an ash off his cigar. 
"You didn't get it enough at the OBelisk." 

"As a result of the Egyptian, we helped the OBelisk 
a lot because they got their ideas from us," he said. 

Boswell's idea for a campus paper was not praised by 
everyone, however. 

President Shryock, whom Boswell described as 
looking and acting like an English Bulldog, warned Boswell 
if he did publish a newspaper, that he would not graduate. 

Apparently, Shryock had a change of heart and 
allowed Boswell to publish under the condition that two 
faculty members censor the newspaper before each 
publication. Shryock named two teachers, who unknown to 
Shryock, were in favor of Boswell's plans. 

Young Boswell began work with Clyde Vick, as 
editor-in-chief, Boswell's brother, and about five reporters 
on this weekly publication that sold for about $1 per year. 
He said he was uncertain about the size of circulation, but 
added that 1,000 newspapers a week were ordered from the 
publisher in East St. Louis. 



What advice would he give to today's editors of the 
Egyptian! 

"If I were to criticize them, they are making it more 
of a standard newspaper than a student newspaper," he 
said, toying with a book of matches. "Now maybe for a 
school of 22,000 that's alright, but I think my formula was 
right for a school of 1,000." 

"We published it more as a magazine. It was a very 
beautiful thing," Boswell proudly said. "Although I don't 
know anyone who was happy with it except me." 

The white-haired man, who never did receive a free 
subscription to the D.E., related the story of his 
introduction to former SIU President Brandt in 1978. 
Boswell said he was introduced to Brandt as the man who 
founded the Daily Egyptian. 

"You're the guy who is responsible for all this," - 
Boswell remembered Brandt as saying. 

"It would lead me to believe," Boswell remarked, "he 
wasn't happy with the D.E." 

Boswell remembered one scandal in his SINU days — 
for it was called Southern Illinois Normal University then 
— when a female student shocked the campus with her 
outrageously sexy attire. 



Text by Lizann Griffin-Photos by Jim Hunzinger 





She wore black, yellow, and white striped socks that 
extended up to her knees. 

But not for long. 

Within hours, a campus official called her into her 
office. Off came the socks, which were never to be seen on 
campus again, according to Boswell. 

"You didn't see any gals on campus with shorts on," 
Boswell sadly pondered. "Isn't that pitiful that 1 had to 
grow up in that environment'.'" he asked. 

Boswell also had comments about today's student. 

"-lust don't put us in the same category as you 
(students) now," he said. "Do you realize you are about 
three generations younger'.'" 

"I think today's students are great, but I couldn't keep 
up with them. Their perspective of life is so much broader. 
They have a better imagination." 

In my day, he said, people who made movies of 
humans traveling to the moon were considered crazy, but 
later people adopted these ideas; men have walked on the 
moon. 

After graduating from SIM'. Boswell served 18 
months in the army, went to law Bchool in Chicago, and 
started his law practice in Marion. Boswell then began his 

state's attorney days. 

Historians charge that Boswell was involved with the 



Ku Klux Klan and that his involvement didn't only 
concern law enforcement. 

In L924, the Klan staged a huge parade in protest of 
a grand jury's findings concerning a Klan attack on the 
hospital in Herrin. 

Protestant ministers, veterans of the Civil War. and a 
band took the lead, marching down Herrin's main street, 
according to historian Paul Angle in his book. "Bloody 
Williamson," published in 1952. 

"The rank and file followed - professional men, 
merchants who had closed their stores for the morning, 
women pushing baby buggies, and others carrying small 
children. Everyone marched with determined step and 
each with a small American Hag in their button hole or 
pinned on their dresses." the Marion Republican 
remembered 

Arlie Boswell, according to Angle's book, brought up 
the rear of the parade as one of the color guards. 

"I hope 1 may never get out of this chair if I'm lying 
to you." Boswell leaned forward to deny Angle's statement. 
"I have never owned a Klan robe or hood in my life." 

Boswell's trouble began not when he formed the 
Egyptian, but when he was reported in newspapers across 
the nation as saying that the prohibition law could never 
be enforced, and that juries would not convict a man with 








a half pint of liquor. 

"The liquor law was one of the most terrible laws ever 
passed," Boswell remembered. "It made hoodlums out of 
people." 

In 1929, prosecutors charged Boswell with taking $75 
a week from the Charlie Birger Gang, a gang of bootleggers 
and robbers, in exchange for protection from prosecution. 
He was tried and convicted in federal court to two years 
in Leavenworth Penitentiary and fined $5,000. 

"Do you think," asked Boswell, "a guy ever lived that 
was courageous enough to take money from Charlie Birger 
and his gang, and to prosecute (11) and send (one of) them 
to the gallows?" 

Boswell was stripped of his law practice in 1930, and 
he wasn't reinstated until 1939. 

"What the Supreme Court found on their own motion 
was that I wasn't guilty of moral turpitude and should 
never have been disbarred," Boswell said. 

That was the first time in history the Supreme Court 
had done that, according to Boswell. 

"What greater honor could come of a living human," 
he marvelled. 

Boswell said he has lived a charmed life — one in 
which he has been shot at five times and hit three times. 

"To this day I still don't sit with my back to the door," 



Boswell peeked behind himself. "I'm not superstitious . . . 
just cautious. 

In 1978, Boswell relived his roaring twenties states 
attorney days when he appeared as a witness in court 
against Birger gangster Danny Brown, whom Boswell had 
sent to prison for robbery. 

Brown was suing the Southern Illinois Magazine for 
liable since they had identified him in a photograph 
caption as one of the Birger Gang members. 

Brown told the judge he was currently employed as a 
custodian at a school. 

"I'm sure when they saw me (in court) they thought 
their geese were cooked. They thought I was dead," 
Boswell quipped. 

Boswell said he was rather uncomfortable sitting in 
the court room. After all, three Birger gansters whom 
Boswell had convicted were present and there was no 
bailiff attending the trial. But upon Boswell's request to 
the judge, a sheriff monitored the trial. 

When Boswell identified the man in the Southern 
Illinois Magazine photograph as being Brown, the Birger 
Gang member lost his case in court. 

If Boswell had pistols at the time, he could have cooly 
blown the smoke away and returned them to their holsters, 
for Boswell had again defeated an old enemy. 






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Portrait of a Haunted House 



Text & Photos 
by Joel Wakitsch 



•J. Charles Hundley built the 
majestic red-brick house in the 
northwest corner of Carbondale in 
1900. It sits among a number of 
elegant houses that contradict the 
simple southern style of most of 
Carhondale's housing. 

It has been called the Hundley 
House ever since it was built, but the 
name has implied three different eras 
since 1900. 

In 80 years the dwelling has 
changed from the home of a rich. 
ex-Carbondale mayor to the business 
of Millicent McKlheny. During the 
middle years through, the Hundley 
House was known as haunted. 

McElheny, a 26-year-old Carbon 

dale native, started a combination gift 
shop, interior design, and art gallery in 
the edifice in 1978. Her massive 
display of quality crystal, pewter, 
silver, and china is spread throughout 
both floors of the structure. A back 
room is used tor her interior design 




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layouts and an interesting upstairs 
bedroom is the home of a gallery where 
local artists can show their work. 

"I put my 'dream-come-true' art 
gallery in the same room in which 
Charles Hundley was murdered in 
1928," McElheny said as she toyed 
with her bright, plaid, knee-length 
skirt. 

According to early accounts, Mr. 
and Mrs. Hundley were very wealthy 
and avid art collectors. In 1928, 
Hundley and his wife were myster- 
iously killed in their home at about 
midnight. To this day, the murderer 
has not been found, but authorities 
believe it was someone who knew the 
Hundleys. Many think that Victor 
Hundley, a son who lived behind the 
Hundley House, had murdered his 
parents in order to collect on their will. 

"There was never really enough 
evidence to convict Victor, but it was 
someone familiar with the house," 
McElheny forced her fingers through 
her short wavy hair. "He knew where 
all the light switches were, and he 
knew his way around." 

At one point in the investigation, 
the police did find a shirt of Victor's 




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that was blood-stained, according to 
McElheny, but it was found to be the 
blood of an animal from one of Victor 
Hundley's recent hunting trips. 

Two years later, the house was 
bought by a local Carbondale man, Ed 
Vogler. Vogler sold the house in 1971 
after building a new house, but said he 
believed that ghosts lived in the house 
during his stay. 

"We bought the house during the 
depression, so we got a good deal on 
the house," Vogler said. "Our family 
likes to think there is a friendly spirit 
that lives in the house." 

Vogler said that during his 41 
years in the Hundley House many 
wierd things happened which con- 



en 



The Hundley House sells tine 
china and silver as evidenced by the 
< -hina setting nnd sterling silver deer. 
A convenient bridal registry also 
brings in browsers all the way from 
Cape Girardeau, Mo. 






vinced him that spirits did exist in the 
dwelling. 

"I remember one instance when a 
book jumped out of our bookcases," 
Vogler said. 

Vogler said that his family never 
had problems with the ghosts and that 
they were never enough to drive them 
out of the house. 

McElheny, who has a master's 
degree in art history, said that if ghosts 
did exist in the house, that they must 
have left with the Voglers. 

"About all I ever hear around this 
place are normal noises associated 
with old houses," McElheny quipped. 

When McElheny moved in, she 
tried to restore the home to its natural 
style. Black and white checkered tiles 
now cover the floor, as they did in 
1900. All wood was stripped of paint 
that was left by the Voglers and 
replaced by wood finish. In fact, the 
only original piece of furniture that 
still exists in the house is a huge. 
rose-vine stained-glass window that 
leads your eye upstairs to the 
mysterious bedroom. 

All of the expensive art pieces 
that Mrs. Hundley had acquired 
through the years were sold at a 
private auction along with all of her 
furniture when she died," McElheny 
frowned. 

(1 hosts or no ghosts. McElheny 
said that her gift shop is thriving and 
that she will never plan to change the 
location of her husinc 

"My business is a nice alternative 
to the mall where all people do is simp. 
shop, shop." McElheny shook at the 
thought. "There are not so many 
people, and best of all, it's quiet here." 



s 



Text by Pete Knei 




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Editors note: Due to a mechanical camera problem, about, 
half of all photos taken 'during halloween night were not 
syncronized with the electronic flash unit. This resulted in bad 
negatives and headaches for the editor. We apologize if your 
picture is not included in this section. 



It's been confirmed. Halloween in 
Carbondale is tradition. With the 
word of madness and insanity spread, 
people from all over the Midwest are 
coming to join the affair; and everyone 
on every Carbondale council is getting 
worried. 

Not many students, however, are 
trying to live the tradition down. 
About 15,000 people hit the strip this 
year in Halloween drag ranging from 
outlandish to outrageous to nonexis- 
tant. They crammed together on 
South Illinois Avenue, bookshelved at 
each end by a bar. 

A few weeks before, SIU councils 
pegged the night as "Carnivale 79." 
The Office of Student Development 
sought 50 students early in October 
who were "friendly, sociable in- 
dividuals with high degrees of self 
confidence" to help Carbondale and 
SIU Security Police monitor main 
street activities. 

The prospective "student mar- 
shalls" would have no power of arrest 
but would ask vagrant students to 
control themselves and report major 
offenders to any near-by officer. 
Booths were also wanted to sell 
approved items on the strip during 
festivities, thus adding to the carnival 
flavor. 

Halloween night brought out the 
beet, the worst, the most violent and 
even the crest. 





Photo by M Btanton 



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The marshall plan nearly fell 
through. Only 34 students appeared at 
the orientation meeting. They weren't 
turned away, but given new duties 
focusing mostly on clean up and booth 
protection. The students were ren- 
amed "Halloween Helpers" and given 
special white hats and name tags. 

Eight cinema and photography 
majors prepared to shoot a documen- 
tary on what was about to happen. 
Police Chief Ed Hogan worried that 19 




Halloween night brought 
the future, the present and the 
past altogether for a night of 
frolic. 





and 20-year-olds would use the night 
as a grand finale before the legal 
drinking age rose in January. A 
"Lawyer's Guide" telling what to do 
with police run-ins was published in 
the Daily Egyptian. 

When the hour arrived, most 
fingers uncrossed. 

The strip squirmed with masses 
of bodies, mostly standing and 
drinking or laughing and waiting for 
something more to happen. 



Some made merry by smashing 
glass on cement. Others chose moving 
costumes as their targets. Many 
grabbed food at the booths and sat on 
cold sidewalks to watch. 

Only 49 arrests were made over 
Friday and Saturday for "minor" 
offenses such as underage drinking 
and disorderly conduct according to 
Hogan. Las year, twice as many arrests 
occurred. 

The biggest problem, said Hogan, 



CO 





The gentleman here offered some sound advice; repent Most Students who 

repented decided it was a bad choice. 



was glass layering South Illinois 
Avenue. He said the crowd was out for 
fun more than trouble. 

Carbondale Memorial Hospital 
treated 36 persons, mostly for cuts. 
Only one person was admitted. 

Reactions were mixed as to 
whether or not the Halloween Helpers 
and booths made any difference. 

Joe Sobczyk, Daily Egyptian 
editorial page editor, called the six 
booths that sold mostly food, "nearly 
invisible," and the 23 Halloween 
Helpers on the strip, "completely 
invisible." 

"The concept of Carnivale '79 
broke apart like an empty Busch 
bottle hitting the pavement," Sobczyk 
wrote. 

Halloween Helper, Glenn Stolar, 
didn't agree. 

Stolar said that, "this year was 
only a starting point. Those involved 
know it was a success." 

The Halloween Helpers were hard 
to see, according to Stolart, because it 
is hard to pick 23 people out of 15.000; 
and because they were not very 
recognizahle even though they wore 
hats and name tags. 




Stolar added that the booth idea 
did not work well because they were 
located in the secluded spots and the 
booth workers made money for the 
owners, but did little to occupy the 
crowd. 

"If you give the people something 
to do, like game booths, they won't 
break bottles," Stolar said. 

He thought "calling the Hal- 
loween Helpers invisible was 
ridiculous." They cleaned areas 
around booths, extinguished small 
bonfires, kept people from climbing 
roofs, gave directions to newcomers 
and notified authorities of one injured 
drunk. 

"There was no real trouble to 
notify the police of. There was no 
necessity," Stolar said. "We used 
general intelligence when dealing with 
people. We weren't there to be a force, 
but to be a barrier between police and 
students." 

One Halloween Helper received a 

Family reunions were popular, 
while other had to call home as did Mr. 
Claus. 



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Groucbc A/./rv came close to dying tor the second time, while another two 
look .is iftbeyjust finished registration. 



dollar tip from somebody "for doing a 
good job." Many people dropped 
bottles off with the Halloween Helpers 
to be thrown away. 

At 4 a.m. Sunday, city clean-up 
crews attacked South Illinois Avenue. 
After spending $2,000 worth of labor 
and machinery, they finished clearing 
the can and bottle debris. 

Mike Norrington, SIU Security 
Policeman and public relations officer, 
said he believes in having the party, 
but only for one night. 

"The only way to solve the 
problem is to cancel some of the 
activities and shut the bars down 
earlier. Litter and police hours have to 
be reduced," Norrington added. 

The only way the tradition can 
successfully be continued is to have 
SIU Security and Carbondale Police 
intertwined more, Norrington said. It 
will always be on South Illinois 
Avenue, but with more supervision 
and regulations, it can be made less 
COBtly in clean-up and overtime police 
payment. 

Carbondale City Council is 
already preparing for Halloween 1980. 
Moving the festivities to a city-owned 
farm east of town has been suggested. 
With the area made available, there 
could be big beer tents and a huge beer 
bust. 

But who'll bring the take- 
over-the-town atmosphere? 



S 



Halloween Revisited: 1916 

Text by Pete Knect 



Halloween madness shook Carbondale in 1916. It just 
took another form. 

An advance article in the first edition of the October, 
1916, Egyptian (the forerunner of the Daily Egyptian) said 
the Annual Halloween Mardi Gras at Carbondale has 
grown to be the largest celebration of its kind in Southern 
Illinois. 

Fifteen to 20,000 people were expected for an 
extensive float parade. The article promised the evening 
"to be one of gaiety." 

From the November edition of the monthly Egyptian, 
the evening sure must have been a real blast. Nearly 14,000 
people turned out for the parade celebration. 

Miss Mae Floyd of the Southern Illinois Normal 
University was chosen as Carnival Queen for her loyal 
school support and "extracurricular activities." 

Announced by a trumpeter on a black show horse, 
Miss Floyd led the parade with an American flag across her 
lap and "10 little fairies around her." Then came the floats. 

Citizens designed floats representing the Colonial 
period in history. Various businessmen used floats to 
advertise their products. Sunday school students 
performed Biblical stories. Town lodges and clubs 
contributed. SINU created floats to fit different 
departments. 

A biology float "brought out the idea of the progress 
of science." Agriculture had a "Husking Bee" float with 
students dressed in blue overalls and straw hats. The 
geography department was depicted by persons in the 
national costumes of Japan, Holland and Spain. A science 
float covered physics, astronomy and chemistry. The 
household arts department represented the "Housewife's 
Dilema." Adding to the fun, 100 juniors met in a 

gymnasium "which was decorated with pumpk— x^.^s, 
fodder and branches of golden and brown leaves, the class 
colors being brown and gold." 

The juniors had come for an evening with the 
Halloween spirits, refreshments and games of the season. 
Game winners and the most comically dressed person, 
couple and group were given prizes. 

Then, "the refreshments, which consisted of one 
barrel of popcorn, several pounds of candy and, best of all, 
ten gallons of cider were served. 

Just think. By now, all that cider has fermented. 




A group of seven smiles invitingly, as two cowboys bite 
the dust. 




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he excitement of the evening grew as the 
Marching Salukis, clad in street clothes, made 
their way past the student center towards the 
roaring glow of the bonfire. The crowd 
increased in size as the band shuffled along, 
playing just about anything. The annual snake 
dance, sponsored by the Phi Sigma Kappa 
fraternity, got the 1979 Homecoming weekend 
underway. 

The intense heat warmed the crowd into 
fist-waving chants in support of the king and 
queen candidates. Brush Towers candidate, 
Annette Taeffe of Glenview, and University 
Parks' Bill Dixon of Elk Grove, took the 1979 
King and Queen honors. 

Joe Barwinski, football team captain, 
assured the crowd that SIU would "tear the hell 
out of their opponents" in a rousing speech. That 
they did, in a rousing win over Witchita State, 
38-7. 

Alpha Eta Rho took first place float honors 




in the annual homecoming parade, complete 
with clowns, marching bands, and rollerskating. 
In the homecoming concert, Van Morrison 
tried to match the excitement that Bob Dylan 
stirred up one year earlier. Generating a lot less 
excitement and a skimpier crowd, Morrison 
could never hope to match the magnetism of 
Dylan. Maybe the fact that Halloween crept a 
couple weeks too early this year hurt Morrison's 
chances. 



Job Market 1980 



Text by Tamara Miner 



In order to give the SIU graduate 
a look into his future, the OBelish II 
conducted a survey of the depart- 
ments at the university. Chances of 



obtaining a job in a related field within 
two years, starting salaries, and the 
high and low GPA's of those students 
graduating from the departments were 



among the information investigated. 
Here are our findings from the surveys 
we received back: 



College of Business and Adminstration 



There were 27 graduates Fall 1979 
in accounting. These graduates can 
expect an average salary of $1,206 per 
month for a beginning accounting job. 
The average GPA for Spring 1979 was 
about 2.79 with 4.0 as the high and 
2.011 as the low. Accounting grduates' 
chances of getting a career-related job 
within two years of graduating are, 
"the best of any non-technical 
degree," according to the college of 
business and administration. 

Administration sciences 
graduates', of fall 1979, have "very 
good" chances of getting a career- 
related job, with an average salary of 



$1,102 per month, according to the 
college. Spring 1979 graduates' GPAs 
ranged from 2.020 to 3.936 with an 
average of about 2.632. 

Three students graduated with a 
degree in business economics fall 
1979. The high GPA for spring 1979 
graduates was 3.695. The low GPA was 
2.262 and the average GPA was about 
2.76. "Very good" are their chances of 
getting a job-related career and 
graduates can expect an average 
monthly wage of $1,123, said the 
college. 

Finance majors' chances of 
getting a career-related job are also 



"very good," according to the college. 
There were nine students who 
received a fall 1979 degree and they 
can expect an average salary of $1,102 
per month. Spring 1979 graduates had 
GPAs ranging from 4.0 to 2.112, with 
2.542 as the average. 

Marketing graduates of spring 
1979 had an average GPA of 2.555, 
with a high of 3.937 and a low of 2.078. 
Their chances of getting a job-related 
career are "very good," says the 
college, and the average monthly 
salary is $1,040. There were 23 fall 
1979 graduates in this program. 



College of Communications and Fine Arts 



Journalism graduates have a 70 
percent chance of getting a field- 
related job within two years of 
graduating and the beginning salary 
ranges between $10,000 to $14,000. 
There were 30 journalism students 
that graduated fall 1979. The high 
GPA for the spring 1979 graduates was 
4.0 and the low GPA was 2.0. The 
majority of journalism students minor 
in political science, English, and 
marketing. To increase career op- 
portunities, journalism students 
specializing in news-editorial or 
photojournalism, should minor in 
liberal arts. Those specializing in 



advertising are advised to minor in 
psychology or marketing. 

There were 15 fall 1979 graduates 
in speech communications, and their 
potential salary range for a beginning 
job is between $10,000 to $15,000. 
There really isn't a minor program, 
but speech communications students 
are advised to take courses in 
journalism, English, and business to 
increase their career opportunities. 
Graduates of spring 1979 had an 
average GPA of 2.8. The high GPA was 
3.9 and the low GPA 1.95. There are no 
expected differences in the Fall 1979 
graduates. 



"We really don't have a national 
ranking system but we do have a 
highly regarded program," wrote 
Randall Bytwerk, assistant professor 
of speech communications. "Our 
public relations program is one of the 
best in the midwest." 

There are 100 jobs currently 
available in public schools alone for 
graduates in speech pathology and 
audiology, and SIU had 37 fall 1979 
graduates: 31 masters and six doctoral. 
No information was received on this 
degree program for the undergraduate 
level. 



School of Engineering and Technology 



Graduates in the engineering 
programs have "excellent to a hundred 
percent" chance of getting field- 
related jobs, according to Dean 
Kenneth Tempelmeyer. Depending 
upon the graduates qualifications and 
experiences, beginning salaries range 
from $1,300 to $1,900 per month. The 
high GPA for spring 1979 graduates 
was 3.72. The low GPA was 2.60 and 
the average was 2.61. There were no 
differences expected for the fall 1979 
graduates. The engineering program 
at SIU is fullv accredited bv the 



Engineers' Council for Professional 
Development. 

The engineering technology 
program is ranked first in the nation 
and graduates have a hundred percent 
chance of getting a job, according to 
Dean Tempelmeyer. There were 22 
graduates in engineering technology 
for fall 1979 and their potential 
beginning salary range is between 
$1,400 and $1,900 per month. Last 
spring, graduates had a high GPA of 
3,96, a low GPA of 1.96 and an average 
GPA of 2.85. 



The industrial technology 
program is also ranked first in the 
nation according to Dean Tempel- 
meyer. There are 50 fall 1979 
graduates in industrial technology and 
their chances of getting a job are a 
hundred percent. The potential salary 
for beginning jobs are between $1,400 
and $2,000 per month. The average 
GPA for spring 1979 graduates was 
2.85, the high was 3.55 and the low was 
2.85. 



College of Liberal Arts 



SIU's anthropology program ranks 
30th of 81 schools surveyed nationally, 
according to a 1976 trade magazine 
article. There are approximately 10 
spring 1980 graduates in anthropology 
and their minors range from philo- 
sophy to psychology to religious 
studies to geography to art to 
computer science. To maximize career 
opportunities, student should minor 
in either museum studies or conserva- 
tion archeology. The average yearly 
salary is between $8,000 and $12,000. 
The average GPA for spring 1979 
graduates was 3.08 with the high at 
3.76 and the low at 2.22. 

In the classical studies program, 
the graduates potential salary range 
"varies." 

The majority of the graduates 
minor in English and history, although 
the department suggests they minor 
in, "almost anything. Computer 
Science perhaps." 

"We consistently have good to 
excellent students," says the depart- 
ment. The high GPA in the last two 
years has been 3.95. 

There are two spring 1980 
graduates. Their chances of getting a 
field-related job are "good" if they are 
broadly-related and "less good" if they 
are specifically related. 

There are approximately 12 
graduates in economics for spring 
1980. The GPAs for the spring 1979 
graduates ranged from 4.00 to 2.27 
with an average of 3.05. The majority 
of the graduates minor in anth- 
ropology and accounting, but the 
department suggests minoring in 
business to increase career opportuni- 
ties. The chances of graduates getting 
a field-related job within two years 
upon graduation are "good," writes 
the department. 

Economics majors find jobs in 
banking, industry and government 
(federal, state, and local). Economics 
is considered a good background for 
graduate study in any of the social 
sciences, law, or business. 

Teachers with bachelor's of arts 
degrees in English have a potential 
salary range of $10,200 to $12,000. The 
average GPA for spring 1979 
graduates was 3.27 with the high GPA 
of 4.00 and the low GPA of 2.38. 
Approximately 26 students will 
graduate in English spring of 1980. 
The majority of the graduates are 
minoring in journalism, radio- 



television, economics, art, and gra- 
phics to increase their career op- 
portunities. 

Fall 1979 had two graduates in 
French and spring 1980 has three 
graduates. The average GPA of 
French graduates is 2.90 and most 
minor in cinema and photography, 
education, theater, or English. To 
increase career opportunities of 
French students interested in teach- 
ing, the department suggests minoring 
in either a second foreign language or 
English. Non-teaching student should 
minor in business courses, fields from 
the College of Human Resources, or 
political science to increase their 
opportunities. High school French 
teachers start at $10,000 a year. If the 
students go on to graduate school and 
qualify for an assistantships, they are 
paid about $4,000 for nine months. It 
is estimated that graduates have a 50 
percent chance of getting a field- 
related job within two years of 
graduating. 

The geography program at SIU 
has been ranked 21st in the United 
States, according to the department. 
Last spring's graduates had a high 
GPA of 3.33 and a low GPA of 2.61. 
The average GPA was 2.97. Geography 
graduates have a beginning salary 
range of $10,500 to $12,000. The 
geography program "requires an 
interdisciplinary minor taken from 
several environmentally-related disci- 
plines," say the department. 
Graduates' chances for getting a job 
are "very good." 

"All but two of last year's grads 
found environmental or planning 
jobs," wrote the department. 

The German program has one 
graduate for spring 1980. Although the 
potential beginning salary is $11,000, 
graduates in German have a very slim 
chance of getting a field-related job 
within the next two years, according to 
the department. 

The potential salary range for 
beginning jobs in history are between 
$8,000 and $18,000. There are approx- 
imately 19 history graduates for spring 
1980. The department suggests that 
students minor in business, computer 
science, and statistics to increase their 
career opportunities, although the 
majority of history students are 
minoring in political science, art 
history, and psychology. The high 
GPA for spring 1979 graduates was 



3.95, the low GPA 2.24, and the 
average was 3.15. 

"With the decrease in the number 
of history majors, the chances of 
getting a field-related job are greater 
than in previous years," wrote the 
department. 

The linguistics program has two 
spring 1980 graduates and their 
potential starting salary is between 
$10,000 and $15,000. To increase 
career opportunities in linguistics, 
students should minor in English, a 
foreign language, psychology, anth- 
ropology, sociology, or computer 
science. The average GPA for spring 
1979 linguistics gradeates was 2.92. 
The high was 3.16 and the low was 
2.55. Graduates' job chances are 
"moderately good" in areas of applied 
linguistics such as English as a second 
language of bilingual education, 
whereas "other specialization 
demands graduate work," according to 
the department. 

The high GPA of the spring 1979 
mathematic graduates was 3.68, the 
low was 2.86 and the average was 3.31. 
There are approximately eight 
graduates in mathematics for spring 
1980, and their chances of getting a 
field-related job within the next two 
years are "excellent," according to the 
department. The majority of the 
graduates are minoring in computer 
sciences. Besides computer science, it 
is suggested to mathematics students 
that they minor in engineering, 
business or economics. 

The potential field-related job 
outlook of philosophy majors is "fair 
but not certain," according to the 
department. There are approximately 
six spring 1980 graduates in philo- 
sophy. For last spring's graduates, the 
high GPA was 3.78, the average was 
3.04, and the low was 2.47. To increase 
career opportunities, philosophy 
students should minor in computer 
science, or if they wish to teach, they 
should minor in a field that can be 
applied to high school, such as social 
studies, English, natural sciences, etc. 
There are no philosophy teaching jobs 
available without a Ph.D. 

"Philosophy at the under- 
graduate level is directed towards 
general training and civilizing of the 
mind rather than towards vocational 
training; its aim is the development of 
a liberal mind rather than a trade 
school product," the department says. 



College of Liberal Arts icontinuedi 



There are approximately 37 
spring 1980 graduates in the political 
science degree program. Although 
there is no "real" program ranking the 
faculty was ranked 57th in publica- 
tion. Spring 1979 political science 
graduates minor in history, 
psychology, English, and community 
development. It is suggested that 
students minor in economics or 
business administration to increase 
their career opportunities. Political 
science graduates' chances of getting 
a field-related job are "excellent" with 
some graduate work, such as in the 
Master's of public administration 
program, according to the department. 

Approximately 58 students will 
graduate in psychology spring 1980. 
The majority of the graduates are 
minoring in sociology, philosophy, 
political science, anthropology, 
French, computer science, administra- 
tion of justice, mathematics, 
chemistry, art and English. There was 
a high GPA of 4.00 for the spring 1979 
graduates and a low GPA of 2.27. The 
average was 3.22. 

"The market for a bachelor of arts 
in psychology is essentially the same as 



the market of bachelor of arts with any 
liberal arts major," says the depart- 
ment. 

The religious studies programs 
has two graduates for spring 1980. 
Last spring the graduates had an 
average GPA of 2.38; 2.43 was the high 
and 2.32 was the low GPA. 

"Religious studies is not a 
vocational degree at the bachelor 
level," wrote John F. Hayward, 
chairman of religious studies. 

The potential beginning salary for 
graduates in Russian is approximate- 
ly $12,000 and the chances of 
graduates getting a field-related job 
are "good," according to the depart- 
ment. The national ranking of the 
Russian degrees program at SIU is 
"comparable." It is suggested that 
Russian students minor in business to 
increase their career opportunities. 
There is one student graduating in 
Russian for spring 1980. 

Approximately 15 students will 
graduate spring 1980 with a degree in 
sociology. Their chances of getting a 
field-related job is "above average" if 
they are trained in research methods, 
statistics and/or computer science. 



according to the department. The 
sociology graduates of spring 1979 had 
an average GPA of 3.04. The high GPA 
was 3.61 and the low was 2.58. There 
are no expected differences for the 
spring 1980 graduates. The majority of 
the sociology graduates are minoring 
in psychology, political science, 
business and administration of justice. 
To increase career opportunities, 
sociology students are suggested to 
minor in computer science or adminis- 
tration of justice. 

The chances of the two spring 
1980 Spanish graduates have in 
getting a field-related job within the 
next two years is "good," according to 
the department, and their potential 
salary is between $11,000 and $14,000. 
The high GPA for the spring 1979 
graduates was 3.33, the low was 3.10, 
and the average was 3.31. It is 
suggested that Spanish students 
minor in business, English, elemen- 
tary education or French to increase 
career opportunities. 

There are no graduates in speech 
communications or theater for 
spring 1980; no other information was 
received. 



The national ranking of the 
biological sciences program at SIU is 
"good," according to the department. 
There were 17 fall 1979 graduates and 
their chances of getting a field-related 
job within the next two years is 
"good." The majority of the graduates 
are minoring in disciplines of the life 
sciences. It is suggested that students 
in biological sciences minor in either a 
physical of life science to increase their 
career opportunities. 

"Students should take courses in 
computer science as electives to 
enhance their potential for employ- 
ment." wrote the department. 

The average GPA for the spring 
1979 graduates in biological sciences 
whs :*..">. The high Cil'A was ID and the 
low was 2.0. 

The chances chemistry 
graduates have in getting field-related 
lohs are "good," according to the 
department. 

The chemistry graduates' poten- 
tial salary lor a beginning job depends 
on the degree; $1,200 to $1,500 per 
month with a bachelor of science; 
$2,000 to $2,400 per month with a 



College of Science 

Ph.D. There is no minor required of 
chemistry students, but the depart- 
ment suggests that chemistry students 
minor in math or physics or computer 
science to increase their career 
opportunities. SIU offers a degree in 
chemistry with a business option 
which is "very successful." 

There were 12 fall 1979 graduates 
in geology and they have a "hundred 
percent" chance of getting a field- 
related job within the next two years, 
according to the department of 
geology. The potential salary ranges 
for a beginning geologist with a 
bachelor of science from $13,000 to 
$15,000 per year, where as a geologlBl 
with a master's is paid between 
$22,000 to $26,000. Spring 1979 
graduates in geology had a high GPA 
of 3.9 and a low of 2.4. There are no 
minors required, but it is suggested, to 
increase career opportunities, geology 
students minor in engineering, 
forestry, computer science, or any 
science. The potential beginning 
salary for microbiologygraduates 
with a bachelor of art's is $16,000 plus. 
There are 21 seniors who should 



graduate in spring 1980 and their 
chances of getting a field-related job 
are "very good." 

"Both the master's and the 
bachelor of art's degree students in 
microbiology have had good success in 
obtaining positions in either private 
industry of public health related 
organizations," wrote Dan McClary, 
professor of microbiology. 

Microbiology students are sug- 
gested to minor in chemistry to 
increase their career opportunities, 
although there is no minor required. 

Past graduates of allied health 
career specialties have earned 
between $4.50 to $6 per hour for their 
starting job. The average GPA for the 
spring 1979 graduates was 3.2. The 
high was 3.7 and the low was 2.6. There 
are no expected differences for this 
year's graduates. All the spring and 
summer graduates are working in their 
chosen specialty on a full-time basis, 
as of November, 1979, according to 
Arch Lugenbeel. coordinator of 
AHCS. 



Architectural technology 

graduates' chances of getting a job are 
"excellent — if they have good 
academic records," according to Gene 
Trotter, associate professor. 

The architectural technology 
program at SIU was the first in the 
U.S. to be approved by the American 
Institute of Architects. SIU graduates 
in architectural technology "outper- 
form those of baccalaureate programs 
upon entering the profession," wrote 
Trotter. 

Architectural technology 

graduates' potential salary range is 
$600 to $1,000 per month for a starting 
job. 

Spring 1979 graduates had an 
average GPA of 2.59. The high was 
3.57 and the low was 2.00. There is no 
change expected for the spring 1980 
graduates. For graduates entering 
baccalaureate programs, Trotter 
suggest they take environmental 
studies to increase their career 
opportunities. 

The national ranking of the 
aviation technology degree program 
is "high" at SIU and graduates in the 
program have "excellent" chances of 
getting a job, according to J. W. 
Schafer of STC Aviation Technology. 
The potential salary for a starting job 
ranges from $6 per hour to $32,000 per 
year. The average GPA for the spring 
1979 graduates in aviation technology 
was 2.5. The high was 3.8 and the low 
was 2.0. There are 40 graduates this 
year. 

In both aviation and avionics 
technology, there is a national 
shortage of 50,000 technicians expect- 
ed by 1985. 

There are 10 graduates in avionics 
technology this year. The program at 
SIU is highly ranked nationally, 
according to Larry Burkhead. The 
potential beginning salary is between 
$6.50 and $9.75 per hour and the job 
outlook is "good." The GPA for the 
spring 1979 graduates ranged between 
a high of 3.5 and a low of 2.00.The 
average was 2.5. 

The commercial graphics- 
design degree program at SIU is 
ranked first in the state and sixth in 
the nation. Graduates' chances of 
getting a job are "excellent, or they 
wouldn't be here!" according to John 
L. Yack, assistant professor. There 
were 37 spring 1979 graduates and 
their potential salary ranges for 
starting jobs between $8,500 to 



$13,700. The average GPA for the 
spring 1979 graduates was 3.45. The 
high was 4.00 and the low was 2.97. To 
increase career opportunities, Yack 
suggests that students take "more 
graphic design courses which are not 
now offered by the university." 

The correctional services 
graduates have "very good" chances of 
getting a field-related job, and the 
starting salary ranges from $8,000 to 
$12,000. The GPAs of the spring 1979 
graduates ranged between 4.0 to 2.0 
with 3.0 as the average. There are no 
expected differences for the 15 fall 

1979 graduates. To increase career 
opportunities, James Hendricks, 
assistant professor, suggests that 
correctional services majors minor in 
psychology, business, social welfare, or 
administration of justice. 

Dental laboratory technology 
graduates have "excellent" chances of 
getting a job, according to Dennis J. 
Laake, coordinator of dental tech- 
nology, and the program at SIU is one 
of the top five of the 58 accredite 
schools in the country. Thirty-six 
students graudated in spring 1979. 
The salary range for those graduates 
was $160 to $267 per week; the average 
salary was $185 per week to start. The 
average GPA for last spring's 
graduates was 3.0. The high was 4.0 
and the low was 2.02. There are no 
expected differences in the spring 

1980 graduates. 

According to Byron Johnson, 
assistant professor, the electronic 
data processing program at SIU is 
"highly respected." There are about 30 
students that will graduate spring 
1980 and their chances of getting a job 
are "excellent." The beginning salary 
is between $12,000 and $15,000 per 
year. There are no minors, but 
Johnson suggests graduates consider 
the STC baccalaureate program. 

Law Enforcement graduates 
have "exceptional" chances of finding 
a field-related job and the potential 
starting salary is between $10,000 and 
$18,000, according to James Hen- 
dricks, assistant professor. The law 
enforcement program is "very high" in 
national ranking. There are 30 fall 
1979 graduates and it is expected that 
their GPAs will be similar to last 
spring's graduates who had an average 
GPA of 2.8. The high GPA for spring 
1979 graduates was 4.0 and the low was 
2.0. Hendricks suggests that graduates 
minor in business or psychology. 



Mortuary science and funeral 
service students who wish to work in a 
funeral home will have jobs by the 
time they graduate, according to 
Donald Hertz, associate professor. 
There were 20 students who graduated 
in August 1979, and their starting 
salary was between $150 and $200 per 
week during the traineeship period. 
The average GPA for the August 1979 
graduates was 3.032. The high was 3.95 
and the low was 2.13; there are no 
expected differences in this year's 
graduates. Although associate degree 
students do not have a minor, Hertz 
suggests graduates work toward a 
baccalaureate degree in a related field. 
SIU's nursing program graduates 12 
students per year. Last year's 
graduates had an average grade of 'B' 
with the high grade A' and the low of 
'B-.' For a beginning job in nursing, 
the salary is $5.35 to $6 per hour in 
Souther Illinois; in the rest of the state 
the salary is higher. (There are 
increments for night and p.m. duty 
plus overtime). The job outlook for 
graduates is "excellent." 

"All are employed after gradua- 
tion that seek it!" wrote Hees. 

Hees suggests that elective be 
taken in science (chemistry) and child 
growth and development. 

The STC nursing program is a 
council member for the Associate 
Degree Nursing Council of the 
National League for Nursing and are 
in the process of reapplying for NLN 
accreditation. They were participants 
in a national "open curruculum 
research project" headed by the NLN 
between 1974 and 1978. 

According to R. White, assistant 
professor, graduates in the 
photographic and audio-visual 
technology program have "excellent" 
chances of getting a job. The program 
is one of five certified by the Photo 
Marketing Association International. 
The potential starting salary of 
photographic and audio-vicual tech- 
nology graduates is $14,000. Spring 
1979 graduates had an average GPA of 
3.1. The high was 4.0. 

The 22 physical therapist assis- 
tant graduates from fall 1979, have an 
"excellent" job outlook, and can 
expect a starting salary of between 
$8,000 to $11,000 per year. The high 
GPA for spring 1979 graduates was 
3.86 and the low was 2.5. 



Spinning 

Your 
Wheels 



Text by Paula Gray 
Photos by Brian Howe 

SIU may be famous of partying, 
but it also gathers fame at the other 
end of the spectrum — its services and 
facilities for handicapped students. 

"As far as comprehensive pro- 
grams go, SIU had one of the best in 
the country," said Ron Blosser, head 
of the Specialized Student Services 
Office. 

However, he explained, consider- 
ing laws which have been recently 
enacted concerning the handicapped, 
there isn't much of a basis for 
comparison. 

"SIU had somewhat of a head 
start, especially in the area of support 
services and programs," Blosser said. 
"Also, we've made more progress 
comparatively in these areas and in 
the areas of recreational activities, 
wheelchair athletics, and transporta- 
tion." 

Having speech therapy and 
physical therapy on campus is a 
valuable asset not found easily 
elsewhere, Blosser added. 

Some physical accessibility prob- 
lems still exist on campus, Blosser 
noted, such as the lack of an elevator 
in Woody Hall. 

About 280 students with varying 
disabilities, including those who are 
wheelchair- bound, semi -ambulatory, 
or those with impaired sight or 
hearing, and others with learning 
disabilities are enrolled at SIU. 

The Specialized Student Services 
Office was created to provide 
specialized services and a method for 
adapting all general services. 

"Our office considers it very 
important to integrate our services 
into regular activities, and our main 
goal is to integrate students into 
regular student life," Blosser said. 

Some Mi-vices are individualized 
as needed, hut care is taken not to 
separate the handicapped from the 
university community, he explained. 




The "hunt-and-peck" method of typing ia not uncommon in itself, but few do 

it with their nose as Dennis Fraxier must do. 




Jim Ro takes the term "wheelie" literally as he descends one of the ramps of 
Faner Hall. 



Handicapped students are not 
required to use these services, Blosser 
said. They must take the initiative to 
find out what is available and decide 
what they should utilize. 

"Handicapped students have to 
assume responsibility the same as any 
other student," Blosser commented. 

One of the major services they 
offer is the recruitment and referral of 
attendants, readers, and note takers. 
Blosser said there was a constant need 
for these workers. 

Attendants may work full or part 
time, depending on the amount of 
assistance the handicapped student 
requires. 

A wheelchair repair service is 
available through Specialized Student 
Services to those who pay a repair fee. 
The service repairs both manual and 
electric chairs and keeps an inventory 
of spare parts. 

"Wheelchair repair is an increas- 
ingly important service, especially 
since more and more students are 
using power chairs," Blosser said. 

Another highly-utilized service 
offered is a test proctoring service 
designed for students who are blind, 
have a limited manual dexterity. 
These students may need the ques- 
tions read to them or may need more 
time to take the test. 

Textbooks on tape or in braille, as 
well as special equipment such as tape 
recorders, talking calculators, braille 
typewriters, etc., are also available for 
visually-impaired students. 

Other services for the blind 
include orientation and mobility 
training to help familiarize these 
students with the campus. 

"Our programs for hearing- 
impaired students have come about in 
the past few years and some are still in 
the process of being formed," Blosser 
said. "The area of learning disabilities 
is also relatively new." 

Another service offered is pre- 
admission information and admission 
planning, housing assistance, and 
referral. 

Housing on campus for non- 
ambulatory, single, undergraduate 
students is at Thompson Point where 
there are two modified rooms on the 
first floor of each of the 11 dorms. 
Modifications include lowered tele- 
phones, fold-out doors, and clothes 
racks, grab bars on the bathroom and 
shower stall walls, and a fold-out seat 
in the shower. 



Southern Hills and Evergreen 
Terrace, which are housing complexes 
for married students, provide 
modified facilities for non-ambulatory 
married students. 

Some private dorms such as the 
Baptist Student Center, Freeman 
Hall, Wilson Hall, and certain other 
private houses, and some apartments, 
also have modified living areas. 

Since the distance of some of the 
living areas from campus makes it 
necessary or desirable for them to have 
cars, physically disabled students or 
their attendants qualify for special 
parking privileges administered by 
Specialized Student Services. Numer- 
ous handicapped parking spaces are 
designated in parking lots around 
campus to enable disabled students to 
park near desired building. 

"This had greatly helped to 
increase the general accessibility of 
the campus," Blosser commented. 

According to Blosser, elevators, 
ramps, wider doors, and modified 
toilet facilities in most of the buildings 
on campus, along with bevelled street 
curbs, make the overall campus 
accessibility good. Some problems still 
exist, such as parking problems, curb 
cuts which are too steep, and the lack 
of elevators in some of the older 
buildings. 

Kathy Dermody, a junior and a 
"wheelie," said that another acces- 
sibility problem is the poor placement 
of ramps, especially around Faner. 

"Now that I know where they are, 
it's not so bad," she said, "but for the 
first few months I was here, it was 
murder." 

Dermody also complained that 
the bathrooms in Faner are modified 
for wheelchairs, but are still largely 
inaccessible because of the double 
doors. She added that other people use 
the elevators too frequently when all 
they have to do is walk up one flight of 
stairs. 

Dawn Coats, an education major, 
said the elevator in the Agriculture 
Building is inaccessible because of the 
gate which has to be closed before the 
elevator will come back down. 

"If the gate is open," she 
explained, "you have to ask someone 
to go upstairs and close it for you so 
you can get the elevator." 

Coats added that the locks to the 
elevators could be lowered to make the 
easier to reach. 

Specialized Student Services also 



aids wheelchair-bound students by 
operating two vans with hydraulic 
lifts. Free of charge, this service 
includes transportation to and from 
classes for those living off-campus. 
The vans drive the students to the 
train station and to the two local 
airports. They are also used in 
emergencies. 

Non-class related trips are con- 
sidered a low priority and are 



although adding that many of the cuts 
are more steep. 

The progress has continued, 
Blosser observed. In the past year and 
a half, there have been more curb cuts 
placed on Main St. 

Coordination of services through 
other offices which have programs for 
the disabled students is also an 
important function of this office. 

These other offices include the 




David Fletcher assist Tom Hafferty out of the van for handicaps. 



scheduled according to availability of 
time and funds. 

Accessibility in the city of 
Carbondale has been improved in the 
past years, Blosser said. 

"In the early 1970's, there was a 
project involving the Specialized 
Student Services Office and certain 
civic groups which tried to get more 
curb cuts, which they did," he said, 



Student Health Program, Career 
Planning and Placement Center, 
Counseling Center, Student Work and 
Financial Assistance, Clinical Center, 
Special Supportive Services, Center 
for Basic Skills and Illinois Division of 
Vocation Rehabilitation (IDVR), 
which partially pays for the education 
of handicapped students. 

"The Career Planning and 



<n 



Placement Center is especially good in 
helping handicapped students decide 
on careers and then finding jobs after 
graduation, especially in cases where 
employers may be reluctant to hire 
someone with a handicap," Blosser 
said. 



The offices also deals with faculty 
awareness: alerting the faculty of the 
presence of handicapped students in 
their classes and educating them on 
how the student can be accommodat- 
ed. 







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Car/ Brigman, whose neck is inoperable, is able to drive with the help of a vast 
array of mirrors of all sizes. 



"This is especially important in 
the area of hearing impaired 
students," Blosser said, "because that 
is a handicap which is not readily 
noticed." 

An area of increasing importance 
for handicapped students is recrea- 
tion. SIU meets this need through the 
Student Recreation Center's program, 
"Recreation for Special Populations." 

The program is divided into two 
areas — formal and informal. The 
formal segment includes such sports as 
basketball, softball, and track and 
field, while bowling, swimming, 
canoeing, weightlifting, horseback 
riding, and chess are included in the 
informal segment. 

"We do the same things as the 
able-bodied population (does), except 
there are some modifications," said 
Richard DeAngelis, assistant coordin- 
ator of the programs. "Of course, there 
aren't too many modifications, or it 
wouldn't be the same." 

A gumball rally is sponsored by 
this group twice a year. 

They also host the Little Egypt 
Games, a qualifying regional competi- 
ton for the national finals, which SIU 
alternates hosting with the University 
of Illinois. 

They sponsor a wheelchair athle- 
tic club known as the Challengers, 
which raises funds to help pay for the 
teams, and sponsors the university's 
competing wheelchair athletic team, 
the Squids. 

"The Challengers also try to 
educate the public as to the abilities of 
people in wheelchairs," DeAngelis 
said. 

Some students in wheelchairs who 
were interviewed felt that they were' 
well-accepted by their fellow students. 

"They treat me pretty well," said 
Lee Smith, a freshman in general 
studies. 

"Most people are willing to be 
patient with me," remarked Dermody. 

"They treat me just like they treat 
everybody else," stated Coats. 

Having handicapped students on 
campus can also help non- 
handicapped students. For example, 
Doug Garrard, a freshman from the 
Chicago suburb of Glendale Heights, 
made a few "wheelie friends." 

"Since coming down here," 
Garrard said, "I have learned that 
people in wheelchairs are just as 
'normal' as anybody else." 



CO 



Vision 

Without 

Sight 

Text by Lizann Griffin 
Photos by Brian Howe 

Michael Nelipovich is 34 years old 
and going blind. 

You might not be able to tell so by 
watching him. For Nelipovich carries 
himself with faultless dignity and 
confidence. He turns his head towards 
his conversational partner, and even 
compliments her on her appearance. It 
is only natural to him, this following of 
the social graces. 

The telltale signs are the cane and 
dark glasses. He does not bump into 
walls and mutter to himself, which is 
the stereotype of the blind. 

This SIU student working on his 
doctorate degree in rehabilitation has 
3 per cent vision in his left eye. What 
he can see from the left eye, with good 
lighting, color contrasts and by 
directly focusing on an object is knifed 
by tunnel vision. 

He said he has known since his 
childhood in Detroit that one day he 
might be completely blind as the result 
of an inherited defect, although very 
few visually impaired people are 
completely blind. The actual realiza- 
tion of living in darkness didn't strike 
him until the age of 25, after the first 
of his three children were born and his 
sight failed even faster. Within three 
years his sight was so poor he began to 
use a cane. The cane freed him, he 
said. 

"I didn't have to worry (about 
asking) if someone was going in that 
direction or ask my wife, Helen , if she 
wanted to go somewhere; in essence, 
asking her to take me," Nelipovich 
said recently in the Woody Hall 
Cafeteria. 

Wit h t he cane, a loss of anonymity 
came. Canes fulfill one of their 
functions in that they make the blind 
visible, but the sighted public also 
remembers their bearers. 

Upon seeing him in public, 
children will sometimes loudly 
question their mothers about his cane 
and lis UB6, he said. The mothers will 
often react with a "hush, he might 
hear." 




Here, Nelipovich shows his two sons, 
game of chess, despite his blindness. 

Other times, the more precocious 
will ask the bearer himself. If the child 
is sassy, he will respond, "It's a stick to 
hit smart kids with." 

He said his blindness limits him. 

"I can't walk into a bar with ease 
and find a place to sit," he said, 
crossing his ankles. 

The lack of environmental control 
is limiting factor on socialization, he 
said. Nelipovich referred to the blind 
person who is sheltered as a child, later 
placed in a school for the visually 
handicapped, and enrolled into a large 
public university for socialization as 
an example. 

"If you are a passive individual 
who is not in control of your 
environment, you are going to let other 
people tell you where to go, when to go 
and how to do it," Nelipovich said, 
stroking his brown beard. 

He gave as an example the 
visually handicapped person who sits 
rigidly erect as the person who feels 
uncomfortable in his environment. 

"They aren't acting naturally," he 
said, casually packing his pipe with Sir 
Walter Raleigh Tobacco and lighting 
it. 

He described himself as someone 
who doesn't like complainers, people 
who feel that life has dealt them a bad 
deal. He added, "I have what I call my 
blind days' when I curse my fate 
because I am feeling sorry for myself." 

His friends are success-oriented, 
but the clients he serves may not be. 

Although it takes him more time 
to complete a job than it would for 
someone who is sighted, Nelipovich 



Nick and Richard, the finer points of the 

said that he can complete that home 
re-modeling project (his hobby) when 
he is well-rested and psyched-up. 

He told the story of his uncle who 
was blinded by the same inherited 
defect and retired from life by "sitting 
around for 30 years collecting disabili- 
ty payments while his wife worked." 
This image was his extended family's 
only conception of a blind person, he 
said, and they expected him also to 
retire from life. It was this expectation 
that propelled him in the opposite 
direction. 

"I don't consider myself in- 
digent," he said. "I don't consider 
myself unemployed. I have so many 
things going for me and my family that 
getting sympathy doesn't make that 
much sense." 

Nelipovich said he helped to 
establish and was the first to be 
elected president of the New Mexico 
chapter of the American Association 
of Workers for the Blind in 1975. He 
was the state president of the New 
Mexico Rehabilitation Teachers 
Association and the national president 
of the National Association of 
Rehabilitation Instructors from 1975 
to 1977, he said. He added that he 
taught at the University of Arkansas 
at Little Rock graduate's rehabilita- 
tion for the blind program from 1976 
to 1978. Nelipovich said that he won 
one of the "Outstanding Young Man 
of the Year Awards" from the Jaycees 
in 1979. He had been nominated for 
the award by an Arkansas Chapter of 
the club. 



He said blindness is often used as 
an excuse for a personality handicap 
and that society supports this by 
forgiving a blind person for anything. 

"The image of the blind beggar 
prevails," he said. "I could walk 
around in rainbow-colored clothes 
tomorrow and be accepted by the 
sighted public." 

Poor hygiene, wearing mis- 
matched clothes, rocking in public or 
eye poking are all socially unaccept- 
able, even though the sighted public 
accepts them in those who are visually 
handicapped, he said. The blind 
person acting in this manner should be 
told about it so he can better adapt, 
Nelipovich added. Rocking and eye 



poking are stimulations done to 
compensate for the lack of visual 
stimulation. 

"A person with a visual handicap 
who has all the mental faculties can 
lead a normal existence," he said 
blowing on a spoon of chili. 

For instance, dimly-lit dance 
rooms were more troublesome than 
finding dates for Nelipovich as a 
young buck. 

Blindness can stand in the way of 
friendship, he said, citing the "Archie 
Bunker Syndrome" as the reason. 

"(Sometimes) they won't accept 
me . . . they'll accept me as the 'blind 
guy.' I'm still Mike Nelipovich with 
likes and dislikes, but I just happen to 




Nelipovich's ears take over his eye's duties as he prepares to "listen" to a book. 
Notice the buttons on the recorder. 



be visually impaired." 

He says he finds SIU students to 
be "pretty cool," and that he is treated 
at levels that range from "good to 
excellent." 

"I'm trying to think of something 
bad (that has happened) on campus, 
but I can't," he paused. "I think it (the 
reason) is the atmosphere . . . 
accepting and freewheeling. They 
have more acceptance of the visually 
impaired." 

He praises SIU for its services for 
the handicapped. The transit system, 
he said, will take a handicapped 
person to the bank or to school and 
back. 

Workers in Specialized Student 
Services, "bend over backwards to 
help," he said. 

He speaks of SIU as an academic 
institution with flattery. 

"I think it deserved to be 
recognized for being the only universi- 
ty to have a doctoral program in 
rehabilitation." 

He advised those who want to 
help a blind person to first ask if he 
needs assistance, instead of pulling 
him in a direction they think he 
wanted to go. 

Be specific in giving directions. 
Don't say, "It's over there," and wave 
in the correct direction. 

"Man, I can miss a Greyhound 
Bus if I'm not looking right at it," he 
laughed. 

Also, touching the blind person to 
compensate for the lack of eye contact 
and saying good bye instead of waving 
and walking away are suggestions 
Nelipovich made for those relating to 
a blind person. 

Despite his apparent good rela- 
tions with other people, Nelipovich 
said he doesn't have much of a social 
life. 

"But that's my choice, because I 
feel that my family deserves more of 
my time than my friends do," he 
firmly said. 

He says he plays football with his 
sons, Nicholas, 9, and Richard, 7, 
admitting that he gets knocked in the 
head with the ball at times. 

His daughter, Jessica, 3, shows 
him pictures she has colored by saying, 
"Daddy, feel this." 

Nelipovich said that early in his 
10-year marriage, he was unable to 
discuss his disability with his wife. 

"We joke about it now," he 
laughed. 



Cn 



aBOMBinable 

SNOWMEN 

Text/Photos by Joel Wakitsch 



This was do ordinary Sunday. Books were shut, the 
semester had just begun, and the first trace of snow came in 
the form of five inches two days earlier. The white powder had 
fermented into treacherous packing snow, and the inevitable 
was about to happen. 

A mob of war-hungry eskimos charged out of the Triads, 
Hinging snowballs at and through the hub lounge windows of 
Mae Smith. That's all it took. The war had begun. 

About MOO warriors slushed, tripped and kicked their way 
through the snow. A shopping cart donated by the local IGA 
served as an ammunition depot on wheels for the Towers' side. 
The Triad relied on quick packing technique and quicker legs 
to keep up with the Towers' modern equipment. Hack and 
forth, each side took its turn charging the other between Mae 
Smith and Neelv. 








£ 




L»a V 



■**«• 




Minor casualties like bloody noses, chilled fingers, wet 
underwear and exhaustion seemed to be the rule of the day. 
The war even subsided for awhile when the ambulance came 
to haul a dazed combatant away. With no sign of the Saluki 
Patrol in sight the battle continued. 

Two hours passed before the crowd started to dwindle in 
an effort to thaw its fingers and lick its wounds. A few diehards 
persisted, but for the most part it was over. The battle field 
looked like one. Students were too tired to start studying. The 
windows would be expensive. 



RAINBOWS ARE 

MULTI-COLORED 



How many different facets can one 
man have? As many as there are colors 
in a rainbow. In Dr. Kay Rainbow's 
office in Southern Illinois University's 
English Department hangs a sixth- 
grader's drawing. Red, blue and green 
don't make up this arch hut unusual 
colors — chartreuse, pink, orange-yellow 
do. 

Some people call him Sunshine. He 
lives on a hilltop in Makanda. Illinois, 
population 300. The 61-year-old Doctor 
of Philosophy came to Southern Illinois 
University in 1949 from the University 
of Chicago. Since then he has taught 31 
different classes in the English Depart- 
ment. 

His specialty, though, is early 
English literature-Beowulf, Chaucer. 

He has read everything written 
before the 15th century, and although he 
reads some modern classics he does not 
consider himself a "modern" man. 

I >r. Rainbow is not a modern man in 
any sense <>! I he word. He hakes his own 
bread, has seen one movie in his life and 
has never owned a T.V. 

He built hi> own home on five acres 
"I land and there he lives a peaceful 
existence with his dog. I'm. and his cat. 
Nap. 

"Life is too short," he kept telling 
me. shaking his head as if trying to 
convince me. He is such a firm believer 
in that. Seventeen years ago while he was 
finishing up the paint in his house, that 
same phrase recurred in his mind. "This 
is not life, stop doing it." he said. And 
did. "Even today you can see where I 
slopped painting, right in the middle of 
a simke." Surely thai would bother me. 



I said, always seeing that wall only 
part-way done. "But life is too short," he 
said again, "to it spend doing something 
you don't want to do." 

Dr. Rainbow says that if he could 
teach a class in a plane, he'd have both 
his loves in one place. He had always 
wanted to fly. and back in 1974, one of 
his students took him up. He was then 
introduced to the flight instructor. 
Lessons followed and he now has his 
wings. 

One of his brothers is a pilot for 
United, flying out of New York, while 
the other brother lives in Wyoming, 
working for an aerospace company. He 
will soon be travelling to -Japan to sell 
timing mechanisms lor the Olympic- 
games. Ray visits each brother twice a 
year for three days. He doesn't like to 
travel but. "I owe them that much." he 
says. 

His mother left them when Ray was 
eleven. His father and the three boys 
lived in poverty in Pennsylvania. His 
father was earning $5 a month. The 
chores were divided up and Ray. the 
eldest, was designated cook. 

"I always feel I got the easiest job," 
he said. "It's hard to mess up an egg. or 
commeal mush. Rut I could make a 
banquet out of a can of tuna (which cost 
about 7c then) by adding milk, 
margarine, and flour, and spreading it on 

toast." 

Although Ray doesn't like to cook, 
he is a good one. In the summer he has 
a garden full of tomatoes and corn, but 
he doesn't preserve or can anything. 
\\ hat he doesn't eat, he gives away. 

Dr. Rainbow eats onlv one meal a 






Text by Maureen Ann Keegan 

day — dinner. "It's not that i m opposed 
to lunch," he says, "but my stomach is so 
disciplined that it's not hungry until 
evening. I'm usually doing something 
around lunch and don't have time." 

Time. It almost seems that Dr. 
Rainbow is short of it. But it's just that 
he doesn't waste it. No alarm ever wakes 
him. he's up at five every morning to his 
own natural, internal clock. He swims a 
mile every morning at six, seven days a 
week, at the Ramada Inn pool, in the 
dark. He likes it that way. 

Monday through Saturday he's on 
campus; Sundays he goes to church. He 
is Episcopalian and likes ritualized 
ceremonies and formality in his church; 
he likes to know where it's going - 
direct and clean. 

Dr. Rainbow has never published 
his work and has no desire to: "I have 
never had a thought that was absolutely 
fresh," he said. "If I did I'd give it to my 
students, maybe one of them would be 
able todosomething with it. I don't want 
to be remembered that way. Life's too 
short." 

The only T.V. show Dr. Rainbow 
has ever seen is Kukla, Fran, unci Ollie. 
It was on in one of the University of 
Chicago lounges and he says he's never 
seen anything that great. 

"I found more philosophy in that 
show t han I see in real life." he said, "and 
I love puppets." 

Fielding's novel. Tom Jones, was 
made into film in 19(il and Dr. Rainbow 
went to see his last movie. I was 
expecting him to say it was bad; that the 
movie did not meet his expectations as 
the novel did. 



'Life is too short. 



"It was wonderful," he said. "I 
thought they did a superb job." But why, 
I asked, if both experiences with video 
have been so good, don't you go back? 
"It's like falling in love," he told me, 
"once you've had a love, very little else 
matches up to it. And I don't want to 
ruin the memory." 

He admits he's judging T. V. without 
really having experienced it. "But my 
students are great judges," he says, "and 
they tell me about it or write it in their 
essays or papers. They tell me it's junk, 
and they should know. Some of them 
even study with the TV on. I don't see 
how they can do that. I need absolute 
silence to read and that's what I've got 
on my hilltop." 

Dr. Rainbow drives a Buick in to 
campus. "I'm really not a Buick person," 
he said, "or a Cadillac person. I had an 
Opel which was costing me $600 a year 
to run. It was brand-new but things kept 
going wrong with it that weren't covered 
by the warranty. So a friend said to me, 
'Ray, you drive into town every day. We 
gotta get you a dependable car' — so he 
sold me a Buick." 

Dr. Rainbow says he is notorious for 
his political contributions. He gave $15 
to the Nixon campaign and says, "I stuck 
by him until I heard him lie one morning 
on the car radio. There was nothing 
wrong with what he did in Watergate, I 
don't condemn him for that, but he was 
silly and foolish not to destroy the 
tapes." 

This election year Dr. Rainbow 
supports Connally. "He's able, young 
and experienced," he says. "Some people 
criticize him for changing from a 



Republican to a Democrat. But I say, if 
I decide the house is on fire, I'm a fool 
not to get out. There's nothing wrong 
with his changing his mind." 

Dr. Rainbow will spend Christmas 
in New York with his pilot brother and 
his wife, and son. 

This past Thanksgiving he spent at 
home. "Turkey doesn't taste right unless 
it's over 20 pounds," Ray's father used to 
say. Now whether he believes this or not 
he doesn't say. 

But he bought a 22-pounder this 
year. He asked in his classes if there was 
anyone who didn't have plans for 
Thanksgiving. There was only one 
student, so he came out to Makanda to 
Ray's and Tin's and Nap's for a 
Thanksgiving meal. "Together we made 
a nick in the,bird," said Ray. "I froze the 
rest and have it whenever I feel like 
having turkey." 

When I first met Dr. Rainbow three 
years ago in his Literary History of 
English class, he was boycotting coffee 
— prices had skyrocketed. 

He was always very punctual at 
eight in the morning, usually wearing the 
same thing, occasionally a different coat 
or trousers. He called everyone formally 
Mr. or Miss (not Ms.) with their last 
name. But his earthiness came through 
as did his vigor and enthusiasm. He 
smiled a lot then and still does. 

The other day when I went into his 
office I began to reintroduce myself. As 
I say, it had been three years. "Oh, I 
know who you are," he broke in. 

After we had been talking, he pulled 
out of his desk drawer, on this cold 
December day, two freshly cut hibiscus, 



one pink and the other yellow. "I usually 
bring these in for the secretaries," he 
said. He outstretched the pink one, 
saying he thought it would go better with 
the light blue I was wearing. He has a 
greenhouse, 10 by 17 feet, attached to his 
home. But he says he doesn't spend 
much time there — 10 to 15 minutes a 
day just to water and keep dead leaves 
off the plants. He marvelled at the 
beauty of the flower and told me it would 
last 24 hours without water. "It would 
still look just as fresh if you were to wear 
it tonight." And I did. 

Just as I was leaving he said, "And 
you still wear earrings." 

"Yes," I admitted, "never miss a 
day in fact." 

"Earrings are meant to go through 
the earlobe like yours. I feel sorry for the 
women I see in class with those clip-on 
things. I feel like saying, 'You poor girl, 
don't you want to take those off, they 
must be pinching you terribly.'" 

Yep, I thought. That's Dr. Rainbow, 
so observant, witty, warm, and brilliant. 



Yep, I thought. That's Dr. Rainbow. 
So witty, warm and brilliant. 



to 




used and abused 




£U&±- 




Although the majority of students at SIU are aware of 
the Student Health (Jenifer, tew know much about it than 
the iael that it provides medical care to the ill. 
g^B^fl Accoring to Sam McVay. director of the Student 

Health Program there are three purposes tor the Student 
Health Center. 

The first is to aBsist the students in keeping 
themselves healthy. The second is to help the students 

I acquire skills to deal with some of their illnesse8 On their 
own. The third is to provide quality medical can when it 
McVay estimates that out of some 50,000 visits made 
by the students to the Health Center last year, about 
10,000 to 15,000 were merely bad colds and only about 
20,000 visits were really necessary. 

However, these statistics are an improvement 
previous years. In 1976. nearly 70,000 students visited the 
Health Center. In the past three years the visit rate has 
dropped 28 percent. 

McVay also estimated that about 10 percent of the 
student body uses 60 pi nent of the resources provided by 
the Health Center. 

The push to deal with this problem according to 

McVay. will begin in spring of 1980. The first step will he 

to identify these multiple users, as he refers to them, and 

at her as many demographics as possible 






The Health Program wants to find out why these 
students visit the Health Center so often and also wants 
to teach them to deal with some of their ailments, perhaps 
assisting them in illness prevention. wt:- 

The most recent program initiated by the Stadent" 
Health Program is the Student Wellness Resource Center, 
which began in August of 1978. ^k 

Thii program which places emphasis on the overall 
improvement of the student's quality ot lite, has become 
increasingly popular in the past few years. ^k^fli 

According to Mark Cohn, coordinator of the Student 
Wellness Resource Center, the reason for the sudden 
interest in such programs is because people all over the 
nation want to take control of their health. With the rising 
cost of medical care, this thought only makes sense. 

Cohn says of the Student Wellness Resource Center, 
"The concept is nothing new; it's the packaging that is 
new." ^g M 

The packaging lure at Sll consists of four 
components. They are: The Lifestyling Program, the 
Patient Activation Program, the Human Sexuality Service, 
and the Alcohol Education Project. 

The purpose of the Lifestyling program is to increase 
the quality of the student*' lives, rather. than to treat 
diseases. This component i- divided into 1 ur categories: 
exercise, ecology, nutrition, and relaxation. 



■Ar^UJ 



j- 5 1 



-, ' 



V 



£ V 



r 




k 






KWELIO 



Snah i pi 



Ȥ" 



reductio^HjiTOiTBiacWid ex 
|g Cohn'says !6f the o 
person a|£S"^Bol&,' not j 
A group of student; 
J: «x^lainea*.UlMll LUlk 



are smokin^Klmi 
se support grBps. 
onent, "We are looking at a 
in one aspect." 
want to quit smoking, he 
rrsT^>" ; jt smoking. Substitutions for 
king, such as proper exercise to lake off the weight so 
often gaiuSdJavjsmokM^vhen they quit the habit, are also 
discussed. 

Though there are groups specifically designed for 
smokers and those desiring to take off a few pounds, Cohn 
feels the exercise support groups are often more effective 
than the specific groups themselves. 

The Patient Activation Program fulfills one of the 
three purposes for the ej|^|ance of the Student Health 

assume responsibility in 

?ases '&f upper respiratory 
cuts, and abrasions. 




i Student 



ce provides students with 



accurate knowledge aboutVsto25jty so they may clarify 
their own values and make decisions that they may 
integrate into their own lives. 

"We do not teach right from wrong|| says Cohn, ' w 
teach facts with the hope that the students will decide 
themselves on a right and wrong." 

Gohn says a big emphasis is placed on birth control 
ly for those that are sexually active, both me 



len and 



J. 



lOCUNE 




*«? 



Wehcte N 

student 



J« 




Though statistics showing the effectiveness of the 
program are not yet available, a study is being conducted 
at present comparing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors 



UeUcteN 

who have gone through some aspect of the 
'xuality p 'ogram with those who have not. The Student 
ellness Resource Center is anticipating a favorable 
tcome. 

Individual , consultations are also available Tor 
dents concerning birth control, sexual problems, 
gnancy, and homosexuality along with other aspect f of 

Perhaps the most important of these four is the 
Alcohol Education Project. SIU iBne of five universities 
in the nation chosen by the NIAAA to be a part of the three 
year project,. Funding came from the Illinois Department 
of Mental Health. 

"We are not any different tba^Bny other university in 
terms of alcohol," Cohn says. "It's Bt that the money! 



good, estimating that literal, 
sat in on lectures. 

I^^^Bires are usually set up by resident assistants to be 
given to the residents iHieirdMxiitories. Lectures consist 
of facts about akoholKd thejfeects of alcohol with the 
hope of teaching responsible drinking. 

One student who sat in on a lecture claims he didn' 1 
!earn an incredible amount, but said he has accepted 
responsible thinking instead of his earlier alternative of 
prohibition. 

The/unded project has just one year remaining. Cohn^ 
however, says the Student Wellness Resource Center willj 
be picking up the majority of the project, but the funding 
will have to come from other sources. 



t»\«o 



CAMPHOR 




>tory 




X 




1 1 1 > 



1 l\ 




. • 




"ERBUGS 



OBelisk II Photo Contest 
Winners: 



Landsca pe] 



1. JWY BENDER «. 

2. STE^E NOZICKN a* 



JOHN T. NNERKE 



3rd 




to 

CO 



Human Interest 



1. X)HN CL4RK 

2. GREG DREZDZON 2nd 
,. STEkE NOZICKK 





On most any day of the 


"It's 445-79-8659," the 


work week, some student some- 


student answers with con- 


where on campus can be found 


fidence. 


coming down with the "red tape 


"What did you have for 


blues." Woody Hall and Wa- 


lunch today " the teller asks. 


shington Square seem to breed 


"Lunch! What does that 


an unusually high amount of 


have to do with my fees?" the 


germs transmitting this ugly 


student asks curiously. 


disease. 


"Nothing," the teller re- 


The disease begins in- 


plies. "But whatever you had. 


nocently enough. In fact, it often 


half of it is still on your chin." 


goes unnoticed in the early 


The student cusses the 


stages. 


teller under his breath. 


"Hi," the student says as he 


"Obviously — a student 


approaches the window of his 


worker," he thinks. 


choice; which always proves to 


Although this appears to be 


be the wrong choice. "Is this 


nothing more than a minor flare 


where I pav mv right to breathe 


up, it is, in reality, the first germ 


fee?" 


to enter the student's body. 


"What does your last name 


spreading the dreaded red tape 


begin with?" the teller asks, 


blues. He has now become 


r standing behind the safety of 


infected. From now on the germs 


the counter. 


will continue to multiply at a 


".I." the student replies. 


rate even faster than that of 


"What is your student 


tuition. 


number?" 





CM 



"Well," the student asks, 
"can I pay my right to breathe 
fee here or not?" 

"Actually sir, I regret to tell 
you that according to the data 
you have given me, you can not 
pay it here. Window three," the 
teller suggests. 

The student walks to win- 
dow three where he is greeted by 
another student worker. 

"Is this where I pay my 
right to breathe fee," the 
student begins before he is 
interrupted. 

"Right to breathe fees are 
paid at window one," the teller 
informs him without looking up. 

"But I just came from 
window one," the student says 
confused. 

"Sorry," is the teller's 
answer, "I can't help you here." 

The student is headed 
towards an acute case of the red 

"Can I pay my right to breathe 
fee here or not?" 

tape blues, possibly one with 
great side affects. As he walks 
back to window one, the first 
real symptoms can be seen. 
Unfortunately, they often are 
not recognized as such. 

His walk becomes heavier. 
Veins begin to bulge in his neck 
and forearms. 

"Yes," the teller says 
quizzically having seen this 
student's face once already and 
thinking she was done with it. 

"They sent me back here," 
the student growls. 

"They?" 

"Window three." 

"Which window three?" the 
teller continues to question. 



"Three. You know, the one 
between two and four!" 

"Oh, you must have 
thought I meant window three 
in this office. I was speaking of 

"That's odd... I don't 
remember any right 
to breed fee." 

window three in Washington 
Square," she said chuckling. 
"Oh, you silly goose." 

Laughter is one of the most 
antagonizing agents to the 
student who has already con- 
tracted the red tape blues. It 
only makes things worse. 

As the student heads 
towards Washington Square, 
about one-half mile away, he 
reflects on the half hour he just 
wasted. As he does, his veins 
bulge even more and take on a 
blue glow, contrasting with the 
red tint which begins to over- 
come his face. The student 
suffering from this disease 
should not be given the op- 
portunity to be by himself, for 
this leads to the student working 
himself up even more. 

Once at Washington 
Square, the student addresses 
the teller. 

"I was sent here from 
Woody Hall. They said this is 
where I pay my right to breathe 
fee," the student repeats him- 
self. 

"That's odd," the lady says. 
"I don't remember any right to 
breed fee." 

"Not right to breed — right 
to breathe! f," the student says. 

"Oh yea, right to breathe. 
Go to window three." 

The student proceeds to 
window three where he is met by 



a student worker talking on the 
phone. Her back is to him. 

"So after you spread the 
honey all over and lick it off, 
then you can ..." 

Impatiently, the student 
clears his throat. The worker 
jerks around, unaware that he 
had been waiting. 

"I came to pay my right to 
breathe fee," the student ex- 
plains. 

"OK, can I have your 
form?" 

"What form?" the student 
asks. 

"Your form for respiratory 
rights. . .form number 632- 
95-17." 



Wmdow JL 
Tuithn+Fees 




to 






"But Woody Hall didn't say 
anything about that! How am I 
supposed to get one of those?" 
the student asks helplessly. 

"They have them at Woody 
Hall," the teller replies. 

A cold sweat breaks on the 
student's brow. His pupils dilate 
and his lips tighten and thin out. 
His breathing becomes heavy. 
The student's condition is now 

His walk becomes heavier. 
Veins begin to bulge in 
his neck and forearms. 

irreversible. He is past the point 
of no return. It is only a matter 
of time until the disease 
climaxes. 

The student storms out of 
Washington Square, not bother- 
ing to open the door. This is a 
sure sign that the student is past 
the point of no return — lack of 
bodily feelings; a numbness. 
Once this spreads to the region 
about the neck, the climax 
begins. 

During the half-mile walk 
back to Woody Hall, the day's 
events ferment in his mind. He 
began at 1:45. It is now after 3 
p.m. A feeling similar to extreme 
annoyance sets in, which is 
actually the virus spreading to 
different parts of the body. The 
student takes his feelings out on 
all around him. He kicks dogs, 
slaps children, trips old ladies, 
punches pregnant women in the 
stomach and urinates on 
wheelies with mechanical prob- 
lems. 

He reaches Woody Hall and 
places himself in the line for 
window one. The teller sees him 



Window H 
Student Loans 




for third time that day. 

"Back again, huh? Is 
something wrong?" she ignor- 
antly requires. 

"No," the student replies. 
"I was in the mood for a horror 
show, but none were playing. I 
thought I would come back and 
look at your face some more!" 

The student often becomes 
snide when infected to such an 
extensive degree. 

"Well what is it you need?" 
the teller asks. 

"I need to fill out my form 
for respiratory rights." 

OK, go to window five." 

Reluctantly, in anticipation 
of another goose chase, the 
student proceeds to window 
five. 

"I need my respiratory 
rights form." 

"OK, let me see your intent 
to inhale form," the teller asks. 

"My what?" the student 
yells. 

"Your intent to inhale form. 
You didn't get one at Washing- 
t . Square?" 

Being intuitively astute, as 



are all SIU students, the student 
predicts another trip to Wa- 
shington Square. This is not 
what the infected student 
should hear. The infected 
student should always be kept 
happy, even if it means telling 
him that all Iranians are to be 
deported and that George Mace 
is in charge of flying the plane 



CO 



which has already been desig- 
nated as a DC-10. 

The student begins his trip 
to Washington Square. The 
veins in his neck can be seen 
bulging from ten feet away. His 
face is so red that traffic stops 
when he crosses the road. The 
cold sweat he began to break 
earlier is now running in rivlets 

"I need to fill out my form 
for respiratory rights." 

down the creases on each side of 
his nose. 

He enters Washington 
Square. The employees sense 
that he is irritated about 
something. 

"Can I help you with ..." 
the teller innocently begins. 

"Damn right you can," 
comes the student's reply. "I 
need some form called an intent 
to inhale form. I assume this is 
where I get it." 

The teller receeds to the 
back room and soon returns 
with the form. No questions are 
asked and the student is sent on 
his way. 

This is very bad for the 
infected student for it gives him 
a sense of things beginning to go 
right. A feeling of promise 
overcomes his flustered form. 
However, this feeling only serves 
to intensify the final blow. The 
student trods passively back to 
Woody Hall. His veins are 
shrinking, his facial tone is 
nearing normal. The sweat has 
quit flowing. 

He climbs the steps to 
Woody Hall and begins to pull 



Window 7 
Moos- foment 




open the door. It doesn't budge. 
He tries another time, but gets 
the same results. The situation 
suddenly hits him as he looks up 
at the Pulliam clock. It is 4:33. 
Woody Hall closes at 4:30. His 
veins swell, his face reddens and 
sweat begins to once more spurt 
from the pores on his forehead. 
The infectious germs race 
northward infecting that often 
empty region of the neck known 
to most as the head. He flings 
himself face-down on the 
ground, thrashing about and 
foaming from the mouth. He 
yells obscenities at the top of his 
lungs concerning Woody Hall, 
Washington Square and the 
people who work within. 
Fortunately, the SIU Police 
usually manage to find these 
people before they destroy too 
much property. 

Little research has been 
done in relation to this heart- 
breaking disease. A few things 
are known, though. 

The best medicine for the 
red tape blues is preventative 
action. In other words, don't set 

"OK, let me see your 
Intent to Inhale form." 

foot in buildings posing the 
opportunity to contract the red 
tape blues. 

If one does contract this 
vicious disease, there is only one 
thing which can be done; induce 
massive quantities of liquor into 
the student. This will calm him 
down. 

Unfortunately, this pres- 
cription does have a side affect 
— it wears off. 




Carbondale? Forget it for awhile! 
The Shawnee Forest is out there, 
calling. Once a thicketed woodland 
ruled by kings of France and Spain. 
Now the Shawnee Forest stands as a 
tempting invitation to the good life for 
tired students; a whirlwind of sights 
and smells. Shawnee has become chic. 

And no wonder; wander with me 
along some of the main parts and 
roads of this crisp and invigorating 
woodland of Southern Illinois. Let's 
begin driving south through the little 
town of Makanda. Makanda is located 
within the boundaries of the Shawnee 
Forest and is the nearest town to Giant 
City State Park. Makanda is charming 
— although a bit dusty. 

In the late 1800's, merchants and 
businessmen came to Makanda to cash 
in on this growing town. People with 
big ideas came there to build a new 
main street and railway station. 
Things were looking good for Makan- 
da when suddenly the Illinois central 
Railroad announced that the trains 
would no longer stop in Makanda 
because of rescheduling. 



At first the poeple fought by 
petitioning, then by angry protests as 



trains passed by. After awhile, the 
people gave up their fight and some 




Park Map 



s 




moved on. Even the determined coal 
miner gave up his efforts and went 
back to the obscurity of the coal mines. 
Now, only the old store front is 
standing; it's 90-year-old wooden 
sidewalk remains in narrow layers of 
splinters. 

We start climbing out over hill 
after hill into Giant City. The winding 
blacktop leads us into a sweet-smelling 
forest that turns golden in autumn and 
comes alive with picnicing students in 
the summer. Camping and picnic areas 
are surrounded by swaying yellow 
wildflowers. Not far in the distance we 
can see massive rock formations. 
Devil's Standtable, a dangerous 
arrangement of slippery stones often 
wet with runoff from freshly fallen 
rain, remains one of the most 
breathtaking formations in the park. 
Near this area, spearpoints and 
arrowheads dating back 2,000-3,000 
years were found. Archeologists 
believe these artifacts to be evidence 
of some of man's earliest activities in 
the midwest. 

Very nearby lies one of the most 
expansive masses of sandstone in 



Seen above is the Makanda Town 
Hall, just before entering Giant City 
where Rapelling (right) is common. 

Southern Illinois. The rock is known 
by some as "Shicana," mountain of 
sand. Indians who lived in the forest 
area would go up on top of Shicana to 
worship the sun. Shicana is still a good 
place for some quiet meditation. 
Adventurous meditators can be seen 
silhouetted on the horizon as the early 
morning sun begins to rise. 

Shicana is also used by many 
mountain climbing clubs and sport 
repellers. One member of the Shawnee 
Mountaineering Club said that every 
time he sees Shicana he gets the urge 
to climb it. From on top about 150 feet 
in the air, tall pine trees look like 
miniature models and the trees seem 
to come together and form velvety 
looking hills that reach out to the 
horizon. In the clearings far below 
there are keggers and group picnics 
that flourish during the warm months 
in Giant City. Frisbees and beer seem 
to grow best in this climate and are 
tended carefully by students. 




Southeast of Giant City the 
highway turns and crosses flat 
farmlands as we head toward Feme 
Clyffe State Park. Soon after driving 
over steep black enbankments, the 
road comes to a clearing and passes a 
stretch of spectacular shear cliffs 
known as Draper's Bluff. I was there 
one winter; the snow lay on the boughs 
of the numerous evergreen trees that 
cover the hill. Only the cave sites 
weren't snow covered. It was late 
afternoon and the warm sunlight 
highlighted the sparkling snow and 
the sweet smell of pine filled the air. 

In Feme Clyffe there is a central 
valley from which unusually shallow 
gorges and thin canyons radiate. It was 
here that I saw a rare sight. A little red 
fox trotted ear deep through the snow, 
now and then tunneling swiftly into 
the flowing white drifts, probably in 
search of food. He must have heard me 
because suddenly he perked his head 
up out of the snow. I could see flakes 
of white falling off his whiskers and 
onto his wet fur. His attentive ears and 
eyes checked me out before he turned 
and ran far into the woods. 

This park is full of life. Ferns and 
lichens, beautiful flowers in the 
summer, a place where birds sing and 
squirrels chatter at play, where 
interesting rock shapes and small lake 
are transformed in their appearance 
during the winter. 

The area surrounding Feme 
Clyffe was formerly the winter 
hunting grounds of the Indians. The 
last Indians to use it were the 
Cherokee in 1838-1839. About 100 
years later, the land was owned by 
Miss Emma Rebman, a former teacher 
and Johnson County superintendent 
of schools. Miss Rebman is responsible 
for naming various points in the park, 
as well as being the first to open the 
land up to the public and use it as a 
park. The park lake was built in I960 
and stocked with largemouth bass, 
channel catfish, redear, bluegill, and 
bullhead. 

Spending time in these forests 
gave me a chance to really get a feel for 
the personality of the land and its 
uniqueness. Kach park has its own 
characteristic tempo. The richness of 
the forest land in Feme Clyffe, with 
thousands of dark pine trees; their 
boughs look sleek and smooth from 
afar like the black coat of a panther. 



Standing straight up with prickly pins 
allowing nobody too close, the 
aristocracy of the Bristlecone and 
Whitebark Pine. Their distinction 
proves too much, and other trees 
simply must grow elsewhere. 

Giant City is like a comfortable 
playground of young school children. 
A place to romp during recess. The 
giant rocks outstretched like arms to 
welcome you into its herbal home. 
"The attractive thing about Giant City 
is that when you're there, you feel like 
you're far away, but really you're not." 
That is how one SIU student feels 
about it. The park's atmosphere 
contrasts sharply with what is to be 

Above is the rushing water from the 
Lake Kincaid Spillway. At right is a 
lookout at Pine Hills. 












| 


■ ^gpKy J 




•- 



TA/s is the Crab Orchard Spillway 
east of campus. 

found in our little city of Carbondale. 
Our residential centers along with our 
industrial areas and the modern, 
scientific structures where we go to 
class are what we must escape from 
every now and then. Just the exper- 
ience of being elsewhere is enough to 
energize the senses and inspire the 
imagination. Variety is once again the 
spice of life. 

Giant City offers an ample variety 
of landscape that forms a tapestry of 
natural art and architecture. The 
scenery changes with the seasons and 
is never dull. There are basic emotions 
and feelings that become excited just 
by spending time, perhaps with a close 
friend, in wandering through the park 
that one Neely Hall resident pro- 
claimed, "It's like going to church." 

Let's move north, over the 
flatlands to Carterville. Far up ahead 
on the road we see dead muskrats, 
squirrels, and other small animals. 
This tells us that we are near the Crab 
Orchard Wildlife Refuge. Most 
animals don't leave the refuge very 
often because it is so large. Crab 
Orchard is composed of 43,000 acres of 
lake and woodland, where eagles are 
known to circle the sky. Canadian 
geese seem to like it too; so much in 
fact, that they have stopped in Crab 
Orchard for their winter roost now for 
hundreds of years. Grey and white, the 
Canadian geese roam the land. Their 
padded feet carry the swelled birds 
where they want to go. Their multi- 




tudes move like currents on a calm 
lake, when slight breezes blow gently 
and cause ripples in all directions. 

The geese sometimes get to 
honking and the real fun begins. 
100,000 screeching geese, seemingly 
going nuts, is a sight that every person 
should see. There is no way that even 
the most melancholy person can watch 
the mob of outstretched necks 
snorting at absolutely nothing without 
getting a kick out of it. You may be 
tempted to join in on the fun and blow 
a few notes on your own. There was 



one fellow there that got into honking 
so much that even after the geese 
stopped, he continued. Some of the 
geese turned and watched the man. 
Apparently he was saying something 
that was worth listening to. 

The crowd of migrating geese can 
be viewed from aboard an old 
locomotive that takes visitors through 
the full expanse of Crab Orchard 
Wildlife Refuge. The old locomotive 
takes a jaunt through the woods every 
Sunday and can be boarded at North 
Market Street in Marion at 2:00 p.m. 



to 
CO 



Courtesy ill Depi ot Conservation 



Crab Orchard is filled with 
Canadian Honkers in the winter, but 
during the summer it's filled with 
Carbondalian students. The variety of 
animal life in Crab Orchard Refuge is 
almost as diverse as the number of 
watersport activities in Crab Orchard 
Lake. Divers, fishermen, and sail- 
boaters all come to Crab Orchard. The 
SIU Sailing club takes full advantage 
of the 12,000 acre lake because it is so 



close to the campus. According to one 
sailing club enthusiast, the Crab 
Orchard Lake is an exciting place to 
sail because it has all these inlets and 
weird swampy parts. 

Each of the parks we have 
described have one thing in common. 
They are the places students can go to 
get away. The next time you feel like 
getting away, try the enjoyable, 
natural play spots; try the parks. 




Park Map 



On a bike. 

Text by Bruce Simmons 



It's spring break. Temperatures 
have just begun to rise and to reflect 
springtime. The urge to travel is in 
your system. 

Travel home? Yeeech! 

Travel to Florida with the rest of 
the gang? Too expensive. 

What's a student to do? 
Take a lengthy vacation. 

Tour the countryside of the vast 
network of the Shawnee National 
Forest — by bicycle. 

That's right — bicycle ... It is 
inexpensive and provides the student 
with the opportunity to experience the 
outdoors on a much more intimate 
level. 

The "Shawnee Forest Flyer" is 
one noted bicycle tour in the Southern 
Illinois area. It takes its name, of 
course, from its location in the 
Shawnee National Forest. 

Begin the tour by heading south 
on Route Til for about six miles, then 
turn east towards Giant City State 
I'ark. After touring the park, head 
north through the backroads for about 
two miles. Now turn east again. The 
back roads will wind all the way 
through Little Grassy Lake. Devils 



Kitchen Lake and Crab Orchard Lake, 
finally pointing north, taking the biker 
to Route 13. 

At Route 13, turn east and 
continue for about seven miles. 

At this point, turn south on Route 
148. Keep going south for about 9>A 
miles. Now pick up Route 37, which 
also runs south. Continue for five 
miles and Goreville will pop into sight. 
This is a good stop for food and other 
supplies. 

The next scenic sight is Feme 
Clyffe State Park, about W« miles 
further south on Route 37. The park 
has a snack bar, which can be useful 
for killing a quick munchie attack. 

Head south on Tunnel road. This 
road will send the biker pedaling 
furiously as he climbs the hills of 
Simpson and Tunnel Hill for the next 
15 miles. 

Take Route 147 east at this point 
for about six miles, then head south 
once more on Route 145. 

Here, the biker can enjoy the 
beauties of the Ohio River in Fort 
Massac State Park. This park reflects 
the heritage of the Revolutionary War. 
It is also a superb site at which to rest 
and watch river traffic. 

The trek takes up once more by 
heading north on Route 45 and by 
passing through Mermet until coming 
to Route 169, about 15 miles away. 

Go west on Route 169 for 10 miles, 



passing through Boaz and Karnak. 
Soon Route 37 will pop up on the 
horizon. 

It is now only 20 miles back to 
Fyrne Cluff State Park and Goreville. 
From here just backtrack using the 
roads travelled to get to Goreville. 

If the trail through Little Grassy 
State Park, Crab Orchard Lake and 
Giant City State Park is no longer of 
interest, another trail can be taken on 
the return trip. 

Continue north on Route 37 for 
about 16 miles and soon Carbondale 
will surround you. 

Extreme caution should always be 
exercised when touring by bike. The 
automobile, of course, presents the 
biggest danger. Always yield to them. 

Before ever leaving the house, 
chart out the proposed tour on a map 
and take it along. This can save 
frustrating hours of becoming lost. 

Much gear will be needed for 
excursions of this nature. Transport 
the gear by mounting it on the bicycle 
in some manner. This prevents the 
possibility of a spill at high speeds 
when its too top heavy. 

For more information on this 
subject, writ*: 

The Illinois Office of Tourism, 
2209 W. Main St., Marion. II., 62959 
or 

Bicycle Institue of America, 122 
E. 42nd St.. New York, N.Y., 10017. 






Itoar Drop 
ContpwiQ Aro6 




Sanitary Dumpin 
Station 



Park Maps 





Pholo by Bill Mustan 





STYX 






A 



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i 



Jffsif 



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pikmo by W Mmui< 




Van Morrison 



Photo by Brian Howe 




Photo by Rich Saat 




Photo by.SPC 



By Jim Hunzinger 

SALUKI TRIVIA QUIZ 

1. What are the names of the two statue figures in the Old Main Fountain? 

2. What is one of the oldest fraternity traditions here on the SIU campus? 

3. Who was the first president of SIU? 

4. What was the name of the first Saluki dog? 

5. How did he die and where is he buried? 

6. What are the names of the four Saluki dogs presently housed at Alpha Phi Omega 
fraternity? 

7. What is the name of an SIU student now heading the Nazi American Party? 

8. What was the year of the first printing of the Obelisk? 

9. Why is southern Illinois known as little Egypt? 

10. What is the total acreage of SIU? 

11. What mistake can you find on this year's cover. 

12. In what year did the SIU basketball team win the NIT and who spurred on the 
victory? 

13. What was the first official SIU football team called? 

14. When was the school first chartered? 

15. When was the Saluki adopted as the SIU sports symbol? 

If you missed one or more, you know quite a lot about SIU. Have you thought about applying for 
the presidency here? 

If you missed between two and five, there is no need to be bo ashamed as to go into seclusion for 
a year; nine months will suffice. 

If you missed more than six, are you sure you go to SIU? 



Answers on page 143 



© 




Text by Bruce Simmons 

Coach Paul Blair's badmitton team suffered a loss before 
their season ever began this year, since Ginny Morris and Janet 
Ridenour graduated. Dennis Mansor tops the list of male 
players for SIU, though males seldom get the chance to 
compete. 

Nothing was fishy about Coach Bob Steele and his 
swimmers this year. The team did well in the Chicago 
Invitational, and at press time had a winning record of 3-2. 

The lady tankers, under the direction of Coach Rick 
Powers, came on strong this year under the veterans May Jane 
Sheets and Julia Warner. 

Experience was found to be the key this year for Coach 
May Beth McGirr and her lady golfers. Experience was 
welcomed in the form of Sandy Lemon, a two-time 
intercollegiate champion. 

As if Coach Jim Barrett and the mens golf team did not 
have enough to worry about with just the opponent, Coach 
Barrett and the team must also take on the wind, the sun and 
the course. The golfers had not begun their season at the time 
of publication. 



Claudia Blackman felt that her girls cross country team 
"did real well" this year headed by Patty Plymire and Lindy 
Nelson. The bulk of the team is expected to return for the 
1980-81 season. 

The mens cross country team, under the direction of Lew 
Hartzog "did an outstanding job this year" according to 
Hartzog. He added he was very pleased with the team since 
they were "completely inexperienced and young." The team 
had racked up a 2-2 record by the time of publication. 

The girls tennis team returned without their No. 1 player 
this year, Sue Csipkay, who was lost through graduation. Coach 
Judy Auld, who headed the team of five seniors and one junior 
plans on moving Mauri Kohler up to take Csipkay 's place. 

SIU's mens tennis team will "keep on improving" 
according to Coach Dick LeFever. He noted that the team, 
which had a 3-2 record at publication time, is easily in the top 
twenty. LeFever feels that experience is the key for his three 
freshmen and three sophomore team. 

This was a growing year for Deborah Hunter and her 
volleyball team. The team had little experience, but good 
heads, according to Hunter. The loss of Robin Deterding will 
be felt next year. 



Itchy Jones and his hasehall team are depending on good 
hitting to continue their long running record as a team of 
winners. The hurlers have not yet begun their season, hut if 
history repeats itself they should do well since they ended last 
year's season with a 13-6 record. 

The girls Softball team and Coach Kay Brechtelshauer felt 
the loss of Karen King and Helen Meyer alter they graduated 
last year. The team, which consists of seven seniors, three 
juniors, two sophomores and five freshmen, has a nice blend of 
experience and youth. 

Nine starters returned to -lulee Illner's field hocky team 
this year, but had to regroup anyway due to the loss of live 
starters from last year. Freshman Kllen Massey led the team 
in scoring with 18 goals. 

Rev Dempsey took his football team to an impressive H-.'i 
record this year; the best showing since I960. The long term 
improvement of the football team showed that his four year 
plan was indeed a success. 

Claudia Hlackman described her track girls as "a team 
that comes on well at the end." Patty Plymire and Cathy 
Chiarello headed her list of runners, the last of whom 
completed her last season at SIU. 

Twelve superstars were lost through graduation for SIU's 




track team and Coach Lew Hartzog. This left him with five 
seniors, three juniors, five sophomores and twenty-two 
freshmen; the least experienced team since 1968. Hartzog's 
indoor runners stood at 1-1 at the time of publication, while 
his outdoorsmen have not yet begun their season. 

Bill Mead, mens gymnastics coach saw his life long record 
at SIU raise to 215-67 this year. The team, which was 2-6 at 
the time of publication was headed by Dan Muenz who led the 
pack of four seniors, five juniors, four sophomores and six 
freshmen. 

The girls gymnastics team got off to a slow start this year 
under the direction of Coach Herb Vogel. The team did pick 
up later with the return of All -American Denise Didier who had 
been out of competition since 1976. 

The story of this years wrestling team was experience, or 
the lack there of. Mike Pelligatti was the only senior grappeler 
this year. Coach Linn Long and his team, consisting of 
Pelligatti, one junior, one sophomore and seven freshmen 
found the year to be a learning experience to the tune of a 4-7 
press time record. 

•Joe Gattfried opened his second season as basketball 
coach with many problems. Wayne Abrams had a scratched 
cornea. Hod Camm was ineligible. Charles Nance had a broken 
hand and Edward Thomas had a dislocated thumb. Gottfried 
and the team tried to fight off these troubles all year long, but 
retired the season with a 7-15 record. 

A young team of dribblers was plopped into the hand of 
girls basketball Coach Cindy Scott, with three freshmen 
pulling the bulk of the weight in the early weeks of the season. 
The team was also hampered by Sue Faber's knee injury. 




Pf*olo by Ricl* MulchCfoh 





Photo by Rich Saat 



Photo by Brian Howe 



Answers to Saluki Trivia 

1. Paul and Virginia 

2. Painting the Old Main cannon. 

3. Robert Allyn (1874-1892) 

4. King Tut 

5. King Tut was killed by an automobile in 1954 and is buried at the north end 
of McAndrew Stadium by the flag pole under a concrete pyramid. 

6. Bandit, Debbie, Kalide and Shariff. 

7. Frank Collin 

8. 1914 

9. There was a drought in the northern counties in 1842. The wheat fields dried 
up, the streams died in their beds. But in southern Illinois, rain fell and there 
were good crops. From the north came people seeking corn and wheat as to 
Egypt of old. 

10. 7,368 acres 

11. Look at the Obelisk they are building and the shadow of the obelisk. There 
is a point on the shadow and not on the structure. 

12. 1967 — Walt Frazier 

13. The Maroons after the school colors of maroon and white. 

14. 1869 

15. 1951 



Photo by Brian Howe 



CO 




Text by Bruce Simmons 

He sat on his Hill Park Apart- 
ment couch conversing informally. 
Blue jeans covered his husky thighs 
and legs. His large upper body was 
hidden underneath a blue flannel 
shirt; its sleeves rolled up to expose 
two thick forearms. On the top of his 
right forearm was tatooed a flower of 
blue, red and green which seemed to 
blow in the wind every time he clasped 
his right hand, making the appropriate 
muscle flex. His head, sporting 
unshaven cheeks and chin, topped off 
the 6-foot 1-inch 240 pound frame. A 
silver medallion of St. Sebastian, the 
protector of athletes, hung around his 
neck, partially hidden from view by his 
shirt. A friendly smile exposed his 
somewhat out of line teeth. 

This is Joe Barwinski, strongside 
Linebacker for the 1979 Salukis — 
alias killer. 

Barwinski assumed this name, a 
left-over from his high school days in 
Youngstown, Ohio, with the help of a 
friend. 

"Our high school team was pretty 
good; we were state AAA champs my 
sophomore year. We've always been 
((inference champs and we've always 
had a really good defense. We were 
called the "Kill Defense." My best 
friend from back home said, "Why 
don't you do something crazy? Write 
something crazy on your helmet — 
why don't you write kill or Killer or 
something like that?" So I put Killer 
on my helmet." 

Barwinski had a tough decision to 
make come the end of his senior year 
in high school; where to attend college. 




"I was recruited by Ohio, Mi- 
chigan, Penn State and others. I was 
pretty good in high school, but I wasn't 
big enough to go to Ohio State or Penn 
State or someplace like that. I knew I 
had a real good chance of starting my 
freshman year if I really did good. I 
knew Coach Dempsey back in Young- 
stown, so he called me up and asked 
me to come and visit SIU. I was his 
first recruit here." 

Barwinski had made his decision 
which would take him another four 
yards down the field of life. 

"One thing I do not like is the fan 
support," Barwinski said shaking his 
head. "It pisses me off! I'd like to be in 
the fan's shoes sometimes and show 
them what a player really needs from 
the fans! I don't regret going to SIU, 



though. I love the university — It's 
really beautiful." 

Without the support of the fans to 
the degree he would like, Barwinski 
must find other ways to get up for the 
season's games. 

For the 1978 season, his junior 
year, Barwinski shaved his head to 
form a mohawk and pierced his ear. He 
later obtained his tatoo (which he had 
wanted since he was a kid) and wrote 
Killer on his helmet. 

"I feel that a lot of athletes would 
like to get a mohawk or shave their 
heads," Barwinski contended. "A lot 
of them do. It really makes them 
psyched up, it makes the fans psyched 
up and it makes their own teammates 
psyched up. That's why I did it. It 
really psyched me up — looking crazy, 



looking ugly, trying to scare the guys 
on the other team and stuff like that." 
He continued with a slightly sadistic 
smile. 

Barwinski says he doesn't get up 
for the games by means of drugs or 
alcohol. 

"I don't drink beer myself. I don't 
like beer. I don't smoke grass either." 

So Barwinski continues on, 
playing out the role of football player. 
He suits up numerous times a week, 
takes his place on the turf, and 
proceeds to bang heads for hours on 
end. After four years of high school 
and four years of college, those hours 
begin to add up as do the injuries — 
standard equipment with years of 
football. 

Barwinski started the first four 
games in 1976 with a broken wrist. 
That was one of the three times he 
broke it. The first time he broke it, a 
metal screw was put in. He later 
succeeded in breaking that screw and 
another was put in. Barwinski has also 
broken his ankle, (which needed 
surgery) and his leg in route to 
stardom. 

"I think it was really worth it," 
Barwinski said reflecting back on his 
career. "It was an experience for me. It 
gave me an education since I came 
here on a scholarship, a chance to live 
on my own and a chance to meet 
people." 

But, when Mark Hemphill was hit 
by a member of the ISU team and 
paralyzed, Barwinski began to think 
harder. 

"That really made me wonder 
why people play this game," Barwinski 
said looking down at the floor. 
"Sometimes Coach says, 'Go out there 
and just KILL them!' I don't want to 
kill — just tackle them. That's good 
enough. I don't want to hurt the guy." 

In spite of this, however, the word 
vengence still resides in Barwinski's 
vocabulary. 

"I broke my leg against Lamar 
Tech my sophomore year and I 
couldn't wait to play them next season 
cause I was going to kick their ass for 
doing this to me!" 

Barwinski noted that there were 
some tensions between team members, 
yet these problems were not evident 
on the field. 

"There are some people that don't 
like each other, but they have to play 







<B 




with each other. It's not that they will 
go to the extent of, 'I don't like you — 
I'm not going to block for you.' They'll 
do the job because that is their job. 
They want to better themselves and 
help the team as a whole." 

After living through four years of 
high school ball, and four years of 
college ball, Barwinski discovered that 
the two are played on two very 
different levels. 

"In high school, playing football 
was more for the fun of it, whereas in 
college it gets to be more of a business 
type thing; more meetings, harder 
practices — more serious of a thing." 



It's Barwinski ... not barn whisky ! 



But all good things must come to 
an end, and Joe Barwinski's football 
career is no exception. The 1979 
season is the last season he will ever 
play in. 

"I'm not going to go into the pros', 
Barwinski assured. 

Rather, Barwinski would like to 
own his own construction company 
someday, implementing what he has 



learned in his four years at SIU. 

And advice for future followers in 
his footsteps? 

"Don't let them play as early as I 
did," Barwinski said in reference to his 
days of grade school football. "Don't 
let them play till their in high 
school." So the legend of Killer is 
born, lives and dies ... or does it die? 






Old volleyballers dont die.. 



Text by Bruce Simmons/ 
Photos by Brian Howe 

They spike. They smash. They attack. 

A motorcycle gang? 

No, they're much prettier. 

A female motorcycle gang? 

No, not even close. "They" are SIU's Saluki Spikers. 

Dehorah Hunter, SIU's volleyball coach for five years 
running, likes what she has seen this year and is even more 
excited about seasons to come. 

"We have a good team," the reigning mentor said, 
sitting at her desk in Davies Gymnasium. "Our team has 
little experience, yet they are capable and have good 
heads." 

"This had been a rebuilding year. Next year we should 
be really good," she said, cracking an aggressive smile. 

Hunter explained that the team's strongest point is its 
eagerness to learn. 

"They have learned from experience players that we 
do have," Hunter told, speaking in reference to the three 
seniors that will be with the team next year — Dinah 
Devers, Sandy VVitherspoon and Robin Deterding. 

Overall, though, the team is young; and experience, or 
actually the lack of it, it what hurts the Spikers the most. 

"You have all these possibilities," Hunter began. "The 
body has several choices to make . . . the mind is 
struggling . . . the two conflict." 

The only remedy for this ailment is actual playing — 
actual time jumping, setting and spiking on the court. In 
short — experience. 

Deterding, captain of this year's team, showed enough 
talent to earn herself a spot on the all-state list. 

"Robin's just a fantastic athlete," Hunter explained 
with widened eyes. 

Deterding shares the optimistic attitude of her coach 
concerning future volleyball teams. 

"Their potential is unlimited." Deterding said. 

The team puts in many hours every week in an 
attempt to better itself for its next foe. 

"We condition every other day in the morning," 
Deterding explained. 

The conditioning consists of mostly running and 
jumping. The practice itself, during which the team drills, 
is conducted every day for two and one half hours. 

"Sunday is the only day of rest." 

On weekends it's time to get serious as the team plays 
in tournaments and dual competition. What is racing 
through the heads of these players when every bump and 
set most counts? 

"•lust concentrating on the ball and trying to figure out 
where you have to go next." Deterding explained. 

So next year. Deborah Hunter will have something to 
plan for: a winning season better than this year's. And the 
younger players will have dreams of tournament wins. 



i 




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regional and national play and body-sacrificing saves 
which send them sprawling headlong into fan-filled 
bleachers. But what happens to graduating players? Are 
their days of adrenaline racing wins and agonizing defeats 
over? Deterding isn't planning it that way. 

"I would like to coach at the high school level," she 
said. 

So, old volleyballers don't die — they just smash 
harder. 



00 






they just smash harder ! 




Once again, as in the past 11 years, Davies 
Gymnasium will not get the facelift it so 
desparately needs due to Gov. Thompson's 
decision not to include the money for the project 
in his capital improvement budget for fiscal year 
1981. 

The 56-year-old gymnasium, which has never 
been renovated, ranked fifteenth on the 61-item 
capital improvements priority list. 

The building is used for 11 women's athletic 
teams and 42 physical education classes. 









Kneeling; Troy. Ernie Alex, 
Gary Williams. Paul Hinze, 
Kathy Rydbers. Standing; 
Buster Crab, Sinn Dekiel, 
Irene Dayley, Janet Nelson, 
Luisa Ballester, Steve So- 
phie, Jim Miller, Pam 
Karcher, Frank Hoffman. 
Sot Pictured; Trev War- 
shauer, Phil Schanuel, Rut- 
land. 





Text by Bruce Simmons/ 
Photos by Chuck Hnojsky 

Sailing, Bailing, over the bounding 

main. 

Your buck gets sunburned, then 
you fall off at the turn. It is really 

worth the pain'' 

Sieve Sophie, commodore of the 



Sailing Club at SIU, seems to think so; 
and so do the SO plus members under 
his direction. 

•John Raycraft. a member of the 
litTH-TSI Sailing Club, commented on 
the size of the club. 

"The club is pretty big. but many 
of the members aren't really active. 
They onlv come out (to Crab Orchard 



Lake) once, maybe twice a semester. 
But most of them like it." 

The Sailing club began about 
fifteen years ago according to Sophie. 
It existed for a couple of years, then 
experienced some trouble and became 
defunct. It got started once more, 
however, and has been going strong 
since; approximately 10 years. 



s 






The Sailing Club, as a social 
endeavor, has much to offer. 

"It's a good club in that you pay 
your $15 a semester and you get the 
use of a sailboat whenever you want 
it," Sophie stated. 

Raycraft joined the Sailing Club 
initially because it was "just someth- 
ing different." He had not sailed prior 
to joining the club. 

"It's a good deal," Raycraft 
commented. "You get your moneys 
worth." 

Sailing made a lasting impression 
on Raycraft. 

"I'd like to get my own Hobie Cat 
someday," he said explaining that 
Hobie Cats are very good sail boats. 

The Sailing Club functions out of 
Crab Orchard Lake. 

"The way Crab Orchard Lake is 
set up, you can go out there at night," 
Sophie said. 

This provides the member with 
the opportunity to sail anytime day or 
night providing the weather is 




Ol 




in 




cooperative and you have a key to the 
boathouse. 

Membership is unlimited. There 
are requirements on who is able to 
skipper a boat, however. 

"You have to pass a test to make 
sure that we know what you're doing, 
but then you are given a key to the 
boathouse," Sophie explained. 

The test is derived and given by 
the Sailing Club. 

"It's a club test," Sophie began. 
"We have a manual that we print up 
that gives the parts of the boat. They 
have to take the written test, then they 
have to go out and capsize the boat and 
pull it back up. They have to have a 



man overboard drill in the summer at 
which time the person giving the test 
can jump out. The person taking the 
test will have to turn around and pick 
him back up. 

"You can take it as much as you 
want until you get it right," Raycraft 
added. 

"We want to make sure that if we 
let someone go out in our boat, they're 
going to be able to save their crew and 
they're going to be able to save the 
boat," Sophie explained. 

The Sailing Club also has a racing 
team, which participates in area and 
regional ragadas. 

"There's quite a few ways to run 



a ragada; you can run a set number of 
races or you can run the same number 
of races as there are boats, rotating 
each boat and school. Everybody will 
use everybody's boat." 

This year the Sailing Club placed 
fifteenth in the nationals. 

"Sailors are known, at least 
intercollegiately, for being big 
drinkers and big when it comes to 
parties," Sophie said. 

Evidently it is no different even 
on the smaller scale of the club. 

"During the course of the year we 
have a lot of bonfires and a lot of kegs. 
Usually, every weekend, there is a keg 
and food out there (at Crab Orchard 
Lake) during the summer that the club 
actually buys," Sophie grinned. 

Maybe that's what makes the 
pain from the main worthwhile. 



Ol 

CO 




"Jab! Jab! C'mon, you're winging 
it again! Keep your elbows in! Jab! 
Keep your weight forward! Jab! Jab! 
Now punch out of it!" 

These are typical sounds one 
might hear if he were to visit the 
martial arts room in the Recreation 
Center on a Tuesday or Thursday 
night. That is the time during which 
the Boxing Club works out with Keith 
Frazier, Golden Gloves Champ of 
Chicago, at the helm. 

Frazier, whose real first name is 




(Left) Keith and sparring partner, 
Steve dermany, work out at the Rec 
Center. (Right) Steve takes a shot. 



Xavier, is from Zion, but boxes out of 
the YMCA in Waukegan. He par- 
ticipates in various tournaments 
throughout the year. 

Frazier has been boxing for only 
two years, yet has the look and poise 
of a seasoned fighter. 

The 156 pound frame, which 
stands at five feet ten inches, moves 
about the ring with the quickness of a 
rabbit and the agility of a snake. 

Within six months, Keith has won 
his first tournament sponsored by the 
Chicago Park District and proceeded 
to capture the Golden Gloves title in 
18 months. As of December, 1979, his 
record stood at 21 wins and 8 losses. 

"Actually I only lost three," he 
explained. "I was robbed of the other 
five." 

Keith's next goal is the 1980 
Olympics in Moscow. 

This is his first year away from 
home; and more importantly, away 
from his trainer. He must assume all 
responsibility now for keeping in 
shape. 

"I came to SIU because they 
supposedly had a boxing team," Keith 
said wiping the sweat away from his 
forehead with a gloved hand. "I'm 
wasting my time here." 

Frazier is unsure whether he will 
leave SIU at the semester break or 
stick it out until the end of the year. 
He is contemplating going to West- 
chester in New York to complete his 
schooling. 




"I might go home at the end of the 
semester and train til the Olympics, 
then go to New York," he said 
undecidedly. 

Frazier trains throughout the 
year. 

"I'm always in superb shape," he 
said confidently. 

Everyday, Keith runs two or three 
miles, except for Saturday on which he 
runs 14 miles. He does numerous 
repetitions of sit-ups and push-ups, 
but works with weights very little. 

"I work out with light weights on 
my legs," he added. 

But no matter what Keith is 
working with, no matter if he is 
sparring, doing sit-ups or jumping 
rope, "Rapper's Delight" by The 
Sugar Hill Gang will always be blaring 
from his portable cassette player. 

"I just like it!" he said with an 
ear-to-ear grin gracing the front of his 
face. "It helps me concentrate. Even 
when I run, or when I get in the ring, 
I still have that beat in my head." 

Frazier contends that short 
pleasures such as alcohol and drugs are 
self defeating. For this reason, he 
partakes of neither. 

He eats only vegetables, the only 
exception being an occasional piece of 
fish. 




Stay \j/ 
Bruce Sinmnons 

Phobsbj/ 
Jim Hunzinger 



in 



"It's a victory everyday for me 
just to finish training," Keith said, 
jabbing away at an imaginary foe. 

Training consumes a great pro- 
tion of Keith's day. When he isn't 
training, he's studying. 

Keith knows he can meet his goals 
because of his inner faith in two 
sources. 

"I've got faith in the Lord and 
myself," Keith said in a positive tone. 

He put boxing's worthiness into 
perspective in one short statement. 



Keith has no idol. He finds points 
he likes in each fighter's style, but also 
finds points on which he feels the 
fighter could improve. He feels he is 
developing his own unique style. 

"When my time comes, I'm gonna 
beat 'em all," Keith promised. 

He then began to critique himself. 

"I'm a very scientific fighter. I've 
got very quick hands for my size. I still 
want to improve them along with my 
footwork though. I also want to get my 
jab perfected from the left side." 



(Right) Keith gives 
some valuable tips 
to beginner, Steve 
Germany. 




"You got to pay the cost to be the 
boss." 

Keith has assumed the role of 
coach, for the time being, amongst the 
members of the Boxing Club. He spars 
with each of them letting them know 
of their mistakes through tongue and 
fist. The other members contend that 
he is a great help. 

Dave Jarvis, one member of the 
club, found the whole process to be 
aggravating yet profitable. 

"You know you're not going to get 
in on him," he said. "Maybe once or 
twice. It's aggravating, but it pays off." 

Jeff Charlton, vice president of 
the club, staggered to the side of the 
mats having just finished sparring 
with Frazier. 

"I feel like I learned something," 
he said as his mouth guard hung from 
his mouth, impairing his speech. "I've 
improved 500 percent." 

Sometimes Keith goes two rounds 
with each of the club members, 
anywhere from three to five on any 
given night, using only one hand to 
help eliminate the vast expanse of 
darkness between the level he is on 
and the level the other boxers are on. 



Frazier has been entitled the 
"Wizard of Finesse" which appears on 
the back of his robe. 

Frazier must be quick with his 
head as well as with his hands. 

"I'm not supposed to think when 
I see the opening," he explained. "I'm 
just supposed to act." 

Is there really joy in boxing for the 
"Wizard?" Is there joy in running 
hundreds of miles through all 
elements of weather? Is there joy in 
kissing the mat after so many others 
have already tread over it? 

"The joy is not in being not 
knocked down," Keith explained, 
glancing up from a kneeling position. 
"The joy is in rising each time." 

(Right) A 14-mile jog in the early 
morning is just one part of a grueling 
training schedule necessary for Keith. 



Living with 

the Champ 

What do you do when you live 
with a guy like Keith Frazier? Watch 
your manners, say a lot of please and 
thank yous and speak only when 
spoken to, right? 

Rick Rose would be the best 
person to answer that question. He 
lived with Frazier for the fall semester 
of 1979 before Frazier left SIU. 

The two met in the summer of 
1979 while they were registering as 
incoming freshmen. They hit it off and 
elected to share a room in Wilson Hall 
that fall. 

"He was a very disciplined 
person," Rose said of Frazier. "He 
always put his boxing and his books 
before everything else. He wanted to 
go out more and talk to more girls, but 
didn't have the time." 

"Keith was deeply religious, " 
Rose continued. "It played an 
important part in his life. " 

Rose added that Frazier was clean 
and quiet. 

"We had some pretty good talks. 
"He helped me to realize that you have 
to have mental discipline to succeed in 
life, no matter how much talent you 
have. He was pretty cool," Rose 
summarized as his voice trailed off 
into a reluctant sigh. 




Cn 

cn 



Greek 
Philosophies 



of which Plato never 



heard 



by Lizann Griffin 



Sororities and fraternities are 
gaining in popularity again since the 
riots i.tthc late PM'll's and early 1970's 
al SIC. which stressed independence. 

Randy Jensen, graduate assistant 
tor Greek Affairs, said. "The Creeks 
have become more diversified to 
survive." 

Schools arc currently peaking in 
enrollment, Jensen said, and people 
arc looking for identity. 

He said people's attitudes toward 
Greek life have changed again. 

When asked why SIU seems to he 
an anti-Greek university, he said. "I 
think sometimes SIU has had the 
reputation to he the place to get out on 
your own.*' 

In the past. Greeks weren't 
making enough of an effort to gain 
membership, Jensen said. "They 

weren't trying to do anything for the 
overall image." 

He said rush parties were better 

this year because they were more 

organized. 

Rush should improve in the 
future, according to Jensen, because 

fraternities are planning to publicize 
more The ( 'recks plan to distribute a 
rush publication in the summer to 
incoming freshmen and transfer 
students /eus News, the Creek 
newsletter, will be changed into a 
newspaper and will be accessible to all 

Ml students. 

According to Jensen, the advan 
"I being a ('-reek are learning 
cooperation with others, sell control. 
sell discipline, leadership skills and 
lifestyle skills not learned in class. He 
said members help each other with 
studies; and most importantly, acquire 
life long friendships. 



The only disadvantage he could 
cite was that Creek life is time- 
consuming. 

Jensen said there are currently 17 
social fraternities and seven sororities 
at SIU. 

Inter-Creek Council, representing 
the social fraternities and sororities, 
sponsors annual activities; such as 
Welcome Fest (a festival for students 
interested in Creek life), a Muscular 
Dystrophy Dance-a-thon. Theta Xi (a 
variety show), leadership labs for 
Creek members. Operation Merry 
Christmas (a program to give con- 
tributions to children and the needy), 
and Creek Week. 

Creek Week is when fraternities 
and sororities sponsor and participate 
in events and contests with each other. 

In an informal phone survey of 
the trends ot fraternities and sororities 
at SIU. Creek Iraternitv and sororitv 




members said that while their lifestyle 
was time-consuming, they felt that the 
friends they had made within the 
system were closer, and the opportuni- 
ties for obtaining a good job upon 
graduation were greater. 

Janie Pool of Alpha Gamma 
Delta, 104 Small Croup Housing, said 
that while the house meetings, blood 
drives, UNICEF collections and other 
community services absorb much of 
her time, she has learned to budget her 
time carefully to get other activities, 
such as homework, done. 

Pool. 21, said she transferred from 
Southeastern Junior College in 
Harrisburg in the fall of 1978 to live 
away from home for the first time. She 
said she moved into the sorority 
almost immediately. 

The sisters in her house. Pool 
said, provide moral support when they 
are upset. 

"It's just like a home away from 
home." Pool said. "All the girls are 
close. We know just about everyone 
around Creek row." 

"A lot of my high school friends 
have gone away or gotten married. The 
bond between these girls is so dose 
that I know I can come back here (after 
graduation) and feel at home." 

Ken Anderson of Alpha Gamma 
Kho, 1 lti Small Croup Housing, said 
living in a fraternity is "the best way 
to live down here." 

A Thompson Point resident for a 
half semester. Anderson said he found 
himself being awakened at 1 a.m. He 
added that he lived alone in a house at 
University Farms, but became bored 
and lonely. 

"You know the people better 
here." Anderson said. "It's quieter and 



- 




you know everybody a lot better." 

Anderson said that the members 
of his fraternity get along well with 
those people who are not Greeks. 

"We aren't better than anybody 
else and we don't promote that," he 
said. 

A Sigma Kappa resident, Debbie 
Kiser, a sophomore in Administration 
of Justice, said that sorority members 
can come and go as they please and 
that there is no social pressure applied 
to those members who stay out late at 
night socializing. She added that there 
is no pressure to date only those who 
are Greeks, and that she has an 
independent boyfriend herself. 

"Just because I'm in a sorority 
doesn't mean that I have to date a 
fraternity man," Kiser said, "but a lot 
of people do. Probably because we all 
live so close together." 

Kiser said that her sorority sisters 
are not snobbish but open-minded. 

"Anyone can come in our house 
and we will talk to them," she said. 

"I'm going to live here all four 
years," Kiser added. 

With such phrases as "one for all 
and all for one," and "it's like 40 
people sharing one piece of bacon," 
Bob Moore, Kappa Alpha Psi member, 
described his perception of life in that 
fraternity. 

"You learn how to accept the 
shortcomings of other people," said 
Moore. But he added that there was a 
disadvantage to living in an all black 
fraternity. 



"If it was more open and diver- 
sified, it would bridge some of the gaps 
in humanity," he said. 

Moore, a senior in Biology, said he 
thinks that the fraternity activities are 
time absorbing but that an above 
average student could participate in 
them and do homework well. 

Earl Czajkowski is an indepen- 
dent resident of Phi Sigma Kappa, 103 
Small Group Housing, since the fall of 
1979. A spring 1978 transfer from the 
University of Wisconsin, Czajkowski 
said that he moved into the fraternity 
because it was the only place he could 
find at the time. 

"They let me know in their own 
way that I was not accepted," he said. 
"Everybody (fraternity members) is 
one unit and the independents are 
separate." 

He says he feels unaccepted 
because he is the butt of jokes and 
others in the house leave him out of 
activities. Czajkowski added that 
others might not ask him to join 
activities because they may feel that 
he could not participate in them. His 
sight consists of five percent vision in 
one eye. 

Czajkowski said that fraternity 
members socialize mostly with each 
other and date inside the Greek circle. 

"I think there is one guy in the 
house who is not going out with a 
sorority girl," he said. "That is very 
limiting on a person's social life." 

Although Phi Sigma Kappa 
probably stands for something good, 
Czajkowski said, fraternity life is not 
for him because of the committments, 
the "impressing of people and putting 
on airs. I don't think I want to do that. 
I want to be accepted as I am." 

John Vukovich, fall 1979 pres- 
ident of Phi Sigma Kappa, and that 
there is peer pressure in his fraternity, 
but its has good effects. He gave as an 
example the member who is "goofing 
up" at school and is pressured by his 
fraternity brothers to work harder. 

"I can dress as a bum or wear a 
suit," Vukovich said. "I can wear my 
hair at any length." 

A random phone survey of 
dormitory residents showed that many 
students believed the Greek system 
was restrictive on their lifestyles. 
Greek officers, however, disputed 
these claims. 

Senetta Kynard is an eighth floor 
resident in Neely, attended a rush 
party and decided not to live in a 



sorority. Kynard, a sophomore in 
Special Education, said that she felt 
the initiations, such as running 
errands for sorority members, were 
unnecessary to prove loyalty. She also 
said that she doesn't like the strict 
rules, prescribed types of dress, 
hairstyle, and restrictions on friends a 
member may or may not be with. 

"I don't need a social group to be 
chosen for me," Kynard said. "I don't 
need to have my friends chosen for me 
or my comings and goings restricted, 
nor to be labeled a member for a 
certain sorority. I'm not against them. 
It's just that they're not for me. Not 
now." 

Kynard does belong to a type of 
sorority, however, called the Me Phis; 
individualists who don't want to 
belong to a sorority where dues are 
paid or certain types of dress are 
prescribed. It is a group of residents 
from University Park and Brush 
Towers who discuss problems, help 
others with homework, and engage in 
social activities together. 

Except during initiations when a 
long white dress must be worn, dress is 
not restricted for members of Sigma 
Kappa sorority, nor is the hairstyle or 
choice of friends, said Julie Godke, 
president of Sigma Kappa. 

Godke said that there is pressure 
applied to non-Greeks at Rush parties 












Members of fraternities and sororities are like any other 
student on campus. Some enjoy drinking and some do not: 
some are messy and some are not. They come from all walks 
of life, hut thev have one thing in common: they all have fun. 



t 






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1 








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to join particular fraternities and 
sororities because everyone wants 
members. 

"( >n< ■(• you are in t he sorority or 
fraternity, there is no pressure," 
( todke said. 

Eleventh I'limr \eely resident. 
Lori Trimble, Bays thai Borority 
members' time is committed while 
those who live in dormitories have 
more free time i" meel .i l«>i ol other 
people." 



Leslie Cole is a 1 4th floor resident 
of Neely who says she is attracted to 
the sisterhood aspect of sororities. 
( 'ole. a freshman in Special Education, 
added that she wouldn't join a sorority 
until she was deeper into her major 
because pledging consumes much 
time 

"The} (dorm residents) are just 
friends you Bay hello and good-bye to. 

You wouldn't do the same things as 
you would with a pledge Bister." 



Fourth floor Schneider resident, 
Frank Whelan, said he moved into the 
dormitory because it was easy to do 
and he didn't receive any information 
about fraternities while he was at 

home. 

At the beginning of the semesteJ 

Whelan said, he went to Sigma Tad 

Gamma's rush party hut concluded 

that he wouldn't lit in. He said he 
wanted to meet a variety of people and 
t hut fraternity lite wouldn't fulfill this. 



! 



but dormitory Jife would. Dormitory 
life had other advantages, according to 
Whelan. 

"There are a lot of people to meet 
and a lot of things to do," Whelan said. 
"The Towers are close to campus and 
close to the Rec. Center. It's modern 
and warm." 

"They (fraternities) are alright 
for some people but not for me," said 
Joe Zahaitis, a fourth floor resident of 
Schneider. "If it's an academic 
fraternity, then it's for me." 

Zahaitis explained that he felt the 
academic fraternities have not 
stressed the fact that they are 
academic; that they stress intelligence, 
and push for enrollment. 

He added that Alpha Tau Omega 
talked to his Accounting class about 
joining the fraternity, but since he 
hadn't taken Accounting 321, he 
couldn't join yet. 

However, Alpha Tau Omega 
member, Jim Karas, said that any 
college student in good standing can 
join that fraternity. 

"We take any person who is 
committed to that organization," he 
emphasized. "He (a potential 
member) doesn't have to take Ac- 
counting 321." 

Jay Stewart, social services 
coordinator of Alpha Tau Omega, said 
members are only required to keep 
decent hygiene. 

When asked about restrictions on 
dress, hairstyle, friends, and the 
coming and going of its members, Tom 
Meyer, secretary of Alpha Gamma 
Rho, said there is as much freedom in 
that fraternity as each member allows 
himself. 

"There is nothing like those rules 
in our constitution or by-laws whatso- 
ever," Meyers said. "Basically, the 
constitution talks about finances." 

Why is there such a great 
discrepency between how the Greeks 
perceive their lifestyle and how other 
students envision it Perhaps the 
Greeks need more publicity to banish 
stereotypes held of them by many of 
their fellow students. 

She is an 85-year-old woman, 
unmarried, childless, and seemingly 
content with her life. 

Hilda Stein was and SIU profes- 









sor of zoology for 38 years until she 
retired in 1963. Now she inspects 
chapters across the country for the 
national sorority Alpha Gamma Delta, 
called Delta Sigma Epsilon before 
merging in 1958. 

The rituals of rushing and 
initiation must be consistent for a 
national sorority across the country 
and Stein helps make sure they are. 

The white-haired Stein was the 
first member of a national sorority at 
SIU, when the university was but a 
teachers' college, most of the students 
came from southern Illinois, and each 
knew almost everybody else. 

Sororities in the 1920's were the 
height of social life in Carbondale, and 
even high school girls joined them, 
Stein said. Delta Sigma Epsilon met 
on Monday evenings in a house on the 
southwest corner of Mill and Universi- 
ty. 

But don't look for it now. It's 
gone. 

To gain membership into the 
sorority, pledges waited on tables and 
did other odd chores. 

"Every sorority girl learns from 
the beginning she has to help," Stein 
said. 

She said there were no rules on 
how sorority woman was supposed to 
fix her hair, or how to dress. 

Yet, certain behaviors were 
unacceptable. 

I suppose you wouldn't have seen 
a pantsuit or bobbed hair, but that's 
how they lived back then." 

Curfew, which is almost nonexis- 
tent today, was imposed though. 
Perhaps it stemmed from the social 
climate of the day. The curfew was at 
10pm., and punishment was meted out 



the following day by the unlucky 
woman's "sisters" according to the 
severity of the breakage. 

Not all obeyed it. Some climbed 
through the windows; others let 
themselves in with smuggled keys and 
sneaked back to the sleeping porch 
with its rows of bunk beds. Their 
punishment, if caught, often was a 
dateless weekend. 

She says dates with townsmen or 
other students often took them to the 
library, on a picnic or to a sing-along 
around a piano in a parlor. If they were 
really feeling their oats, and had a few 
coins in their pockets (as rare in those 
days as now, said she), they went to the 
movies, which were silent in those 
days. 

Drug use was rare. 

Most people disapproved of "drug 
fiends," which was what they were 
commonly referred to in those days. 

"You just didn't use drugs." She 
frowned. 

Nowadays, students frequent 
beer joints because there is nothing 
else to do, and drug-use seems 
common, according to Stein. 

She also shakes her head with 
wonder on how the Greek system 
received its label of being an exclusive 
institution. Any woman can join a 
sorority, she said, and she doesn't have 
to be a wealthy socialite. 

"There are a number of sororities 
on campus begging for girls," she said. 
"There is no effort to be snobbish." 

To choose a sorority, select one 
whose members you'd like to be 
lifelong friends with, Stein said. 

"It's r )t something you can resign 
from." She nodded. 




MADE IN U S A 



OB lis News 
and Reviews 

Carbondale,1979 8 Pages, 10 Sections OBelisk M * Volume Z 



MO 934614 



Proving that careers still abound 
tor SIT graduates despite the school's 
reputation as being a haven tor 
burned-out low-lifes, President Carter 
nominated SRI graduate Donald F. 
Mi-Henry as the United States 
ambassador to the United Nations. 



By Lizann Griffin 



'59 Graduate Selected as Ambassador to UN 




McHenry, 42, graduated from 
SIU in 1959 with a master's degree in 
speech and political science. The 
native of East St. Louis replaced 
Andrew Young, the controversial 
diplomat who resigned from his post 
after secretly conferring with the 
Palestinian Liberation Organization. 
McHenry was Young's deputy and was 
described by Carter as exhibiting 
"both toughness and coolness under 
fire," and "strong and forceful 
negotiating skills." 

McHenry negotiated last year at 
Kennedy Airport when officials 
delayed the (light of a plane holding 
Bolshoi Ballet dancer Ludmilla 
Vlasova. Her husband, Alexander 
(iodunov, had defected to the U.S. and 



officials wanted to make sure that 
Vlasova's decision to return to Russia 
was her own. 

McHenry was a member of the 
transition team that built the Carter 
White House in 1976. He also attended 
the funeral of the highly-esteemed 
black South Africa leader, Steve Biko. 
as the senior member of a State 
Department delegation. 

In 1969, McHenry considered 
joining SIU's Speech and political 
science departments, this time as a 
faculty member. He rejected the job 
offer for one as a counselor to 
Secretary of State William Rogers, 
Frank Klingberg.emiritus professor of 
political science, said. 






RppletreE Alliance - Off shaat L j 
of ThrEE ITIilE Island 



In April. 1979. in Carbondale, an anti-nuclear group 
mushroomed almost overnight when a bubble at the Three 
Mile Island nuclear power plant rose like bubbly in a 
champagne glass. The bubble at Middletown, PA. 
presented the ultimate in looming threats: meltdown and 

explosion. 

In response to the scare, the once-defunct group. 
Prairie Alliance, was reformed. This time, the accident 
which turned eyes nationwide towards Pennsylvania 
became the group's impel us. Tom Marcinkowski, graduate 
studenl in forestry, said recently. 

After the Three Mile Island plant became defective, 
the group enlarged to 150 people in three days, and 
later changed its name to the Appletree Alliance. Student 

r Government funded the group with $'2<M) that spring. 

- 



Postcards supporting nuclear regulations were sent to 
Illinois state legislators by group members. The group 
publicized the dangers of nuclear power, invited lecturers 
from the state legislature to speak, presented films and a 
benefit concert of bluegrass music. 

Months later, the group was "still alive and kicking," 
Marcinkowski said. He added that 40 active members 
remained, and that during the summer, the group's 
structure became more tightly organized. 

Rallies were held at the Paducah. Ky. Union Carbide 
gaseous diffusion plant to protest the transportation of fuel 
enrichment material. A memorial service was conducted 
for the victims of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. .lapan. where 
atomic bombs were dropped by the U.S. during World War 
II. 

For the fall semester. Student Government funded the 
alliance with $406 and gave it office space on the third floor 
of the Student Center. 



In addition, to educating the public on nuclear power 
safety, costs, and recent accidents, the group is also 
researching the transportation of fuel from the Paducah 
gaseous diffusion plant and the causes of death in the area. 

Shocked students celebrating Halloween on S. Illinois 
Ave. in 1979 may have watched the procession of six suited 
men solemnly chanting as they bore a casket down "the 
Strip." The men wore masks which showed the various 
degrees of disfigurement caused by nuclear radiation. 

The mess at Three Mile Island was cleaned up by 
floofing a containment building and cooling the lethal fuel 
rods in water. Residents of Middletown returned to their 
homes and businesses. But for the Appletree Alliance, 
nuclear power is a threat looming on the horizon. 




Hangovers Shattered for 
Nineteen -Year- Old DrinkerSo . . 

Cries of "prohibition" were voiced as 19 and 
20-year-olds lost their rights to drink when Gov. "Big Jim" 
Thompson signed the bill into law Aug. 21, 1979 to become 
effective Jan. 1, 1980. 

An informal phone survey of liquor store and tavern 
managers showed that generally, while liquor store 
managers predicted a small increase in sales, tavern 
managers expected a decrease. 

When Doug Diggle, manager of Old Town Liquors at 
514 S. Illinois Ave., was asked what he predicted the affect 
would be of the raise of the drinking age of the store's sales, 
he said, "It will probably increase our business slightly." 
"As I recall, people have always been able to get booze if 
they wanted it," Diggle said. "There are phony IDs around 
and everyone has a friend who is 21 years old." 

Bob Decker, manager of Southern Illinois Liquors at 
113 N. 12th, said that he predicted beer sales to go down. 



"The amount of business that we have with that age 
group isn't that great," Decker said. "We'll be able to tell 
it but it isn't that significant." 

Decker added that it would take extra time to card 
those who look underage, and said he regretted that he 
could no longer sell liquor to his regular customers who 
were underage. 

Manager Bob Feld of Booby's at 406 S. Illinois Ave. 
said that the delicatessen didn't sell very much liquor. 

"I don't think it is going to hurt restaurants very 
much," Feld said. 

He added that a group of Carbondale liquor retailers, 
which he would not name, might take the law to the Illinois 
Supreme Ct. to test its constitutionality. The liquor law 
was not passed with a 3/5 majority in the House. A 3/5 
majority is required to supersede home rule laws. 
Carbondale is a home-rule city. 

Bruce Steppig, manager of Second Chance at 213 E. 
Main, said that he expected an increase of patronage by 
those 21 and older to partially compensate for the loss of 
business from those who are underage. 

Steppig said that 70 percent of the students at SIU are 
younger than 21, and that a survey taken when the law was 
first passed showed that 38 percent of his clientele were 
under 21. 

"It's a wait-and-see type of deal," Steppig said. "We 
know it (the sale of liquor) is going to decrease. We just 
don't know how much." 

About 40 percent of the clientele at Gatsby's Bar and 
Billiards, at 608 S. Illinois Ave. is under 21 years old, 
according to manager Rose Collins. Collins said that liquor 
sales would probably decrease. 

"Everyone is going to have to be carded," Collins said, 
"until we establish who is under 21 and who is not." 

An experimental alcohol policy was to be institued at 
the start of the spring semester for on-campus housing, 
off-campus freshman, and sophomores re-approved 
residence halls, and university accepted living centers. 
Those residents 21 and older were to be allowed to drink 
in their private living areas, while liquor was to be banned 
for their younger fellow students. 

A permanent plan which was to become effective for 
the summer semester had not yet been drafted. 



it's no good for them anyway! 

It was a bad year for beer, as its name was battered 
first across the nation and then across the SIU-C campus. 

Nitrosamines, those agents suspected of causing 
cancer in laboratory animals, were found in beer by a 
private research firm. Bacon is the only food in which 
nitrosamines have been found, and the agent's level is 
regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 

Nitrosamines had not been regulated by the Food and 
Drug Administration, but a Washington citizens' group 
had filed a petition asking for regulation. 



05 



In a survey conducted by Jack McKillip, associate 
professor of psychology, and the Student Wellness 
Resource Center, heavy drinkers were found to have lower 
grade point averages than light drinkers. Heavy drinkers 
were defined as those people who consume mora than 14 
drinks per week, while light drinkers were defined as those 
who drank less than three alcoholic drinks per week. 

The study found that students are more often likely 
to drink than the average American citizen, although 
statistics show they are not as often found to be heavy 
drinkers. The level of drinking done by SIU students was 
found to be consistent with that of other large state 
universities. Freshmen were reported to be the heaviest 
drinkers, and single students were said to drink more than 
married students. 



Twenty food service employees 
working at Freeman and at Stevenson 
Arms, 600 W. Mill, went on strike 
September 17 in an attempt to gain 
wage increases, better benefits, and 
improved working conditions. 

All of the strikers demands were 
met, and the strike was ended 
September 20. 

A petition was circulated among 
Stevenson Arms residents which 
stated, "We do not think the amount 
of rent we are paying is equally 
commensurable to the quality of 
services being rendered by the 
management." The petition also 
protested inadequate phone service. 



an unkept lounge 

area and broken 

clothes dryers and 

plumbing fixtures. 

The petition was signed by 114 

residents. 

"At the very least," the petition 
stated, "we should be allowed the 
courtesy of living in a properly 
sanitized and disinfected housing 
complex." 

Rodney Trottman, Stevenson 
Arms resident assistant, said, "The 
management seems more concerned as 
a result of the petition." 

Residents supported the strikers 
by protesting at Stevenson Arms for 




one day. . .A large sign was posted 
bearing the words, "Let's be reason- 
able. Let's negotiate. Let's eat." 

Residents ate at the Student 
Center cafeterias until September 26, 
when the food at their dormitories 
could be delivered. Residents were 
given an allowance of $1.25 for 
breakfast, .$2 for lunch, and $2.25 for 
dinner. 




TVvo Pregnancies per day 
at Health Service 



Despite the easily-obtained and inexpensive methods 
of birth control available at the Health Service, at least two 
pregnancies per working day were confirmed there. Don 
Knapp. doctor at the Health Service, said recently. He 
added that there were about 200 working days at the 
Health Service per year. 



"I think it (the figure) is about steady," Knapp said. 
"I don't think it has changed over the last four or five years. 
We don't have any good figures to compare with other 
universities, but similar incidences probably occur on a 
comparable campus." 

Sandy Landis, coordinator of Human Sexuality 
Services, said about 93 to 95 percent of these women choose 
to abort their pregnancies. This figure may be 
conservative, she said, because many of the women didn't 
contact Human Sexuality Services for counseling. The 
women may have discussed their pregnancies with friends 
or family members who have been pregnant. They are 
then referred to abortion clinics. The students also answer 
abortion advertisements in newspapers. Others marry or 
drop out of SIU, she said. 

Landis speculated that the reasons the women became 



pregnant were the lack of birth control utilization and the 
freedom of living off campus. Three times as many women 
come into Human Sexuality Services for pregnancy 
counseling, she said, than for birth control counseling. 

"By far and large, the number of women who come in 
for pregnancy counseling have used no birth control 
method whatsoever," Landis said. "Or some women have 
used some method some of the time . . . that's when they 
get pregnant." 

"The reason behind the unwanted pregnancies most 
often cited by the students on questionnaires filled out 
before they were counseled for their pregnancies was, "I 
didn't think I'd have sex." "It (birth control) was too messy 
or bothersome," and "I didn't use the method regularly," 
tied in second as the most often cited reason for the 
unwanted pregnancies. 



SIU Clones around with Plants 



A laboratory that would research plant 
genetics and cloning was completed in 
Life Science I in October, 1979. There 
scientists may be able to clone a plant 
gene — and be the first to do so. 
Cloning is the process of isolating a 
gene and duplicating it. 

"It's an area which people are just 
getting into and we have a good start," 
Michael Sung, SIU biochemistry 
professor, said recently. "If we can do 
this type of work and it is of 
significance, it could obviously bring 



SIU national recognition." 

Sung added that increased fund- 
ing could potentially be awarded to 
the department and more students 
might enroll in this department, 
should SIU scientists be the first to 
clone a plant gene. 

Composing the group of scientists 
are three biochemists, two mi- 
crobiologists, two plant and soil 
scientists, and one botanist. 

Experiementation has already 
begun on cloning the genes in legumes 



that are implicated in the nitrogen- 
fixing process. Nitrogen is a soil 
fertilizer. 

Experiments are conducted under 
the P-2 classification, a regulation set 
by the National Institute of Health, 
that consists of physical containment 
of the work. The laboratory must be 
certified by the Internal Biological 
Safety Committee, which is recognized 
by NIH. 



PartLj Dawn with 5hi_jlab 



Skylab, the $2.5 billion, 118-foot spacecraft used by 
astronauts to conduct experiments, fell back to the earth 
in a shower of blue and red flaming junk onto southwest 
Australia on July 11, 1979. 

Whether deserved or not, SIU students have a reputation 
for party excellence, and they planned to greet Skylab 's 
arrival with their typical odd humor. 

Steve Paoli, junior in radio and television, said he 
planned to throw a party, but then the darn thing came 
down before the party did. 

"Everything happens in Carbondale," Paoli said. He 
added that he thought Skylab would fall on Carbondale, 
too. 

"The sky is falling. The sky is falling," is what Paoli 
said he had wanted his guests to squawk as they ran around 
in their Chicken Little costumes at his home. 

He added that he had been considering building a 




bullseye target for placement in his backyard so the pieces 
of junk would hit it, creating a lake-sized hole. He'd add 
the water, he said. 

Paoli, a WIDB disc jockey, said he chose songs 
pertinent to the incident to the day Skylab did fall. 
"Burning Sky," by Bad Company; "Catch Me Now I'm 
Falling," by the Kinks; and "Eight Miles High," by the 
birds were songs chosen for the day's playlist. 

WIDB was once located on the top floor of the Student 
Center. The building, Paoli said, is the tallest in 
Carbondale. He said he thought it would be the first to be 
hit by chunks of Skylab. 

"The Australians got the cake," he said. 

Beat out of his chance to throw a Skylab party, Paoli 
commented, "I guess I was happy it didn't fall on 
anybody." 

Meanwhile, the city of Carbondale prepared for this 



CO 



possible emergency by mobilizing the police, firemen, and 
public work services, said Randy Jackson, director of 
Carbondale's emergency services. 

Jackson said he and a few firemen manned the city's 
emergency operating center at 607 E. College from 5 p.m. 
on July 10 till noon the following day. Jackson said he was 
in radio contact with Jackson County officials, who were 
in touch with those in Springfield, Illinois. Washington, 
D.C., officials kept informed those officials in the nation's 
state capitals as to the where abouts of the falling Skylab. 

Jackson said he didn't believe the laboratory would 
fall on Carbondale because the area in which it could have 
landed was so large that the odds were against it. 



Skylab could have theoretically fallen anywhere on the 
earth. 

"We stuck around anyway until we knew it would 
land," he said. 

Then they "closed up shop." 

If Skylab had fallen on Carbondale, police and firemen 
would have cordoned off the area and gathered the pieces 
to be given to officials in Washington, D.C. 

The exercise "didn't cost us a dime," Jackson said. 

The manpower for that time period was either working 
as a part of a shift, or, like Jackson, was salaried and was 
required to be at his post without overtime pay. 




Dean Spills his Guts 






John Dean jetted into Williamson 
County Airport to lecture on his part 
of the Watergate conspiracy. It was 
one of approximately six lectures Dean 
makes yearly. 

Dean spoke at the Student 
< 'enter's Ballroom I) to an audience 
composed mostly of students. 

Dean, the former Nixon adviser 
who devised the Watergate cover-up, 
said he didn't feel he was cashing in on 
his crime, explaining that he has 
rejected many lucrative offers. 

The trim man said he became 
disillusioned with the American 
judicial system when he met a young 
man in Texas who had been jailed for 
one year for possession of one 
marijuana cigarette. 

"I only t;"t lour months for all the 
things I did." Dean said. 

When a tape recorder belonging 
to a reporter from a local radio station 
loudly clicked off in the front of the 
ballroom, Dean joked that he could 



make up for its owner's 17 i/s minute 

gap- 
It drew chuckles from the 
audience. 

The motivation behind the 
Watergate conspiracy was to gather 
evidence of Democrats taking kick- 
backs from businessmen in Miami in 
exchange for holding the Democratic 
convention there. Dean said. Nixon's 
campaign had begun to falter because 
the press had alleged that ITT Corp. 
had bribed the Republican National 
Committee with .$400,000 to drop an 
antitrust suit. 

Deep Throat, the informant who 
was the keystone to uncovering the 
Watergate mystery to reporters Rob 
Woodward and Carl Bernstein, could 
have been only one person, said Dean. 
He added that he was going to 
Washington D.C. the following day to 
encourage that person to admit he was 
Deep Throat. 




Safety Transit System 
takes 95C from Students 

As a result of fears for the safety 
of their female students. SIU students 
voted to refund the Women's Transit 
Authority in the spring of 1979. 
Students were to begin paying a 95 
cent campus safety fee either summer 
or fall semester, 1980. 

The system's name was changed 
twice, the last time to the Campus 
Safety Transit System. 

The van used in the previous 
system had been used solely for 
women, but the new system was to 
transport any male or female affiliated 
with the university. 

This time, a 40-passenger bus was 
to be used, travelling in a circle to 
Brush Towers, Southern Hills, Ever- 
green Terrace, Small Group Housing, 
and the Recreation Center from 6 p.m. 
to midnight Sunday through Thurs- 
day. 

Women were to still have the use 
of a dispatch car which would take 
them to their off-campus residences. 




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SEASONS GREETINGS 



Thomas Stubbs, an art 
student at SIU conjured up this 
poster symbolizing the relation- 
ship between Khomeini and 
other parts of the world around 
Christmas time, 1979. 



Anti-Iranian sentiment reached a peak on the SIU-C 
campus early in November 1979 when about 200 demonstrators 
gathered in the Free Forum area to protest against the capture 
of American Embassy workers in Iran. 

Chanting, "Iranians go home," and "Keep America 
beautiful — deport Iranians," the SIU students joined with 
other college campus' across the nation and voiced their 
outrage at the dilemma. 

The demonstration was organized by a group of students 
who call themselves Americans for America. The leader of the 
student coalition, Dave Gorsage, said the demonstration was a 
peaceful one, ". . . to show American spirit and patriotism 
until the hostages are set free." 

From a speaker, one of the members of the A.F.A. shouted, 
"Iranians aren't welcome anymore," and the crowd cheered. 

Many of the students carried American Flags and posters 
but the majority observed and seemed amused at the event. 

One student, barely audible above the noise of the crowd, 
yelled, "Stop racism!" He said that he didn't support the 






protest and that the students were advocating "nationalistic 
tendencies." He maintained that most of the students were 
"just a bunch of racists." 

Several policemen were scattered around the outskirts of 
the crowd to keep the students from getting out of control. One 
of the policemen said that the riots of 1970 started with about 
the same number of people. He added that at that time, the 
students were protesting the war in Cambodia. 

Now, at the time of publication, half way through 
February, student sentiment towards the Iranians and 
Ayatollah Khomeini remain the same. Several dorm windows 
around campus sport slogans of "Kill Khomeini" and "The 
Iranians came here for an education — we'll teach them a 
lesson." 

Steve Dahl, a disc jocky from WLUP in Chicago even went 
as far as to write a song about Iranian sentiment. 

The hostages also appear closer to freedom according to 
a "key negotiator" who said that they will be freed upon 
investigation of crimes related to the shah. 



CT5 




PCB Leak Looks Bleak 



A toxic chemical h;i<l been leaking tor two years from the 
transformer in the basement of the Health Service before it was 
cleaned up; il was made known recently. 

Whether polychlorinated biphenyl leaked from the Health 
Service transformer, through the sump pump, down a brook 

and into Campus Lake, would not lie known till testing W8S 

completed l>\ the i-m\ of spring semester L980 

John Meister, director ol Pollution Control at SIU, said 
thai the cracked gasket in the transformer which caused the 

leak w.i- not repaired earlier lieeaiise workers thought the 

transformer had to be replaced. A physical plant worker later 
ascertained that the transformer could be repaired. It was not 



until the 1978 Thanksgiving Break that the transformer could 
be fixed, due to technical factors. 

Tests had first been conducted by undergraduates and 
graduates majoring in fields relating to pollution control. The 

total COSl of the testing was estimated by Meister to he .>.'(. SOtl. 

Barry testing indicated thai the fluid from the transformer 
contained 50 to KXl percent I'CB. Meister estimated that a 
maximum ol 15 gallons of the fluid leaked from the 
transformer, based on the amount that had to be replaced. 

It PCB were to lie found in Campus Lake. Meister said 

there would lie many factors that would determine the steps 

taken to clean it up. 






"It depends on how much PCB is found," Meister said. 
"What is the technology and what is the cost for removing it? 
It's a big unknown." 

Meister estimated that the level of PCB in Campus Lake 
would be two to five parts per billion, because it is dispersed 
in all parts of the environment at this level since it has been 
in use for 100 years. To be considered a danger, the chemical 
would have to be present at a level of 500 parts per billion. 
Since the chemical is heavy and is not water soluble, if present, 
it would be found resting in the lake sediment in an area "the 
size of a bedroom." Campus Lake covers about 47 acres. 

One way the chemical would be removed is to dredge the 
lake. The chemical would then be shipped to one of three sites 



that the Environmental Protection Agency regulates in the 
country. Meister said that negotiations will begin first with a 
firm located in north central Illinois to remove the PCB - 
contaminated testing equipment. If the business deal is 
reached, the equipment would be stored away from a 
population "out in the middle of some old strip-mining pits." 

Larry Ziemba, director of the Marion Enviromental 
Protection Agency, said that the possible danger of PCB in 
Campus Lake is small. 

"I don't think the PCB could impose any threat to the food 
chain because of the small quantities that leaked from the 
transformer," Ziemba said. 



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SIU students stood out in the cold early in 1980 to express 
their feelings towards the threat of re-instating the draft. 
President Carter lost a few brownie points through his views on 
the matter, especially with the college crowd. In February, 
approximately 400 students followed Rich Schumacker. a law 
student and Vietnam veteran, to Ballroom D of the Student 
Center to speak out in protest of the draft. Schumaker spoke 



much of the time and when he commented that Carter " . . . 
is waving the flag and wrapping himself in the cloak of national 
securitv to win votes. " the crowd went into a frenzy of cheers 
and applause. He also added that Carter should draft the people 
who favor the draft "... starting with Carter himself, and then 
the representatives, and then the senators. " The protest 
remained peaceful. 



<j> 



I OS UOrmS • A Comparison 

Rating Carbondale's pizza 
was easy, but rating 
Carbondale residence 

Text by Tamar Miner halls is much tOUgher- 

Photos by Jim Hunzinger SO we'll let yOU decide. 



"All single freshman under the 
age of 21, not living with parent or 
guardian, are required to live on- 
campus residence halls, or similar 
privately-owned residence halls." 

And so started my work for this 
story. I set out in October to rate the 
dorms and ended up in December with 
a story on the residence halls. 1 
tramped from Wilson Hall to the 
Baptist Student Center, from 
Freeman to Steagall Hall talking to 
residents, RAs, administrators and 
directors. I asked questions . . . some 
of which administrators refused to 
answer. 

I found OUl that all of the 
residence halls are "comparable" just 
as the University says they are to be. 
Kach hall has its own advantages and 
disadvantages. 

Wilson Hall is far from campus 
and two-thirds of the students there 
are freshman, but there is a swimming 
pool, a lush recreational area/TV 
lounge, and residents are allowed to 
paint their own rooms. 

The Baptist Student Center has 
stringent rules of conduct, but it was 
the cleanest place I visited. 

Stevenson Arms facilities are 
sparce, but the large number of 
graduate Students keeps the dorm 
1.1 1 111 and quiet mosl <>f the time. 

Freeman Hall is a little lurther 
from campus, but it has a very close 
group ol residents and an interesting 
courtyard. 

The tone of the off-campus 
residence halls is a loose-knit family. 
I'.it McNeil. Supervisor of OIT- 
I .impus Housing, credits the Five Star 
Hall Competition lor this feeling. The 
Five Star contest awards ofl campus 
halls with points for academics. 



athletics, social programming, cultur- 
al/educational programming and 
community service. 

McNeil said the competition has 
brought the off-campus residence 
halls closer together, raised their 
awareness, unified their efforts, and 
forced each dorm to know the others. 

McNeil's philosophy is "family" 
and she passes this idea to the staff 
that she hires herself. 

Realizing there isn't the money 
for facilities like the ones on-campus, 
McNeil said she compensates by 
"giving them love." 

The disadvantages of Brush 
Towers are the number of residents 
(816) in each building and the distance 



from campus. The advantage is the 
closeness to the Recreation Building, 
IGA, Pinch Fenny, and the Saluki 
Theatres. 

University Park is a unique 
mixture of the male Triads and the 
mostly female Neely Hall. The unity 
between these halls is almost nonexis- 
tent. 

Thompson Point residents have 
a beautiful view of the Lake-on-the- 
Campus, but they also must contend 
with all the insects that come with the 
lake. 

But, as Mrs. (ireg of Wilson Hall 
told me, "I've worked in dorms for 
eighteen years and it's the same gripes 
over and over." 







Wilson 
Hall 



Under the direction of Mrs. Fern 
Greg, Wilson Hall is struggling to gain 
respectability and upgrade a poor 
reputation. Mrs. Greg admits that this 
cannot be done in one year. The 
facilities are in poor shape and there 
are janitorial problems. Greg however, 
is trying to get things painted and lay 
the carpet. 

As an indication of this upgrad- 
ing, eight to ten residents returned 
from last year. Activities for the first 
semester included guest speakers each 
week, window painting at Halloween, 
dance, backgammon, ping-pong and 
pool tournaments. Intramural sports 
also seems very popular at Wilson 
Hall. 

The building is locked at 11 p.m. 
and residents are asked to show meal 
tickets and ID cards to get in. 
Damages this year were estimated by 
Greg to be between nine and ten 
dollars per resident. 




Baptist 

Student 

Center 



The Baptist Student Center is 
owned and operated by the Illinois 



Baptist State Association. The BSC is 
a "Christian-oriented dormitory" 
which provides programs to "lead 
non-Christians to knowledge and 
committment to Christ" and to "help 
the Christian grow in their faith and 
service." The purpose and the rules 
are stated in an interview sheet which 
residents must sign before they enter 
into housing contracts. 

The rules prohibit alcoholic 
be'verages, gambling, non-prescribed 
drugs and sexual intercourse. There is 
a demerit system in which 10 demerits 
warrants eviction. 

Residents can get demerits for 
smoking in the Johns in the building, 
excessive noise, inappropriate dress 
and room decorations, profane or 
obscene language, unexcused absence 
from floor meetings and returning to 
the BSC under the influence of alcohol 
or drugs. 



Damages at the BSC are minimal 
and it is "only one year in 12 that any 
damages are charged," said Larry 
Shacklee, BSC Director. 

The BSC had the highest over-all 
grade point average in the 1978-79 
Five Star competition. 

Regular activities at the BSC 
includes: Monday evenings Bible 
study, Tuesday morning prayer 
breakfast, Wednesday Baptist 
Student Union meeting, and Thurs- 
day chapel services. Once a month 
there is a dorm activity, such as a trip 
to Six Flags, a hayride or a skating 
party. Intramural teams are also very 
popular. 

Activities to raise money for the 
Red Cross, Muscular Dystrophy 
Association and summer missions are 
also sponsored. There is an annual 
formal dinner for Thanksgiving, 
Christmas, and Valentine's Day. 



05 

CD 



Stevenson 
Arms 



Affectionately known as "The 
I'ii-.." Stevenson Arms is located at 
600 West Mill Street. Stevenson Arms 
won first place last year in the Five 
Star Hall Competition. 

"The RAs at Stevenson are 
experts in planning and organizing in 
all five areas of the competition. For 
this reason we were rated number one 
last year and we intend to do the same 



this year," said Kebede Jimma, head 
resident coordinator lor Fall semester. 

About fifteen residents are second 
year returnees and three residents 
have lived at Stevenson Arms for three 
years. A majority of the students in the 
SIU School of Medicine live at 
Stevenson Arms. 

Damages at Stevenson Arms were 
$4.50 per resident last school year and 
"it is likely that it will be just about the 
same this year", according to Jimma. 

Security procedures include 
locking the east and west wing exits at 
midnight, and resident assistants are 
on duty until 4 a.m. The front 
entrance is open 24 hours per day. 

The living conditions have been 
"progressively better" according to 
•Jimma and he gives the RAs absolute 
credit for this. 





■fcr T ? ;, 



.. • "■,■! .. • i- 



Thompson 
Point 



Freeman 
Hall 



Known u Freeman, thi> re 

•idence hall i-. located three blocks 

north ol the \\ ham Kduclion Building. 
Act i\ it ies in at Met ic. BOI ial, 

cultural, and community service are 



sponsored regularly at Freeman. Sixty 
residents returned from last year and 

fbui residents have lived at Freeman 
lor three years. 

Norhert Dunkel, RHC at Free- 
man, expects damages and disciplin- 
ary action to decrease by "establishing 
more of a home/community atmos- 
phere." 

Additional security procedure- at 

Freeman include a SR \ on duty at the 



front service desk from 5 p.m. until li 
a.m. Every hall hour. RAs make 
rounds. 

"I have lived both on-campus lor 

four years and now off-campus," 

Dunkel said. "Personally, oil campus 
otters more programming, a less hectic 
da] . and a better living condition. The 
name ol off-campUS housing is on the 

rise and I believe the on-campus 

facilities should be more aware." 




"V.SSfifeiLf 



Located on a peninsula in Lake- 
on-the-Campus, Thompson Point 
consists of 10 residence halls and 
Lentz Hall, the common building. 
Thirty to 40 percent of the residents 
return for two years and more students 
apply to live at TP for three and four 
years than for University Park or 



Brush Towers. Thompson Point also 
has the least amount of damages for 
any of the on-campus halls. 

Security procedures include 
locking entrances 24 hours per day; 
each resident having a key to get in the 
building. 

The programming/governance 



system at TP is called the Thompson 
Point Executive Council. Branches of 
TPEC are the Social-recreation 
Activity Council (SRAC) and the 
Cultural-Educational Activity Council 
(CEAR). Each hall has representatives 
on the councils and a dorm council of 
their own. 

The SRAC is the most active, 
planning movies, dances, TP nights at 
Second Chance, ALSAC and Amer- 
ican Heart Association Drives and an 
annual Christmas dinner complete 
with presents for 15-20 under- 
privileged children. 

The CEAR programs trivia bowls, 
college bowls, guest speakers and 
lecturing professors. 

The individual dorms councils 
take an interest survey in the 
beginning of each school year and 
make programs from the survey 
results. 

Hall activities include decorating 
for Homecoming and Christmas, 
canoe trips on the Big Current and 11 
Point Rivers, campouts, and trips to 
St. Louis baseball games. A backgam- 
mon tournament progressed from 
intra-floor to inter-hall competition. 

The Intramural Committee of 
TPEC plans vollyball, chess, Softball, 
basketball and jogging activities. 

All this makes for a "personal 
community" of residents who are 
"really close" according to Lisa Keefer^ 
says, "It's all right here." 




The attitudes of the students living in 
the dorms vary greatly. Some complain 
about the food service, while others 
complain about the restrictions set by the 
Resident Assistants. On the other hand, 
many of the students like the dorms and 
the way of life they offer. But then again 
many students enrolled at SIU like 
hemorrhoid problems. 




University 
Park 



Like a strange conglomeration of 
leftovers. University Park is made up 
of Neely Tower and the Triads: Allen, 
Wright, and Boomer. Trueblood is the 
commons building. 



Brush 
Towers 



Straddling the East side of 
campus like two torso-less giants are 
Mae Smith and Schneider towers, 
(irinnell Hall is the commons building 
where residents from both Towers eat. 

Programming at Brush Towers 
varies From Tower-wide activities 
(trips to St. Louis Hockey games, Six 
Flags, hayrides. and square dames) to 
floor activities (cheese tasting parties, 
dining at McDonalds, plant swaps and 
intramural teams), according to Jeff 
Mm. re, Graduate Assistant 1< .r Pro 
gramming at Brush Towers. 

Moore said the RAfl do the 

majority ol programming, usually 
planning something every week. Often 

tWO Hours will do an activity together 
such as .1 candlelight dinner, canoe 
trip, horseback ride, camping trip or 
^uest BDeaker. Some of the speakers 
have been from Human Sexuality. 
Touch of Nature and ( "arcer Planning 



and Placement. Programs dealing with 
alcohol awareness and abuse are 
frequently planned. Annual activities 
include a talent show, casino night, 
and a haunted tunnel on Halloween. 
The Programming office also sponsors 
a tutoring program. 

Dale Turner, RA on 12th door 
Schneider said that for social activities 
usually :?0 to 45 residents out of 50 will 
participate. For educational activities 
during a weeknight, such as a 
presentation from Human Sexuality. 
five to 20 students participate. 

It "brings residents together" 
Turner said of floor activities, to 
create a "community atmosphere." 

Twelfth floor Schneider is known 
as the Buzzin' Dozen. Turner and his 
floor have worked hard to develop a 
floor identity. For example, the first 
week of school they sent welcoming 
letters to all the women of Brush 
Towers. 'Turner said that the floor has 
to work at programming, and it's hard 
work, but the floor wants to do it. They 
feel good about it said Turner. Their 
el forts have been so successful that the 
Honey Bears and the BuuuV Do/en's 
Cousins have emerged 

Turner also attributes the 
Community atmosphere with the low 
amount of damages on the floor. 
Residents know each other and don't 



feel as if they're living with strangers 
that don't care if something is broken. 

"People like living there," said 
Turner. 

The money for activities comes 
from the Campus Housing Activity 
Fee. Each resident pays the $9 fee at 
the beginning of each year. According 
to Moore, CHAF monies are used to 
pay for a majority of the programming. 
Usually a nominal admission price is 
charged to the residents, such as 50 
cents for a movie in order to provide 
more programming. Other activities to 
raise money were PUMPKIN Grams 
for Halloween, Goody Bags for Finals 
Week and a massage workshop. 

About AQ per cent of the residents 
return for a second year at Brush 
Towers. 

Damages for Fall 1978 were $1126 
lor Mae Smith and $ 1 1,616 tor 
Schneider. 

According to Joe Gasser the 
Towers will have more damages than 
the other residence halls because there 
are more residents (816), more glass 
and four elevators per building. 
Replacing an elevator panel costs 
between $2500 and $2800. 

The entrance to Mae Smith and 
Schneider is locked at 10 p.m. and 
residents must show a meal ticket to 
get in after this time. 






About a third of the students 
return for a second year of living at 
Neely. About 20 per cent return for a 
second year at the Triads, but Joe 
Gosser of University Housing expects 
that number to pick up with the 
installation of air conditioning. 

The East Side Programming 
Board has a budget of $1700. They 
schedule events such as movies, 
campouts to Kentucky Lake, hayrides, 
and shopping trips to St. Louis. 

Because the Triads and Neely 
have different house councils, there is 
difficulty in planning co-ed programs. 
Neely allocates the CHAF funds by 
floor and the Triads allocate on a 
first-come-first-serve basis. 

Armondo Olivares, the Graduate 
Assistant for Programming at Univer- 



sity Park said that the Triad's method 
works better. 

The largest University Park 
events were the Boomer Bash and the 
Allenfest at Giant City, each drawing 
over 1200 residents. Buses and food 
were provided for each. 

Another popular event was the 
progressive dinner between Allen II 
and Neely. One Hundred forty 
residents participated. 

Besides social activities, guest 
speakers and fundraising events for 
ALSAC are often planned. 

Mark McGuire, HRC at Allen, has 
worked to get the RAs under him to 
know the other RAs and most of the 
residents in Allen. He hopes that by 
doing this, Allen I will get to know 
Allen III, adding to hall unity. 




Like most other residence halls on 
campus. Smith Hall has its share of 
crazy moments. Cramming 43 people 
into the first-floor bathroom takes the 
idea of the communal John a bit too 
far. 




Disciplinary problems are "way 
down" from 1970 according to Virginia 
Benning of the Student Life Office. 
For 3600 residents on campus, there 
were 178 write-ups for Fall 1978. 

"The RAs see discipline as .a 
learning experience," Benning said, 
"rather than punitive action." 

Residents who are written up are 
given a choice between having a 
hearing before the Judicial Board or 
an administrative Board. The Judicial 
Board is made up of students. 

Evictions go through this system 
and University Housing must have 
documentation and show reason 
before there can be an eviction. 

Except for the Baptist Student 
Center, the off-campus residence halls 
follow this same system. 



CO 












u. 

o 



3 #3 



Uj 



CO 



STEVENSON 
ARMS 



S1560/yr. 
52750/single 



20 by 11 



2-1SI & 2nd 

floor 
1-3rd floor 



4-1st & 2nd 
floor 
2-3rd floor 



3/3 floors 



FREEMAN 



S1560/yr, 



230 sq. ft 



3/3 floors 



WILSON 



$1700/yr. 
$2180/single 



19 by 11 



up to 60 



1/4 floors 



BAPTIST 

STUDENT 

CENTER 



$1700/yr. 



12 by 13 



24 



THOMPSON 
POINT 



$1556/yr 



10 



12 



by 19 
for 2 
by 34 
for 4 



1. 2. or 4 



3/10 halls 



BRUSH 
TOWERS 



$1556/yr 



13 by 19 



? h.ill 



UNIVERSITY 
PARK 

NEELY TRIADS 



$1556 $1556 
/yr /yr 



13 


11 


by 


by 


19 


17 



2 2 



4 6 



4 none 



u. 

O CO 

m g 

S CO 



U. ill 
Uj ^ < CO CO 

5 CO l o n w 
5? 0: o § 2 <t 

T CO o 



194 




Q 

c?of 
co ccp 



CO 

o 



CO 



ill 
O 



80-20-25-15-44 



2 blocks 



37 spaces 



/ 



2 beds, 1 bedstand, 1 lamp, 
2 desk lamps, bookshelves, 
2 desks, 2 chairs, 2 
dressers, 2 closets, 1 wall 
mirror, 1 lounge chair 



laundry, 2 cable TV's, 
pinball machine, ping-pong 
table 



230 



130-54-30-18-2 



3 blocks 



36 spaces 



2 beds, 2 desks, 2 chairs, 
shelves, 2 lamps, 2 garb, 
cans, towel racks 



cable-color TV, fireplace, 
study tables, 2 washers, 2 
dryers, 50 people, vacuum 
cleaners, brooms, etc. 



398 



275-50-80-4-5 



V2 to 3/4 

mile 



95 spaces 



2 beds, 2 chairs, 2 drawers, 
2 desks, 2 lamp, 
bookshelves, 1 mirror, heat 
and AC control 



swimming pool, TV lounge, 
study room on ea. floor, 
laundry on 2 floors, resident 
can paint their own rooms 



285 



86-48-55-37-18- 



1/4 to 1/2 

mile 



none 



2 beds, 2 dressers, 2 
drawers, 2 towel racks, 2 
desks, 2 chairs, 2 gar. cans, 
2 lamps, bookshelf, 2 
closets, heat and AC control 



5 TV's, washers and dryers, 
vending machines, rec. room 
W/ pool, ping-pong, pinball, 
snack room, chapel, library, 
Bible study classroom, 
music practice room W/ 
piano, prayer room, study 
rooms, lounge, fireplace 



120/hall 
1200/area 



52%-30%-12%-6% 
These figures are based 
on all three dorm areas 
put together. Separate 
dorm figures were not 
available. 



2 blocks 



613 spaces 



2 beds, 2 gar. cans, 2 
sheets and pillow case/bed, 
2 pillows, 2 desks, 2 
drawers, 2 chairs, wall 
phone 



game room, exercise-weight 
room. Banks Memorial 
library, typewriters, sewing 
machines, calculators, check 
cashing service, post office, 
stamps, washers and dryers, 
TV/recreation lounges, 
snack bar 



816/hall 
1632/area 



1500-2000 
yards 



share one lot: 
508 spaces 



2 beds, 2 gar. cans, 2 
sheets & pillow case/bed, 2 
desks, 2 drawers, 2 chairs, 
wall phone 



sundecks, library, game 
room w/ pool tables, 
ping-pong, recreational 
equip., piano, check cashing, 
luggage storage, washers, 
dryers, iron board, 
kitchenettes, hair washing 
rooms w/ dryers, lounges, 
study rooms, exercise room 
w/ weight equip., 



816 110/hall 
1146/area 



1500-2000 
yards 



2 beds, 2 gar. cans, 2 
sheets & pillow case/beds, 2 
desks, 2 drawers, 2 chairs, 
wall phone 



sundeck, tennis & basketball 
courts, large playing field, 
check cashing, grocery 
store, luggage storage, 
washers and dryers, 
kitchenettes, library, piano 
room, post office 



SIU 



Electives 

Text by Bruce Simmons 
& Karen Clare 

SIU offers a wide range of class electives to the college 

student intent on getting a good education. However, wouldn't 
it be amusing to take a course in: 

USB 206 — "Finding Your Way Around Campus" — An 
introduction to the various methods of locating the right class 
in the right building. (Prerequisite: Freshman standing). 

GSC $100 — "Poverty and the College Student" — A look 
at the many ways of spending and not spending Dad's money. 
Covers the basic lifestyle of the "poor college student" and 
various methods of how to borrow and avoid paying debts. 

LIE 320 - "Excuse Making" This class teaches the 
student how to make successful excuses. Upon completion of 
the class, students will no longer worry about making up missed 
exams or getting credit for late papers. This class is a great help 
to all students of junior and senior standing. 

GSA 8:00 - "Alcohol Impairment Prevention" 
Explores various techniques of relieving hangovers and how to 
make it through classes the next day without snoring. The 
toothpick method or propping open eyelids will be discussed 
in detail. Other psychological aspects of alcohol on the brain 
will be discussed. 

HI'/ 102 "How to Look of Age" This class is directed 
towards under-aged freshmen who can not obtain liquor due 
to their peach fuzz faces. Methods of dress, stance and speech 
will be discussed. 

BUZ 115 - "Partying for Non-Majors" This class is 
aimed at those students who party less than 15 hours a week. 



Choices of liquor, music and munchies will be covered. 

GSB 211 "How to Make it Through Finals Week 

Without Having a Nervous Breakdown" — An examination of 
the stresses, tensions and frustrations that often accompany 
the last week of classes. An in-depth exploration of the effects 
of exams on eating, smoking and sleeping habits will be 
discussed. 

GSE 123 — "How to Get 25 Things Done in 20 Minutes" 

— A must for the procrastinator, this course takes a quick look 

at the hectic life of the co-ed and offers solutions to problems 

such as writing a term paper, doing laundry and reading "War 

and Peace" in one night. 

GSB .305 — "Roommate Pressures and Problems" — 
Intended primarily for those students suffering from the "lack 
of compatibility" syndrome, often found among students with 
roommates who blast their stereos while you are trying to study 
or while attempting to sleep before 10 a.m. 

HEL 499 — "Finding the Proper Spouse" - This course 
will teach students what to look for in possible mates. Features 
such as schooling, finances, family mental background and 
anatomy will be studied. 

GSD 185 — "Ten Ways to Avoid Woody. Hall" — 
Designed for those who break into a cold sweat at the thought 
of going to Woody Hall. An emphasis will be placed on how to 
avoid red tape and long lines. 

GSC 114 — "Is There Life After College" — This 
philosophy course gains insight into the assumption that 
college life, believe it or not. is the best time of your life. 
Problems in the real world are discussed and alternatives to 
graduation are strongly emphasized. 

Child Development 345 - "Child Rearing" - A good 
course for all expectant parents. Tactics such as scolding, 
teaching and how to put them up for adoption when all fails 
will be covered. 

GSB 107 ~ "Finding a Book in Morris Library" - An 
introduction to the process of locating a specific book on 











any one of the seven floors in any given aisle yet without getting 
lost in the shuffle. 

SEX 169 — "Date Making" — This course is designed 
with the shy and inexperienced in mind. Tactics in phone 
calling, making conversation with strangers of the opposite sex 
and asking out best friends' girlfriends will be discussed. 

Sociology 411 — "On Becoming a Rock Star" — 
(Prerequisite: Senior standing with G.P.A. of 1.5 or lower) This 
class prepares all future flunkies for becoming instant music 
successes in the field of rock music. Length of hair, spastic 
movements and unintelligent yelling will be studied. 

Child Development 291 — "Effects of the Environment on 
Children" — This course is taught through practical 
experience in the lab. The effects on the pre-pubic child after 
being exposed to rock music at 120 decibels for 24 hours and 
the effects on children fed a steady diet of Billy Beer and 
Hostess Ding-Dongs will be studied among other conditions. 

Physiology 146 — "Basic Burping" — This class is a must 
for freshmen males. It teaches one to be one of the boys; a jock 
and macho all in the short time of one semester. Tone quality, 
duration and stench will be studied. 

Anatomy 450 — "Birth Control Methods for the 80's" — 
This course studies futuristic concepts of birth control soon to 
be available on the market. Forms such as the soddered zippers 
and the time-lock trousers will be discussed. 

Psychology 302 — "Apathy" — This class instructs 
students on how to cope with apathy. The course will go into 
details on tactics for not caring. Upon completion, the students 
will not care that he has flunked, that he owes five months back 
rent, or that the state is building a nuclear reactor in his back 
yard. 

English 492 — "Exploration in Language" — The main 
purpose of this course is to build the student's vocabulary along 
with increasing comprehension. Upon completion of the 
course, students will be able to use words and phrases never 
understood before such as "study" . . . "textbook" . . . and 
"go to class." 

Science 238 — "Gas Exploration" — This course is all 



about gases and how they are formed, which foods originates 
them and the best and quietest methods for the release of them. 
Myths concerning beans and onions will be discussed also. 

Physical Education 311 — "Self Amusement" — This 
course is designed to combat the periods of loneliness brought 
on by the lack of money. Many forms of self amusement not 
requiring money are studied including mold growing, and 
starting toe jam collections. 

Physical Education 394 — "Fluegy Flicking" — This 
course is designed with those students in mind'who have back 
problems or similar ailments which prohibit them from getting 
their physical education credits through tennis or basketball. 
Finger arch, nail length, the Brazilian backhand and the 
Australian curl will be studied to name a few. 

PAS — "Test Taking" — This class will show students 
how to relax before tests, thus allowing them to score higher 
on them. Methods of copying without getting caught will also 
be discussed ensuring even higher test scores. 

Agriculture 438 — "Cow Palpation" — This class fills up 
quickly so those wanting to take it should register early. The 
class centers in on pregnant cows; how to determine their 
pregnancy, and what to do after they are discovered to be 
pregnant. Guest lecturers will be featured throughout the 
semester including Elsie, the Borden Cow. 

Agriculture 358 — "You and Your Fetal Pig" — A must 
for all future hog farmers. The class takes a student on an 
in-depth look at fetal pigs, all the way from mother to Purina 
Monkey Chow. 

EAT 252 — "The Balanced Diet" — This course is 
recommended for those students living on their own for the 
first time. Among other things to be discussed will be the five 
major food groups: meats and poultry, breads and cereals, dairy 
products, vegetables and liquors. 

Sociology 333 — "How to Become Part of the In Crowd" 
— If you don't have many friends, this class will be a great 
asset for you. How and when to use current phrases such as 
"Go for it" and "it was great — especially the time you moved" 
will be discussed along with the proper walk. 






Courlwy o< SIU Archives 



DORJflS 



OK. you win! We've had our 
chance to fill you with the most 
interesting stories of the year. It's only 
fair to include all the breathtaking 
dorm and group shots that we've also 
assembled. A few treasures from our 
backfiles have been added to spice 
things up a bit. 



I 



00 



University Park 



Mae Smith Hall 2-6 




* 



-<$>c u£ij_ 



I 



First Row; Cheryl Canamore, Chris Benson, 
Caralyn Schneider, Jocelyn Treadwell, Melinda 
Herron, Susan Burns, Jill Hager, Panela Nelson, 
Alisa Heyen, Bill Baird, Orval Kuhn, Laura Whalen, 
Jill Nosko, John Connors, Mike McGarel. Second 
Row; Maria Scheckman, Briana Surd, Nancy 
Macenas, Janette Hohl, Dan Esters, Leslie Houser, 
Tim Colglazier, Mariana Oliviero, Valerie Busch, 



Dale Chandler, Connie Fox, Unknown, Lori 
Woodward, Renne Harris, Alan Boba, Unknown, 
Jane Harper, Luke Lyter, Unknown, Mike Falkman, 
Mike Coffey, Will Goldstein, Unknown, Frank 
Zgonc, Alan Sculley, Molly Cook, Ruth Waytz, 
Steve Warnelis, Kim Wilcox, Bob Carlson, Noreen 
Hart, Kurt Prell. 



Mae Smith Hall 7-11 




First Row; Kathy Basden, Marsha D. Dutton, Debbie 
Babcock, Cheska Anselmo, Diane Short, Thea West, Ivan 
Eddi, Greg Card, Dave Morris, Tony Wyleta, Ray Lang, Mark 
Willson, Mike Ecoonan, Ted Moore, Brad Maulding, Mike 



;a«Lv3S5i 



Wrzesinski, Cortney Hughes, Steve Davis, Norman Powell, 
Brad Wills, Unknown, Gart Baker, Tom Cromwell, Unknown, 
Rick Grliatt, Chris Chiappetta, Brad Cross. 



to 



Mae Smith Hall 12-17 




Names Submitted; Mariann Pritchard, Nancy 
Hoelscher, Lori Jones, Marsha Huffman, Mah- 
sheed Jamnejad, Erika Humpidge, Karen Gibhart, 
Donna Garrett, Valerie Hoggatt, Brenda Benard, 
Connie Friend, Angie Rund, Maggie Biederbeck. 
Kathy Whalen, Mary Credille, Margaret Walker, 
Lynn Kiebbowski, Richard Koenigs, Paul Holzapfel, 
Tim Preston, Al Hasken, Richard Witt. Chris Zettek, 
Don Schaefer, Michael Medwedeff, Robert 
Gardner, Phil Berg, William Boyd, Rich Kenny, 
Patricia Zampa, Sharon King, Linda Czosek, 



Colleen Gross, Sheila Breen, Jean A. Barnerd. Sara 
Graening. Alise Holden, Cynthia Holtfreter, 
Cathleen Mason, Julia Adams, Julia Johnson, 
Judith Roark, Michelle McDonald. Katherine Keefe, 
Nancy Krogull. Barbara Caires, Robin Shade. Sara 
Sinclair, Jeanne Sarno, Diane Chudoba, Jenifer 
Mobley. Lori Sigrist. Cheryl Ungar. Pam Albers, 
Kathy Lonson, Gail Osgood, Sandy Carlsen, Cindy 
Murphy. Bev Collingsworth, Lisa Greene, Gayle 
Majerczyk, Cheryl Walters, Penny Dietrich. 



Neely Hall 2-6 




First Row; Ronda Zucco. Sharon Timmerman, Diana Beasley, 
Teresa Rainwater, Patrica Diement, Marsha Smith. Mark 
Barrow, Rick Dorsett. Kathy Prichard, Sandy Klein. Second 
Row; Hazel Gray, Dedra Pendleton. Marshelle Owens, 
Thelma Nettles, Susan Ohm, Irene Papademeteiou, Susan 
Hultgren, Cheryl Sullivan. Cathevine Williams. Amy Sobiech. 
Denise Aubuchon, Rosemane Hill. Carrie Hewdee. Lee Bell. 
Janine P.. Lisa Leech. Third Row; Jim Currie. Marcus Rowe. 



Unknown. William Futrell, Jr.. Jane Oldigs. Mitchell Kaufman. 
Chris Harre. Linda Bussman. Paula Weir, Dawn Wagenk- 
necht, Don Ford. Lynne Doerr, Rhonda Pace, Wayne Worker, 
Denise Rhodes. Mike Munzo. Akiko Okumura, Larry Wolters, 
Jenny Clauding. John Schrag. Jan Julius. Julie Wisdom. 
Stefan Geiger. Kent M.. Karen Kassen. Brenda S.. Paul Wick. 
Sherrie Erukson. 



Neely Hall 7-11 




First Row; Cindy Halik, Lisa Heppler, Ylonda 
Williams, Loretta Nettles, Kim Mayo, Joyce 
Henderson, Linda Haake, Donna Murphy, Lori 
Spale, Melissa Watana, Melissa White. Second 
Row; Laura Carlson, Kari Beyer, Debbie Blazek, 
Leanne Borgstrom, Terry Vecchio, Pam, Robin 
Zears, Kathy Winfield, Adrianne Wazol, Rhonda 
Mehring, Beth Joseph, Lisa Jones, Debbie Volz, 



-im^^2&™m^^&&?^ ;*■■;£ sjffisSs 



Rite Coyne. Third Row; Lauren Whaley, Sue 
Balmes, Sue Waltman, Suzy Smith, Alicia 
Parsegian, Mary Churnivic, Colleen O'Connor, 
Sherry Tostouaranek, Mary Kusy, Unknown, Janet 
Wegrzyn, Unknown, Brenda McConnell, Carol 
Loisel, Tracy Blankenberg, Unknown, Ann 
O'Malley, Unknown, Donna Murphy. 



o 



4? 




**• 



Neely Hall 12-17 




First Row; liana Labowitz, Joe Mulligan, Tammi Holody, 
Kathy Roche, Patty Kusinski, Unknown, Unknown. Second 
Row; Debbie Phillips, Cathy Rennolds, Cary Dickson, Lisa 
Grieg, Debra Freeman, Brenda Fikes, Twila Lavender, Naomi 
Davis, Julie Salamon, Unknown, Unknown, Donna 



Seabrooks, Unknown. Third Row; Cathy McGarel, Linda 
Lofstrom, Unknown, Unknown, Leo Casaunas, Mary Dailey, 
Unknown, Unknown, Lisa Wilhelm, Unknown, Kathy Hess, 
Unknown, Linda Rosihoneck, Jacki Calwell, Melody 
Murphey, Unknown, Valerie Upchurch. 



00 



Schneider Hall 2-6 




Schneider Hall 7-11 




First Row; Chrystal Platis, Mary Milne, Brenda Steinmetz. Joy 
Cameron. Michelle Lamore, Lori Ivy, Candace Conwell, 
Laurie Smith, Michele Turner, Christine Porter. Second Row; 
Anne Morris, Klmberly Jackson, Cheryl Hiatt, Larry Shute. 
Ray Quintanilla, Anne Krone, Maureen Noonan, Tomary 



Jefferson, Bob Liss. Kim Nederhouser. Matt Garich, Karen 
Weidenbach, Sandy Pedermon, Derek Booker. Westley 
Smith, Colleen Griffin. Karen Myers. Mark Schwolow. David 
Glass, Ken Harris. Jill Thrush. Debbie Gallo. Kevin Baker. 
Monica Lee, Karen Kaufman, Connie Weber. 



00 



Schneider Hall 12-17 




First Row; Doug Fitz, Kathy Smith, Rhonda 
Funderberg, Barb Kucharczyk, Traci Driver, Holly 
Seal, Kim Harkness, Rachel Baruch, Cheryl Amari, 
Sally Berlin. Second Row; Sandra Calhoun, Teresa 
Geels, Amy Brown, Robin McGee, Sherry Cristol, 
Greg Sidwell, Lee Childers. Third Row; Unknown, 
Unknown, Unknown, Karen Watroba, Laura 
Hozian, Paula Bogosian, Sue Desousa, Joanne 
Elia, Margie Marquardt, Jeanne Charvat, Bob 
Pearce, Unknown, John Casey, Kevin Skibbe. 



Fourth Row; William Huber, Gene Taylor, 
Unknown, Unknown, Unknown, Jeff Gorham, 
Unknown, Unknown, Mike Nadolski, David 
Newhardt, Kevin Slaven, Robert Clark, Chip Pirsch, 
Thomas Sutterer, Jeff Arden, Joseph Vollmer, 
Marion Riddle, Gene Cheroniak, Bob Guziel, Ron 
Juliano, Dan Kleffman, Cyrus Fakroddin, Shawn 
Ingram, Unknown, Maris Grabaway, Guy Giahmini, 
P. J. Schranz, Steve Krogul, Randy Becker, Jim 
Roff, Unknown, Greg Sonnenfeld. 



4 



JP 



%> 



Allen 1 




First row; Jeff Baitman, Ward Dawson, Karl Wahl, Shawn Johnson, Peter Pfeifer. Third row; Kevin Ball. Jon Sonney, 

Foley, Don D'Agostino, Jim Contratto, Dan Johnson, Peter Dean Kirk, Don Parkin, Mitch Gober, Mark Walker, Jon 

Grieder. Second row; Dave Klimcak, Michael Cusack, Ken Dzengolewski, Greg Springer, Brad Cummins, Horace 

Oschsenhofer, Doug Grabenstetter, Roy Dave, Derrick Singleton, Nelson Taylor. 



00 
CO 



Allen II 







Allen III 




First Row; Spencer Wilkins, 
Paul Reed. Larry Basilio, Bill 
Gary, Harry Wright, Jack 
Patmythes. Berry Cline, Pat 
Helmers, Roger Warner, Ron 
Seyforth, Pete Debenny. Jerry 
Michael Tintera, Kevin Sabo. 
Jeff Weinert. Mark Dyer, Keith 
Gerard, Mike Murphy, Joe 
Oliver, John Schmidt, George 
Phelus. Second Row; Mike 
Wujcik, Rick Carr, Rytas Kleiza. 
Jim Baer, Bruce Bucz. Jim 
Lucas, Scott Tidaback, Tim 
Schulte, Mike Armstrong. Brian 
Bliss, Bruce Bellack. Richard 
Roberts. Rodney Blackford. Jeff 
Carroll. Scott Wood. John 
Kampa, Tony Smith. Carlson 
Livingston, Scott Alka. Chris 
Olson. Third Row; William Lyles. 
Fritz Levenhagen. Fred Lieb- 
liech, Jeff Brown. Mark Ley, 
Paul Brinkworth. Tom Berkley. 
Marcus Maltbia. Larry Bayer. 



First Row; Pat Canevello. Chris 
Cooper, David Weir. Sean 
Doyle. Gregg Spreit. Mike 
Doyle. Fred Pope. Tom Lessen. 
Neil Baltz, Mike Barber, Scott 
Musial, Mike Lovekamp. Mark 
Barrow. Dan Scott. Second 
Row; Jerry Dixon. Gary Deigan. 
Bill Dombrowski. Jim Lyles. 
Anthony Johnson, Anthony 
Jackson. Dean Zarrick. Joel 
Cluver, Eric Therkildson, Greg 
Drezdzen. David Larrick, Jeff 
Hyde, Bob Cundiff. Charles 
Deyo. Ken Kollman, Buck 
Childers. Gary Clouse. Mark 
Huelskamp. Bob Lamb, Dan 
Rogars. 



First row; John Toal, Dan 
Feiwell, Phillip Hues, David 
Kallal, Bryan Latham, Resse Jo 
Slack, Steve Taylor, Walter 
Henderson, Joe Weaver, Chuck 
Kennedy, Armando Dealba, 
Fayez Fanik. Second row; Mario 
Alvino, Ken Brewar, Keith Krapf, 
William Iwome, Greg Kullick, 
Bert Halbert, Jeff Druckman, 
Fred Hutchinson, Jeff Jaster. 
Mark Hooska, Vance Johnson, 
Miguel Vindas, Ken Hughes, 
Gary Doman, Herman Brass, 
Earl Kenny, Robert Tyler, Tom 
Herrmann, Robert Brown, David 
Borowski, Tim Commings, Paul 
Turner, Jerome Terry, Barry 
Kelpsas, Dale Bishop, Robert 
Franklin, Jeff Paris, George 
Tuttle, Paul Vaner, Owen Jar- 
and, Ron Bolda, Chris Warlick, 
Brian Van, Kevin Krahn. Third 
row; Aarne Joelo, Scot Borg, 
Dan Bolda, Randy Deihs. 



1 






Boomer I 




Boomer II 



First Row; Mike Schwalb, 
Marion Teagle, Scott Monroe, 
Edmund Stuntz, Duwain Bailey, 
Kieth Conaway, Greg Riley, 
Glenn Stolar, Ted Trimble, Rick 
Robbins, Evan Rushing, Mark 
Buchheim, Tom Brown, Rick 
Niedhardt. Second Row; Russ 
Mars, Jon Ramp, Mark Town- 
send, Joe Brent, Steve Lhotka, 
Tom Seneczko, Mark Stieren, 
Steve Rabeor, George Moeri, 
Michael Waylen, Danny Bur- 
rows, Steve Kalter, Doug Night- 
engale, Danny Scheck, John 
Wermeling, Doug Swanson, 
Alex Salerno, Jim Tauchert, 
Nick Unangst, James Earl 
Swick, Tim Stuedell, Dave 
Hoffmann, Curtis Turner, Mark 
Sanderson, Tom Rushing. Third 
Row; Ted Titus, Bob Shepelak, 
Jim Triplett, Jim Scott, Eric 
Baird, Tom Braun, Scott Ken- 
nedy, Mark Siegel, David Ur- 
banski, Michael Vaughan, 
Robert Rosene, Larry Sandidge. 




00 



Boomer III 








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Wright I 




$ 



Wright II 




First Row; Cliff Beatty, John Austin, Tom Moore, 
Mike Palmer, Gary Delfiallo, Dave Nelson, Mark 
Bee, Dan Bakker. Second Row; Rob Rempert, John 
Boncoure, Dan Beck, Tom Monroe, Dan Ro- 
driquez, Mark Homan, Jim Grose, Ed Beggs. Third 
Row; Eric Edwards, Mark Weller, Roger Loy, Steve 
Erwin, Mark Haugen, Mark Orrison, Lyle Ganther, 
Bob Petty, Rudy Rosillo, Mike Wilson, Nelson 
Hinds, John Carrow, John Ritichie, Craig Manning, 



Will Augustine, Jim Culleu, Steve Maty, Glenn 
Roberts, Mike Crocco, Ron Miller, Jim Dehn, John 
Marshall, Dave Comstock, Tom O'Brien, Steve 
Camp, Dave Finnerty, Greg Dailey, Paul Connelly, 
Al McKay, Nate Johnson, Sherman Modre, Steve 
Feld, Larry Becker, Dave Parks, Clay Erickson, 
Grey Olson, Warren Evans, Bob Konecek, Dave 
Robinson. 



Wright III 




First Row; Kenneth Yang, Asim Khan, Michael Anderson, 
Larry Sweat, Robert Sagendorf, Bill Cronin, Mark Fitzgerald, 
Steve Slaw, Theodore Fields, Mark Larimore, William Spruit, 
Joseph Walsh, Larry Zieman, Jim Gross. Second Row; Brian 
Hanback, Ted Behr, John Roberts, Jerome Fritchle, Mark 
Hriciga, Arnold Harris, Jim Roberts, Kurt Kennard, Tom 
Scheve, Lawrence Eric Edmondson, Daniel Wudthe, Dave 
Shafer, Mike O'Toole, Tim Burkhalter, Kyuwheh Huh, Michael 



Santher, Robert J. Gregorich, Mark Combs, Mike Ellman, 
Wayne Lurz, Charles Sisk, Henbert Rnekes, Unknown, 
Michael Scannell, Steven Leone, David Rowold, William 
Holland, Gerald Markowski, Hillis Johnson, Michael Szumlas, 
Roger Giller, Kelly Cotter, Tim Fisher, John Crouch, Robert 
Kennedy, Howard Streeter, David Huttel, Unknown, Joe 
Leonetti, Ricky Wallace, Tom Lena, Jim Mansfield, Mark 
Klaisner, William Spencer, Anthony Davidson Boyd. 



00 



Thompson Point 

Abbott Hall 




First row: Clayton Kemmerer. Miles Kilcoin, Jim 
Cane, Mark Collins, Mark Monroe, Bruce Wilcox, Ken 
Lipetz. Second row; John Dunning, Bret Banner. 
Mark Goldberg, Jerry Fielding, Tim Kott, Bob Loeffel, 
Ken Proctor, Wayne Ksiazkiewicz, Jan Faassen, Jeff 



Brzinski, Don Scheele, Martin Merkau. Tom Vickery, 
Jim Zeinz, Craig Moffat, Perry Baid. Douglas Nichols, 
Tom Pardee. Joe Henderson, Brian Plaut, Tod 
Lindbeck. 



Bailey Hall 




First row; John Kubinski, Jay Cook. Brian 
Pendleton. Garen Cornett. Neal Bryant. 
Scott Hodge. Arnie Venclauskis. Second 
row; Mike Bennett. Al Davis. Kevin Eager. 
John Buford, Daniel Homuth. Rick Hankins. 
Anthony Delgado. Robert Churchill, John 
Halm, Reginald Kirkwood. Robert David- 
son, Unknown, Unknown. Brian Kerber. 
Unknown. Tim Henry, Bryan Williams, 
Unknown. Paul Seifert. David Darrough. 



Phillip McClarey. Bill Andrie. Bob Frisch. 
Bryan Warner, Donald Young. Jeff Sodaro. 
Tim Frahm. Keith Chappell. Ken Macgarri- 
gle, Stanly Farley. Arnie Bernstein. Mark 
Mazza. Brian Barth, Vic Arredondo. Mark 
Cornell. Scott Bayliff. Doug Garrard. John 
Norns. Paul Harrison, John Herena. 
Timothy Haviland. Greg Picur. Third row; 
Jeff Banker, Paul Antena. 



oc 



Baldwin Hall 





First row; Marian Webster, Nancy Rainey, Lori 
Buckley, Bonnie Adams, Patty Kasebier, Joan 
Couch, Karen Swalec, Unknown, Amy Klaus, Karen 
Trippi, Linda Rasmussen, Jenny Fields, Nancy 
Lyznicki, Celeste Nezzle, Kay Blachinsky, Janet 
Ruddy, Mary Hogan, Linda Childress, Chris Ponce, 
Georgette Voldemarons. Second row; Janilyn 
Dailey, Amy Witte, Caren Bell, Celene Bochat, Ruth 
Nelsen, Brigid Jenot, Margie Beerup, Kim Meyer, 
Sue Gaylord, Susan Hankla, Mary Melone, Rose 



Roider, Leslie Price. Third row; Patti Thompson, 
Lois Bell, Lisa Andreae, Cathy Creed, Susan 
Stapleton, Jeanna Hunter, Julie Gradle, Kari Loess, 
Johnna Parker, Sue Lidicker, Becky Ramage, 
Kathy Schmidt. Fourth row; Jayne Barrow, Kim 
Lafferty, Shelley Wilderson, Bobbi Hulling, Elia 
Perez, Doris Harrah, Kathy Hall, Barb Dirkson, 
Merri Wente, Linda Stockman, Leanne McConville, 
Sheryl McKee, Leslie Sloan, Chris Schramek, 
Helen Taylor, Patty Graham, Kris Budelier. 



Bowyer Hall 




First row; Janet Huffman, Sue Welk, Jill Schuld, 
Jane Miller, Karen Napen, Judy Mussallem, 
Therese Ferriter, Lauri Boswell, Lynda Kohne. 
Second row; Nancy Chodosh, Cindy Mann, 
Stephanie Bischof, Jackie Dailey, Karen Hoff. 
Fourth row; Terry Delahanty, Katie Granton, Barb 
Drobilik, Pam Petrow, Cathy Richten, Christine 



Struck, Pam Hall, Susan Partridge, Peggy Knox, 
Peggy Robinson, Angie Smith, Mary Kay Steffes, 
Nancy Moon, Monica Jones, Liane Foster, Mary 
Jean Vyncke, Debby Standeart, Marcia Frederick, 
Jamie Grobelink, Sharon Dennis, Pat Fisher, Beth 
Beyene, Carol Buch, Joni Gages, Tena Davis. 



00 

to 



Felts Hall 




First Row; Dan Stratlon, Paul Karr, Dan Lesnick, 
Greg Gehont. Mike Welch. Randy Vanderhoff. Terry 
Binder, Don Colclasure. Rusty Ayres. John Kuzinch. 
Olaf Klutke, Ward Schultz. Second Row; David 
Clarke, Bill Savage, Ed Guerrero, Joe Blonski, Larry 
Moher, Kevin Thomas, Jim Harbin. Mike Gossett. 
Third Row; Staffort Gavin, Jim Christopher, Tim 
Castle. Joe Orr. Bob Kruger. George Smith. Dennis 
Ludwig. Don Matter. Scott Julian, Bob Siebecker. 



Dave Coe. Dave Linke, John Steinway, Bill Brush, 
Unknown. Dave Lenzi, Tracy Roberts, Unknown, 
Kevin Hughey, Unknown, Al Heston, Unknown. 
Craig Feldner, Mike Powers, Vic Vanderaa, 
Unknown. Rich Aholt. Unknown. John Reddy. Bob 
Alien, Kane Keirnan, Mat Josefouigz, Barry 
Newman, Dave Latimer, Bill Jones, Mark Hameister. 
Unknown. Jeff Patzke. Grey Oiler. 



Kellogg Hall 




First row; Kimberley Ryan, Francie Carver, Sherry Beatty, 
Stephanie Green, Jill Anderson, Holly Price. Patty Roth, 
Nedra Smith, Mary Beth Von, Lucy Mosenbacher. Francie 
Saiver. Denise Cariello. Lois Jacobs. Teresa Stratton. Breda 
Gannon, Janice Cannon, Joyce Simpson, Laura Speight. 
Tern Fry, Tsui Fong Wu, Stacy Summers, Janice, Julie 
Wallace. Laura Dyer. Karen Carter, Lori Abney, Sherry 
Hagan. Ellen Diederich. Second row; Barbara Scheer, Judy 
Meade, Jenny Beeze, Kim Bartlow, Gail Anderson, Cynthia 
Meador, Maria Cepa. Rhonda, Kris Hazard, Julie Becker, 



Cinda Chullen. Charlene Akins, Michelle Martina. Lisa Smith. 
Mary Jo Myers. Suzanne Fauteux, Dawn Coats. Third row; 
Brenda Elstrom, Ann Suslavich, Julie Becker, Maureen 
Rennolds, Jean Watermain, Kelly Sandusky. Shay Grant. 
Ame Zarski. Jane Rapp. Julie Stroud. Paula Graeper. Donna 
Kurtz. Tracy Fowler, Leslie Oetgen, Julie Kush, Beth 
McDermott, Janet Mose, Jeri Williams. Sara Bilder. Kendra 
Hackstadt, Kim Vugrinec. Carol Brinkman. Pat McKiou. 
Shirley Baucus. Becky Miller, Kris Lovett. Diana Stanley. 
Shelly Brown. 



Pierce Hall 





First Row; Phil Kedzuch, Charlie Sowders, Kevin 
loannacci, Rick Hartmann, Dennis Hughes, Stan 
McCoy, Dave Cascarano, Al Fischer, Mark Carter, 
Randy Brown, Larry Best, Kim Montroy, Mike 
O'Conner. Second Row; Dill Kerkhover, Steve 
Werner, Andy Bolt, Don Brunner, Jim Mackey, Joe 
Szweculak, Bill Russ, Eric Austin, John Saban, 
Gene Maynard, Scott Broster, Dave Bruki, Ken 
Detloff, Prez Cole, Ralph Locher, Kevin Schaller, 
Steve Johnson, Kevin Doyle, Greg Collingwood, 



Karl Terp, Kevin Cranford, John DeBruyn, Eric 
Ulaszek. Third Row; Unknown, John Harris, John 
Kemic, Gary Pfaffinger, Kirk Paulsen, Dave 
Perkowitz, Phil Abbinante, Steve Scheuber, 
Unknown, Dean Tisch, Steve Eck, Tracy Epps, 
Kevin Ring, Jeff Skimel, Phil Hernandez, Buddy 
Smith, Bob Taylor, Mike Carano, Paul Dow, Tom 
Beckman, Unknown, Unknown, Bob Callos, Steve 
Daube, Ted Kinnamon, Lou Flinker, Jeff Clarke, 
Steve Shannon, Craig Keller. 



Smith Hall 




First Row; Renee Farris, John Underwood, Atsuyuki Nake, 
Kris Zanni, Jerry South, Kristy Swallow, Cathy Scheidt, Kit 
Hamilton, Mike Walczak, Jeff Behnke, Jody Bolles, Karen 
Uyeno, Beth Brandt, Janice Crutcher, Ned Jacklin, Howard 
Kleinstein, David Trandel, Rolland Vandeveer, Sandy Fee, 
John Miles, Cindy Hall, Patricia Johnson, Beth 
Collinbqourne, Michael Toricelli, Cindy Humpherys, Cheri 
Goldstein, Keith Kapocius, Roger Bolton, Patsy Jones, 
Seth Brown, Patrick Essig, Gary Hilmes, Joe Ziolkowski. 



Second Row; Martin O'Conner, Mary Home, Ross Thorne, 
Patricia Biermann, Donna Marie Noak, Jeff Daley, Robyn 
Gurnick, Sue Kaufman, Kevin Hahn, Doug Oloman, Mike 
Aurand, Scott Connelly, Susan King, Jim Law, MaryBeth 
Knorr, Donna Robbins, Gary Gibula, Laine Giovanetto, 
Trudy Keyser, Jane Spesard, Sara Cox, Paul Hinze, 
Terance Scerine, Jack Gariota, Philip Eberlin, Scott Hicks, 
Meyer Wiseman. 



CD 



Steagall Hall 




First row; Rick Smith, Nancy Myrdek, Lori 
Harris, Karen Karibian. Second row; Chris 
Phalen. Elaine Gold, Alan Fries. Karen 
Wooley, Karen Hawk, Donna Shaw, Todd 
Ziegler, Curt Loyet, Carole Shearer, Kitty 
Wallensack, Jeff Wey, John Gustafson, Barry 



Giacone. Bruce Weaver. Third row; Tom 
Linder, Carl Macuiba. Tim Pflauem, Tracy 
Schulze. Eric Schiller. Patty Rohrbacher. 
Dirk Huntley. Steve Sophie. Dave Greer. Rick 
Bakosh, Simon Harris. Mel Bonnell, Barb 
Sawicki. Bob Werdan. Tim Wheeler. 



Brown Hall 




First Row; Dave Dickerson. Frank Dalsanto. 
Terry Sponsler. Matt Muldoon. Second Row; 
J. D. Cross, Mike Fleming, Howard Ganden. 
Curt Sinclair, George Fields. Paul Kroll. Ken 
Shaw. Jim Pavlism. Terry O'Neal. Unknown. 



Lenny East. Chuck Parrott. Jo Ferrero, 
Unknown Third Row; Rob Effinger. Mike 
Salmond. Marty Garramone. Randy Web- 
ster, Don Torry. Jeff Day. Ron Gaviller, 
Unknown. John Merkle. 



35 



o 

R 



2IkmJ 



Groups and Organiza- 
tions make up a big chunk 
of the SIU family. Some are 
more recognized, more 
wealthy, and of course, 
more fun than others. We 
asked each group to include 
a paragraph or two about 
themselves this year. As you 
can see, not all were com- 
pelled to do so. 



I 



GROUPS 
A 

N 

I 

Z 

A 

T 

I 

O 

N 

S 




Courtesy of SIU Archives 



CD 



Orienteering Club 



The Southern Illinois 
Orienteering Club is a 
sport club in existence to 
promote the sport of 
orienteering in Southern 
Illinois. Orienteering is 
cross-country running 
which involves using a 
detailed contour map and 
a compass to negiotiate 
ones self through a preset 
course of markers. 

The club holds meets 
for beginning and exper- 
ienced orienteer's and 
organizes travel to nation- 
al meets in various parts 
of the country. 




- 



Front Row; Ellen Riley, Jim Hertz, Karl 
Reynolds, Jonathon Schmidt. Second Row; 
Anne Krumpelstaedter, Kathy Sharpe. Third 
Row; Tom Sparks. Brian Schaffner. Rob 



Dunlavey. William Dempsey, Robert Hesketh. 
Grant Sovereign, Tom Lone, Steve Jackson. 
Jim Green. Jeff Roberts, Christina Anderson. 



Intramural Sports Advisory Board 




L to R; Rory Clark. Mike Miller. Harry Aldndge. Paula Mytych. Pat Ade. 



— 
01 



Block and Bridle Club 





First Row; Janet Ruddy, Ken Kennedy, Ken Schurter, Ty Langham, Dean Wright, Unknown. Second Row; 
Thomas Meyer, Susan Hultgren, Mike Nauman, Unknown, Howard Sopy, Denise Grandfield, Sue 
Mangiamele, Rod Kenderdine, Unknown, Dr. Powell, Dr. Woody. 



Egyptian Divers 




Front Row; Jan Martin, Ric Jonson, Greg 
Allegretti, Mike Andersen, Bill Jamrok, Don 
Meier. Second Row; Ken Detloff, DaveGuinnip, 
Doug Dufford, Julie Arenberg, Chris Phillips, 
Stephen Sophie. Third Row; Stephen Fischer, 



Scott Henderson, Dean Tisch, John Ladley, 
Tim Ringness. Fourth Row; Unknown, 
Unknown, John Singler, Phil Reece, Debbie 
Kuhajda, Rudy Sommer, Brian Dykstra, Gino 
Agostinelli. 



Southern Illinois 
University's Scuba Diving 
Club is well worth their 
weight in salt water. Aside 
from diverse origins and 
individual areas of inter- 
est, all members share 
similar views on the club's 
art form, which is seen 
through each individual's 
enthusiasm. 



to 

en 



Saluki Pom Pon Squad 



First Row; Angela Prather. Ann 
Williams. Terry Miskimen. Julie 
Behrends, Sherry Zabroski, 
Tammy Adams. Second Row; Ann 
Chandler, Janet Barkan, Jann La 
Piana, Kitty Wallensack, Patti 
Jackson, Vicki Lo Biano. Not 
Pictured; Laureen Craig. 




Backgammon Club 



First Row; Roger Levin, Guy 
Thomas. Scott Jensen. Scott 
Sherman. Jimmy Gevas. Second 
Row; Kathie Pratt. Foad Amoon, 
Don Schumann, Cindy Toohey. 
Jerry Boyle, Cindy Umfleet. 
Jordan Gold, Georges. Unknown. 
Phil Feinsilver, Jerry Garcia. Anne 
Gevas 










Saluki Flying Club 





First Row; Bob Young, Bill Dixon, 
Jeff Kinnery. Second Row; Scott 
Sowers, Chuck Hill, Paul Fuhr, 
Harry Jarvis, Dave Greer. 

The Challengers 




First Row; Joyce Shepherd, Linda Martin, Gerry Zimmerman, 
Paulette Subka, Jim McElroy. Second Row; Dawn Craik, 
Mary McClemon, Nancy Vice, Mike Herzovi, Dennis Wallace, 
Sheryl Sungail. Third Row; Ellen Cook, Arnie Venclauskas, 



Mary Ann Merchen, Mike Gossett, Mike O'Conner, Kathy 
Dermody, Pat Lee. Fourth Row; Howard Thomas, Richard 
Smith, Maria Fredrick, Jo Cook, Rich DeAngelis, Tom 
Vickery, Kim Rennolds, Mary Sullivan. 



CO 



Agribusiness Economics Club 




First Row; Keith Starr. Jim Binfield, Randy Kinzinger. 
Second Row; Steve Phillips, Jeff Erb. Lynn 
Wedekemper. Gary Beyers, Mark Waller, Alan Pieper, 



Ken Kocher, Rolland Vandeveor, Jim Miller, Unknown, 
Tami Schaafsma. Edward Beggs, Bob Schultz. 



Agriculture Student Advisory Council 




First Row; Randy Kelley, Vicky Hagemann. Bob Sloan, Mark 
Frederking, Dr. William A. Doerr. Second Row; Peggy Graver, 
Randy Kinijinger, Ken Kennedy. Dennis Greenlief, Jim 



Benfield, Tom Meyer. Brett Bussler. Tom Fahey, Skip Easter, 
Larry Trommer, Lynn Wedekemper. 



00 



Joint Student Council- College of 
Engineering and Technology 





First Row; Larry Dalton, Frances 
Parton, James Patterson. Second 
Row; Dean Templemeyer, George 
Komora, Paul Stonikas, Clevelend 
Sebree, Steve Kinkade. 

Science Fiction Club 




First Row; Charles Gee, Doug Purviance, Marcel Jacobs, Mijatov, Tom Cox, Wayne Lurz, Cheri Solway, Derrick White, 
Garry Wilcox, Guy Thomas. Second Row; Gene Gyore, Bob Steve Staneff, Valerie D'Antone. 



CD 
CD 



NSSHA 



First Row; Adriene Brown, Denise 
Jensen, Melodia May. Susan 
Landess. Second Row; Judi 
DeGroot. Anita Celli. Estelle 
Klasner, Terry Yeager, Jim Vol- 
pert. 

SICCM-ADN Program 





First Row; Agnes Carnaghi. Sandy Hyduk. Sue Larcom. Judy 
Newton, Sylvia Kagetf. Susan Piland. Second Row; Gay 



Grace. Nancy Hart, Ruthann Lampkin, Treva Dickerman, 
Jackie Buttell. Grace Watgen. Alice Hees. 



Pan-Hellenic Council 




Sphinx Club 

r 




L to R; Duwain Bailey, Bob O'Daniell, 
Dorrie Kaplan, Winston McAdoo, Mrs. 
Winston McAdoo, Rod Talbot, Martha 
Jean Rasche, Mike Scully, Bob Saltzman, 
Virginia Karnes, Rex Karnes, Julie 
Behrends, Robert Gentry, Pat Melia, Pete 
Alexander, Jim Karas, Frank Horton, Marty 
Schmidt, Mary Lou Swinburne, Bruce 
Swinburne, Nancy Harris, Carl Harris, 
Sandi Britt, Father Jack Frerker. New Fall 



members not shown; Diana Albertini, Amy 
Biggs, Rebecca Bressner, Cynthia 
Burgess, William Doerr, Gary Dowdalls, 
Mark Duewer, Julie Godke, Nick Gritti, Gail 
Kear, Donna Kunkel, Janet LaPiana, 
Dennis McKilligan, Charles Martello, Derek 
Moore, Theresa Peters, Debra Quantock, 
Nancy Tormeno, Tom Trentlage, Tammy 
Whitten, Mark Yoder, Kay M. Pick 
Zirkovich, Ronda Zucco. 




First Row; Allyn Dobson, Sandi 
Britt, Cris Pelefas. Second Row; 
Beth Bigham, Cindy Burgess, 
Julie St. John, Jamey Williams. 



Since 1939, the Sphinx Club 
has provided honorary recogni- 
tion to those undergraduate and 
graduate students who have 
made an outstanding contribution 
to the S.I.U. and Carbondale 
communities. Election to Sphinx 
Club is based on participation in 
campus activities and exceptional 
scholarship. The activities con- 
sidered include service, profes- 
sional and departmental organ- 
izations, Greek letter organiza- 
tions and residence hall activities, 
interest groups, athletics, and 
campus wide involvement. 
Members in Sphinx Club are also 
the only students from S.I.U.-C to 
be recognized in Who's Who 
Among Students In American 
Universities and Colleges. Honor- 
ary membership may be given to 
any person other than an under- 
graduate or graduate student who 
has made an outstanding con- 
tribution to the University 
community. 



to 

o 



Clothing & Textiles Club 







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Front Row; Amy Biggs, Polly Piland, Anne Hampton, Barb 
White. Dianna Klein, Gina Sarlo, Cindy Roach, Terri 
Grahovac. Randee Korer. Second Row; Diane Meyer, Sue 
Ellen Rich, Ann Mulchy, Jan LaPiana, Kitty Wallensack, Shari 



Bavma. Ellen Kostelc. Sue Stockwell, Angela Boozas, Helen 
Dunn, Diane Venvurnin, Roberta Issacson, Eva Woods, Laura 
Enloe, Julie Mangiamele, Karen Tennis. 



Advertising Design & Illustration Club 




First Row; Gina Staten, Cindy Fisher, Elaine Luper, Lori 
Rircher. John Yack, Jene Bacha, Kim Gross, Karyn Haworth. 
Terri Kubian. Brad Fuller. Second Row; Andy Fenkbeiner. 
Cindy Jackson, Dave Fissell, Nancy Speilman, Bob Rubey. 
Amy Meyers. Kent Hunter, Jane Elson, Mark Green. Donna 



Losey. Tim Fischer. Charlene Chastain, Colleen Carr. Doug 
Rush, Diane Noland. Dan Ford. Leslie Pearls. Geoff Melick, 
Nadine Michl. Tom Grant, Bob Onken. Patti Vaughn, Paul 
Robinson, Chris Thompson. 



s 



Student Art League 





Front Row; Unknown, Patricia Taylor, Kathy Unknown, Margo Walton, Jude Heck, Diana Dimus, 
Woodhull, Alice Mclnstry, Sharon Moritz, Mark Caryl Pausteck, Tim Trovillioni, Matt Kolinski, Diane 
Kretzman. Second Row; Wes Crumm, Bruce Byrum, Eschner. 



American Society of Interior Design 




First Row; Dennis Stevens, Pam Ezell, Deb Beccue, Randall 
Manson, Barb Caires, Unknown, Mary Sullivan, Unknown, 
Lisa Hammond. Second Row; Kendell Youngs, Lisa Merkle, 



Alisa Bliwas, Stephanie Scardon, Jon Kimmons, Nancy David, 
Gina Gookin, Tami Sargent, Gregor Moe, Unknown, Julie 
Johnson. 



to 

o 

CO 



Home Economic Teachers Assoc. 



Left to Right; Marilyn Cox, 
Carolyn Holloway, Elaine 
Ricketts. Nancy Whitehead, 
Lynda Spaniol, Charlotte 
Stanley, Kendra Wilburn, 
Cathy Pierce, JoEllen Whi- 
tehead, Phyllis Ponton, Kay 
Brittle, Jane Rapp, Dr. 
RoseMary Carter, Joyce 
Pettijohn, Mary Lee Mit- 
chell. Tammy Bauer. 




SIU Botany Club 



Left to Right; Steve Dittrich. Dr. 
Lawrence Matten. Dr. Walter 
Sundberg, Sue Fender, Jon 
Howe, Sharon Chermak, Paul 
Cohen, Dan Barta. 




-T 
© 



Ural interpretation Club 





First Row; Eric Ewan, Clark Ann 
Mitchell, Lois Goss, Carolyn 
Boyce, Matt Deichmann, Tersa 
Baumgart. Second Row; Allan 
Kimball, Ann Deichmann, Sue 
Mace, Dr. Marion Kleinau, Allison 
Beam, Annette Queyquep, Eric 
Peterson. Third Row; Bill Bowlus, 
Larry Modaff. 



Engineering Club 




First Row; Steve Pitts, 
Scott Meisinger, Paul 
Stonikas, Greg Schae- 
fer, Chuck Anderson, 
Jeff Ippel, Second Row; 
Mike Peters, Tom Par- 
dee, Charlene Arins, 
John Angstmann, Cinda 
Chullen, Zasmida 
Samah, Hootash, John 
Bonnett, Jim Sykora, 
Azhani Wahab, Unk- 
nown, Razali lorid. 



to 

o 



T.EE.C. 




Left to Right; Josh Gilbert, Kit Hamilton, Mark Hameister, 
Kent Croon, Scott Baylif. Becky Miller, Eric Larson, Shirley 
Bacus. Vic Eric, Lisa Kiefer, Jim Kahfeldt, Jeff Cole, Todd 

Student Alumni Board 



Higgins, Monica Jones, Donna Spurrier, Karen Swalec, Chris 
Phelan. 




Left to Right; Janice Barnes, Tom Cromwell, Roger Dettloff. 
Teresa Abell, Rita Jackson. Chirstopher Phelan, Bob 



Saltzman. Bill Scully. Shelley Wilkerson. 



8 

<M 



New Student Orientation 





College of Business & Administration Student Council 




Front Row; Mike Guiffre, Janet Lindholm, Francie Schlake, 
Robert Mosley. Second Row; Tim Plahm, Chuck Marx, Laura 



McAdams, Tom Jaskowiak, Maggie Higgins, Brian McGrath, 
Valerie Anderson, Sharon Lerman. 



t\3 

O 



Geology Club 



Front Row; Ann Little, Glen 
Leubking, Eric Lipten. Mark 
Klaisner. David Latimer. Second 
Row; Jeff Zeman, Jeanice Bleem, 
Kaizen Fitzmaurice. Third Row; 
Jeff Kirtland, Jim Greyback, Dick 
Burroughs, Marci Killian, Dr. 
George Fraunfelter, Art Cisneros, 
Kathleen Adams, Mark Sollmon, 
Alejandro Lopez. Dave Hewing, 
Craig Edwards. 




Plant & Soil Science Club 




Front Row; Tom Fahey. Rhonda Miller, Gail Gregersen, Vicky 
Hagemann, Kim Pool. Larry Tromner. Mike lacomini. Second 
Row; Irv Hillyer. Larry Strubhart, Sherry Beatty, Val Whisler. 
Sharon Duray. Ray Knoll, Sandy Thomas. Les Wieglos, Rene 



Frasher, Eric Ulaszek, Terry Ettinger. Sally Pigman. Unknown. 
Herbert Tebbe, Bob Lenken, Kevin Hanningan, Unknown, 
Unknown. Mary Frye. 



00 

s 



Society of Geological & Mining Engineers 





First Row; Issam Kherniser, Rob 
Young, Kathleen Adams, Wayne 
Frankie. Second Row; Frances 
Parton, David Hewing, Chris 
Cravits, Lynn Moade, Brian 
Goetsch, Jim Greybeck, Glen 
Luebking. 



Society of Manufacturing Engineering 




Front Row; Gil Rutherford, Danny Donaldson, Unknown, Dave 
Goeco, Geoff Dean, Unknown. Second Row; AN Asef, Ebrahim 
Farokhnia, Mitch McDowell, Leif Thorson, Steve Kinkade, 
Philip Beyer. Third Row; Feisal Hijazie, Fred Smith, Mike 



Weaver, Eric Glidden, Mike Quam, Howard Greer, Bruce 
Willams, Gary Wilcox, Joseph Ohmes, James Grace, David 
Newlon, Tom Watson, Phil Anderson, Larry Blackford, Jim 
Glowiak, Steven Hasty. 



to 
o 
to 



Society for Advancement of Management 



Front Row; John Smith, Melodie 
Ranstrom, Colleen Murphy, Kris 
Anderson, Dorothy Tsuruta. 
Second Row; Cathy Baker, Jeff 
Olund. Barb Malloy, Scott 
Stender, James Paul, Dan Hogan, 
Tess Garey. Heather Ryan, 
Melody Reams. 

New English Organization 





o 

CM 



Agribusiness Econ. Grad Club 





Front Row; Bob Shaeffer, Amy 
Sheetz, Annette Queyquep, Mary 
Schulz, Tim Mooney. Second Row; 
Tom Reed, Tom Anderson, Dan 
Hintzsche, Bill Nicholson, Lars 
Timpa, Dr. Moe. 



Theatre Guild 




Front Row; Bernadette Motrhome, Kama Berte, John 
Ellerman, Moamgam Mbassa, Mark Waller, Chris Loiacono. 



Second Row; Dr. George Shoemaker, Edouard Kassi, Bill 
Lapp, John Williams, John Kelly. 



Marquesis Brotherhood Society 




Seated; James Rogers. Left to Right; John Wesley, Dwaine 
Venton, Darzel Price, Rodney Trottman. 



NRAA 




First Row; Susan Godley, Julie Westenberger, Gloria Cheryl West. 
Bueno, Tom Rafferty, Gail Kear. Second Row; Ken Cayo, Lorenz. 



Susan McRae. Ralph Matkin, Dr. Jerome 



(M 



ivm/i Assoc. 





Japanese Student Assoc. 




First Row; Megumi Komiya, Takeshi Ogawa, Safumi Ohashi, 
Masayuki Tanaka, Fumihiko Inaki, Michiko Shimohara, 
Kazuko Matsumoto. Second Row; Tonohide Sagara, Mitsuo 
Yamauchi, Yasuko Nakashita, Margaret Oae, Yoko Sano, 



Kuniko Kusano, Tadashi Negishi, Fuminori Nakamura. Third 
Row; Keisuke Ota, Isao Nago, Fukiko Doi, Taketo Fukui, 
Ippei Suzuki, Shinichi Hayashi, Ippei Hirai, Shuji Abe 



to 

I— ' 



Blacks Interested in Business 



Front Row; James Rogers, Milfred 
Moore. Shelia Hudson, Robert 
Campbell, Elaine Jones, Lance 
Peeler, Roberta Hearn. Second 
Row; Jeffery Copeland, Reggie 
Campbell, Grailing Brown, Robert 
Wonsley, Robert Mosley, Unk- 
nown, Everett Warner. Venitia Hill, 
Richard Rock. 




Assoc, of Legal Students 




First Row; Debbie Reeder, Mary Moughamian, Judy Mosier, 
Lisa Scronce. Carol Sympson, Karen Lelonek, Felicia Walton. 
Second Row; Denise Netterville. Melanie Wieland, Paula 
Atteberry. Kim Phillips, Stacey Summers, Diane Derfler, Dee 
Donaldson. Ruth Ponton, Cindy Clore-Davidson, Stephanie 



Shearer, Third Row; Cynthia Woods. Pauletta Morse. Tracey 
Cole, La Zann Blackman, Brenda Quintero. Stacey Hanner. 
Tanna Held, Lori Kincade. Alica Heyen, Cindy Flune, Karen 
Castrale. Sallie Diekroeger, Cathy McFann, Peter Flores, Alan 
Wernecke. Claudette Luepke. 



in 



Girls Rugby 








Front Row; Nora McKilligan, Beth 
Beyerl, Deb Pasley, Karen Paquin, 
Barb Canoto, Danae Frick. 
Second Row; Chris Lupica, Dee 
Neal, Sandy Hyduk, Shannon 
Maulding, Mary Beth Jung, Jackie 
Dailey, Holly Hartman, Mary Ellen 
Corrigan, Susan Kelly. 



SIU Recreation Club 




First Row; Linda Mulkevin, Karen Kivschke, Pat Stang, Tom 
George. Second Row; Patty Rohrbacher, Frankie Ferrario, 
John Daniel, Sue Kettelkamp, Debbie Burda. Third Row; 
Chuck Campbell, Theresa Goss, Tony Drahos, Vicki Lang, 



Rich Wyman, Joann Vongenhen, Bonnie Brush, Linda 
Brougham, Mike Rizhevson, Jan Noble, Janet Stout, Julie 
Enyart, Dr. William OGrien, Rich Cichy. 



to 



Racing Bike Club 




Left to Right; Dan Casebeer, Michael Lynch, Stephen Apple, Al Bourg, Michael Jenkins, Bob Rubey, -John Belcher, Kevin Budd, 
Linda Elgart, Kim Evans. 



Shorinji Kcmpo Marial Arts Club 




Front Row; Tina Mantay. Tadashi Negishi. Rod Straton, Mass, Chuck Roberts. Third Row; Karl Kerstein. John Nelli, 
Mitsuo Yamauchi, Mark Brandner. Second Row; Ippei Hirai. Dan Miller, Shannon Tindall. Unknown. 
Fuminori Nakamura, Tom Walters, Jeff Plimpton, Jerri Lyn 






Touring Bike Club 





Left to Right; Dave French, Peter Pfeiffer, Jody Ott, Schmedly, Etbert Hannah, Brien Van. 



Weightlifting Club 




Front Row; Sue Cittadino, Liz Werner, Rick Palmer, Roger 
Poppen. Second Row; Alan Xanders, Marrin Wright, Bob 
Howerton, John Chernis, Blair Gambill, Neil Plotsky, Randy 
Mileur. Third Row; David Brussell, Dominic Cittadino, Mike 



Walter, Mike Marini, Bill Burton, Gary Lenz, Carl Williams, 
Fritz Lerenhagen, Jan Podrebarac, John Boncuore, Jim 
Cazel. 



to 

-J 



Southern Synchers 



First Row; Mary Nedza, Carol 
Fischer. Eileen Casey, Roberta 
Isaacson, Rose Giannola, Sue 
Hayes. Second Row; Mary 
Heitman, Roberta Flanders. 
Marilyn Pond. Jan Guenther. 
Tina Anderson, Tanya Wynn. 
Third Row; Chris Wichman, Alice 
McKinstry. Jill Polley. Cindy 
Sorn, Sandy Stonis. 




Twirlers 



Left to Right; Brenda Acree. 
ao Tammy Whitten, Vicki Rupp. 




SIU Cheerleaders 





First Row; Steve Sedlacek, Donell 
Caswell, Dave Erlenbaugh. 
Second Row; Trina Green, Lorita 
Shirley, Ronda Beltz, Tara Eaton, 
Melanie Rayburn, Polly Richie, 
Lisa Vanhorn, Polly Piland, Jill 
Lambert. 



Southern Singers 




First Row; Kathy Clayton, Ellen Bluestone, Dawn Cowap, 
Debra Ogilvie, Diana Mills, Cheryl Eigenrauch, Angela 
Wappel, Kelee Flannery, Diane Timmerman, Michelle Leger, 
Joan Bishop, Jennifer Besse, Denise Bohlmann, Sheila 
Shepard, Lauren Bishop, Karen Garabedian. Second Row; 



Don Bishop, Leonard Holmes, Patrick Jones, Scott Kennedy, 
David Beccue, Michael Cain, Bob Rainey, Richard Kempiak, 
Mark McGrath, Doug Enos, Gregory Burris, Peter Alexander, 
Charles Lloyd. 



to 

I— ' 

to 



Accounting Club 




PRSSA 




First Row; Jean Full. Sheri Thetford. Ashton. Second Row; Pat Johnson. 
Ellen Riddle. Bob Quane. Laurie Chuck Hempstead, Ron Lindsey. Dr. 
Anderson. Susan Crusoe, Lynette Don MacDonald. Cindy Peper, Charles 



Beck, Mary Lee Montague. Rich Jarrett. 
Barry Newmiller. Ken Solow. 



z 

CM 
CM 



Marketing Cub 





First Row; Larry Cohen, Cindy 
Dusik, Sharon Herman. Second 
Row; Debbie Bell, Barb Keller, 
Marilyn McElroy, Brian McGrath, 
Doug Neufeld. Third Row; Gail 
Smith, Margaret Hill, Jane Harper. 
Fourth Row; Bill Baird, Dave Reid, 
Jim VanWolvelear. Fifth Row; Bob 
Dunk, Gary Havlik, Dave Speck. 



Inter-Greek Council 




First Row; Sherrie Johnston, Donna Lasenby, Terri 
Stinnette, Rick Blue, Allyn Dobson, Randy Jensen, Marcia 
Barnett, Donald Cole. Second Row; Derek Moore, Cris 
Pelefas, Sandi Britt, Inez Anderson, Diane Smith, Chris 
Blankenship, Brenda Coble, Debbie Wood, Kathy 



Krawczyk, Cindy Burgess, Franz Smith. Third Row; Mark 
Yoder, Steve Wagoner, Steve Stromquist, Mark Duewer, 
Dave Doyle, Bill Morris, Joe Was, Julie Godke, Larry 
Lefferts, Rodney Sharp. 



to 
to 



Alpha Epsilon Rho 




First Row; Mark Dyer, Maureen Foster, Jeanine Herold, Gary 
Smot. Rory Clark, Dean Sasman. Second Row; Julie Scherl, 
Annette Bergh, Dave King, Mike Herzovi, Tom Marko, Harold 
Gerdes, Ava Odum, Jack Hutton, Brian Mahalick, Michelle 
Mears, Mary Taglieri, Vicki Babu, Steve Paoli, Craig Brown, 
Vince Finato, Steve Kravitz. Third Row; Beth Brandt, Bob 
Butler, Steve Bernstein, Ed Chochrek, Barb Munzert, Peggy 



Terry, Jeff Parker, Jack McDevitt, Gary Petersen, Karen 
Stanwick, Mary Zeiler, Kurt Kiser, Hans Herman Thun, Dave 
Averbach, Al Madison, Warren Lewis. Ed Dee. Brian 
Schumacher, Dave Platta, Brian Gerval, Brian Beljanski, Heidi 
Heinzmann. Francesca Anselmo, Kathy Keenan, Jeff Daley, 
Suzanne Joseph, Paul Reis, Eileen Reedy, Cathy Armandroff, 
Teri Winking, Eric Gemmer, Barry Horwitz, Tate Tetrault. 



Alpha Eta Rho 




First Row; Joe Deminico, Joe Benscoter, Alex Holm, Joe Cox. 
Mario Alvino, Earl Snook, Scott Mission. Second Row; Mike 
Perillo, Debbi Staib. Jan Mazurek, Ron Beed. Arvind Laroia. 
Mike Schmidt, Craig Klingler, Roger Doran. Rob Osmon, Jeff 



Ellison. Bob Hayes. Robin Lawson, James Paolella. Chuck 
Balboa, Dave MacKenzie, Graham Tuke. Bob Kozar, Gary 
Campbell. 






Alpha Gamma Rho 





First Row; Scott Welge, Matt 
Reidy, Mike Huber, Ken Ander- 
son, Tony Tracy. Second Row; 
Randy Brooke, Mike Nauman, 
Mary Taylor, Jeff Fraulkner, Jed 
Fraley. Third Row; Rich Gerger, 
Brian Harmon, Larry Brink, Chuck 
Shaub, Randy Twyford, Bob 
Rainey, Thomas Meyer, Scott 
Welge, Ray Hartman, Jim Miller, 
Rodney Schmidt, Allen Anders, 
Mark Brazinski, Kerr Seehusen, 
Tony Brown, Larry Agne, Doug 
Wood, Glen Koch, Kirk Anderson. 



Alpha Gamma Delta 




Front Row; Diane Marunde, Kim Merhar, Charlene Brescia, 
Anna Gillis, Lynn Whitehead, Michelle DeVaull, Polly Piland, 
Konni Reis, Nancy Kowal. Second Row; Tanya Alley, Tami 
Soelhke, Timi Soelhke, Ann Marie Porter, Cheryl Jones, Kim 
Barron, Julie Kelly, Laura Roy, Ann Buchman, Angie Cox. 



Third Row; Patty Jackson, Allyn Dobson, Candy Hall, Kim 
Roloff, Crystal Palmer, Kim Strasser, Renee Farris, Celeste 
Wright, Jody Bvatte, Janie Pool, Theresa Sakonyi, Juliana 
Stuber, Kristen Kessler, Tammy Whitten, Cris Pelafas, Julie 
Hellmer. 



to 
to 
w 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 



Front Row; Donna Miller, Renee 
Kennedy, Deborah Walton, Gena 
Gunn. Kim Wells, Valerie Epps. 
Second Row; Donna Wimes, 
Pamela Whitaker, Clara Simmons, 
Roxanne Riddick, Terri Stinnette, 
Cheryl Toles, Marsha Walton, 
Vanessa Haynes, Eolene Howard- 
Burton. Third Row; Debra Kim- 
brough. Ruth Younge, Joy Jones, 
Cynthia Parker, Cheryl Perkins, 
Alesia Burns, Dena Walton. 




Alpha Phi Omega 



Front Row; Mike Reece, Mi- 
chelle Edmonds, Melody Bartel, 
Annie Quinliven, Duane John- 
son, Steve Vogt. Patricia Gran- 
dis, Robyn Frick. Second Row; 
Carol Fischer, Cindy Umflect, 
John Underwood, Chris Struck, 
Gloria Arenas, John Sode, 
Doneta Price, Lynn McWhinnic, 
Amy Heimann, Willa Devin, Lisa 
Schambach. Stan Dekiel, 
Margaret Ernat, Dave Temple, 
Mary Kay Donohue, Mark Glas- 
gow. Bev Paventi, Tracy 
Kovacic. Craig Homann, Glen 
Smith. Bill Martinez, Jeff Geyer, 
John Ogle, Therese Piraino, 
Kathy Kaiser, Lana Benning. 




CnJ 



Alpha Lambda Delta 




£7C__^ 




Front Row; Patti Cadagin, Nancy Ponton, Lisa 
Peden, Karen Long, Cheryl Mitchell. Second Row; 
Michelle DeVaull, Jane Rapp, Paula Graeper, Karen 
Smith, Therese Piraino, Sherry Zabroski, Patricia 



Gardner, Dorothy Andrews, Thelma Nettles, Pam 
McGee, Lynn Zimmermann, Melisse Marks, Sandy 
Bigham, Virginia Benning. 



Alpha Tau Omega 




Front Row; Bart Baker, Rick Short, Al Winterle, 
Jeff Haight, Jay Stewart, Carl Miller, Dr. C. David 
Schmulbach, Brandon Cox, Ellen Campbell, Mike 
Meschler, Randy Bettis, Mike Mossman, John 
Gonzenbach, Floyd Glenn, Jim Cox, Jeff 
Christensen, Bob Cairo, Steve Killian, Jim Surles. 



Second Row; John Berns, Mike Howell, James 
Knight, Kris Pacey, Bob Oldershaw, Mark Dyslin, 
Wilfredo Olmds, Mark Duewer, Kyle Kerestes, 
Tom Hevrdejs, Mark Houska, Scott Maher, Jim 
Karas, Ken Gleichman, Paul Evans, Dave Benson, 
Ken Mueller, Scott Roberts. 



to 

to 

en 



Alpha Zeta 



Front Row; Cindy Krone, 
Laura Rutherman, Brett 
Bussler. Kevin Hannigan. 
Second Row; Denise 
Grandfield. Sue Fender, 
Kevin Rushing, Sue Tryba, 
Todd Higgins, Mike 
Santner, Brian Gates. Third 
Row; Amy Janik, Kirk 
Pamper, Peggy Graver, Bill 
Chappell, Dennis Greenleaf. 
Loyd Pohl. Greg Slack, 
Marcus Bates, Dr. Robert 
Aurther. 




Delta Alpha PSi 




a 



Delta Sigma Theta 




_a£K>)«) 



Delta Chi 




to 
to 



Kappa Alpha Pfei 



Front Row; Randy John- 
son, Emmit Harris, 
James DeJonhett. Don- 
ald LaSsare, Marty 
Long. Second Row; 
Cannon Fears. Ronald 
LaSsare. Kim Johnson, 
Dwayne Williams, Kirk 
Loveyy. Third Row; 
Tony Carter, Ronald 
Daughthery, Andre 
Moore, George Hart, 
Kenny Vick, Doug 
Evans. Cgirg Charleton, 
Ben Moore. 




Kappa Omicron Phi 



Front Row; Monica 
Alles, Susan Rice, 
Phyllis Ponton, Sallie 
Stahl. Second Row; 
Mary Jane Gingrich, 
Gail Peterman, Char- 
lotte Sims. 




CM 
CM 



Omega Psi Phi 





Front Row; Edward McMillian, Leonard Langston, 
Fred Moore, Charles Meredith. Second Row; Henry 



Williams, Dwayne Flowers, Charles Anthony, Felix 
Giboney, Henry Bumpers. 



Pi Omega Pi 




Front Row; Cynthia Dobbins, Hazel Andros, Judy 
Howard, Pam Melliges, Karen Schmerbauch, Cathy 
Odum. Second Row; Debra Sanders, Phyllis Bond, 
Sheryl Bleyer, Mary Armstrong, Teresa Kirby, 



Cherryl Snyder, Nancy Rebeschini, Betty Miller, Jill 
Belcher, Gerolyn Sommer, Tim Aurand, Jo Davis, 
Tamara Bicket, Dr. Marcia Anderson, Cherie 
Cooper. 



to 

CO 



Sigma Kappa 



Front Row; Sue Murphy, 
Tammy Wolgan, Pam 
Petrow, Carol Conroy, 
Becky Bressner, 

Claudette Leupke. 
Shiela Washatka, Sue 
Welk, Debbie Swan. 
Second Row; Carolyn 
Athans. Cheryl Bock, 
Debi Kaiser, Julie 
Godke, Dorothy Coch- 
ran. Marty Shaub, Janet 
Cleveland. Lynn Hynes. 
Third Row; Kate Lath- 
am. Robyn Whitburn, 
Donna Kunkel, Suzi 
Kemp, Randi Perlman, 
Carol Harres, Sandi 
Britt, Nancy Tormeno, 
Noreen Terlap, Cathy 
Patterson. Margaret 
Brandt, Chari McDon- 
ald, Tonya Mork, Vicki 
LoBianco, Angie Boor- 
as, LaZann Blackman, 
Regina Hutton, Lorri 
Whiting, Donna Reide, 
Mary Jane Mahlke. 
Kathy Mullen. 



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Phi Mu Alpha 



Front Row; Bob Cohlmeyer, 
Mike Hanes, Pat Tueth, Bob 
Siemer, Ed Pabich. Second 
Row; Chuck Hoy. Mike Raley, 
John Flautt. Dan Metcall. 
Third Row; Bruce Weaver. 
Steve Bogren, Rick McCoy, 
Bill Webber. Fourth Row; 
Craig Ryterski, Tom Sparks. 
Gil Rutherford. Bill Webber. 




© 

EC 



Sigma Tau Gamma 



Front Row; Jim Turner, 
Lisa Pope, Dawn Gamauf, 
Lori Schock, Tammy 
Gormley, Kurt Keller. 
Second Row; Mary Ann 
Jones, Holly Lee, Becky 
Rich, Tom Bisnack. Third 
Row; Don Wells, Chuck 
Schultz, Mike Vidusek, 
Dave Reimer. Fourth Row; 
Rob Zimmermann, Tim 
Motz, Kurt Sagendorph, 
Dan Vidusek, Tom Dierolf, 
Bob Zettler, Dan Pope, 
Rainer Krautwald, Miles 
McClure, Tim Urness, 
Larry Luebbers, Bill 
Fuller. 





Pi Sigma Epsilon 




Front Row; Roxanne Knauss, Jim Polachek, Simon Lodge, 
Audrey Wilson, Cherri Pitman, Jane Stimac. Second Row; 
Kathy Stachurski, Dwaine Wilson, Toni Betti, Rick Hankins, 
Jay Cook, Wendy Rebert, Pam Mueller, Lynn Dintleman, 
Tracy Rujawitzc, Laura McAdams. Third Row; Lisa File, 
Teresa Knox, Bill Massolia, Barb Sawicki, Julie Faletti, Bob 
Liss, Tom Hoschiedt, Peggy Dewberry, Tom Martin, Dan 
Thomas, Patti Flieder, Theresa Sakouyi. Fourth Row; Ken 



Solow, Patty Chandler, Jim Tuerk, Diane Metrick, Rich 
Rindo, Sue Aust, Unknown, Tom Skwirut, Scott Maxwell, 
Karen Ramsey, Judie Dobrydnia, Greg Buric, Kathy Sayre, 
Steve Gade, Ken Kempa, John Pruitt, Kevin Swan, Mark 
Russow, Jim Dolan, Mike Curry, Kathy Ryan, Jeff Moore, 
Craig Haines, Brian Freeland, Unknown, Bill Davis, Bill 
Beaupre. 



to 




Front Row; Jim Hale, Bert Silich, Linda Vaneol. Bob Cooper, P. K. Davis, Mark Russell, Don Schumann, Terry Dockerson, 
Gorge Kamora, Monty Moore, Antony Man, Roger Missavage, Lawrence Lim, Steve Pearod, Dr. Thomas Jefferson, Dr. 
Larry Dalton, Tayfun Bayazil. Second Row; Greg Griffin, Dr. Stewart Ferrell, Dr. Curtis Dodd, Dr. Jim Evers. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

' a » • 
i a i 




00 



Front Row; Phil Hocher. Christian Alieff. Charles Williams. 
Dave Hackett. Dave Encson, Kurt Neely. Steve Santarelli. 
Second Row; Rupert Van Den Bogarde. Mike Strandell, Dave 
Gorsage. Steve Walter, Jim Santarelli. Dale Schweighart, 
Mike Whitson. Chris Soderstrom. Mike Finelli. Doug 



Mikeworth. Third Row; Eric Nixon, Chris DeMarco, Scott 
Hessick. Mike Miller, John Welbourn, Bill Ryan, Dan 
Gawaluck. Bob Butler. Steve Stromquist. Mark Yoder. John 
Cronin. Colon Wyatt. Tom Gayne, Steve Clark. 



Asso. of Child Educators 



- 




> 



First Row: Mah Livengood, Melody 
Bartel, Paula Neumeier. Second 
Row: Cindy Gay, Laura Harmon, 
Gail Perkins, Kevin Doherty, Maggie 
Mathias. 



Law Enforcement 



First Row: Richard Marinello, Kerry 
Knodle, Nancy Stevens, Ann Domin. 
Second Row: Steven Weger, Bob 
Mingo, Bill Erfurth, Kathy Whit- 
temore. 




French Club 




First Row: Dennis Frazier, Mick 
Barens, Ray Broersma, Becky 
Norton. Second Row: Howard 
McQuarrie, Jim Kuhn, Judy Aydt, 
Margaret Epro, Tracey Des Enfants, 
Xu Ngu. 



to 

CO 
CO 



Alpha Kappa Psi 




First Row; David Bjork, Greg Larsen, Sergio Rabinovich. 
Shirley Johnson, Bob Hartmann. Jeff Russo. Second Row; Bur 
Rem. JoAnn Capezio. Ila Allen, Jeanine Allen, Kedra Miriani, 
Irene Hodes, Mardi VonHermann. Third Row; Barry Duncan, 
George Jaskiewicz, William Morgan, Jim Chambers, Lindy 



Eggemeyer, Debbie Walsh, Debbie Wilson, Mark Lauderdale, 
Jim Brakas, Debbie Koerber, Eltrimice Booth. Maggie 
Higgins, Connie Field, Francie Schlake. Doug Cummins, Steve 
Wykle. 



Alpha Phi Alpha 




First Row; Winston Phillips. Richard Gardner, Rodney 
Herring. Franz Smith. Daryl Leake. Joseph Mason. Second 



Row; Dennis Hunt. Randy Allen. Ivan Sherrill. Booker Clay, 
Tony Curtis. Ramon Rowery. Syrron Stephens, Curtis Davis. 






Sigma Gamma Rho 





First Row: 
Kathrine Collier, 
Judith Ann 
Dennis, 

Donna Williams. 
Second Row: 
Dora Weaver, 
Carmella Taylor, 
Jackie Clayton, 
Wanda Woods, 
Dorris Weaver, 
Faith Geater, 
Cynthia Capers. 



Pi Mu Epsilon 




First Row; Dennis Frazier, Steven Lazorchak, Darrell 
Wagstaff, Robert Gregory, David Mees, Nick Sortal, Camy 
Abba. Second Row; Lowell Carmony, Darla Chambers, Karen 



Smith, Vicki Proctor, Becky Carrell, Joe Wilson, AN Sazegari, 
Karen Christensen, Aminah Ahmad. 



to 

CO 



Sigma Phi Sigma 




First Row; Paula Polk, Rochelle Bryant, Beverley Smith. 
Second Row; Mack Young, Mark Staab. Eric Austin. Kevin 



Smith, Tom Cromwell. James Vallero. Mike Kisler. Tom 
Mullen, Dennis Dahl. Jeff Wey. John Gibson. 



Saluki Swingers 








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First Row: Ron Sutton. Mark Hedinger. John Murphy. Alan 
Greenberg. Bob Bauman. G. Russell Hancock. Second Row: 
Darrell Millsap. Kaye Anderson. Will Rietreld. Tammy Bauer. 
Leslie Sentel. Wendy Broadbooks. Daniel Barta. Third Row: 



Gayle Roberts, Cindy Gossard. Yvonne Magdziak. Leo 
Bohanon. Sue Fender, Maria Stockton. Norshila Abdullah. 
Sraeyah Ismail. 



- 
ri 



Angel Flight 





First Row: 
Capt. Sam Crow. 
Second Row: 
Cathy Stranc, 
Kathy Miller, 
Jean Wootton, 
Amy Larson. 
Third Row: 
Ruth Dexter, 
Marie Cox, 
Linda Keel, 
Theresa Hartke, 
Chris Kroninger, 
Deb Hurt. 
Fourth Row: 
Greg Parish, 
Sharon Strusz, 
Pam Davis, 
Dave Casebeer, 
Diane Stanley, 
Sherry Beatty. 



Linguistics Student Association 




N2 

CO 

-a 



Dental Hygiene 




First Row: Sandy Lieberenz, Sue Page, Sonda Melton, Kim 
Petersen, Beth Bowman, Laura Milstead, Michelle DeVaull. 
Mary Jo Gramke. Linda Czosek, Debbie Pfaff. Second Row: 
Nancy Glomb. Wendy Hurt. Ju-Lee Adams, Karen Litherland, 
Jeannie Launer, Lois Burgener, Linda Winvaugh, Ellen 



DuShane. Third Row: Kimberly Grott. Susan Mueller. Christy 
Reid, Mary Ellen Pooley, Susan Jones, Patty Jones, Bill 
Stilwell. Fourth Row: Sara Graening. Colleen Gross. Lesa 
Wilson. Valerie Yarkik. Margaret Holmes. Joan Mollohan, Kim 
Lathrop. Cindy Holtfreter, Lauranne Newhouse. 



Future Farmers of America 




X 

■M 



Judicial Board — 





fSk 



First Row: 
John Czuba, 
Suzan 

McCutchen, 
Vickie Jones, 
Keith Kovarik, 
Mickey Haslett, 
Dale Reisenbigler 
Second Row: 
Wies McNeese, 
Alan Greenberg, 
Mike Dennis, 
Aaron Stanley, 
Edward 

Bergstrom, 
Virginia Benning, 
Steve Miller. 



Baptist Student Center 



i r 

i 






UgKH 






•I® 





First Row: Gary Heath, Sheri Minton, Lori Summers, Jill 
Lambert, Kandi Rippy, Janet McHaney, Gayla Wilkerson, 
Karla Thierry. Second Row: Tadahiro Fukunaga, Lori Clark, 
Melissa Stuckey, Leanne Hopkins, Janet Coleman, Stephanie 
Tebow, Denise Adams, Patty Williams, Cindy Little, Linda 
Morton, Debbie Gallmeister, Debbie Vickery, Kathy 
Touissaint. Third Row: Larry Shacklee, Steve Disney, Kim 



Lausen, Dave Beccue, Larry Schonert, Jeff LeBaron, Walter 
Hehner, Sue Dronski, Ken Deason, Harry Clendenin, Mike 
Roberts, Frank Keck, Scott Burke, Keith Morgan, Kevin 
Kunce, Danny Procter, Andy Gillespie, Russ Deason, Kenny 
Sprague, Marlin Wilkerson, Dave Owens, Jeff Klingenberg, 
Mike Rumsey. 



to 

w 

CD 



Student Athletic Adv. Board 




First Row: Cindy Clausen, Mary Gilbert. Patty Jacques. Cindy 
Scott. Jan Berglin, Peg Kielsmaer. Second Row: Sandy 
Lemon. Cathy Chiarello, Penny Porter, Mauri Kohler. Lynne 



Williams, Denny Kelly. Sue Fazio. Sue Faber, Gayle Penewell. 
Robin Deterding. 



Arnold Air Society 




First Row: Tom Purple. Thomas Klincar. Kenneth Hlavacek. 
Jonathan Sabatmo. Henry Detwiler. Marcus Starbuck. 
Charles Strusz. Second Row: Linda Keel. Amy Larson. 
Deanna Craig. Debbie Hunt. Cathy Stranc. Chris Kroninger. 
Sean Kennedy. Jim Surles. Todd McCollum. Third Row: Capt. 



Sam Crow. Michael Potts. Charles Barnett III. Mike Bristow. 
Bryan Warner. Mark Hunter. Bryan Browning. Umesh Kukreti. 
Fourth Row: Jay Kelleher. Robert George. Jay Edmiston. 
Scott Maher. Paul Copeland. Mark Yoder. Tim Lapsys. 
Frederick Boucher 



— 



Food and Nutrition 



<^h 





First Row: 
Carole Herron, 
Ellen Finegan, 
Mike Conlin, 
Myra Fujimoto. 
Second Row: 
Dr. Frank Konishi, 
Janet Ormond, 
Pat Jackson, 
Kathy Smith, 
Sue James, 
Sue Kovar, 
Steve Xanos. 



Design Intiative 




First Row: Lenny Laidlowe. Second Row: Biff Bryson, Lori 
Bowdownstein, Willie Mellowstar, Ian Emslieburg, Dean 
Bryson, Rosetta Schoen, Twad Squire, Lloyd Amonge, Dom 
Kay, Polly Pacois, Joe Hatchett, Ethel Snertz. Third Row: 
Jimmy Jones, Deanna Semobedean, Denny Goldwater, Leo 
Dombrowski, Charlie Solari, Buckminster Fuller, Marina 



Baskerville, Ibey Funk, James Smith, Lillian Freud, Patty 
Smith, John Role, Mac Lee, Roily Bryson, Dwight Friye, 
Imogene Bloos, Irid Ibike, Harry Rheams, Roberta Conrad, 
Wandy Riggins, Tom Tueter, Salty Crackers, Dora Bloack, 
Ducky Bryson, Woodrow Gamreserves, Bertha Rose, Chuck 
Chox, Wayne Kowalski, John Kommenmann. 



to 








s 



SS&*)n 







j 






' 




A^' 1 




^ 








« 






- 


B i 



Allen, Carla 
Marketing 



Allen, Ha 
Finance 



Carbondale. II. 



Apple, Donna 

Accounting Harrisburg. II. 

Arndt. Chris 

Bus. and Admin. Carbond. 

Ashley, Michael 
Marketing Paris, II. 



Ashley, Timothy 
Marketing Paris, II. 



Asu, Chien 
Marketing 



Aust, Susan 
Marketing 



Baird, William 
Finance L 



Galesburg, I 



Bourbonnais, II. 



Baratta. Michael 

Accounting Arlington Hts., II. 



Barnicle, Katie 
Bus. and Admin. 



Va. Bch.. Va. 



Beaty, Elizabeth 
Marketing Ewing, II. 



Bell, Deborah 

Marketing West Chester, Oh. 



Bell, Janet 
Admin. Sciences 



Bening, Lana 
Admin. Sciences 



Decatur, II. 
Decatur, II. 



Bjork, David 

Marketing Mt. Prospect, II. 

Blackburn, Jeflery 

Admin. Sciences Moline, II. 

Bohnemeir, Cinthia 
Accounting Cartersville, II. 

Brakas, James 

Finance Riverside, II. 

Brand, William 

Bus. And Admin. Carbondal 



Britt, Sandra 

Accounting Vernon, II. 

Broker, Stephen 

Admin. Sciences Carbondale, 

Buyer, John 
Adm Sciences 

Bussie, Anita 

Accounting Chicago, II. 

Bryne, Michael 

Marketing Carbondale, II. 



Campbell, Frank 
Marketing Peoria, II. 

Capezio, Joann 
Accounting Skokie, II. 

Caplan, Howard 

Finance Schaumburg, II. 

Cashmore, Bill 

Marketing Carbondale, II. 



Cherry, Doug 
Accounting 



Carbondale, II. 



Chiarello, Catherine 
Admin Sciences 



Youngstown, Oh. 



Clarno. Tod 

Finance Peoria Hts., II. 

Connell. Scott 

Marketing Badlands, Ca. 

Cook, Frances 
Marketing Moro, II. 



to 

CO 



Cummins. Douglas 
Admin Scionces Tower Mill. II 

Curtis. Thomas 
Accounting Chicago l| 

Daniels. Lawrence 
Finance Chicago. II 

Davis. William 
Marketing Streator. II 

Demar. Slephen 
Bus Econ Flossmoor. II 



Diederich, Denis 
Finance Ottawa. II 

Dtefenbach. Wilma 
Accounting Bontield. II 

Digby, Leroy 
Accounting Chicago. II 

Dobnnick, Charles 
Finance Pmckneyville. II 

Dowel i. Michael 
Admin Sciences Wauconda. II 



Marketing 
Bus and Admin 
Marketing 
Marketing 
Accounting 



Downs. Kevin 
Chicago. II 

Draite. Keith 
Batavta. II 

Durkm. Lori 
Peoria Hts . Ill 

Dyra. Frank 
Chicago. II 

Eaton, Carol 
Carbondale. II 



Edgecombe. Kent 
Finance Mattoon, II 



Edstrom. Thomas 
Accounting Moline. II 



Ellicott. Thomas 
Marketing Morrison. II 



Endtcott. Tom 
Marketing Carbondale. II 



Fnckson. Carl 
Marketing Sullivan. II 



Esanjkowski Lucy 
Marketing Park Forest. II 



Marketing 



Farneti. Eugene 
Cedar Point. II 



Ferguson. Roger 
Admin Science* Marion. II 



Fletcher. Jacqueline 
Admin Sciences Oakley. II 



Personnel Mgml 



Marketing 



Fo*ey. Pamela 
Springfield. II 



Foy, Kenneth 
Libertyvtikff. II 



Freetand. Brian 
Marketing Danville II 



Gam bill. Blair 
Admin Science* Kankakee. II 



Gardner Patrtcia 
Accounting Waukegan. II 



Admin Science* 



Gentry. Ronald 
Sprtngheid 11 



Geriach Joeeph 
Carbondale n 



Gtenn. Floyd 
Marketing Hem. II 

Griffith Roger 
Admm Science* Cobden II 



Guyion. Jai 
Finance Chicago n 




Itl i ?) 7ui 





Accounting 



Ha, Don* 

Carbondale M 








Hall. Gary 
Marketing 

Harper, Jane 
Marketing 

Harvell, Bret 
Marketing 

Havlik, Gary 
Marketing 

Hawks, Robert 
Bus. and Admin 



Prospect Hts.. II. 
Chicago Hts.. II. 
Deerfield, II. 
Carbondale, II. 

Dundee, II 



Hearn. Roberta 
Admin. Sciences 



E. St. Louts. II 



Hendryx, Christopher 

Admin. Sciences Dixon, I 

Henkin, Henry 

Marketing Skokie, II. 

Hennessy. Chris 

Accounting Des Plaines. 

Henss, Paul 

Accounting Trenton, II. 



Hewitt, John 
Bus. and Admin. 

Hodes, Irene 
Marketing Niles, 



Hogan. William 
Accounting Aurora, II. 

Hoke, Richard 

Finance Carbondale, II 

Holland, Debra 

Bus. and Admin. Flora 



Hudson, Sheila 

Accounting Chicago. II. 



Carbondale, II. 



Carbondale, II. 
Glencoe, II. 



Ismail. Rosinah 
Admin. Sciences 

Johnson, John 
Marketing/Econ. 

Johnson, Shirley 
Finance Chicago. 



Johnson. Steven 

Marketing Carbondale, 



Johnston. Charles 

Admin. Sciences Cairo, II. 

Jones, Patricia 

Marketing Kankakee, II. 

Jurgens, Leslie 

Marketing Mundelein, II. 

Kempa. Kenneth 
Marketing Darien. II. 

Khaalig. Tarig 

Accounting Carbondale. II. 



Klein. Roniann 

Marketing Lawyersville. NY 

Klenovich. George 

Bus. Admin. Chicago, II. 



Kisly, Michael 
Admin. Sci. 

LaPlaca, Philip 
Special Major 

Larson, Connie 
Accounting 



Crystal Lake, II. 

Palatine, II. 
Westmont, II. 



Lassiter, Jay 

Marketing Metropolis. II. 

Lee, William 

Finance Carbondale. II. 

Lewis, Jerry 

Marketing Nokomis, II. 

Lewis, Michael 
Marketing Naperville 

Liss, Robert 

Marketing Glenview, II. 



to 



Londngan Timothy 
Bus and Admin Springfield II 



Man. Banjamin 
Carbondale, II 



Admin Sciences 



Mark /Ad Set 
Accounting 



Mann. Daniel 
Accounting Albion. II 



Martin. Gary 
Glen wood. II 



Man. Charles 
Downers Grove. II 



McDonough, Edward 
Admin Sciences Napervtde. II 



Accounting 
Finance 

Marketing 



McEnlee. Mark 
Lockpon. II 



Mcintosh, Lori 
Orland Park. II 



Metnck, Diane 
Cicero. II 



Miller. Charles 
Bus Mgmt Woodndge, II 



Mills. Stephen 
Finance Carbondale. II 

MHone. Gary 
Ace 7 Fin Flora. II 

Mitchell. Marilyn 
Accounting Oak Lawn. II 

Monsen. Paul 
Accounting Glenview, II 

Mosley, Robert 
Marketing Ranloul. II 



Moss. Richard 
Smi Bus Mgmt Libertyville, II 

Mueller, George 
Special Major Blue Island. II 

Musser. Richard 
Marketing Peoria. II 

Naert. Roch 
Bus Admin Carbondale, II 

Linda Gall Oklay 
Finance Palatine. It 



Accounting 
Accounting 
Ad Science* 



Odle, James 
Marion. II 

Ogilby. Suzanne 
Carbondale. II 



Ohashi, Satumi 
inabe Mie. Japan 



Bus Econ 



Accounting 



Finance 



Onsando. J ease 
Nairobi. Kenya 



Oran. William 
Mundeietn. II 



Othman. Husain 
Carbondale, ll 



Pappa* Phillip 
Accounting Chicago, II 

Parks, Janet 
Accounting Molina II 

Pal el. V.i«» 
Ad Hoffman EatalM. II 

Pallon. Pamela 
Accounting Oaadaie ll 



Pavttsin Ja 
Admin Science* Spnngfieid. it 

Peterson . Brian 
Weatmonl. II 



Admin Sciences 



Accounting 



PfHe. There** 
Decatur ii 



Ptanm Ttmolhy 
Oman— a Worth. II 







H«n U«.k.|.ng 



PV>H*y. H»l 
CMcago. • 





Podolski. Stanley 

Accounting St. Louis. Mo. 

Polachek. James 
Marketing Chicago, II. 

Polczynski, Matt 

Accounting Nashville, II. 

Potter, Mary 

Finance Carbondale. II. 

Pruiett, John 

Marketing Ft. Wayne, In. 



Purnagupta, Surabhan 

Bus. and Ad. Bangkok, Thailand 



Haia, Anthony 

Finance Chicago, II. 



Ramjahn. Fiona 
Admin. Sciences 



Chester, 



Ramsey. Robert 
Accounting Marion, II. 

Rann, Carey 

Accounting Chicago. II. 



Reed. Daniel 

Accounting Naperville, II. 



Rhodes, Matthew 
Bus. and Admin. 



Dixon, I 



Rich, Steven 

Accounting Carterville, II. 

Richtman. Clare 

Admin. Sciences Aurora, II. 

Rindo. Richard 

Marketing Crystal Lake. II. 



Rockoff, Scott 

Finance Glenview. II. 

Rogers, James 

Accounting Chicago. II. 

Rosenstein, Mark 
Finance Miles, II. 

Ryan, Mary 

Marketing Edwardsville, II. 

Samars. Nancie 
Marketing Berwyn, II. 



Samples, Robert 
Marketing Lansing, II. 

Scanlan, Martin 

Finance Springfield, II. 

Schieble, David 

Acc./Russian Mt. Prospect, II. 

Schlake. Frances 
Accounting Goreville. II. 

Schlinger, Gary 

Marketing Carbondale. II. 



Schreimann, Daniel 
Accounting Carbondale, II. 

Schuerman, Mariann 

Admin. Sciences Springfield, II. 

Schumacher, Rick 
Accounting Sigel. II. 

Scillufo, Robert 
Accounting Palatine. II. 

Sorbin, James 

Accounting Carbondale, II. 



Shariffudin, Mohamed 

Finance Subang Jaya Selan. Mai. 

Shaw, Daniel 

Business Granville, II. 

Short, Rick 

Accounting Farmer City, II. 

Sinnott. James 

Finance Carbondale. II. 

Skinner, Shirley 

Accounting Golden Gate. II. 



to 

-3 



Admin Sciences 
Bus and Admin 
Bus and Admin 
Marketing 

Marketing 



Skwirut Thomas 
Norndge. II 



Simdee, Car) 
Elmhurst. II 



Smart Judi 
Dundee. 1 1 



Smith. Barry 
Eldorado. II 



Smith. Gale 
Philo. II 



Stannieri, Timothy 
Accounting Chicago, tl 

Steele, Mark 
Carbondale. II 



Accounhng 
Accounting 
Marketing 
Accounting 



Slnph, David 
Libertyviiie. n 



Swan, Kevin 
Belvidere. II 



Swmson Dean 
Durand. II 



Suryn. Robert 
Accounting St Louis. Mo 

Thurston. Thomas 
Marketing Wallingford. Ct. 

Trankle. Michael 
Bus/Rec Mngt Lake Bluft. II 

Tranyiet, Mmhthanh 
Bus Econ Carbondale. II 

Tremuhs. Peter 
Bus and Ad Highland Park. II 



Trexler, Kevin 
Accounting Alto Pass. II 

Tuerk, James 
Marketing Peoria, ll 

Vaughan. Angeline 
Marketing Mt Vernon. II 

Weber, Steven 
Accounting Deerlield. II 



But /Finance 



Wenz, Kenneth 
Schaumburg, ll 



West port, Cathleen 
Finance Orland Park. II 

Williams. Daniel 
Accounting Chicago. II 

Williamson, Timothy 
But and Ad Murphysboro. II 

Willis, Carole 
Accounting Peoria, ll 



Wilson. Debra 
Chicago, ll 



Admin Sciences 



Marketing 



Wineberg, Mark 
Des Plaine*. ll 



Wiseman. Belly Jean 
Marketing Petersburg. II 

Wootton. James 
Murphysboro. II 



Bus Econ 

Accounting 

Admin Science* 

Accounting 
Bu« end Admin 



Wright DavKJ 
Carbondale. ll 



Wyfcie. Stephen 
Rock island, ll 



Young. George 
Carbondaie tt 

.'•tiler Robert 
Champaign. II 



Hoacnetdl Thomas 
Marketing Henry, n 



00 




THe 



°eez ,. 




Seni 0rs 












*«. WALT£ 









Y 

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B» 

■ /!/ 












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CO 



Adams. Cynthia 

An .■English Skokie II 



Allen. Steve 
Barnngton. It 



Speech Comm 



Anderson. Charlotte 
Radio-TV East St Louts. II 



Anderson, Laurie 
Pub Rel Scott AFB II 



Auerbach. David 
Radio-TV Wilmette. II 



Babu Victoria 
Springfield. II 



Baker. Joan 
Park Forest. II 



Balamos. Oebra 
Rad -TV/Pub Rel Decatur. II 



Ballard, Janice 
Music/Business Alton, II, 



Balsley Julie 
Speech Comm Danville. II 



Bates. Brian 
Journ Carol Stream. II 

Baumgartner. Sharon 
Speech Comm Elgin, ll 

Baur. Kimberly 
Speech Comm Springfield. II 



Cm/Photo 
Radio- TV 

Pub Rel 
Comm /FA 
Theatre 
Radio- TV 

Pub Rel 



Becker. Randy 
Waukegan. II 



Bernstetn, Steven 
Lincolnwood, II 



Berry. MeJvin 
Carbondale. II 

BHIig. Curt 
Park Forest. II 

BHtgen. Robert 
Crystal Lake. II 

Bird. Richard 
Watseha II 

Borucke, Robert 
Chicago. II 



Radio TV 

Speech Path 

Rad to- TV 



Brandt, Beth 
Paramua. NJ 

Brockman. Susan 
Jerseyvtlle, II 

Brown. Craig 
Carbondale II 

Bur gar d, Theresa 
Ypsilanti. Ml 

Buller. Robert 
Carbondale. II 



Caldwell. Douglas 
Journalism Christopher. II 

Cannon. Julie 
Radio-TV Peoria. II 



Cares. Cornne 
Carbondale It 

Carts. Kelty 
Carbondale. n 

Can Richard 
Rock ford. II 



Radio- TV 
Photography 

Speech Path 



Carter. Debra 
Paducah KY 



Chandler. Dale 
Radio- TV Elgin u 

Charnota. Dan 
Sp Comm Rolling Meadows II 

Chochre*. Edward 
Radio- TV 




^A®* 






n«jio-Tv 



Clvk. Slacvy 
v«ro Baactt. Fl 






Cohlmeyer, Robert 

Music Fairview Heights. II. 

Crawford, William 
Cin/Photo Roselle, II. 

Czekanski McCuthen, Susan 
Art Carbondale, II. 



Czusa. John 
Sp. Comm./Avia. 



Chicago. II 



Davidson. Thomas 

Speech Comm. Marion. II. 



Davis. Todd 

Photo Carbondale, II. 



Dee, Edward 

Radio-TV Reading, MA 



Delord, Diane 
Comm. Grph. 



Prospect Hts. II. 



Demeyer. Ann 

Sp. Comm. Springfield. 

Dennis, Judith 

Radio-TV Chicago, II. 



Desocio. John 
Photography 



Wichita. KS 



Devrieze, Craig 

Journalism East Moline. I 

Dougherty, Edward 
Journalism Decatur, II. 

Drury, James 

Journalism Glen Ellyn, II. 

Eames, Christopher 

Adv. Arlington Hts, II. 



Eaton, Diane 

Radio-TV Peoria, II. 

Edwards, James 

Speech Comm. Dixon, II. 

Edwards, Sherry 

Comm. /FA Lake Bluff, II. 

Ekstrom, Michael 
Radio-TV Lansing, II. 

Elbert. Steven 

Journalism Maywood. II. 



Finck. Bruce 

Cin/Photo Carbondale. I 

Eovaldi, Mark 

Art Murphysboro, II. 

Esposito, Mary 

Theater River Forest. II. 



Estrin, Robert 
Cin/Photo 



Etienne, Erin 
Journalism 



Northbrook, II. 



Evans, Patricia 
Journalism Chicago, 



Fandel, Stephen 

Radio-TV Metamora, II. 



Fiala, Richard 

Radio-TV St. Louis, Mo. 



Fleming. Daniel 

Radio-TV Mokena. II. 



Fontana. Rita 

Adv/Jour. Pinckneyville. II. 



Foster, Maureen 
Radio-TV Winfield, II. 



Friedman, Louis 
Radio-TV Brentwood, 



Full, Jean 
Pub. Rel. 



Sublette, 



Ganden, Jodi 

Radio-TV Calumet City. II. 



Gault, Charles 

Art History Decatur, II. 



to 

Cn 



Speech Comm 



Gersiem Nancy 
Carbondale. II 

Glaser. Stuart 
Enghshtown. NJ 

Godke. Julio 
Kewanee. II 



Graham. Bruce 
Western Springs. II 

Grant. Steve 
ism Chicago, ll 



Green. Cheryl 
Carbondate. ll 



Gremilhon. James 
Journalism Joltei. II 



Sp Comm 



Griffith, Larry 
Louisville. Ky 



Griffin. Sherelle 
Radio-TV Chicago. II 

Guaidoni. Janice 
Special Major Hernn. n 



Harvey. Becky 
Journalism Mt Vernon. II 

Hathaway. Daniel 
Radio-TV Sayville. NY 

Hayes. Marcia 
Journalism Gary. In 

Heil. Marva 
Music Ed Cobden ll 

Hempstead. Charles 
Sp Comm Springfield, ll 



Hennessey. Maureen 
Pub Rei Essex Jet. Vt 



Advertising 
Radio- TV 
Cm/Phoio 



Hernandez. Vincent 
Streamwood. H 



Herold. Jeanine 
Indianapolis. In 



Hnojsky. Charles 
North Riverside II 



Hodes. Charles 
Cm/Photo Wilmette. II 



Radio- TV 

Radio- TV 



Hofbauer. Joyce 
Ots Plaines, II 



Horwitz. Harry 
St LOUIS. Mo 



Howk. Raymond 
Cm/Photo Red Bud. II 



Humphreys. Cynthia 
Journalism Bismarck, ll 



Jacobs. Douglas 
Radio- TV Caaeyvme II 



Johnston. Sherrks 
Pub Re* Rockford. H 

Judd. Thomas 
Cm/Photo St CharkM, II 

Juliano. Ronald 

Radio- TV Chicago " 

Kennedy. Thomas 
Rad»o- TV Park Rtdge. II 



Comm R/TV 



Keoxuch Philip 
Lagrange Park 11 



King. Dav»d 
R*dh>TV Rantoul. II 

Kiser Kurt 
TV BdCT CarUnvXle It 

Koonce Kenneth 
Cm Photo Manchester, ll 






R»dfc>TV 



Kkaeman. Kokf 
East Alton, ll 



Kopp. Bruce 
Northiake II 




d- 




Krewer, Katherine 

Pub Rel- Arlington Hts. 



Krieschen, Mark 

Radio-TV Des Plaines. 



Kuechenmeister, Henry 

Photo Jour. St. Louis, Mo 



Kunkel, Donna 
Journalism Waterloo, 



Lanning, Jane 

Art History DeKalb, I 



Lantz, Leeann 

Radio-TV Oak Lawn, II. 



Lappin, Robert 
Speech Comm. 



Mulkeytown, II. 



Larkins, Sherese 
Radio-TV Carbondale, 



Lawlor, Anne 

Journalism Des Plaines, II. 



Lewin, Kent 
Radio-TV 



Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 



Lewis, Warren 

Radio-TV Carbondale, II. 

Lindquist, Wendy 

Advertising Springfield. II. 

Lindsey, Ronald 

Speech Comm. Hiltsboro, Mo. 

Linton, Alan 

Radio-TV Marseilles, It. 

Lipert, Alexander 

Radio-TV Colts Neck, NJ 



Lloyd, Charles 

Radio-TV Channahon, II. 

Longmire, Suzanne 
Journalism Cullom, II. 

Lynch, Randy 

Radio-TV Bourbonnais, II. 

Maier, Thomas 

Radio-TV Creve Coeur, Mo. 

Maloney, Martha 

Speech Path. Springfield, II. 



Carlinville. II. 

Boonville, Mo. 
Palatine, II. 



Marko, Thomas 
Radio-TV/BDCT 



May, Melodia 
Speech Path. 



McArthur, Mary 
Speech Comm. 



McConnell, Antoinette 
Speech/Pub. Rel. Chicago, 

Meats, Michelle 

Radio-TV South Beloit. II. 



Metz, Robert 

Journalism Murphysboro, 

Modzak, David 
Radio-TV Cicero, II. 



Moon, Karen 
Speech Comm. 



Marion, II. 



Mooney. Kevin 
Cin/Photo Chicago, 

Moore, Derek 

Art Maywood, II. 



Morhaim, Rob 

Radio-TV Champaign, II. 

Morris, Jan 

Sp. Path/Aud Wheaton, II. 

Morrison, William Jr. 
Cin/Photo Richmond, Va. 

Moulton, Melissa 

Pub. Rel. Carbondale, II. 

Moyles, Cheryl 

Comm./FA Park Ridge, II. 



to 

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CO 



J<-um;ilr,m 



Munzerl. Barbara 
Edwardsvtlle. II 

Mums. David 
irt Chicago, u 

Muslan. William 
Evergreen Park. II 

Nawrocki. Diane 
Arlington His . II 

Neal. Dee 
Zetgler. II 



Journalism 
Theatre/ Dire 



Neely, Curtis* 

Ranloul II 



Nicholson. William 
Carol Stream. II 



Oberg. Joanie 
Comm/FA Homewood. II 



Odom, Ava 
Chicago II 



Radio- TV 
Cm/Photo 



Oliver. Joseph 
Napervtiie. II 



Olson. Jeneii 
Rocklord. II 



Oven url. Daniel 
Photography Peoria. II 



Ovryn, Ken 
Park Forest. II 



Owens, Pamela 
Cm Photo Castle Hayne. II 



Owens, Theresa 
Champaign. II 



Parker. Jeffrey 

Radio-TV Albany. II 



Patterson, Catherine 
Radio- TV Hefrm. II 



Pausteck, Caryl 
Art Wheeling. II 



Penner. Diana 
Fayetteville. It 



Peper. Cynthia 
Arlington Hta . II 



Perlman. Randi 
Adv/Jour Glencoe. II 

Perry. Anthony 
Journalism Decatur. II 

Perutti. Janeen 
Journalism Chicago. I) 



Pet 
Radio- TV 



Gary 
Erie II 



Speech Comm 



Advertising 



IngM M 

Rock ft 



Pod. Jante 
Marnaburg. II 



Ouanlock Debra 
Speech Comm Aurora, li 



Radio- TV 



Reedy Eileen 
Oak Lawn, n 



Rett Paul 
Radio- TV Ml Prospect II 

R*cnarda. Lynn 
Journaham Chicago II 



Sp Comm 



Riddle EHen 

Weatcheate*. H 



CN 



Robertson Sfwrtey 
Mus*c Kentlend. In 

Rogers Daniel 
Comm /FA Chicago. H 

Saamen. Dean 
Radio- TV Whetton. " 

Scneri Ju*e 
Radio- TV Algonquin. N 






Serrett. Jim 
FA/Pnting 



Carterville. II. 



Shalon, Steven 

Journalism Glencoe, II. 

Sieyel. Eliot 

Cin/Photo Orangeburg, NY 



Skelton, Russell 
Speech Comm. 

Skipper, Todd 
Speech Comm. 



Chicago, II. 
Chicago, II. 



Skowron, Paul 

Art Carbondale, II. 

Sloane, Anne 

Music Carbondale, II. 

Solow, Kenneth 

Pub. Rel. Morton Grove, II. 

Spector, Scott 
Art Skokie, II. 

Spurrier, Donna 

Journalism Paducah, KY. 



Squires, Randy 

PhotoJour. Decatur, II. 

Stanwick, Karen 
Radio-TV Chicago, II. 

Steele, James 
Journalism Silvis, II. 

Stromquist, Steven 
Advertising Rockford, II. 

Stuntz, Conrad 

Journalism Greenville, SC 



Taggart, Silas 

Music/Bus Des Plaines, II. 

Taglieri, Mary 

Radio-TV Calumet City. II. 

Taliana, Lisa 

Theatre Edwardsville, II. 

Terry, Thomas 

Radio-TV Chicago. II. 

Thetford, Sheri 

Sp. Comm. Washington, II. 



Thybony, Cynthia 

Advertising Mt. Prospect, II. 

Toles, Cheryl 

Art/ED. Chicago, II. 



Tueth, John 
Photography 



Bethany, 



Twomey, Joseph 

Cin/Photo Cincinnati, Oh. 

Urben, Bruce 

Advertising Wheaton, II. 



Vandeley, Debra 

PhotoJour. Marshfield, Wi. 

Vaughn, Mary 
Advertising Price, Ut. 

Wagner, William 

Cin/Photo Wheatonville, II. 

Wakitsch, Joel 

PhotoJour. McHenry, II. 

Walter, Kathleen 

Art Carbondale, II. 



Warnelis, Steve 

Journalism Rockton, II. 

Watson, Clifford 

Fine Arts Berkeley, II. 

Weiler. David 

Radio-TV Wauconda, II. 

West, Paulette 

Radio-TV Chicago, II. 

Westbrook, Patricia 
fladio-TV Chicago, 11. 



to 



White. Tamara 
Radio- TV Chicago, ll 



Whilnghl. Carol 
Mustc/EO Marion. II. 



Williams. Vance 
Carbondale. II 



Wilson. Crawford 
Art Decatur. II 



Wimes. Donna 
Journalism Chicago. II 



Winking. Ten 
Radio-TV Springfield. II 

Wisnoski. Patricia 
Pub Rol Sesser II 

Woloshin. David 
Radio-TV Skokie. II 

Wrobei, Craig 
Radio- TV Willow Springs. II 



PhotoJour 

Radio- TV 

Theatre 



Wutke. Gregory 
Carbondale. II 



Wynne. Kathleen 
Mi Prospect. II 



Ziehlke, Richard 
Northbrook. II 



Zteae, Martha 
RTV Decatur. II 



Zimmerman, Gerald 
Journalism Coultervllle, II 



Venet. Allen 
Chicago, ll 





CN 



Q3EI-IS* 



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,92' 









educa^on 



en 
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English 


Acree. Brenda 
Ml Carmel. II 


History 


Adams. Richard 
Eldorado. II 


Math/Com Sci 


Ahmad. Ammah 
Carbondale. II 


Alshuely. Khalileh 
Master's Degree Oman, ah 


Education 


Andrews. Regma 
Evanston II 


Andros. Hazel 
Business Ed Benton. II 


Arlngton. Edwina 
Ed Media Vienna, II 


Business Ed 


Banks. Dinah 
Oak Park. II 


Occup Ed 


Bannon. Kenneth 
Carbondale, ll 


Spec Ed 


Baptiste. Camilla 
Norlhbrook, ll 


Phy Ed 


Barnard, Leesa 
Rushville. In. 


Barnett, Larry 
Health Ed Tamms. II 


Early Chldhd 


Ban el, Melody 
Romeoville. II 


Education 


Bernard. Brenda 
Metropolis, II 


Business Ed 


Benz. Linda 

Carbondale. It 


Elem Ed 


Bernardoni, Carla 
West Frankfort. II 


Business Ed 


Bicket. Tamra 
Watseka. II 


Biol Cathieen 
Elem Ed Crete, 11 


Biiyew. Sandra 
Spec Ed Oblong, II 


Phy Ed 


Bitar. Majwa 
Carbondale, II 


Phy. Ed 


Blandford. Dawna 
Jonesboro. tl 


Early Chldhd 


Bogen. Maria 
Highland Park. II 


English 


Boguslaw, Carol 
Carbondale. II 


Botsch. Maryann 
Elem Ed Carmi. II 


Recr 


Boyd. Ellyn 
Carbondale. ll 


Elem Ed 


Bradford. Dtetrtch 
Markham. II 


Recr 


Brougham, Linda 
Kankakee. II 


Bruckner. Br end a 
Ptiy Ed SekJen. NY 


Recr 


Brush. Bonnte 
Mi Prospect. II 


Burda. Deborah 
Recr Dotlon. II 


Elem Ed 


Burke. LOT) 

Belleville, ll 


Spec Ed 


ButteJi. Julie 
WHiiamsviiie. II 


By rum Bruce 
Art Canton, il 


Elem Ed 


Car net t Cindy 
Herrisourg. II 


Bus Ed 


Castagna. Paula 
Waal Frankfon. ll 





m o 99 





Cichy, Richard 

Recr. Chicago, II. 

Close, Janet 

Education Deerfield, II. 

Cobbs, Frank Jr. 

Art Ed Carbondale, II. 

Connolly, Patricia 

Spec Ed Sheridan, H. 

Cotter, Timothy 

Ind. Arts Ed Galatia, II 



Daniel, John 

Recr. Park Ridge, II. 

Demeris, Christina 

Education Champaign, II. 

Dempsey. Terrie 

Health Ed Carbondale, II. 

Dennie, Denise 

Spec Ed Homewood. II. 

Dennis, Lisa 

Phy. Ed Stratford. Ct. 



Deschenes, Suzanne 
Health Ed Wheeling, II. 

Deterding, Robin 
Biology Troy, II. 

Dickson, Lou 

Elem Ed Vienna, II. 

Dogde, Lura 

Jour. Orange City, Fl. 

Douglas, Sharon 
English Ozark, II. 



Doyle, Mary 

Bus. Ed Champaign. II. 

Drahos, Anthony 
Recr. Chicago, II 

Dunnigan, Christy 
Music Ed Colp, II. 

Elsea, Catherine 

Health Ed Sparta, II. 

Entman, Pamela 

Phy. Ed Chatman, II. 



Ernat, Margaret 

Home Ext. Peru. II. 

Eubanks, John 

Phy. Ed Romeoville.ll. 

Evers, Jane 

Phy. Ed Metropolis, 11. 

Fagan. John 

History Carbondale, II. 

Falkenberry, Sheree 
Special Ed Ava, II. 



Ferrario, Frankie 
Recr. Belleville, I 



Frailey, Arthur 

Ind.' Arts Maranda, II. 



Fuller, Jane 
Early Chldhd. 



Morton, II. 



Futur, Woldai 

Economics Carbondale. II. 



Gajewski, Peter 

Occup. Ed Chicago. 



Gay, Cindy 

Elem Ed Wonder Lake, II. 

Gillette. Andrew 

Occup. Ed North Charleston, SC 

Glasco, Katherlne 

Elem Ed Marion, II. 

Goins, Shirley 

Elem Ed Goreville, II. 

Grant. Deborah 

Spec. Ed Rantoul, II. 



to 

CO 



Education 

Early Chldhd 

Sp Path 

Elem Ed 

Health Ed 

Bus Ed 
Recr 
Home Ec 
Spec Ed 
Spec Ed 

Phy Ed 

Phy Ed 



Harford, Brenda 
Harnsburg, II 

Hale. Lisa 
Collmsville. ll 

Harbach. Beverly 
Naperville. II 

Harmon Laura 
Springfield. II 

Hams. Maria 
Jonesboro. II 



Hatley. Vivian 
Robbins. II 



Hemberger, Laura 
Carbondale. II 



Henry, Phyllis 
Mound City. II 



Hohimer. Wilam 
Cave-ln-Rock. II 



Hollander. Lori 
Olympia Fields. II 



House. Angeha 
St Louts. Mo 



inglis. Roy 

Watervliet. NY 



Jelley. Thalia 
Elem/Spec Ed Zeigler, II 

Jourdan, Melinda 
Spec/Eksm Ed Chicago. II 

Karcher. Pamela 
Phy Ed Marion, II 



Kee. Roger 
Id Johnston City. II 

Kletn, Sandy 
Spec Ed Skokie. II 

Koonce. Susan 
Wautseka. n 



Home Ec 
Phy Ed 
Spec Ed 



Kossow. Susan 
Metropolis, ll 



Loziowaki. Karen 

Hickory Hills. II 



Lange Cheryl 
Recr Des Plaines. 11 

Lavazza. Karen 
Health Ed Joltet, II 

Legg. Mary 
Clacl Std/Eng Carbondale. ll 

Lemon, Sandy 
Covington. Va 

Lewis. Oebi 
Du Quoin II 



Phy Ed 
Recr 



Lewis Kathy 
Home Ec Ed Seaaer II 



Earty Chldhd 



Liefer. Patricia 
Red Bud. ll 



Lovrenc*c. SueAnn 
H««lth E Crystal Lake, ll 

Lyncn. Frencia 
Love* Park. II 



Engkan 
Spec. Ed 



Mag»e. Bonnie 
Nofthbrook II 



Earty Chklhd 



Man. Sherry 
Downers Grove II 



Mastey. Carry 
Occup Ed Ootton. II 



Poi Sci 
Elem Ed 



McDowell Mike 
Ceve-in-Roch. II 



McKie. Linda 
Weet Frankfort, ll 








McKnrtTy. Moras 
Elrty COKJhd Flort. II 






McTaggart, Diane 

Home Ec. Ed Watseka. II. 

Melliges, Patricia 

Bus. Ed Marion, II. 

Mess, David 

Math Carbondale. II. 

Mitchell, Robert 

Soc. Std. Zeigler. II. 

Moore, Terry 

Spec. Ed Bellwood, II. 



Morris, Mary 

Elem Ed Carbondale, II. 

Mueller, Eva 

Spec. Ed Carbondale. II. 

Mulkerin, Linda 

Recr. Chicago, II. 

Musgrave, Betty 

Bus. Ed Marion, It. 

Naderhoff, Katherine 
Elem Ed Quincy. II. 



Noble, Elizabeth 

Elem Ed Springfield. II. 

Noble. Jan 

Recr. Kansas City, Mo. 

Noland. Sally 

Spec Ed Decatur, II. 

Nord, Julianne 

Spec. Ed Murphysboro, II. 

Norman, Joan 

Recr. Murphysboro. II. 



Oldigs, Jane 

Recr. Rockford, II. 

Oremus, Kimberley 

Pol. Sci. Bridgeview, II. 

Parenti, Beverly 

Spec. Ed Villa Park, II. 

Parmythes, Jon 

Elem Ed Rockford, II. 

Pearce. Charlotte 

Spec. Ed Carterville. II. 



Penewell. Gayle 

Phy. Ed Newport Beach. Ca. 

Doyle-Petosa. Sharon 

Early Chldhd. Carbondale, II. 

Pflasterer, Brenda 

Elem Ed Lenzburg. II. 

Phelps. Suzanna 

Elem Ed Marissa, II. 



Pierre Jerome. Gerard 
Biol. Sci. Zion, II. 



Place. Londa 
Early Chldhd 



Pinckneyville. 



Polonas, Jeanne 

Early -Chldhd West Peoria, II. 



Porter, Penny 

Phy. Ed Indianapolis, In. 



Pullett, Lorelia 
History Pulaski, II. 



Rash, Juanita 

Soc. Std. Raleigh, I 



Reid. Rosemary 

Phy. Ed Glenwood. II. 

Rennolds, Kimberley 
Recr. Wilmette, II. 

Rhoades, Crystal 

Elem/Spec. Ed Du Quoin. II. 

Richerson. Michael 
Recr. Lombard, II. 

Richter, Rhonda 

Recr. Waukegan, II. 



to 



Phy Ed 



Roberts. Karen 
St Louis. Mo 



Rothenbeck, Kathryn 
Spec Ed Carbondale. II 

Rowatl. Evetyn 
Elem Ed Colp, II 

Roylek. Jean 
Recr Matloon. II. 

Ruck. Sharon 
Early Chldhd Elgin. II 



Ruesler, Cynlhia 
Recr Mgmt Cahokia. II 

Rusniak. Reed 
Spec Ed Clarendon Hill. II 

Scarlala. Dma 
Rec Berwyn. II 



Schiller. Eric 
Crystal Lake. II 



Schmerbauch, Karen 
Bus Ed Lindenhurst. II 



Schmidt. Karen 
Phy Ed Yorkville. II. 

Schurman. Julie 
Phy Ed Greenvtew. II 

Sitva-Shadday, Willetta 
Spec Ed Mahomet. II 



History 



Simick. Barry 
Eldorado. II 



Smith. Amy 
Spec Ed Carbondale. II. 



South. Karen 
Spec/Elem Ed Enfield. II 



Home Ec 
Health EdC 
Recr 



Spamol. Lynda 
Decatur. II 

Staples, Susan 
Champaign. II 

Stock. James 

Homewood. II 



Sloffer. Denis* 
Elem Ed Cary. II 



Stout. Janet 
Recr Rochester, II 

Stevens. Holly 
English Washington. In 

Stewart. Kathryn 
Dance Ed Urban*. II 

Sullivan Mary 
Recr Gienvtew. II 

Swineburn* Wendy 



Elem Ed 



Carbondale. H 



Thompson, Elizabeth 
Elem Ed Ml Vernon. II 



Thompson. Joann 
Art Mt Vernon. II 



Thompson. Siuanne 
History Carrier Mills, h 



Thrush. Robin 
Earty CMdhd Benton. II 



Thudium. Slantfofd 
r Oak Park, n 



Heelth Ed 
Spec Ed 



Tortorea. Sueann* 
Carpentertville II 

Vagas Jack 
Youngslown Oh 

VarujQunas. Rita 
v Wmiteid. ii 



CN 
CN 



Vaoderwett. MtchaeJ 
Spec Mfr Palatine. i> 

Vc* Robert 
ind Arti Gateaburg u 




f » 




Walters, Thomas 

History Woodridge, II. 

Wheal, Amy 

Recr. Lincoln. II. 

White, Francis 

Elem Ed Kinsman, II. 

White, Sharon 

Spec. Ed Cisne. II. 

Whiting, Lorri 

Early Chldhd. Schaumburg, II. 



Whitten, Tammy 

Phy. Ed Salem, II. 

Wiley, Julianne 

Spec. Ed Mt. Zion, II. 

Williams. Carl 

Phy. Ed Chicago. II. 

Williams, Eileen 

Art Golconda, II. 

Williams. Lynne 

Phy. Ed Costa Mesa. Ca. 



Witherspoon, Cassandra 
Recr. Chicago, III. 

Woodward. Carl 
Occup. Ed Hull, II. 

Wyman, Richard 

Recr. Great Falls. Mt. 

Young. Cynthia 

Elem Ed Murphysboro, 

Young, Susan 

Recr. Lombard, II. 



Yurisich. Susan 

Elem Ed Chicago, II. 

Zaharopoulos, Vaso 

Phy. Ed Carbondale, II. 

Malek-Zakeri, Vahid 

Educ. Media Carbondale, II. 

Zimmer. Donna 

Spec. Ed Mahopac, NY 



Zukoski, Cathy 
Speech Comm. 



Chicago, II. 



Austin. Mark 

Bio. Sci. Cobden, II. 



Cindy Carnett 
Elementary Ed. 



Harrisburg. II. 



Rydberg, Reed 
Art Chicago. 



M \\ - 



to 

Oi 
CO 



SEHKgS 






1 



Human 



Resources 







Alles, Monica 
Food and Nut. 



Anderson. Cheryl 
Admjn. of Justice 



Burbank. II. 
Chicago, III. 



Aubertin. Catherine 

Inter. Design Carbondale, II. 

Bagsby, Debra 

Food and Nut. Redbud. II. 

Ballenger. Laurene 

Child and Fam. No. Chicago, 



Barbre, Patrica 

Textiles Carbondale, II. 



Barker, Tonya 
Inter. Design 

Barnes, Antonia 
Social Welfare 

Barnett. Susan 
Social Welfare 

Bauma. Shari 
Cloth- and Tex. 



Carbondale, II. 
Chicago, II. 
Ottawa, II. 
Bloomingdale, 



Behrends, Julia 

Inter. Design East Peoria, II. 



Biggs, Amy 
Cloth, and Tex. 



Carbondale, II. 



Bishop, Lauren 

English Elizabethtown, II. 



Black, Cynthia 
Cloth, and Tex. 



Blincoe, Sharon 
Food and Nut. 



Bliwas, Alisa 
Inter. Design 



Bodett, Carol 
Inter. Design 



Bopp, Karen 
Inter. Design 



Boyne, Celia 
Child and Fam. 



Brandt, Margaret 
Admin, of Justice 



Chicago, II. 
Murphysboro, II. 

Lincolnwood, II. 
Elk Grove Vlg.. II. 
Lincolnshire, II. 
Carbondale, II. 
Elk Grove, II. 



Braverman, Ellen 

Urban Study Schaumburg, II. 

Brescia, Charlene 
Cloth, and Tex. 



Bressner, Rebecca 
Social Welfare 



Brooks, Gregg 
Admin, of Justice 



LaGrange, II. 
Evansville, II. 



Newton, II. 



Brown, Keith 

Design Lombard, 



Brown. Rebecca 
Food and Nut. 



Carter, Jane 
Food and Nut. 



West Frankfort, 
Marion, II. 



Casebeer, David 

History Carbondale, II. 



Castellucci, Maria 

Child and Fam. Chicago, II. 



Chan, Lillian 
Food and Nut. 



Chicago, 



Clements, Doreen 

Social Welfare Percy, II. 



Cogwell, Sandra 
Child and Fam. 



Chicago, 



Corcoran, Lisa 
Design Carmi, II. 

Corzine, Michael 
Family Ec. Mng. 

Costa, Marie 
Admin, of Justice 



Assumption, 
Chicago. II. 



to 
Oi 

en 





Admin of Justice 


Derosa. Janice 
Des Plaines. n 




Donahue. Mary Kay 
Admin of Justice Fairfax. Va 




Cloth and Tei 


Doolm. Diana 
Naperville. II 




Cloth and Tex 


Dougherty. Kelly 
Carbondale. H 




Design 


Dunn. Tern 
Springfield. II 




Social Welfare 


Engiebrett. Laura 
Brookfield II 




Inter Design 


Erkman. Debra 
Monticello. II 




Ernst. Mary 
Retailing Farina. II 




Euneman. Patricia 
Social Welfare Mundelein. It 




Social Welfare 


Evans. Claude 
Carbondale. II 




Admin of Justice 


Evans. Robert 
Chicago. II 




Admin of Justice 


Fans. Robert 

Wiimette. II 




Fiedler, Kimberley 
Social Welfare Carbondale, ll 




Child and Fam 


Fields. Jenifer 
Clinton. II 




Food and Nut 


Filippo, Christina 
Waukegan. II 




C4F/Soc Wei 


-miayson. Teresa 
Westchester. II 




Admin of Justice 


Fitts. Holty 
Wheaton. II 




Social Welfare 


Foster. John 

Metropolis, II 




Admin of Justice 


Furst. Donald 

Bell wood. II 




Admin of Justice 


Ganota. Jack 
Chicago, ll 




Social Welfare 


Gehrt. Brad 
Cobden. II 




Admin of Just 


Geyer. Rosi 
Melrose Park. II 




Retail 


Gibson. Diana 
Hinsdale. II 




Admin of Justice 


Glass. Carolyn 

Chicago II 




Retail /Advert 


Gimk. Jackie 
Mi Prospect. II 




Food and Nut 


Gnidovtc. Susan 
Rock Island. II 




Social Warfare 


Grachek Laurie 
East Peoria II 




Food and Nut 


Grandis. Patricia 
Carbondale n 




Oueniher. Thomas 
Admin of Justice Skoki*. II 




Child and Fam 


Haqq Isiai 
Carbondale. ll 




Hamilton. Marshall 
Admin of Justice OelUgren. H 




Hampton Ekiabelh 
Cloth and Tin Libertyv** II 




Hodge*. Suns*/ a v 
Admin of Justice Chicago. II 




inter Oe* /Photo 


Hull Kathy 
Ml 7lon II 




Food and Nut 


Jackson. Patricia 
Carbondale II 








*s? 



& 





Jesukaitis. Constance 

Cloth, and Tex. Chicago, II. 



Johnson, Carol 
Admin, of Just. 


E. St. Louis. II. 


Jones, Melanie 

Retailing Belleville, II. 


Jones. Vickie 
Child and Fam 


E. St. Louis, II. 


Kelly, Kathleen 
Child and Fam. 


Norridge, II. 


Khaalig, Raushanah 

Child and Fam. Carbondale. II. 


Koctur, Drew 
Food and Nut 


Carbondale. II. 


Koszela, Laura 
Child and Fam. 


Chicago, II. 


Kusinski, Paul 
Admin, of Justice 


Chicago, II. 


Lauchner, David 
Inter. Design 


Carbondale, II. 


Leach, Donna 
Food and Nut. 


Carbondale, II. 


Lee, Robyn 
Admin, of Justice 


Cary, II. 


Lefferts, Lawrence 
Admin, of Just. 


Springfield. II. 


Leigh, Patricia 
Pre-School Ed. 


SpHrland. II. 


Loeffler. Patti 
Admin, of Justice 


Schaumburg, II 


Longo, Virginia 
Social Welfare 


Homewood, II. 


Magers, Steve 
Rehab. Ser. 


Carbondale. II. 


Majerczyk, Janet 
Soc. Services 


Chicago, II. 


Maiden, Wanda 
Social Welfare 


Maywood, II. 


Mandell. Lisa 
Child and Fam. 


Carbondale, II. 


May. Connie 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Peoria. II. 


McCowan. Mary 
Apparel Des. 


Chicago. II. 


McElmury. Elizabeth 

Social Welfare Matteson, II. 


Meason. James 
Admin, of Justice 


Chicago, II. 


Merkle, Lisa 
Inter. Design 


Danforth, II. 



Metheny, Cheryl 

Food and Nut. Cairo, l 



Meyer, Diane 
Cloth, and Tex. 



Springfield, II. 



Miller, Katherine 
C&T/Retail Waukegan, 



Miller. Nancy 
Inter. Design 

Misktmen, Teresa 
Admin, of Justice 



Peoria, II. 

Glen Ellyn, II 



Muenter, Christine 

Social Welfare Hoyleton, 



Mulkey, Nancy 
Cloth, and Tex. 

Nelson, Sharon 
FEM Maywood, 



Neyers, Nancy 

FEM Carbondale, II. 

Neyrinck, John 

Design Waukegan, II. 



Mount Vernon, II. 



to 





Social Welfare 


Norton. Ellen 
Rock Island. It 




Design 


Norton. Rebecca 
Princeton, II 




Inter Design 


Oae. Margaret 
Carbondale, ll 




Child and Fam 


Ohm. Can 
Gram Park. II 




Child and Fam 


Ohm. Teresa 
Grant Park. II 




Olson. Bobbie 
CAT/Retailing Austin. II 




Admin of Justice 


Olson. Lori 
Park Ridge. II 




Pak. Chi 
Finance Kowloon, Hong Kong 




Parker. Cynthia 
Admin ol Justice Peoria, II 




Health Care 


Parish. Greg 
Carbondale. n 




Child and Fam 


Peterson. Ruth 
Carbondale. II 




Admin of Justice 


Pitchford. Patrice 
Chicago. II 




Child and Fam 


Powell. Vanessa 
Chicago. II 




Human Dev 


Pratt. Deborah 
Park Forest. II 




Child and Fam 


Price. Darzel 
Chicago, ll 




Food and Nut 


Raney. Susan 
Rochester. II 




Admin of Justice 


Regan. JeMrey 
Springfield. II 




Social Welfare 


Rengo. Rebecca 
K a lev a. Mi 




Social Welfare 


Reynolds. Susan 
Centralia. II 




Fam Ec Mgt 


Rhodes. Nancy 
Jonesboro. II 




Food and Nut 


Rice. Susan 
Wood River, ll 




Social Welfare 


Richmond. Judith 
North Chicago, ll 




Fam Econ 


Riddetl. Nancy 
Sparland, II 




Cloth and Te 


Roach, Cynthia 
x Henry. II 




Rock wood. Joseph 
Social Welfare Carbondale. II 




Sanchez. Lucy 
Social Welfare Cvy. n 




Retail 


Sarco. Gma 
Melrose Park, n 




inter De**g 


Sargent. Tamt 

1 Zetgier. ti 




Admin of Justice 


Scanneii. Jamee 
Chicago, n 




Scardon. Stephanie 
inter Design Princeton. II 




Design 


Schertz Karl 
Wheaton. II 




Social Welfare 


Schickel. Cathy 
Oksnvtew. II 




inter Design 


Schutti. Leslie 
Hamburg NY 




Admm ol Justice 


Sedlacs* Julia 
Carbondale. II 


00 


Special MaK* 


Shaver. Jerry 
Carbondale. u 









o 
"2? 





Sheets, Mary 
Cloth, and Tex. 


St. Louis. Mo. 




Shingles. Lynda 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Chicago, II. 




Sicich. Jeanne 
Inter, Design 


Homewood, II. 




Sims. Charlotte 
Food and Nut. 


Carbondale. II 




Sinclair. Sara 
Social Welfare 


Mahomet, II. 




Skawinski. Cathie 
Food and Nut. 


Park Ridge. II. 




Smith. Janice 
Human Res 


Chicago, II 




Smith, Michael 
Admin, of Justice 


Carbondale, II. 




Spurlock, Diana 
Social Welfare 


Carbondale. II, 




Stockton, Maria 
Human Res 


Prophetstown, II. 




Stoller, Peter 
Admin, of Justice 


New Lenox. II. 




Sunko, Patricia 
Food and Nut. 


Bensenville, II. 




Sykes. Stephen 

Design Carbondale. II. 




Szpisjak. Mickey 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Berwyn, II. 




Taylor. Barbara 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Blue Island, II. 




Thomas, Diane 
Admin, of Justice 


Chicago, II. 




Toulouse, Marlyce 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Lake Bluff, II. 




Trovillion, Kathy 
Lodg. Sys. Mgt. 


Goreville, II. 




Wahaib, Charlotte 
Admrn. of Justice 


Carbondale, II. 




Wallensack, Catherine 

Cloth, and Tex. Wheaton. II. 




Warning, Sandra 
Food and Nut 


W. Chicago. II. 


• 


Washatka. Sheila 
Inter. Design 


Creve Coeur, Mo. 




Weatherly, Elizabeth 

C&F/Soc. Wei. Chicago, II. 




Weber, Julie 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Ransom, II. 




Wechsler, Maria 
Social Welfare 


Niles, II. 




Weekly. Jean 

Retailing Lacon, II. 




Wesolonski, Susan 
Child and Fam. 


LaGrange, II. 




Wiejaczka, Michelle 
Admin, of Justice 


St. Louis, Mo. 




Williams, Kay 
Admin, of Justice 


Salem, II. 




Wilmarth, Cathy 
Social Welfare 


Palatine. II. 




Wilson, Elizabeth 
Inter. Design 


Carbondale, II. 




Wilson, Kim 
Cloth, and Tex. 


Enfield, II. 




Zimmerman, Marvir 
Child and Fam. 


Fort Dodge, IA 


NO 



Ubera\ A^ 







,-U 




<%3r± 



-y<^- 



jLJ-c~ 



<j-v* /l -' 



OJ*+ u eJ^ 




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M.1&M 




Abba. Camy 

Comp. Sci. Herrin, II. 

Abbaszahraee, Mina 

Comp. Sci. Carbondale, II. 

Abdulhamied. Fuad 
Ling. Bandung, IN 

Arnold, Bruce 

Comp. Sci Carbondale, II. 

Aronson, Paul 

Psychology Carbondale, II 



Bahnks, Lisa 
Comp. Sci. 



Benner, John 
French/Photo. 



Moline. II. 
Carbondale. 



Benzek. Diane 

Math, Cahokia. II. 



Brauer, Noralee 
History Peoria, 



Brown, Roxanne 
Psychology Bellwood, 



Bousman, Cheryl 
Sociology Farina, II. 

Buch, Vicki 

Psychology Chicago, II. 

Burchard, Stuarl 

Pol. Sci. Carbondale, II. 

Cajka, Dennis 

Pol. Sci. Northbrook. II. 

Caro, Edward 

Psychology Chicago, II 



Chambliss, Kathryn 
Music Cairo, II. 



Prospect Heights. II. 



Chary. Frank 
Geography 

Clark, Gregory 
Psychology 

Cobb. Richard 
Pol. Sci./AJ 

Coffman, Julie 
Psychology 



Cogdal, Pamela 
Sociology Utica, II. 

Cook, George 

Pol. Sci. Hazel Crest, II. 

Crakes, Karen 

Comp. Sci. Riverwoods, 

Currie, James 

Georgraphy Evanston, II. 

Cushing, David 

Econ. Chicago. II. 



Darmstadt, Pamela 

Pol. Sci. Elmhurst, II. 

Davie, Gayla 

Music Ed. Colp. II. 

Deneal, Tom 

Econ. Harrisburg, II. 

Desenfants, Tracy 
English Ames, la. 

Doi, Fukiko 

Ling. Sakai Osaka, Japan 



Doyle, Mark 
Psychology 



Elliott, Denis 
Psychology 



Eschner. Diane 
Psychology 



Eubanks. Carl 

Pol. Sci. Duquoin, II. 



Falaster, Roger 

Comp. Sci. Murphysboro, II. 



Momence, II. 
Murphysboro, II. 
Wonder Lake, II. 



to 



Fehrenbacher. James 
Comp Set Olney. II 

F«rran, Patricia 
Pot Set. Herrin, II 

Femald. Palncia 
Comp Set KissJmee. Ft 

Fogleman. Mary 
History Springfield. II 

Fornof, Thomas 
Math Raniout, II 



Psychology 

Pol Set 



Foss. Carol 
Rock Island. EL 



Foster. Linda 
Chicago. II 



Fox. Jeftery 
Geog Country Club Hills. II. 



Psychology 



Goldman. Laura 
Northbrook. II 



Goranson. Nancy 
Psychology Libertyvtlle. ll 



Gross. Gene 
Duquoin If 



History 



Hall. Mark 
Benton. II 



MuitcMorch 

History 
Pol Set /Journ 



Hubbard, Melvin 
Washington D C 



Huson, Gregory 
Carbondale, II 



Jaconetty, Ronald 
Oes Ptames, II 



Jenkins. Percy 
Econ Chicago. II 



Johnson. Daniel 
Comp Set Hinsdale. II 



Psychology 



Jones. JeH 
Naperville, II 



Yung, Marybeth 
Psychology Clarendon Hills. II 

Karas, James 
Pol SO Glenvtew. II 



Kaufman. Mitchell 
Sociology Skokie, II 

Kay. Catherine 
English Oak Park. II 

Keegan. Maureen 
English Carbondale. II 

Kelley, Kevin 
Geography Urbana, II 



Ptychoiogy 



Kidd. Ruth 
Martinsville, II 



Knight. 
History Peoria. II 



Kelly Sean 
Chicago. II 



Comp Set 
English 

Econ 

Lang 
Econ /Ag Econ 



Koike Vincent 
Yokohoma Cy. Japan 



Kunycky. Ne.1 
Simsbury. Ct 



irehr Stuart 
vansvtlle, II 



Psychology 



l arose Ketty 
Staunton, ll 



Lew Mar. 
Sociology Johnston City, n 

l wnfll* Kanneth 
Carbondale n 







fo% 





Mallen, Carole 

History Naperville, I 



Margon. Hilary 

History Glencoe. II. 



McLaughlin, Myra 
Theatre Chicago, 



McMurry, Terry 

History Carbondale, II. 



McNulty, Suzanne 
Classics Sparta, II. 



McWhinnie, Carolyn 
Psychology McHenry, II. 



Mills, Martha 

Sociology Highland Park, II. 



Mitchell.Clark 
Music Benton, 



Moses, James 

Pol. Sci. Flora. I 



Murphy, Colleen 
English Lombard, I 



Musa, Murtaza 

Comp. Sci. Carbondale, 



Neumayer, Dennis 

Comp. Sci. Mokena. II. 



Nomady, Mark 

Pol. Sci. New Lenox, 



Peddicord, Ronnie 
Geography Wayne City, 



Perry, Clifton 
History Anna. 



Pilcher, Debra 

Spanish Lake Villa, 



Price, Timothy 

Comp. Sci. Naperville, II. 



Purpura, Michelle 

HC Ad. Melrose Park, II. 



Quinliven, Annie 
Ling. Hometown, 



Ranstrom, Phillip 
English Elgin, II. 



Read, Esther 

Anthro. Baltimore, Md. 



Rouleau, Mark 

Pol. Set. Itasca, 



Rujawitz. Tracy 

Psychology Belleville, II. 



Ryan, Mary 
Comp. Sci. 



Crystal Lake, 



Ryantroconis. Heather 
English Carbondale, II. 



Scott, Leslie 
Psychology 



Scally, Tammy 
Psychology 



Scully, William 
Comp. Sci. 



Shiba, Miyoko 

Lib. Art Higashiyo, Japan 



Park Ridge, II. 



Glenview, I 



Noiihfield, It. 



Sievers, David 
Psychology 



Carbondale, II. 



Slothower, Terri 
Sociology/AJ 



Smith, Jo 
Music/Bus. 



Smith, Wayne 
Psychology 



East St. Louis, II. 



Sortal. Nick 

Math Herrin, II. 



to 
-a 



Si Clair. Randall 
Pol Sci Tiiton. II 

Stearns. Scott 
Comp Sci Aurora. II 

Stewart. Catherine 
Sociology Champaign. II 

Straub, Laurel 
Comp Sci Elgin. II 

Strohmwer, John 
Psychology Marion. II 



Sykora. Scotl 
Des Plaines. II 



Comp Sci 



Tagatz. Brian 
Crystal Lake. II 



Trotlman. Rodney 
Econ Markham, II 

Troutman. Arenda 
Pol Sci Chicago. II 

Tvrdik, Cart 
Barllelt. II 



Sociology 

History 
Pol Sci 



Uriell, Thomas 
Wilmette. II 



Venet. Allen 
Chicago, ll 



Vonthun. Denise 
Psychology Palatine. II 

Walton. Deborah 
Psychology Carbondale, II 

Watts. Kellie 
Pol Sci Hernn, II 



Pol Sci 
Georgraphy 
Psychology 
Psychology 
Psychology 

Comp Set 
English 

Ling 



Weberg, Brian 
Carbondale. II 



Werner. Steven 
Whither. Ca 



Williams. David 
Carbondale. II 



Wilson. Holly 
Libertyvtlle. II 



Wot*. Fred 
Mt Carmel. II 



Yoder. Mark 

Carbondale, II 



Yohe. Phyllis 
Elk Grove Vlg. II 



Young. Irma 
South Africa 



Young. Marquiette 
Psychology Chicago. II 

Zabrtn. Mich*** 
Paychology Skokw. It 



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Geology 


Adams. Kathleen 
Carbondale. II 




Bio Sci 


Ade. Patrick 
Mackinaw. II 




BioPhy 


Alzaben. Emad 
Salmteh. KU 




Goot 


Ambrose James 
Carpenters vi lie. II 




Cham 


Anderson. Carter 
Burnsville. MN 




Atteberry. Alan 
Zoology Neoga. II 




Botany 


Barta. Daniel 
Evanston, ll 




GecJ 


Bariz Paul 
St Charles. II 




Zoology 


Beat. Thomas 
Macomb. II 




Bk> Sci 


Bell. Todd 
Rock Falls. II 




B«nzinger Elizabeth 
Botany LaGrange. II 




Bio Sci 


Bigham. Beth 
Pinckneyville. II 




Chem 


Bigham. Larry 
Pinckneyville. II 




Zoology 


Bloom. Jonathan 
Highland Park. II 




Zoology 


Bon am. Lex 
Barnngton. II 




B'oi Sc 


Budd. Kevin 
Lincoln. II 




Zoology 


Carle. Debbie 
Glenview. II 




Chrosioski. Charles 
Microbio Benlon.ll 




Commings. Ronnie 
Comp Sci Chicago II 




Bio /Pre- Dent 


Czapev Dan 
Olymp.a Field. II 




Bio Studies 


Daar. Alan 
Carbondale. ll 




Geo! 


Deason. Kenneth 
Burbour. Mo 




OeJonge. Christopher 
Zoology Nrxihbrook, II 




Chem 


Dodson. Larry 
Carbondale. II 




Zootogy 


Edwards, Janel 
Leeueur. MN 




Eitena. John 
Zoology Virden. II 




Physio 


EngeJ. Sharon 
Lawrencevilie. H 




Geol 


Ernest. Jon 
Carbondale II 




Bio Sci 


Fischer Mary 
Decatur, ll 




Bto Sci 


Fischer. Richard 
Arlington Hts . II 




B*o Set 


Fish. Hmtmnm 
Mascoutah. n 




F tegel Lynn 
M«crob*o Downers Grove. H 




Geol 


Frank* Wayne 
Rantoui. ll 




Physio 


Frtcfc Warren 
WeltonvMe. n 




Chem 


Buchen. John 
Rocktord II 



*vw« 










Funneman, Rick 

Bio. Sci. Teutopolis, 



Goetsch, Brian 

Geo). Lake Villa, II. 



Gray, William 

Microbio. Dolton, II. 



Greybeck, James 
Geol. Makanda. II. 



Hackett, John 

Microbio. Rockford, 



Harris, Joe 

Zoology Salem, II. 

Hoppe, John 

Chem. Carbondale, II. 

Ismail, Mohamad 

Physics Carbondale, II. 

Ivarson. Corey 

Bio. Sci. Rolling Meadows, 



Jackson, Leslie 
Physio. Hurst, II. 



Jamnejad. Mahsheed 
Biology Tehran. Iran 

Jensen, Scott 

Bio. Sci. Carbondale, II. 

Jones, Mary 

Physio. Murphysboro, II. 

Joseph, Bradford 

Biology Carbondale, II. 

Kaeser, Diane 

Math. Marion. II. 



Kasano. Kuniko 

Microbio. Carbondale, II. 

Kasparaitis, Irene 

Bio. Sci. Chicago, II. 

Kelly. Joseph 

Zoology Palatine, II. 

Kern, Dennis 

Physio. Arlington Hts.. II. 

Koch. Robert 

Zoology Mt. Prospect, II 



Kolb, Melissa 

Geol. Carbondale, II. 

Kovacic, Tracy 

Physio. LaSatle, II. 

Kruempelstaedter, Anne 
Zoology Winnetka, II. 

Leslie, Donna 

Biology Chicago, II. 

Lewers, Paul 

Geol. Mendota, II. 



Lonergan. Timothy 
Zoology Springfield, II. 

Luebben, Kurt 

Biology Belleville, II. 

Luebking, Glen 

Geol. Des Plaines, II. 

Mahlke, Mary 

Bio. Sci. Woodridge, II. 

McClelland, Jonathan 
Botany Quincy, II. 



McKinzie, Mark 

Geol. Crystal Lake, II. 

Mengstu, Tjedal 

Bio. Sci. Carbondale, 

Moskotf. John 
Zoology Zeigler, II. 

Miller, Robert 

Zoology Streator, II. 

Mosebach. Julie 

Zoology Carbondale, I 



N3 





Biomed /Tech 


Mueller. David 

Florissant. Mo 




Mylych. Paula 
Premed /Bio Dixon. II 




Physiology 


Noretl. Thomas 

Palatine II 




Zoology 


Norman, Jennifer 

Marseilles. II 




Physio /Premed 


Norton, Debra 
Kankakee. II 




Geology 


Ocker. Valerie 
Carbondale. ll 




Zoology 


Patton. Brent 
Carbondale. II 




Zoology 


Peters. Jeffrey 
St Louis. Mo 




Placek, Richard 
Physiology Elkviile. II 




Botany 


Polley Jill 
Lawrenceburg. ll 




Price. Oonela 
Biology Harvey. II 




Biology 


Rasar. Patti 
Belleville, ll 




Zoology 


Reevis. Monte 
Springfield. II 




Zoology 


Reiff. Peter 
Gorham. II 




Botany 


Richter, Randall 
Waukegan. II 




Geology 


Ricketts. Harry 
Norlhbrook. II 




Bio So 


Romanelli. Ron 
Melrose Park. II 




Zoology 


Rothenbach. Paul 
Bloomingdate. II 




Physiology 


Sabella. Nicholas 
Murphysboro. II 




MhiuMu 


Safford. Venetna 
Maywood. n 




Zoology 


Santarelli. James 
Riverlon. II 




Zoology 


Sawson. Martha 
Decatur, ll 




Biology 


Schuetta. Vera 
Staunton. II 




Physiology 


Shoaff, Paul 
Shelbyvilie. ll 




B*o Set 


Sims. Douglas 
Carbondale. " 




Zoology 


Sode John 
Carbondale. II 




Sollenberoer. David 
Botany St Charles ll 




Geology 


Sollman. Mark 
Wilmetta. ll 




Zoology 


Spytek. Joseph 
Columbia ll 




Zoology 


Squ.no Michael 

Ben sen vi lie U 




B*o Sc 


Strohmeter. Paul 

Marion ll 




Sweeney Kerry 
Zoology Entomol Parts, ll 




Geology 


Swindell Joe 
Cerbondaie N 




TarawaNy. Mohammed 
So /Agrtc Carbondale II 


CO 

i - 

CM 


Chemistry 


Terfcedsen. Linda 
E Peoria, ii 









Thompson. Kim 
Physiology Chicago, II 

Titus, David 

Physio/Micro. Libertyville, 

Tormeno. Nancy 

Bio Sci. Moline, II. 

Vocelka, Lynn 
Biology Lyons, II. 

Webber, Cynthia 

Biology Carbondale, II. 



Webber, Ronald 

Chemistry Carbondale, II. 

Weber, James 

Physiology Burbank, II. 

Weickert, Michael 
Biology Rockford, II. 

Welch. Raymond 

Bio. Sci. Carbondale, II. 

Winterberger, Rene 
Physiology Decatur, II. 



Wyatt. Kenneth 

Zoology Palantine, II. 

Young, Robert 

Geology Deerfield, II. 



Yung, Yat 
Chemistry 



Kowloon, Hong Kong 



Zalisko, Edward 

Zoology E Peoria, II. 

Zeman, Jeffrey 
Geology Joliet. II. 



Chrostoski, Charles 
Microbiology Benton, 



Buchert, John 

Chemistry Rockford, I 




to 
-a 

CD 



Smith. AW*oD 



Corbondale 



Vondol |a 

, u„ R Jocksonv.»e 
Smith, John 

Smith, ^ J 

, , H Carbondaie 
Smith. Robe* 

Murphy^ ' 
Spooncr, 

r r\ A Centrai'Q 

S,0n<0 « : 

w Carbondoic 

Starbock, 

. . D P ,nckneyv.l>o 
Steuerwa'* 

t G M° r,on 

SteVC --" cere 

D FQ.rhcId 

. c st Louis 
S.obodo, R 

Christopher 

T ° 
_ .. r , Wilbur D 

Mt Veri 
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Alton 
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Adebisi. Yekini 

Agriculture Iwo Oyo, Nigeria 

Agne, Larry 

Agriculture Belleville, II. 

Aldridge, William 
Forestry Harvey. II. 

Aluke, Mela 

Forestry Bauch, Nigeria 

Anderson, Kenneth 
Animal Ind. Morris. II. 



Barbercheck, Richard 

Ag. Ind. Champaign, II. 

Barborinas, John 
Forestry Peoria, II. 

Barnett, Gary 

Agriculture Gen. Tamms. I 

Becker. Michael 

Forestry Belleville, It. 

Beeve. Thomas 

Agriculture Springfield. II. 



Berry. Jerilyn 
Agriculture Gen 



Binfield. James 
Agri. Bus. Econ. 



Bock, Cheryl 

PLSS Kissimmee, Fl. 



Brennan, Michael 

Forestry Glendale Hts., II. 



Brockamp, John 

Ag Ind. Mornsonville. II. 



Brooks, John 

PLSS St Francisville. II. 

Brown, Donald 

Animal Ind. Box Eider, SD 

Brown, Richard 
Agriculture Sesser, II. 

Burg, Michael 

Forestry Springfield, II. 

Butler, Cyntha 
Horticulture Ullin, II. 



Bybee. Jeffrey 
Agriculture Gen. 



Ottawa, II. 



Cardona. Theresa 

Forestry Franklin Park, II. 



Carter, Mark 

Forestry Rosiclare, II. 



Cerar, Jon 
Forestry 



Carlinville, I 



Chappell. Bill 

PLSS Carbondale, I 



Cheesewright, Kay 

Agriculture Ed. Chrisman. II. 



Cook, Kitty 
Envir. Interprtatns. 



Cotten, Morgan 

For. Res. Arlington Hts.. II. 



Cox, Sara 
Agric. Ed. 



Beardstown, 



Crain, Charles 

PLSS McLeansboro, 



Criquelion, Susan 
PLSS Auburn, II. 

Davies, Daniel 

Agric. Ed. Johnston City, II. 

Delligatti. Horace 

Agriculture Culpeper, Va. 

Enderley, Michael 

Forestry Morris Plains, NJ 

Erickson, George 

PLSS Des Plaines, II. 



to 

00 



8 



PLSS 


Fahey. Thomas 
Carbondaie. II 


Farthing. Jerald 
Agn Bus Econ Odin. II 


Agrt Econ 


Feldkamp. Scott 
Homewood, II 


Agric Ed 


Finley. Mark 
Charleston, n 


Fitch. Bryan 
Agriculture Casey. II 


Animal Ind 


Foster. Mark 
Dong ola, II 


Animal Ind 


Fraley. Gerald 
JerseyviHe. II. 


Forestry 


French. Celine 
Riverdale. II 


Frenk. Linda 
Animal Ind Athens. II 


Agric Ed 


Fncke, Steven 
Freepori, II 


Friedman. Stephan 
Forestry Carlinville, II 


Forestry 


Gabriel. Stephen 
Carbondaie, h 


Galassi. James 
Animal ind Marion. II 


PLSS 


Galio. Karen 
Palos Park, II 


Forestry 


Gorski. Marion 
Wooddale, ll 


Forestry 


Gnsko. Gary 
Oak Lawn, ll 


Forestry 


Guagiiardo, Sam 
Prospect Hts.. II. 


PLSS 


Hagemann, Vicky 
Ml Morris, II 


Forestry 


Hall. James 
Granite City. II 


Agric Ed 


Harre, Ricky 
Wash vt lie. II 


Animal Ind 


Heaton. Julie 
Lafayetle. II 


Landscape Hort 


Hefternan, Kelly 
Danville. II 


Heneghan, Patrick 
Forestry Chicago. II 


PLSS 


Hickey. Cathy 
Carbondaie. II 


Agriculture Gen 


Hoeffliger. Jane 

Shumway, II 


Animal Ind 


Howells. Gregory 
Elkland Mo 


1 
Agriculture Gen 


Huebener William 
Brighton II 


Hurtthouse. Robert 
PLSS Napervtlle. II 


PLSS 


lacomini. Michael 
WoodvaJe. ll 


Agriculture 


James. Gary 
East Motine. ll 


Jasper Robert 
Forestry Oreena. H 


Agric Ed 


Kaiser. Morman 
Carbondaie. II 


Animal Ind 


Karl. Suzanne 
Park Forest. II 


Animal Ind 


Kenyon Susan 
Spnnohetd. ll 


1 
Ag ind 


<irutnger. Randall 
New Athens. H 







211 

afA 'Ft** 




re: 

'elf 








Klein, Mark 

Ag. Ind. Streator, II. 

Kufalk, Brad 

Agri. Econ. Byron, II. • 

Laird, Kenneth 

Agric. Ed. Cisne, II. 

Langen, Joseph 

Agri. Bus Morrisonville, II. 

Lewey. Brian 

Ani. Ind. Hillsboro, II. 



Littlejohn, Jeffrey 

Agri- Econ. Casey, II. 

Mahoney, Matthew 
PLSS/Hort. Freeport, II. 

Mangiamele. Suzanne 

Ani. Ind. Barrington, II. 

Mburu. David 

PLSS Carbondale. II. 

McLaughlin, Sondra 

Agriculture Gen. Murphysboro. I 



Meyer, Thomas 
Ag. Econ. /Ani. Ind. 

Michalski, Gregory 
Forestry Chicago, 



Mileur, Randy 
Agriculture Gen. 



Murphysboro. II. 



Morris, Doug 
Architecture Salem, 

Morris, Ronnie 
PLSS Malta, II. 



Moxley, Brian 

PLSS Chicago. II. 

Mueller. Michael 
Forestry Justice, II. 

Neumann, Robert 

Forestry Carbondale, II. 

Nyaribo, Fanny 

Agri. Econ. Carbondale, II. 

Payne, David 

Agriculture Thompsomville. II. 



Pigman. Sally 

PLSS Evanston, II. 

Pohl, Eugene 

Agri. Econ. Compton. II. 

Reddick, Randall 

Ani. Ind. Quincy, II. 

Rincker. Irl 

Ani. Ind. Shelbyville, II. 



Rutherman, Laura 
Agri. Bus. Econ. 



Metropolis. II. 



Schaefer, Marcus 

Agriculture Gen. Medora. II. 

Schutt, Terry 

PLSS Lombard. II. 

Selin, Todd 

PLSS LaGrange Park, II. 

Shaub, Charles 

Ani. Ind. Monmouth. II. 

Shaw. Janine 

PLSS Glenview, II. 



Siegel, Gregory 
Forestry Delavan, II. 

Slack, Gregory 

Forestry Carbondale. II. 



Sloan. Charles 
Agri. Ed. Mech. 

Soper, Howard 

Ag. Ind. Canton, II. 

Starr, Jean 

Ani. Ind. Nauvoo. II. 



McLeansboro, II. 



to 

00 

CO 






Styzens Gary 
Forestry Chicago. II 

Swain. James 
Forestry Oiallon. II 

Swaiec. Karen 
Pre-Vel Libenyville. II 

Swayne. Pamela 
Animal Ind Beecher. II 



Agriculture Gen 

PLSS 
PLSS 
Agn Econ 
Agriculture Ed 



Tart. John 
Springfield. II 



Tebbe. Herbert 
Pocahontas. II 



Tims. John 
Crystal Lake. II 



Trost. Robert 
Ciaredon Hills. II 



Vahlkamp. Oemse 
Mascoutah. II 



Vondra. Norman 
Forestry Galena ll 



Ag Ind 



Vukmir, Michael 
Schaumburg. II 



Wagoner. Steven 
Animal Ind Petersburg. II 

Waller. Mark 
Agn Econ Pans, II 

Walton. James 
Agn Bus Econ Anna. II 

Warshamer, Trev 
Animal Ind Carbondale. II 



Wedekamper. Lynn 
Agn Econ 



PLSS 



Weirauch. Bruce 
Lewistown. II 



Welle. Peter 
Collinsville. II 



Whalen. Mary 
PLSS Peoria, n 



Wherry. Ross 
Agriculture Ed Dongola. II 



Williams, Cratg 
PLSS Chicago. II 

Wolfe. Douglas 
EMM Urbana. II 

Woodhouse. David 
Forestry Carpentersvtlle. II 

Yoss, Roberta 
Agriculture Urbana. II 



Agn Bus Econ 



Young. Mary 
Tomball. Tk 



Zamotawtci. Mary 
Animal Ind Chicago, II 







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CO 



Abulaboh Mohamm«d 
Eng Carbondale. II 



Eng 



Aler. Mark 
Burbank. li 



Anderson. Brain 
Eng Tech Marion. II 



Eng Tech 



Anthenat Bruce 
Murphysboro II 



Austerlade. Mary 
Eng Tech Rolling Meadows. II 



Berteisen, John 
Eng Tech Little Vork. It 

Boguslaw. Casey 
Ind Tech Carbondale, II 

Bolts. David 
Engineering Ouincy. II 

Buchholz, Thomas 
Eng Tech Granville. II 

Burns. Lawrence 
Eng Tech Glen Ellyn, II 



Eng 



Caceres, Fernando 
Honduras. Cen Am 



Casper. Thomas 
Eng Rolling Meadows. II 

Cassens. Mark 
Eng Tech Peoria. II 

Clausing. Kenneth 
Eng Highland Park. II 

Cook. Douglas 
Ind Tech Wood River, [| 

Eng 
Eng Tech 
Engl Tech 
Eng 
Eng 



Cooper. Robert 
South Holland. II 



Cox, Lawrence 
Winchesler. II 



Dahmash. Isam 
Carbondale. II 



Decho. David 
Westchester, II 



Deming, Thomas 
East Greenbush, NY 



Eng Tech 

Ind Tech 
Eng Tech 
Ind Tech 

Eng Tech 

Eng Tech 



Dorris. Timothy 
West Frankfort. II 

Eason. Daniel 
Chicago. II 

Edwards. Kevin 
Christopher. II 

Engram. David 
Murphysboro. II 

Fehr. Dave 
Freeport, II 



Fetske. Thomas 
Preirtevtew. li 



Garrett Mitchell 
Eng Tech Carbondale. II 

Ghiassi. Ebrahim 
Eng Tech Alton. II 



Ghosh. Subnen 
Murphysboro. II 

Greene. Terry 
Sycamore, II 



Eng 



Eng 






Or** Ho»iid 
I Tach Ml Vamon. II 

Groaa. Gary 
Eng Tacn Molina II 

Hankla. Gordon Jr 
Eng Ca/DOndaM II 

Hayaaaaa. Talaoro 
Eng Htfoahima JA 

Haw. Carina) 
Wmatow. II 



Eng Tar* 






Hill. John 

Eng. Waukegan. II. 

Holzapfel, Peter 

Eng. Tech. Naperville, II. 

Houldsworth. Wallace 

Eng. Tech. Rolling Meadows, II. 

Houston. Richard 
Eng. Marion, II. 

Hsu. Chiche 

Eng. Galesburg, II 



Hutchinson, William 
Eng. Dongola, II. 

Johnson, Colleen 

Eng. Tech. Morrisonville, II. 

Kaufman, Mark 

Eng. Bloomingdale, II. 

Keilholz. Bradford 

Eng. Tech. Danville, II. 

Keller, Roger 

Eng. Tech. Downers Grove, II. 



Kelly, Rick 
Spec Mjr 



Coulterville, II. 



Kinkade, Steve 

Ind. Tech. Peoria, II. 

Kovach, Keith 

Eng. Tech. Addison, II. 

Krakora. Geoffrey 

Eng. Carbondale, II. 

Kross, Robert 

Eng. Riverdale, II. 



Kucera, John 

Eng. Des Plaines, II. 

Lecuyer, Raymond 

Ind. Tech. Crystal Lake, II. 

Levitan, David 

Eng. Wilmette, II. 

Man. Waishing 

Eng. Carbondale, II. 

Matecki, Edward 

Eng. Tech. Evergreen Park, 



McCracken, Robert 

Ind. Tech. Springfield. II. 

McDonald. Barry 

Comp. Sci. Morriston, II. 

McDowell. Mitchell 

Ind. Tech. Cave-In-Rock. II. 

Moberg, Eric 

Eng. Des Plaines, II. 

Moore, Monty 

Eng. Barlow, Ky. 



Mosebach, Wolfran 
Eng. Urbana. II. 

Murphy, Patrick 

Ind. Tech. Jacksonville. II. 

Neubauer, Daniel 
Eng. Palatine, II. 

Ohmes. Joseph 

Ind. Tech. Metropolis, II. 

Oliboni, Mark 

Eng. Carbondale, II. 



O'Toole, Michael 

Eng. Tech. Hanover Park, 



Owens, John 
Eng. Tech. 

Parks, Donna 
Eng. Tech. 



Mt. Vernon, II. 



Golconda, II. 



Patterson. James 

Eng. Tech. Carbondale, II. 

Penrod. Steven 
Eng. Vienna, II. 



to 

CO 



Eng 



Peters. Michael 
Downers Grove. II 



Polls, Slephen 
Eng Carmi. II 



Powell. Lawrence 
Eng Cuba. II 



Eng Tech 



Reece, Michael 
Coal City, ll 



Riahinefad. Amir 
Eng Tech Shiraz. IR 



Eng 



Ruch. Weston 
Carbondaie. ll 



Rudotski. Mark 
Eng Tech Bolton. II 

Sajewich. Gary 
Eng Evergreen Park, II 

Schalmo. Gary 
Eng Tech Kankakee, ll 

Schmitz. Gary 
Oak Lawn, ll 



Eng Tech 



Eng 



Schumann. Donald 
Carbondaie. ll 



Sorra Alberto-Rafael 
Ind Tech New York. NY 



Eng Tech 
Eng Tech 
Eng Tech 

Eng Tech 
Eng Tech 
Ind Tech 
Ind Tech 
Eng Tech 

Eng Tech 



Shearer. Don 
Mattydale. NY 



Sheehan. Don 
Hoopston, ll 



Sheerin, Gary 

Jacksonville. II 



SparTin, Louis 
Morton. II 

Stefles. Curl 
Stockton. II 

Thorsom, LWt 
St Charles. II 

Turner. Douglas 
Murphysboro. II 

Viscant, Gregory 
Lombard. II 



Wetgle, Glenn 
Carbondaie. II 



Wheeler, Tim 
Eng Tech Canton. II 

Wicks, Kirk 
Ind Tech Motine. ll 

Winston. Sammy 
ind Tech Chicago. " 

Willoughby. Patrick 
Ind Tech Argenta. ll 



Eng 



Wolfe Doug 
Urbane. II 



Eng 



Yaggie Frederick 
Carbondaie II 



Eng Tech 



vates Steve 
Belleville. II 








■ •■• ■ 

„ . mmnar 

..... 

..... n»pp« 



CARLSON R • 

CASE 

CLEMEN 
COON' i • • 

" ' ' ' -..„.»,,,■<. 

COT Tf - " ■ 

..... i ludent H 



Gals' » B « 
inomlcs A-sso* •' 




Ln/ors in Home Economics 






■ - ■ 



• • • 

• N 



reont ■ ; " 

o!aT 

goe • 

GO.: ■. 



Oown.fl Grow '•"E A 
Board 






Technical Careers 






00 
CD 






Tool Mlg 


Abbott, Michael 
Belleville. II. 


Den Hyg 


Adams. Ju Lee 

RocMord. II 


Elec Equip Sys 


Adams. Scott 
Robinson. II 


Elec Tech 


Allegretti. Greg 
Oak Park. II 


Leg Sec 


AMhotf. Teresa 
Decatur, ii 


Aviation 


Alvmo. Mario 
Chicago. II 


Armstrong. Donald 
PAVT Knoxville. fl 


Aulo Tech 


Arning, Daniel 
Centralia. II 


Law Ent 


Atkinson. Lynn 
Palatine, ll. 


Mort Science 


Austin, Eric 
Norm City. II 


Awosika. Toululope 
Special Major Carbondale. II 


Av Bus Mgi 


Baloock, Steve 
Peoria. II 


Av Tech 


Boba. Alan 
Red Hook. NY 


PAVT 


Branson. Bill 
Carbondale. II 


Arch Tech 1 


Brody. Gail 
Highland Park. II 


Elec Data Proc 


Brophy, Colleen 
Rockford. II 


Av Tech 


Budd. James 
Decatur. II 


Deo Hyg 


Burgener, Lois 
Collinsviile. II 


Nursing 


Buttell. Mary 
Elkhart, II 


Carrulhers. Steven 
Civ Eng Tech Marion. 11 


Den Tech 


Casanas. Leo 
Carterville. II 


Cri Rep 


Castraie. Karen 
W Frankfort. II 


Av Tech 


Childs, Jeffrey 
Park Forest. II 


Arch 


Conned, Thomas 
Cameron. II 


Lew Enf 


Cornet! . Galen 
El Paao. II 


Conat Tech 


Coulter. Davtd 
Lombard, ll 


Av Tach 


Crouch. David 
Glen Ellyn. ll 


Leg Sec 


Crowcroh. Jo 
NapervtHe. II 


Cunningham. Sony a 
Sec Oft Spec Chicago, it 


Den Hyg 


Cioeea, Linda 
Libertyville. ll 


Special Major 


Oayno. Bruce 

l incoJnwood II 


Av Tach 


DefcteJ. Stan 
Carbondale. ll 


Deweeee. Barbara 
Sac Off Spec Vienna. H 


Dobrydnia. Judte 
Marketing Peru. H 


Cvptc Dee 


Dudley. Annette 
Maywood. » 




f$\ 



\ ,: -MsmA i aV 1k 





ral 





W7 




Dushane. Ellen 

Den. Hyg. Chicago. II. 



Eaton. Tara 
Cor Ser. 



Ellet. Linda 
Cor. Adm. 



Ellison. Jeffrey 

Av. Tech Mt Prospect. II. 



Elson, Jane 
Comm Grplc. Des 



Englehardt. Sherri 

Sec- Off. Spec Waukegan. II. 

Fehrenbacher. Brett 
Auto/Mktng. Olney, II. 

Fetzer. Ann 

Den Hyg. Burbank, II. 

Fisher. Stephen 

Arch Tech. Omaha, Ne. 



Fissell. David 
Grpic. Arts 



Freeport. II 



Flure. Cindy 

Crt. Rep. Pinckneyville. 



Fox. Constance 

Phys. Ther. Aurora. 



Frick. Robyn 
Elec. Tech. 



Carbondale, II. 



Friedman. Morton 

Auto Tech. Belleville. II. 



Galasini. Mario 
Den. Lab Tech. 



Chicago. II. 



Garrett. Deborah 

Leg. Sec. Virden, II 

Gebhart. Susan 

STC Sec. Clarendon Hills, II. 

Gibson, Sabrina 

Crt. Rep. Chicago, II. 

Gleason. Elise 

PAVT Elkhart. II. 

Glisson, Deborah 

Cor. Law Enf Carbondale. II. 



Goodin, Gina 

Inter. Design Vermont, II. 

Goryl, Steve 

Constrc. Eng. Rockford, II. 

Graening, Sara 

Den. Hyg. Western Springs, II. 

Gramke, Mary 

Den. Hyg. Fowler, II. 

Gunn, Gena 

Den. Hlth. Mgt. Lombard, II. 



Halan. Marlene 
Sec. Off. Spec. 



Norridge. I 



Hall. Linda 

Law Enf. LaGrange, II. 

Hans. Allan 

Elec. Tech. Edwardsvil 

Harrell. Jacquelyn 

Crt. Rep. Chicago, II. 

Hecker, Donna 

Den. Tech. Belleville. I 



Held, Tanna 

Crt. Rep. Murphysboro, II. 

Heimboldt. Karen 

STC Sec. N Barrington, II. 

Helmers, Patrick 

Elec. Tech. Peoria, II. 

Heyen, Alisa 

Crt. Rep. Broadlans, II. 



Hicks, Veda 
Special Major 



Kankakee, I 



to 

to 





Den Hyg 


Hill, Dtane 
Coal Valley. II 




Special Major 


Hobein, Richard 
Wheaton. II 




Arch Tech 


Holloway. Arthur 
Chicago. II 




Holmes. Margaret 
Den Hyg Rochester. II 




Elec Data Proc 


Holody. Tammy 
Scotlsdaie. 11 




Grpic Comm 


Hoist. Lois 
Murphysboro. II 




Holttreter. Cynthia 
Den Hyg Harvard. II 




Arch Tech 


Horton. James 
Chicago. II 




Bus Tech Sys 


Hurley. Jay 

Glenvtew, II 




Den Hyg 


Hurt. Wendy 

Bloomington. II 




Jackson. Cindy 
Grpic Design Marion. II 




Auto Tech 


Jarvill. David 
Ouincy. II 




Johnson. Stephen 
Den Tech Rock Falls. II 




Jones. John 
Auto Hernn. II 




Oen Hyg 


Jones. Patty 
Murphysboro. II 




Biomed /Elec 


Kapocius. Keith 
Oak Forest. II 




Mort Scwnce 


Kerestes. John 
Streator. II 




Den Lab Tech 


Kipp, JeMrey 
Durango. Co 




Mon Science 


Kisler. Michael 
Abingdon, II 




Auto Mgt 


Kite. Alan 
Norridge. II 




Comm Grptc 


Klopp. Nancy 
Carbondale, II 




1 
Avialior 


<nutson. Thomas 
i Ottawa. II 




Av Tech 


Kruoger. Kevin 
Homewood. II 




Krutsinger, Gregory 
Construction Xema. II 




Elec Tech 


Kujawa Richard 
Chicago, ll 




Aulo Tech 


Lambe. John 
Naperville. II 




y ,- 


Lawson. Gregory 
Hillside II 




Arch Tech 


Laryeh. Isaac 
Cerbondak9. II 




Den Hyg 


Lalhrop. Kim 

Annawan II 




Oen Hyg 


Launer, Jeannine 

Virginia. II 




Av Mgt 


Lawson. Robin 
Bethesda. Md 




CM Rep 


Lefonek Karen 
Rock island. II 




Av Tech 


Chicago. II 




Lupe# Susan 
Den Hyg Hoflmen. Estates n 




Av Tech 


Mackenzie. DavnJ 
Hershey. Pa 






o 



1178 




Maytorena, Ramon 

Law Enf Hillsboro. II. 



McKibben, Cindy 

Crt. Rep. Fairfield, 



McMahon, Albert 

Special Major Chicago, 



Michl, Nadine 

Grpic. Illus. Westchester. II. 



Montero, Miguel 

Elec. Engr. Carbondale, II 



Monti, Scott 
Dental Tech. 



Moor, Nancy 
Dental Tech 



Morrow, Joseph 
Elec Data Proc. 



Peking. II. 
Streator, II. 
Streator, II. 



Mosier, Judy 

Crt. Rep. Argenta. I 



Moughamian, Mary 

Crt. Rep. Mt. Prospect, II. 



Mueller, Marsha 

PAVT Napperville. II. 



Negishi, Tadashi 

Av. Tech. Carbondale, II. 



Neihs James 
Elec. Data Proc 



W. Chicago, 



Newhouse, Lauranne 

Den. Hyg. North Aurora, II. 



Newson, Clemmie 

Crt. Rep. Chicago, II. 



Nolan. Marybeth 

Special Major Glenview, II. 

Ottutt, Felton 

Elec. Tech. Centralia, II. 

Osborne, Sally 

Soc. Ser. Hoffman Estates, II. 

Paolella, James 

Av. Tech. Melrose Park, II. 

Patrick, Jeannette 

Const. Mgt. Centralia, II. 



Pierson, Michael 

Mort. Science Flora Emory, 

Poindexter, Michael 

Auto. Tech. Chicago. II. 

Porter, Rex 
Elec. Tech. 



Powell, Brian 
Mort. Admin. 



Price, Tina 
Crt. Rep. 



Des Plaines, II 
Rochelle, II. 
Centreville, II. 



Rainey, Jerry 
Special Major 



Mt. Vernon, II. 



Ramsey . Virginia 
Data Proc. Herrin, 



Rand, Amy 
Dental Lab Tech. 



Orangeburg, NY 



Reichman, Kenneth 

Tech. Careers Highland Park, II. 

Rosio, Mark 

Av. Tech. Glen Ellyn, II. 



Rowe, Kenneth 
Arch. Naperville. 



Rubey, Robert 
Comm. Grplc. 



Ryan, Christine 

Grplc. Des. Brownstown, II. 



Salomon, Andree 

PAVT Glen Ellyn, II. 



Sauko, Judy 
Phys. Ther. Asst. 



Benton, 



to 

CO 



Schneider. Susan 
Hum Comm Sys Skokie. II 

Segretano. Lisa 
CM Rep Marion. II 

Sinclair. Brad 
Jerseyviiie. II 



Aulo Tech 

Av Tech 



Skoien, Michael 
Ml Prospect. II 



Snook, Earl 
Av Mgl Savoy. II 



Southward, Kene 
Arch Tech Cambria. II 



Comm Grptc 



Spiezman. Nancy 
Highland Park. II 



Sprungman. Kathleen 
Phys Ther Sterling. II 

Sronce. Lisa 
Cn Rep Pinckneyville. II 

Staten. Gma 
Comm Grpic Allon. II 



Stawarski, Thomas 
Av Tech Miami. FL 

Stauber, David 
Auto Tech /Bus Elmhurst. II 

Stone. James 
Eiec Metropolis. II 

Stopfer. Frederick 
Law Enl Decatur, II 

Sweeley. Dawn 
Cn Rep Pans. H 



Eng 



Sykora. James 
Carbondale. II 



Sympson. Carol 
Crt Rep Rocktord. II 

Srypura. William 
Elec Downers Grove, II 

Thomas, Beverly 
Crt Rep Chicago. II 

Thomas, Glenn 
Law Enl Carbondale, ll 



Timmermann. Sharon 
Arch Tech Breese ll 



Tombolalo. Michael 
Av Sys Des Plaines. II 



Consuc Mgt 



Trello. Phil 
Springfield. II 



Tuke. Graham 
Av Tech Western Spgs , ll 

Tyut. Dennis 
Elec Sys /Eng Decatur, II 



VeJIero. James 
Mori Science LaSalkt. II 

Vallina Christopher 
Comm Grptc Fairvtew Hti . It 

Van Prooyen. Debbie 
CM Rep Whealon. II 

Wafceland. Norman 
Elec Tech Milan ll 

Washington. James 
Special Ma,o* Chicago n 



Weatherhogg Nancy 
Special Ed Madison Wl 

Weedell. Michael 
Elec Tech Royalton. ll 



Aero Tech 
Av Tech 
Special Major 



Wesley Mark 

Chicago, n 

White John 
Danville, ll 

Whiling. Diane 
Ooflon. ll 




Or> 



117? 




Wilkin, Kim 
Den. Tech. 


Chicago, II 


Williams. Penny 

Adv. Elmhurst, II. 


Willis. Robert 
Elec. Tech. 


Carbondale, II. 


Wilson, Colin 
Elec. Dig. Sys. 


Hampton, Va 


Wilson, Lesa 
Den. Hyg. 


Carbondale, II. 


Winebaugh, Lir 
Den Hyg. 


da 

Johnsonville. II. 


Yarnik, Valerie 
Den. Hyg. 


Staunton, II. 


Yowe, Patrick 
STC BAC 


Carbondale, II. 


Zeller, Lyle 
Arch. Studies 


S. Roxana, II. 




to 
to 



Graduate Set*** 


















Bagby, Tina 

Retail Mdsg Marion, II. 

Baghaee-Rezaee. Hooshang 
Chemistry Salisbury. MD 

Beaven. B 

Higher Ed Makanda. II. 

Blaise, Elizabeth 
Piss Belleville, II. 



Botts, Fae 
Rehab. Cslg. 



Carbondale. II. 



Brodnak, Toren 

Phy. Ed Stanfordville. NY 



Carvis, Robert 

Phy. Ed Waukegan, II. 



Chambers. Kendall 
Law Lewistown, 



Chatchoratkoon, Pradit 
Ed. Ad. Carbondale, 



Couch, Joan 

Marketing Naperville, II. 



Coleman. Albert 

Ed. Ad. Carbondale, II. 

Dreher, Virginia 

Univ. Std. Carbondale. II. 

Edley, Pauline 

Spec. Mjr. Old Bridge. NJ 

Ferguson, Shawn 

Univ. Std. Ft. Myers. Fl. 

Herrndobier. Carol 

Spec. Mjr. Carterville. II. 



Jones, Margaret 

History Carbondale. Ml. 



Mattox, Susan 

Univ. Std. Lake Bluff. II. 



Pulver, Janice 

Law Beckemeyer, 



Shinohara, Michiko 
Education Tokyo, JA 



Schipper. Lynn 
Economics Albany. II. 



Shaw. John 

Faculty Carbondale. II. 



Soja, Roxanne 

Law Elk Grove Village, II. 



Sommer. Martha 

Biol. Sci. Carbondale. II. 



Vecera, David 
Juris Doctor 



Warfield, Eula 

Ed. Ad. Indianapolis, In. 



Wicklin. Mark 

Soc. Libertyville, 



Woodall. John 

Spec. Mjr. Marion, 



Zweiban, Neil 

Law Morton Grove. I 



iM-M 



«4rKD ^* 



to 
to 
-J 



Uz ,f M s f«iafri> {[.„, . 



/( W 



^£ilV 



'C. 



* <,,!lTr Bating 






■ "- 









Vctol, er I962 



"n-.^j • 




: 



(Jenny Behner, 21, 
Is from Blue Mound. II. 
She likes to lay out in the sun, 
mi in the rain and even lav out in the 
snow, but hates to lay out copy. 





A native of Brookfield, Wisconsin, Jim 
llunzingcr loves to take pictures. So far he's 
been caught stealing other people's pictures 
four times. 



♦ ~ 



X 

CM 



Denise (iriindfield, 20. hails from 
Lebanon. II. Denise picked her major 
of animal industries because she likes 
animals so much. She s:i\s small 
puppies are her favorite, especially 
when barbecued over an open flame. 



Chicago. II.. is the home of Brian Howe. Brian likes to work 
with the enlarger. hut we keep telling him that the enlarger 
will not effect his I.Q. 



& 












A resident of Western Springs, Keith 
Kovarik, 21, is head of promotions. He once 
had an idea to promote our sales but we 
couldn't use it — it died of loneliness. 



Johnsburg, II. is the proud owner of d|oel 
Wakitsch, 22. He would like to write for a 
magazine someday and so far has received 
offers from Mad, Hustler and You and Your 
Iguana. 







***&' 





Oswego, II is the ungrateful owner of 
Bruce Simmons. Bruce is ambitious and 
sets his goals high, which often causes 
problems since %e is only 5T" 



Lizann Griffin, from Naperville, II. 
has one big fantasy. She wishes to be 
shipwrecked on an uncharted Island. 
Liz, we hope you get your wish. 



>. 



John Ziles, 22, who hails from 
Geneseo, II., wishes to improve his art 
talents, but we keep telling him that 
there is no market for drawing flies. 




\ 



to 

CD 




CO 

© 





/ 




Created by Jim Hunzinger 



CO 

o 

CO 



Colophon 



The 1980 OBelisk II. Southern Illinois University at 
Carbondale Student Yearbook, was published by the 

OBelisk II stall' at Barracks 0846 on the SU' campus. 

The cover has one applied color, midnight hlue on a 
milhank base of white. The dust jacket is a four color offset 
reproduction on a base of white. The hard case cover was 
made from 150 point hoard. Kndsheets are 80 pound Hlue 
Granite. Paper used for the text of the book is 80 pound 
white enamel. Binding is Smythe sewn with nylon binder's 
thread. Each book is backlined with cloth, rounded, backed 
and cased into cover. 



There are 19 signatures of 16 pages each, for a total of 
.104 pages, excluding endsheets and cover. There are 16 
pages of full color reproductions from color transparencies. 

Text was typeset by the printing company to the 
staffs specifications. Body copy was set in ten-point 
Century with two points leading. Photo credits are set in 
six-point Helvetica. Headlines were set in Italia, Quorum, 
Ivy League, Quentin. Hobo and some freehand lettering 
was done. 

All photos were separately analyzed by densitometer 
and reproduced with a 150 line elliptical dot screen. 

Walsworth Publishing Company of Marceline, 
Missouri represented by Griff Cresham. printed the 2500 
copies of the 1980 OBelisk II. 

Rappoport Studios, Inc. of New York, was the 1980 
Senior photographer. All group photographs were taken 
and processed bv the OBelisk II staff photographers in the 
OBelisk II labs. 



Burt's Sandwich Shop 
901 S. Illinois 
Burt Cannell 

SIU Photo Service 
Rip Stokes 

SIU Legal Service 
Shari Rhodes 

SIU Printing/Duplicating 

Student Work/Financial Aid 
Sue Nahlik 

SIU Purchasing 
Camilla Roherts 
Steve Holiday 

Southern Illinoisan 
H. B. Koplowitz 

Burger King 



FRIENDS 

OF THE 

OBELISK II 



Zantigo's Restaurant 

Henry Printing 
118 South Illinois 

Skate Street 
703 South Illinois 
Steve Johnson 

710 Bookstore 
710 South Illinois 

Agape Film Company 
Jim Bair 

Gold Mine Pizza 
611 South Illinois 
Don M. Medley 



Computer Services 
Roland Keim 
Bill Randull 

The OBelisk II year- 
book would like to thank 
the following members of 
the Carbondale business 
and educational communi- 
ty for their support. 

Mary Lou's Grill 
114 S. Illinois 
Jim & Mary Lou 
Trammel 

Covone's Pizza 
312 S. Illinois 
Robert W. Covone 

The Great Escape 
611 S. Illinois 
Medley & Baker Inc. 

Pick's Liquors 
Lewis Park Mall 
W. H. Pick 









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